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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, February 15, 1906, Image 5

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-02-15/ed-1/seq-5/

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To most points
Southwest
A DELICIOUS DRINK
CEYLON AND INDIA GREEN TEA WILL OUTDRAW THE
FINEST JAPAN CROWN.
Lead Paskets Only. Trial Paokets, 10s. At all Growers.
HIGHEST AWARD, ST. LOUIS, 1904.
Low-Rate Excursions
One-way colonist
aecond-clasa, about naif rat
also round-trip nomeseekers* first-class, at
7JP% of onc-wuy farefirst and third Tues'
days, February and Marcb.
Round-trip winter tourist to certain points in Colorado.
New Mexico and Texas, daily until April 30.
California One-way colonist, second-class,
Feb. 15 to April 7. $34.90 from St. Paul Air
set off
**iC Ji-
"Money is like powder
i has no power until
99
Beecher.
But to merely "set off" powder, or money, is not to
make either serve a purpose. And of the two thingsin
reckless handspowder is rather less dangerous.
If, in business ventures of any sort,- you are ready to
"set off" some money
Set it off in the form
of Publicity in
The Journal
in which it reaches its greatest power!
i^f'~ sw ftm &" "%t
St
ornia
tj
*o- r'^ AakC C. Carpenter. Past. Atft. A T.o & S.
and Minneapohs. $25 from Kansas Lity. p. Guaranty Bldg Minneapolis.
i
City News
POWER FROM THE' AIR
MARVELOUS -PROCESS BEING
EVOLVED BY NORWEGIANS^-OF
VAST IMPORTANCE TO AGRICUL-
TURE. The agriculturists of the world are
liko Coleridge's shipwrecked mariner,
who saw "watei, water everywhere,
but not a drop to drink."
There is an abundance of nitrogen,
foi which the earth hungers and thirsts,
all about them, but the problem ever
has been to make it available. Many
have been -working on that problem in
this and other countries, but in this
great agricultural realm no one has yet
established a practical solution. Suc
cessful processes were advertised sever
al years ago by an American company
operating at Niagara Falls, but the re
sults have not yet become visible to the
naked eye. A professor of the agricul
tmal department, a couple of years ago,
proclaimed the discovery of nitrate cul
tures that were to revivify and reclaim
the tiled and worn acres*of the whole
roand world, and which the farmers
could have for the asking. But they,
too, have apparently failed to "make
good."
It may remain for the little countrv
of Norway to lead the way in extract
ing nitrogen from the atmosohere and
putting it into such shape that it can
be used as a fertilizer. The story of
this wonderful experiment, which is be
ing conducted near Christiania, will be
told in the Normannaheimer depart
ment of next Sunday's Journal.
The importance of the work cannot
be overestimated. The process being
evolved by the Norwegians is attract
ing attention in Germany and Italy.
Perhaps the International Agricultural
congress will develop it. The nitrates
ot Lhile and Peru will be exhausted in
another quarter of a century, but if the
air will yield a cheaper and better pro
duct we can face the prospect with
equanimity. With nitrogen cheap and
abundant, agriculture will be revolu
tionized, and as the world's population
becomes more congested that is what is
needed. Don't fail to read the story
of the wonderful experiments of the
Norwegians in The Sunday Journal.
ST. PAUL IS LACKING
IN MUSICALc TASTE
the publi to attend
failur
recitals by the best artists, shows an
entire lack of appreciation for the
highest form of instrumental music."
So said Miss Gertrude E. Hall, presi
dent of the Schubert club, in her an
nual address to that organization in
Schubert hall, St. Paul, yesterday.
We have hundreds of students in
bt. Paul," she continued, "and as
many more people who claim they just
love music. Consequently I cannot un
derstand the lukewarm attitude of a
large majority of those who claim they
are music-lovers."'
The club elected officers for this
year as follows: President, Miss Ger
trude Hall vice president, Mrs. C. E.
Furness corresponding secretary, Miss'
Catherine Hale as^/stant correspond
ing secretary, Miss Marie Hartsmck
recording secretary, Miss Cornelia
Lusk assistant recording secretary,
Miss Alice Perry treasurer, Mrs.
Haydn 8. Cole librarian, Mrs. J. W.
Thompson assistant librarian, Mrs. D.
F. Colville.
TEST FO^L TEACHERS
Normal Board Would Require a Phys
ical Examination.
