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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, February 21, 1906, Image 12

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Liverpool Game Higher on Polit
ical Outlook Between France
and Germany.
French Acreage Reported 500,000
Bu. Short of the Normal
Past Five Years.
Paris Raid Markets and Opening
and Find No Demand Above
Put Price.
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce. Feb. 21.
The bulls this morning were feeling better when
Liverpool second cables were reported V2@*k
higher, and scalpers bought* quito a little wheat
on the early curb, shorts covering considerable
and opening the market strong at an advance of
%c over the closing price of yesterday.
The demand seemed to have been pretty well
supplied befoie the opening and the bears took
advantage of this to start a raid at the market,
one, or two of the more prominent traders sell
ing wheat freely, prices gradually giving way
under the pressure of short wheat, until the mar
ket had gone below the previous closing figure.
On this break there was a little demand from
the small shortb which absorbed offerings for
the time being the market turning upward for
i*c gain.
Renewed selling on the advance for both long
and short account, soon put the price
and within a fraction of yesterday's low point,
and into put price, where the buying became
a little better, with scalpers buying against
their puts, took care of all the offerings. Later
a little better buying was noticeable, the mar
ket firming up and advancing fractionally.
There was little in the news outside of the
foreign cables. Local stocks show an increase
of 100,000_bu for five days. Receipts 422 cars,
a holiday a year ago, Duluth 72 cars, Chicago 19
cars, Kansas City 09,000 bu, St. Louis 46,000
bu and Winnipeg 131 cars against 67 a year
ago. We shipped out 51,500 bu of wheat and
55,719 brls of flonr. Cash demand only fair,
with the discount a little wider. No. 1 northern
selling at %c under May and No. 2 northern at
2@2%c under May.
The market rallied on a report from Broom
hall that the French acreage was 500,000 acres
less than a year ago. Trade light in the final
hour and the market moved within a narrow
range, showing little change at the close from
yesterday's figures:
Broomhall's Liverpool cable Tead: "Wheat was
firm at the opening, with values %d higher, fol
lowed later by a further sharp advance of
4@%d. Support was stimulated by the Indian
official report issued late yesterday, and cov
ering a period between Feb. 4 and 10, and a
decline in consols, which started shorts cover
ing. On the advance, however, there was some
little realizing and values eased slightly. Corn
was quiet at the opening, with values un
changed to %d lower. Pric.es later advanced
%d In sympathy with wheat and some covering
by local shorts."
Forecast: Illinois, Indiana and Missouri, fair
tonight and probably Thursday, moderate tem
peratures Michigan, fair tonight and Thurs
day, slightly cooler east tonight Wisconsin,
fair tonight. Thursday probably increasing tem
peratures and warmer Minnesota, fair and
warmer tonight. Thursday partly cloudy with
possibly showers north Iowa, fair tonight and
probably Thursday, warmer northwest tonight:
North Dakota, partly cloudy tonight with warm
er east Thursday, rain or snow and colder:
South Dakota, fair and warmer tonight. Thurs
day probably rain or snow and colder Nebraska
and Kansas, generally fair tonight and Thurs
day.
THE FLOUR MARKET
The mills continue to ship out about 50,000
brls a day. practically all of which Is for do
mestic account. The demand is only fair, the
lecent decline in prices not bringing in a much
new business as expected. Eastern buyers tak
ing hold in a hand-to-mouth way and waiting
for the market to become more settled.
Shipments, 53.719 brls.
rirst patents are quotable at [email protected] sec
ond patents. $4 [email protected]: first clears, $3.50@S 60
second clears, $2.45??2.o5
9
THE CASH TRADE
DEMAND IS FAIR WITH ALL GRAINS SHOW-
ING A N EASIER TONE,
FLAXReceipts, 48 cars against holiday last
year. Shipments. 22 cars. Duluth. 47 cars.
Closing prices: Minneapolis, cash, $1.13% to
arrive, $1.13^. An urgent demand from ship
pers and crushers at 2c under Duluth May.
OATSNo. 3 white oats closed at 27%c. Re
ceipts, 21 cars shipments, 30 cars. Shippers
active on the buying side and taking offerings
freely. Market strong.
CORNNo. 3 yellow corn closed at 34%c.
Receipts. 26 cars shipments, 32 cars. Mar
ket firmer, with demand fair.
FEED AND COARSE MEALCoarse cornmeal
and cracked corn, in sacks, sacks extra, $14.25
14.50: No. 1 ground feed, 2-3 corn and 1-3 oats.
70-lb sacks, sacks extra, $14.75@15 No. 2
ground feed, corn and oats, 80-lb 9acks,
sacks extra. $15.25(215 50 No. 3 ground feed.
3-3 corn and 2 3 oats. 70-lb backs, backs extra,
[email protected].
MILLSTUFFSBran in bulk, $14.50 14.75
shorts. $14.50 middlings, [email protected] red
dog. $19.50^20 all Minneapolis in 200-
lb sock. 1 re ton additional: In 100-lb sacks,
$1.50 per ton additional. Shipments, 1,554 tons.
RYENo. 2 closed at 58@59c. Receipts. 1
car shipments, 5 cars. Prices show a de
clining tendency demand fairly good.
BARLEYFeed grades closed at 85@36*
malting grades. 37@46c. Receipts, 27 cars
shipments, 19 cars. A good general demand with
market a little easier.
HAYTimothy, choice, $9 No, 1, [email protected]
timothy. No. 2, [email protected] timothy, No. 3, $6@
7 mixed, $5(97: upland, choice, $8(g8.50 up
land, No. 1, [email protected], No. 2, [email protected] No.
3. [email protected], midland, $5.50@6i rye straw, $4@5
oat straw, $3@4 clover, $5@$6.50. Receipts,
70 tons.
CASH SALES REPORTED TODAY.
No. 1 hard, 19 cars $0.81%
No. 1 hard. 5 cars Sl^t
No. No. No.
No. No. No. .o. No. No. No. No. No. No. No.
No. No. No. No.
No. No. No. No.
No. No.
No. No. No. No. No. No. No No No No No No No
1 hard, 1
1 northern.
1 northein.
i
car
4 wheat.
1 2 Wfi^esday ""Bvefiin*
J,4c lower,
81% 80f4
80% MV)s
22 cars
1 car
1 car
10 cars
2.000 bu to
2,000 bu to
52 cars
S cars.
4 cars
5 cats
2 cars
part car....
10,000 bu to
cars
car., car
cai
cars
12 cars
1 3
1
3
3 4
1 2
1
3 1
1
1
2 1 1
1 northern.
1 northern.
1 northein.
1 northern,
2 northern.
2 northern,
2 northei 0
2 northern.
2 northei 11,
2 northern.
2 northern.
3 wheat.
3 wheat,
3 wheat,
3 wheat.
3 ^heat.
3 wheat.
3 wheat.
3 wheat.
3 wheat.
4 when ft
4 wheat.
4 wheat.
4 wheat.
4 wheat.
4 wheat,
4 wheat.
4 wheat.
4 wheat.
4 wheat,
4 wheat.
4 wheat.
4 wheat.
arrive.. arrive..
Market^ Marrow^ ofi^c^Holiday Character
NOpen.
May
July
$ .8l .81%
.83y .83%%
Minneapolis Oats i
May.
4
81% 81 79 79yt 78%
78% 70V 78%
79 76% 76
741^
arrive.
37 r,
1
*ir 2 77 V*
c?r thin
cais
car, choice...
cars oars cars
car cars, smutty
car. smutty
cars oar. fob..
oar
oar
cars
74% 78 78 75 74 76 73H 78 77% 74H
7ry3 72 72V, 75%
1 car. bin
stained
burnt.
Rejected heat, 1 car
Rejected wheat, 3 cars. smut.
Rejected wheat, 1 car, smut.
Rejected wheat, 1 cai.
stack.,
70
75%
77% 78 72
Rejected wheat, 1 car 76
Rejected v\heat, part car, bin burnt 62
Rejected wheat, 1 car 75
Rejected wheat, 1 car 74
Rejected wheat, 1 car 77%
No grade wheat, 1 car, snow on top 80
No grade wheat, part car, bin burnt 62
No. 3 yellow corn, 1 car, damp .34
No. 4 corn, 1 car, yellow 34^4
No. 4 corn. 2 cars 33
No. 4 corn. 1 car, yellow 35
No. 4 corn, 1 car 32%
No grade corn, 2 cars 33
No grade corn, 1 car, yellow 33%
No grade corn, 1 car, yellow 34
No Ijrade corn, 4 cars 31%
No/grade corn, 2 cars 30
3'0 grade corn, 1 car 31%
'"No. 3 rye, 1 car 55
c. c. WYMA N
TODAY'S RANGE IN WHEAT
No. 3 white oats, 1 car.
No. 4 white oats, 2 cars
No. 4 white oats, 1 car, wheatv.