Judge H. L. Buck of Winona intro
duced a resolution yesterday at the
meeting of the state normal school
board, providing a physical examina
tion for all persons seeking admission
to normal schools. The obiect of the
resolution was to exclude persons suf
fering with tuberculosis and other se
rious ailments, so they may'not be pre
pared for teaching. The resolution also
provided for excluding persons addicted
to vicious habits.
Other members of the board feared
that such a resolution exceeded their
authority, and a committee was appoint
ed to examine the question and report
at the next meeting. It may be that
legislation will be necessary before such
a rule can be enforced.
HUSBAND IS ARRESTED
Montevideo Man Charged with Compli
city in Criminal Operation.
Ernest C. Robinson was arraigned in
municipal court yesterday afternoon on
the charge of being accessory to the
performance of a fatal criminal opera
tion upon Helen E. Robinson, his wife.
The defendant wafc brought from his
home in Montevideo, Minn., yesterday
afternoon and taken directly to court.
He was released upon furnishing an
$1,800 bond.
It is charged that Robinson took his
wife to Mrs. Hatch's place at 32 West
ern avenue and made all the arrange
ments for an operation that resulted fa
tally. Mrs. Hatch is now awaiting
trial.
NIQHTflARE
Gives point to the fact that excessive or
irregular eating disturbs the digestion.
Nightmare or night hag has its day time
correspondence in the undue fullness
after eating, with the belchmes and sour
or bitter rising so often experienced after
too hasty or too hearty eating.
Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical Discovery
cures dyspepsia or bad stomach. When
the weak stomach is strengthened and
invigorated the whole body shares in the
increased strength derived from "food
properly digested and perfectly assimi
lated.
I was a victim of sleeplessness and ex
treme nervousness Induced by chronic indi
gestion and I felt heavy, tired and worn out
continually," writes Miss Mary Smith, of 1613
No. Wahsatch Street, Colorado Springs, Colo.
"Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical Discovery was
the only medicine which relieved me. With
in a week after I began using It that heavy
oppressed feeling after meals had left me,
and 1 found that 1 was able to sleep better
than for months previously. My appetite
was gradually restored, general system was
toned up, nervousness became a thing of the
past and 1 have now been in splendid health
for over nine months."
Sometimes a selfish dealer tempted by
the little more profit paid on the sale of
less meritorious medicines will offer the
customer a substitute as being "just as
fettye"
ood as the "Discovety." I may be
for him because it pays better, but
it is not as good for you, If you want the
medicine that has cured others, and
which you believe will cure you.
lOOO'pa&e Doctor Book sent tree
on receipt of 21 one-cent
stamps to cover postage only
31 stampb for cloth-bound
copy. Formerly sold for fl 50
to extent of over 500.000
copies. Every family should
possess a copy for ready ref
erence In case of sudden ill
ness or accident. It is illus
trated with hundreds of
wood-cuts and several colored
plates Address Dr. R. V.
Pierce, Buffalo. IJ. Y.
Dr. Pierce's Pellets Cure Constipation.
^4
Thursday Evening, TIJE ^INNBAPOLIS^TO^RMli February &\ 5, 1906T5
?cT^liL*dk?!
*m
CHARGES MANY WRONGS
THERESE THIEL ACCUSES HUS
BAND AND LAWYER JN PLEA
FOR DIVORCE.
twenty-two years of married
Thiel is seeking a divorce
After
life, Therese
from Carl Thiel. Her easels on next.
Saturday's special term calendar. Her
complaint contains some most unusual
allegations against her hustSand and
his Duluth lawyer.
The plaintiff is 40 years old and her
husband is 46. Until recently they op
erated a photograph gallery at Duluth.
They have two children now in the cus
tody of the husband, who is at present
a photographer in Hibbmg, Minn. The
wife alleges, she supported herself by
canvassing until her health failed and
that she is now virtually a pauper.
In addition to,numerous chaiges of
cruel and inhuman treatment, the plain
tiff alleges that in December, 1903, at
Duluth, "the defendant entered into
an agreement with a Duluth attorney
for the purpose of beginning against
one Julius Kelleschon an action, Dased
upon the alleged alienation of the plain
tiff's affections from Thiel.
Mrs. Thiel alleges that false reports
about her and Kellerschon were circu
lated. She asserts that the attorney
advised her to go to South Dakota and
institute an action for divorce against
her husband. It is alleged that this
was done so as to get her out of the
state and thus further the suit against
Kellerschon. She says she went to
Sioux Falls and there pretended to es
tablish a residence and began divorce
proceedings.