No. 3 oats, 6 cars.
No. 3 oats, 1 car "ofiiT
No. 4 barley, 1 car
No. 4 barley. 2 cars
No. 4 barley, 1 car.
No. 4 barley, 2 cars
No. 4 barley, 1 car
No. 4 barley, 2 cars
No. 4 barley, 1 car.
No. 1 feed barley. 2 cm.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.['. Q
No. 1 feed barley, part car a
No. 1 feed barley, 2 cars ?o
No. 1 feed barley, 1 car !3?
X" No. 1 feed barley, 1 car."
No. 1 feed barley, 1 car
No. 2 feed barley, 2 cars
RANGE OF WHEAT PRICE IN MINNEAPOLIS i
i
High.
No. 2 feed barley, 3 cars..
No. flaxseed, 3 ears
No. 1 flaxseed, 10 cars
No. 1 flaxseed, 1 car
No. 1 flaxseed, 2 cars i"lIS
No. 1 flaxseed, 6 cars i 14a/
No. 1 flaxseed, 3 cars
Close.
Today.
.81
JB2%
Low.
.82%%
Minneapolis $ .81
Chicago 82%@%
Duluth 81%
St. Louis 80%@%
Kansas City 75%
New York 88*4
Winnipeg 77*4
3 8
.37% .40 .43
.42%
39
'so
,,6
No. 2 feed barley. 1 ear 2 car
3
.35 .35
1.1314 1.13% 1.14%
1: fl
No. 1 durum wheat, 3 cars '70
No. 2 durum wheat,. 1 car** 'aV,
No. 3 durum wheat, 1 car '66
No. 3 durum wheat, 1 car '071c,
No. 1 durum wheat, part car .'71
No. 1 durum wheat, seed, 1 car 73
No. 3 durum wheat, 1 car' IgS
PUTS AND CALLS.
1:30 p.m. report:
PutsMay wheat, 80y,S0%c.
CallsMay wheat, 81%@81%c.
CurbMay wheat. Slo.
STATE GRAIN INSPECTION, FEB. 20.
Cars Inspected InWheatreat Northern
No. 1 hard, 27 No. 1 northern, 50 No. 2
northern, 41 No. 3, 22 No. 4, 10 rejected, 10
no grade, 2.
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. PaulNo. 1 north
ern, 8 No, 2 northern, 13 No. 3, 6 No. 4, 12
rejected, 2 no grade, 1.
Minneapolis & St. LouisNo. 1 northern, 1
No. 2 northern, 6 No. 3, 3 rejected, 8 no
grade, 1.
Soo LineNo. 1 bard, 1 No. 1 northern, 1
No. 2 northern, 4 No. 3, 3 No. 4, 1.
Northern PacificNo. 1 northern, 1 No. 2
northern^ 4 No. 3, 1 rejected, 2.
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha
No. 2 northern, 1 No. 3, 2 No. 4, 3.
TotalsNo. 1 hard, 28 No. 1 northern, 61
No. 2 northern, 60 No. 3, 37 No. 4, 26 re
jected, 17 no grade, 4.
Other GrainsNo. 1 durum wheat. 3 cars
No. 2 durum wheat, 7 No. 3 durum wheat, 14
No. 4 durum wheat, 5 No. 2 winter wheat, 1
mixed wheat. 1 No. 3 yellow corn. 6 No. 3
corn, 3 No. 4 corn. 12 no grade corn, 12 No.
2 white oats, 1: No. 3 white oats, 2 No. 4
white oats, 9, No. 8 oats, 19 no grade oats, 2
No. 2 rye, 3 No. 4 barley, 9 No. 1 feed bar
ley, 13 No. 2 feed barley, 7 no grade feed
barley. 1 No. 1 northwestern flax. 18 No. 1
flax, 8 rejected flax. 2 no grade flax, 1.
Cars Inspected OutNo. 2 durum wheat. 2
No. 4 durum wheat, 3 No. 1 hard wheat, 3: No.
1 northern wheat, 26: No. 2 northern wheat.
20 No. 3 wheat. 9: No. 4 wheat, 5, rejected
wheat. 11 No. 3 corn, 3: No. 4 corn, 1 no
grade corn, 18: No. 2 white oats. 2: No 3
white oats, 10 No. 4 white oats. 19 vo grade
oats. 5: No. 4 barley, 2 No. 1 feed barley*
2- No. 2 feed barley, 1 No. 2 rye. 9 No. 3 rye,
4: No. 1 northwestern flax, 9 No. 1 flax, 19
rejected flax. 1.
DAILY WHEAT MOVEMENT.
The following are the receipts and shipments
at the pwlncipal primary wheat markets.
Receipts Shipments.
Bushels.
New York 10,000
Philadelphia 4,000
Baltimore 3,638
Toledo 5.000
Detroit 4.000
St. Louis 47.000
Boston 667
Chicago 33.749
Milwaukee 12,320
Duluth 36,828
Minneapolis 422.0(H)
Kansas City 43.000
DULUTH. GRAIN COMMISSION. MINNEAPOLIS.
Bushels
19,914. i6^973
""soi
38,000
"4s,cii
H.in
51.500
44,000
RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS, FEB. 20.
ReceivedWheat. 422 cars, 422.000 bu: com.
26.780 bu oats. 35.910 bu barley. 22.050 brf:
rye, 1.070 bu: flax, 52,880 bu flour, 1,596 brls:
mlllstuffs. 75 tons bay. 70 tons: linseed oil,
40.000 lbs carlots, 565.
ShippedWheat. 50 cars, 51,5(0 bu corn,
31040 bu oats. 52,500 bu. barlej, 18.050 bu
rve 5 100 bu: flax. 28,880 bu: flour. 53.719 br's
millstuffs. 1.554 tons: linseed oil, 206,060 lbsv
oil cake. 625,700 lbs carlots 497.
WHEAT RECEIPTS ROADS, FEB. 20.
Milwaukee, 48: Omaha. 8: St. Louis. 13: Great
Northern, 252 Northern Pacific. 8- Great West
ern. 8: Burlington, 1 SoO line, 82 Rock
Island. 5.
CHICAGO GRAIN
Future Trade Orders Executed in All Markets
WHEAT MARKET OPEOTcft) STRONG. BUT
FIRMNESS WAS TEMPORARY.
Chicago, Feb. 21.Influenced bj higher prices
at Liverpool the wheat market here todav jpene
strong on active buying by shorts. The May
option was up i'.@%c to ,fi|% at 82%@82%c:
The market, however, failed to retain its initial
firmness, prices yielding materially on free sel
ing by pit traders. The May delivery lost all
of its earlv gain, the price dropping to 2
@82%c. The selling was due largely to con
tinued mild weather in the United States. -Min
neapolis. Duluth and Chicago reoorted receipts
of 513 cars, against 286 cars last week and
a holiday a year ago.
The low point for May was touched at 82c.
Close.
..28
CLOSING CASH PRICES
On TrackNo. 1 hard, 80%c No. 1 northern, 80%c No. 1 northern to arrive,.
80%e No. 2 northern, 78%c No. 2 northern to arrive, "Syjc No. 3 wheat, 76@77c
durum, 69@72c No. 3 white oats, 27%c No. 2 rye, 68@59c No. 1 flax, $1.13% No. 3
yellow corn. 34%c barley, 36c to 46c.
Close.
Yesterday.
.J -MH i
Year Ago,
Holiday Holiday
.28
THE DAY'S REPORTS
-May Wheat-
Close.
Yesterday.
$ .81%
S2%@%
8iy* 80%
76%
.88% .77%
Close.
Today.
i-:
July Wheat
Close.
Today.
$ .82% .81%% .82%
.79% .73% .87%
Close
Yesterday,
$ .83 .82%
.79% .73%% .87% .78%
The market became firmer during the last hour
on covering by shorts. The close was steady,
with May M,e higher at 82VJ@82% C.
Cash wheat, No. 2 red, 84(ii85e No.- 3 red.
8284c No. 2 hard, SO3?K2%c No. 3 hard,
77?8Slc No. 1 northern. 82 No. 2 north
ern. 81@84c No. 3 spring, 78@83c.
CloseWheat, May, 82%@82%c July, 81%
Liberal local receipts Induced active selling
of corn by provision interests and resulted in,
a weak market. At the opening a fairly steady
tone prevailed, but it soon gave away under
selling pressure. May opened unchanged to %c
higher, at 48@43%c. and declined to 42Vao.
Local receipts were 344 cars, with 3 of contrt-ct
grade.
The corn market became weaker during the
day, because of the lower prices for cash
corn, reported from several grain centers. The
low price of the day was 42%@42%c. A slight
rally took place late in the day, but the close
was easy, with May-off %@%c.
Cash corn. No. 2, 38%fiL3%c No. .1, 37J?
38 Vie.
CloseCorn, May, 42%@42%c July, 43%
43%c.