During ner absence she alleges a set
tlement of the alienation of affections
case was arranged and that Kellerschon
paid $2,500 to Thiel and his attorney.
E.A.YADGHAFS PARTNER
INCOURTATNEWYORK
"Peanuts" Robinson, the brains of
the big Vaughan grain brokerage
swindle, will not join Edward A.
Vaughan in the Hennepin bastile for
some time. He had a hearing yesterday
before United States Commissioner
Shields of New York, where he is await
ing extradition, but the case was con
tinued to March 6 to allow Postoffice
Inspector Boyle to secure the further
proof of his guilt required by the New
York law.
Teresa Kerricks and Lena Leitzman,
both of Minneapolis, testified that they
had been in the employ of the Qommis
sion firm which pullecl $70,000 into it's
office the Metropolitan Life build
ing. They swore that they saw Robin
son receive money orders from custom
ers, but could not swear that the com
missions were never carried out. This
was not sufficient to satisfy the New
York extradition law.
"Peanuts," as he is known to the
postoffice inspectors who have investi
gated him several times for alleged of
fenses against the postal laws, or
Hubert T. Robinson, as he is named in
the indictment and' the New York dis
patches, is supposed (to be the orig
inator of one of the cleverest swindles
on record. Vaughan, who was indicted
with him and now awaits him in the
Hennepin county jail, gives Robinson all
the credit for planning and executing
the deal which made such a vivid im
pression on the public that letters and
money are still coming in from remote
towns where the news fthe exposure
of the firm's methods has failed to fol
low its lurid advertising.
BELLBOY SUSPECTED OF
MANY' CLEYER THEFTS
Detectives at police headquarters
S
are trying to connect the theft of
B. Peisinger's grip n
"m Tnoo^i i TTQI-*-.
with Joseph Hart
lbo now locked up the West hotel bell
at Central station on a charge of lar
ceny.
The boy's scheme was clever, ac
cording to the police. He would enter
a guest's room and take a grip and
immediately check it at the checkroom.
The owner would, of course, miss the
grip and report it at the desk, but no
one thought of looking in the checks
room for it. The hotel would have to
stand good for the theft, and after
the visitor left the grip could be re
claimed.
Peisinger's grip was found in the
checkroom and no one could account
for its being there. Hart is said to
have confessed to several thefts and
an effort will be made to get him to
own up to the Peisinger robbery. Peis
inger's grip containea several articles
of valuable jewelry.
EXPERT HELP WANTED
Sus-
Uncle Sam Needs Men to Help
tain the Government.
Government jobs are waiting for the
men who can pass the examinations
prepared by the civil service commis
sion to test the fitness of applicants.
These positions are:
Aid in the coast and geodetic survey
at a salary of $720 a year. Two va
cancies will be filled after the examina
tion, which will be held on March 14
and 15, and others who qualify will be
eligible for appointment as further va
cancies occur. A. fair knowledge of
mathematics and science is necessary.
Assistant examiner in the patent of
fice at $1,200 a year. An examination
will be offered on Feb. 27 and 28 to
secure a list of eligibles who will be ap
pointed as vacancies occur.
Plant pathologist and entomologist in
the department of agriculture at $1,200
a year. The examination will be held
on Feb. 21 and the successful candi
date will be stationed at Mayagues,
Porto Rico.
Medical clerk, male. This position
is open only to graduates of recog
nized medical schools who make good
in the examination, which will be held
on March 21 and 22. The post pays
$900 a year, and the appointment will
be made as soon as a vacancy occurs.
Copper and brass worker for depart
mental service at Washington,- will be
rated as fireman and draw $750 a year.
The examination will be heid March 7.
Marine fireman for the quartermas
ter's department at large, to be sta
tioned at Fort Morgan, Alabama, and
receive $540 a year. The examination
will be held on March 14.
Laboratory assistant, qualified in
optics and lense making, at a salary
of $1,000 a year. The examination will
be held on March 7.
REMEMBER HIS WORTH
Memorial Services Held in Honor of
Thaddeus C. Field.
Memorial services OT the late Thad
deus C. Field were held in the House
of Hope Presbyterian church, St. Paul,
last evening. Mr. Ifield was chairman
of the "board of trustees and for a quar
ter of a century one of the piUaTS of
the church. DT.W.J BL W.Boyle delivered
a memorial address, in which he paid
eloquent tribute to the departed church
man.
"If I were writing the attributes of
his life briefly," said, the speaker, I
would say 'in business life, integrity
in social life, generosity in church life,
fidelity in family life, tender affec-
tion.'