Oats opened steady, but eased off. in sym
pathy with other grain. Trading was quiet and
chiefly of a local character. May opened a
shade to %c higher at 20%@29'W,c to 28*c
and sold off to 29%c. Local receipts were 153
cars.
Cash oats, No. 2, 29%c No. 3, 29%ci
CloseOats, May, 29%c July, 29%e.
The following was the range of prices:
Wheat May. luly.
Opening 82% 81%
Highest 82% 82%
Lowest 82 81%
Close
Today 82%@%
Yesterday 82%%
Year ago, holiday.
Corn
Opening 43@43%
Highest 43%
Lowest 42%
Close
Today 42%@%
Yesterday 43
Year ago, holiday.
Oats-
Opening 29%
Highest 29%@30 29
Lowest 29% 29
Close
Today 29% 29%
Yesterday 29% 29%
Year ago, holiday.
81%@% 81%
43% 43% 43% 43%@% 43%
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS
DULTJTH GRAIN, Feb. 21.Wheat sold oft
to 81ic early in the session, but later advanced
and closed at 81 %c for May. The market was
dull and the closing price was unchanged. Flax
was strong. Earlj May sold up 3c to $1.16%.
There vias sharp covering and good general
buying. Later reaction took prices off and the
close was advanced l%c at $1.15%.
Receipts, wheat, 72 cars flax, 47 oats. 16
rye. 1 barley, 18. Shipments, wheat, 3,731 bu.
CloseWheat, cash No 1 northern. 81%c No.
2 northern. 78V6e May, 8114c July, 82%c
durum, 70c to 73c flax, cash, $113 May,
$1.15%: July. $1.17 September, $1.15^ Oc
tober, $1.14% oats, 29c May, 29%c.
NEW YORK FLOUR AND GRAIN, Feb. 21.
Flour, receipts 13.194 brls, sales 900 dull and
lower to sell. Wheat, receipts 10,000 bu. sales
750,000: a stronger opening, clue to bullish ca
bles and lower consoltt was followed immediately
by a bear raid under which all advance was
lost weather conditions remained favorable:
May, 88H@88 9-16c: July. 8714$87%c Septem
ber, 80'4 85%c. Corn, receipts 124,700 bu
sales 25,000 easy under larger receipts and in
sympathy with wheat May, 48%@484c June,
48*ic.
KANSAS CITY GRAIN, Feb. 21.Close
Wheat dull May, 75%c July, 73&cf Se^tenttjer
"314c cash. No. 2 hard, 75@78c .No, 3,..7l@
16c No. 2 red, 88@89c No. 3, 83@87%c, Corn
unchanged to lower May, 38%c Julv,' 39%c
cash No. 2 mixed, 88@88%c No. 2 white, 39c:
No. 3, 38%c. Oats unchanged No.- 2 white
29%@30%c No. 2 mixed, 29%c.
WINNIPEG GRAIN, Feb. 21.February wheat
opened at 75c, closed at 75c March, 75c, closed*
75%c May, 77%c, closed 77%c July, t9c.
closed 79c. Cash No. 1 northern, 75c: No. 2
northern, 72c No. 8 northern, 70%c No. 2
white oats, 32%c: No. 3 barley, 37%c No. 1
flax, $1.09. Receipts, wheat, 131 cars, last
year 67.
8T. LOUIS GRAIN, Feb. 21.Close: Wheat,
higher No. 2 red, cash elevator, 84(g89c track,
89@90c May, 80%@80%c July, 79%c No. 2
hard, 79@82c. Corn, lower No. 2 cash, 40c
track, 40o May. 40%c July, 41%c. Oats,
quiet No. 2 cash, 30c track. 3tftf32c May,
29%c July, 28%c No. 2 white, 31%$32e
LIVERPOOL GRAIN, Feb. 21.Wheat, spot
nominal, futures steady March, 6s 8%d: May.
6s 6%d .Tulv, 6s O^d. Corn, spot American
mixed new, easy, 3s lid American mixed old.
quiet, 4s 7i,,d futures quiet March. 4s liy.d
May. 4s Id.
NEW YORK SUGAR AND COFFEE. Feb. 21.
Sugar, raw. steady fair refining, 2%o centrif
ugal, 96 test, 3 ll-32(ai3%c molasses sugar.
2%c refined, quiet cruslied. 5.20c powdered,
4.60c granulated. 4.50c. Coffee, steady No. 7
Rio, 8%c. Molasses, steady New Orleans, 30@
38c.
CHICAGO COARSE GRAIN AND SEEDS,
Feb. 21.Rye, cash 66c May, 65c. Flax, cash,
northwestern, $1.13%: southwestern. $1.0S%
May, $1.15. Timothy. March. $3.35. Clover,
cash. $14. Barley, cash, 37@52c.
GOSSIP OF THE MARKETS
St. Louis wires Charles Lewis & Co.:
"Prominent receiving house here says their cor
respondents, both in central and southern Illi
nois, say wheat crop in very bad condition
also many points In Mis&ourl report the same
way on account of thawing ,and freezing weath-
er."
Broomhall cables that navigation is open In
the lower paits of the Azoff, they beirig free
of ice.
New York wires: "The United Kingdom is
bidding 6d per quarter more for oats than on
Monday. Demand is of a more urgent char
acter."
Friedman, who has been carrying a big line
of tovisions. sold 2,000,000 pounds of short
ribs yesterday. Raymond, another bull, also took
profit's. Armour and Swift did most of the
buvlng on the breaks.
There is a good rlnss of buying going on in
ribs, largely by packers. Would advise buying
July" ribs.
The market in provision* opened 2%c to t%c
lower on lower hog market ftnd selling by pit
traders. Commission houses buying ribs.
Hall, Duluth, to Charles E. Lewis: Flr,^
up on higher cables, very little for sale aud
market full of buying orders.
BerlinWheat unchanged Budapest close,
wheat. %c higher.
Antwerp flaxseed. 3%c higher.
Paris close: Wheat %@l%c higher flour.
4 The northwest weather: St. CloudClear, calm
and fine 26 above. Fergus FallsCloudy and
warm- about 20 above. HillsboroCloudy, light
south wind 30 above. MayvilleCloudy, light
south wind 30 above. ComstockCloudr, light
southeast wind: warm. HunterCloudy, light
east wind. WinnipegClear, calm zero. Fargo
Partly cloudy mild.
AN AUTO STRSSTSWEEPER
New Machine Used in Paris a Lafcor
Saving Device.
Street sweeping ami sprinkling is the
latest use to which the automobile prin
ciple has been applied in Paris. The
device consists of a large automobile
truck fitted with a 470-gailon tank and
a rotary brush fixed diagonally across
the lower frame of the vehicle. A.
twelve-horse-power gasolene motor
drives the machine. In front of the bijj
brush is a sprinkler to discharge a spray"
which first lays the dust before it is
swept by the brush. To the- rear of
the brush is another- spray attachment
which discharges water to sprinkle the
street for a width of twenty feet after
it has been swept. The new machine
accomplishes as mn'eh work as si
street-eleaners and se.verM4'fibrse.waterx
carts. l\ JS^rZWM
I0R06CAN1BFAIR
AFFECTS MARKET
Sales.
29%
=W
a&*.
A
PRICES FALL AS RESULT OF DE-
PRESSION ABROAD.
Great Northern Preferred Drops Four
Points at Opening, Falling to 6V2
LaterOther Northwestern Roads
Experience FallsMarket Bare of
Supporting Orders.
New York, Feb. 21.Prices declined a frac
tion at the opening of the stock market today
with the exception of a few specialties. The
market was affected by the depression abroad
caused by the Moroccan complication. Great
.Northern preferred dropped 4 points, Northern
Pacific 1 and Wabash and Canadian Pacific
large fractions. The volume of business was
moderate.
After successfully restoring the opening losses
and obtaining some margin besides, the market
weakened again and some stocks fell to a lower
K'vel than at the beginning. Momentary ad
vances of ltf(/l% in Heading, New York Cen
tral, Northern Pacific, Minneapolis, St. Paul &
Sault Ste. Marie, Colorado Fuel, Locomotive and
Brooklyn Transit were yielded and losses es
tablished of 2% in Northern Pacific and 1@1%
In Missouri Pacific, North-Western, Colorado &
Southern, Smelting and Lead. The market was
still heavy at 11 o'clock and showed but little
Improvement.
After lying Idle and almost motionless prices
ran off sharply. The drop In Great Northern
preferred reached 6%, Northern Pacific 3%, Del
aware & Hudson and Tennessee Coal 3, Smelt
ing 2%, North-Western 2%, Lead 2 and Head
ing, Union Pacific, Canadian Pacific, New York
Central, Illinois Central, Louisville & Nashville,
Denver & Rio Grande, Amalgamated Copper and
others a point or more.
The declines were made on small sales. The
market came to' a standstill again without a
rally. Bonds were heavy at noon.