^^^j^wsSe *&&-
Iron Bed
f
$3.25
$
3
BOUTBLL'S GOOD FURNITURE.
These Bargains Are Good for
Both Friday and Saturday.
$7.50
A very heavy Iron Bed, your choice of
colors made in two sizes, full and three
quarters. Special for Friday d* ^r gTf\
and Saturday only tp /tJfJ
One to a customer only.
$4.50 reala Cluny Curtains,
0
re
a
$
7
5
full sizes.r
fo
$5.00
ai
Arabians, real Antique, real Point Lace.
A grand collection. This is an excep
tional offer.
Odd Bonne Femme Curtains. Use one
to a windowhalf $1.50
-price
0
0
fo 4
0
0 qualities.
2.00
fo
2.25 rr
4.50 qualities.
5, qualities.
2.50
fo
FRANK A. MUNSEY,
-^V Ai 4i"4^AA QiMtiii
Fancy
Rocker
Birch, with a genuine mahogany back
polish finish upholstered seat, covered with
genuine silk damask. This Rocker is
worth every cent of $10. Special for
Friday and Saturday^ & &* Sf\
tace Curtain Dep't
Odd Silk CurtainsHal$3-00
$1.50
3.75
50c each f
qualities.only
Bepps.
ESTABLISHED IN 1871.
Largest Home, Hotel aad Club Furuiuben lu the Nortawent.
A Minneapolis InMtitution Owned by Minneapolis People.
A Ne Magazine for You
I am bringing out another new magazine that you will come pretty close to
liking. I wouldn't be surprised if it hit you harder than anything in the
shape of a magazine you have ever seen. There isn't much style to it, but it
has the stuff in it that you and everybody else will want to read. It iscalled
THE
SomethingNewin MagazineMaking
THE SCRAP BOOK is the most elastic thing that ever happened in the way of a
magazineelastic enough to carry anything from a tin whistle to a battleship. Every-
thing: that appeals to the human brain and human heart comes within its compassfiction,
which is the backbone of periodica! circulation biography, review, philosophy, science,
art, poetry, wit, humor, pathos, satire, the weird, the mysticaleverything that can be
classified and everything that cannot be classified. A paragraph, a Mttle bit, a saying,
an editorial, a joke, a maxim, an epigram.
Nothing Like It in the World
There isn*t anything inlhe world just like THE SCRAP BOOK. I is an idea on
which we have been working for several years, and for which we have been gathering
materials. W have bought hundreds and hundreds of scrap books,from all over the
country, some of them a century old, and are still buying them. From these books we
are gathering and classifying an enormous number of gems, and facts and figures, and
historical and personal bits that are of rare value. Furthermore, we have a corps of peo-
ple ransacking libraries, reading all the, current publications, the leading daily papers,
and digging out curious and quaint facts and useful facts and figures from reference book,
cyclopedia, etc., etc
Don't fail to get a copy of this first issue of THE SCRAP
BOOK. It sells at the price at which all our other maga-
zines sellTen Cents a Copy and One Dollar by the Year.
On all news stands or from the publisher
price
eac f
2.00 each
eac
fo
$5.00
8e
for full size bed. Bed Set and Pillow
or Bolster Covers to match.n
fine qualitry Bobinet. Embroidered cen
terpiecesf. Full deep valance.
65c 75c
Brussels, real
Ruffled Musli CurtainsfoeMad
90
a
for $1-00 Buffled Muslin Cur-
ai
tains.
6%C yard
8 for 10c Swiss Curtain Muslins.
8^C yard for 12% Dotted and Stripe
Curtain Muslins.
12%C yard for'17%c Fish Net.
35o
eacha
for $1.50
50c
Musliln
eac
Curtains.
Sash
odd Irish Point sash length
Curtains regular price $3.50.
45c each for $1.50 pieces of Imported
Scotch Madras large pieces for sash
curtains.
20c each. f
75o pieces of Upholstery
50c each for Tapestry pieces, cushion top
or upholstery pieces, worth $1.50.
175 Fifth Avenue, New lYork
Letu*
cuter
Intom
contract
with
you.
You can
arrange
tmtlt-
laatory term*
of
pay meat
qualities.
forr
qualities. 64.00
0
0 qualities.
2.50 eacnh for 5.00 qualities.
3.00
fo
eac
7.50 qualities.
$7.5f0
quality Lace Be Set
Curtains.hSas for $2.5 0 rea Brussels
4 *t
'S&'&f.

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