The- market was apparently bare of support
ing orders, but the decline ceased at Intervals
Without any effective rally.
Among the most recent losses were Federal
Mining 6%, Lead 4, General Electric 2% and
St. Paul, Southern Railway, Southern Pacific,
Erie, Wabash, Locomotive, Brooklyn Transit,
Colorado Fuel and People's Gas 1@1%.
An extension of the decline brought prac
tically all prominent stocks within the range of
1 per cent losses. Except for the continuous
pressure, which was considered as significant
because of the inability of the market to shake
it off, very little in the Way of news or gossip
was in circulation. Amalgamated Copper fett
1% and Pressed Steel Car 2%, Smelting 3 "and
Federal Mining 9%.
Stock (:uotations reported' for The Journal by
Watson & Co., brokers. Chamber of Commerce,
Minneapolis. Closing prices are bid.
Stocks High
Am. Car
do pr
Am. Locomot..
do pr
Am. Woolen..
do pr
Am. Linseed...
Am. Sugar....
Am. Smelting*
do pr
Amal. Copper.
Anacon. Cop..
A., T. & S. V.
do pr
Bait. &- Ohio,
do pr
Brook. Rap.
Can. Pacific...
Ches. Ohio.
Corn Products,
do pr i
Chi. Gr. West:
do pr A...
do pr
C.,C.,C. & St.L
Chi. Term
do pr
Col. Fuel & I.
CoJ. Southern.,
do 1st pr.
do. 2 4 pr
ConsoL Ga
Del. Sf Hudson.
I Close
Low- I Bid. I Bid.
est. |Fb. 21|Fb. 20
42% 43% 42% 43%
101
72*4
116%
44%
107
22%
140y4 100%
123% 109%
278%
89%
102% 110%
97 80%
172%
55% 17% 56% 20% 78% 37
100
13% S
71%
45% 44%
109 107
141% 165
189% 159%
111%
285
90
103 110%
109%
877%
89
102%
109%
82% 79%
178
56%
171%
55%
21% 20%
"37t^ 36%
65%, 33% 62% 32%
72% 51%
51% 52.%
176 175%
221 ,,J 208
46% 44 Den. & Rio (i.
do pr
DU..S.S. & At.
do pr
Erie
1st pr._.
2d pr.1
Gen. Electric..
Great Nor. pr.
S* 411. Central..,,.
Iowa Central..
do pr
Inter. Paper..
do pr
K. C. & South.
'do pr
Louis. & Nash.
Soo Railway..
Manhattan Met. St. Ry..
Met. Securities
Missouri Pac..
M., K. & T..
do pr
Mexican Cent.
Mex. Nat. pr..
Nat. Biscuit..
Nat. Lead
do Dr
iNorf. & West.
iNorth Am. Co
(Northern Pac
Northwestern
1\\ Y. Central
(N.Y.C. & St.L
1 do 1st
I do 2d pr
Omaha Ontario & W
Pressed Steel
do pr
Pacific Mall
Penn. R. It.
People's Gas.
Reading
do 1st pr.
do 2d pr..
iRepub. Steel
I do pr
IRoek Island
I do pr
175% 206
44% 87%
.-^4 17%
44
70%
170% 831
173.
'32,%
42% 42% 77%
43% 78
70H "68%
169% 326
171%
32
169%! 171%
326% I 332%
172
31%/
58% 21% 84
30% 60%
146% 153 158%
6%
69%
99%
34%
68
24% 37% 68%
81%
105
87
100% 220% 22 148
61
114
80
185
50% 57%
100%
45%
138%
97%
136%
92 99
31%
104%
25 64% 24%
56%
178%'
65% 37% 99
153
83% 35% 34%
115% 151%
97%
49%
174
32
59 22 84%
31% 61%
147%
151% 159 117%
6
"21%
84 84%
147 154
146 153
117
70
100
34$"
ii% 9
69%
99 34 101
34% 68%
24%
68% 84%
68% 81%
68%
84%
105%
87%
225% 230 149H
105 101
87
100%
220^, 227% 147%
23 0^
148%
'm$
185
51 59%
100%
46%
138%
98%
139%
94
100
32%
105%
25% 64%
50^
46%J 45%
139%7 138%
98% 97%
140% i 130%
32% 31%
105%,
25 64% 25
104%
26% 64% 24% 1st. L. & S. W
I do pr
St. Paul
Southern Pac.
Southern Ry..
do pr
Tenn.Coal & I
Texas & Pac.
T..SI. L. & W
do pr
T. C. R. T...
Union Pac
do pr
U. S. Rubber.
do pr
t*. S. Steel..
do pr
Wabash
do pr
West. Union..
Wheel. & L.E.
do 1st pr.
do 2d pr
Wis. Central..
do pr
^Total sales, 1,076.500 Oshares.
ISO
65%- 38% 99%
154
34%' 37 55%
17814
64% 37% 99
152
33% 35% 54%
179%
66
37%
100 150
34%
116% 151%
97% 50'
108%
41%
106%
23
46 9't%
152% 150%
'49%, 50
108%
42%
107%
25%
40 93%
108% I 108%
41 41%
10C%
2%
45%
93%
107
22%, 45% 93% 19% 46 26 27% 56%
28% 2S% 56%
ACTIVE BONDS AND CURB STOCKS.
Quotations to 1 p.m.j Feb. 21-
Oregon Short Line, 96% bid. 87 asked.
Bock Island~is, 79^ bid, 80 asked.
Japanese lsts, 100%.
Japanese 2ds, 100%, 100.
Japanese 4%s, 91%, 1)1%.
Japanese second 4p, 90%.
A. T. 4s, 79V.. 79%, 79%.
A. T. 6s. 116%.
Reading 4s, lul% 101, 101%.
Baltimore & Otio 3%s, 94 bid, 91% asked.
Atchison 4s, 103% bid, 104 asked.
Southern Pacific 4s, 64% bid, 94% asked.
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 4s, 100%.
United States Steel 5s, 99. 98%. 98%.
Northern Pacific 4s, 104% bid. 104% asked.
Union Pacific convertibles, 149% bid, 150%
Baltimore & Ohio 4s, 104 bid. 104% asked.
Boston Copper, 27% bid, 27% asked.
United Copper, 71.
Utah Copper, 32.
Black Mountain. 11% bid, 12% asked.
Union Pacifk 4s, 304% bid, 104% asked.
Bock Island 5s. 91% bid, 92% asked.
Tin Can common, 9% bid, 10 asked.
Tin Can preferred, 67% bid, 67% asked.
Granby. 9% bid, 9% asked.
Interborough. 227 bid. 229 asked.
Greene Copper, 26% bid, 26% asked.
BOSTON MINTNG STOCKS. Feb. 21.Closing
prices: Adventure, 6%@6%: Allouej 40
40% Arcadian. 4H%: Arnold. 1%^2 At
lantic, 24%@23%: Bingham. 45(f245% Black
Mountain, 11%@12% Boston Consolidated, 28%:
Calumet & Hecla, 710@715: Calumet & Pitts
burg, 36%@37% Centennial. 27(f?27% Con
solidated Mercur. 65@66 Copper Range con,
80%@81: Daly West, 14%ffJ16: Dominion Coal.
84@85 Dominion Steel, 30%g'32 East Butte.
8 Elm River, 2@24 Franklin, 18@18%:
Granby, %310 Greene Con, 27%@27? Isle
Royale, 2H%@24: Keweenail6@16% Lake Su
perior & Pittsburg, 44@44% Michigan, 13%
@14 Mohawk, 57?tj57% North Butte, 85%a386
Old Dominion. 46%@46i$ Osceola. I00(ffl04.
Parrot, 40@40i,i: Phoenix. l%(gl% Pltsbure
& Dulnth. 23%@24 PnettWntie Service, 21
21% Pneumatic Service preferred. 39%r?40%
Quhicv. 9394 Rhode Island, 6?6%. Santa Fe.
2(S)2%: Shannon Copper XJo... 6(ff'6%: Swift &
Co.. 104%J05 Tajoiarackflwi^llO: Tecuinseh
1A%3:14% Tennessee, mgpr-t&rtoi**, 11%
mmmmmmm.
1811% United 8hoev Mach. Co.. 80%@R1%
United Shoe Mach. preferred, 31^81%", United
Copper Co., -70%@71 United States Mining,
58%ffi09 Utah. 03@63% Victoria. 7@7% Wi
nona, 6%@6Mi: Wolverine, 130 Wyandot,
1%@1% N. 8%@.
LONDON CLOSING STOCKS, Feb. 21.Consols
for money, 90% consols for account. 90%: Ana
conda, 14% Atchison, 92%: Atchison preferred,
106 Baltimore & Ohio, 115% Chesapeake &
Ohio. 57% Canadian Pacific. 177% Chicago
Great Western. 21*j Chicago. Milwaukee & St.
Paul,. 185 De Bpers. 18%: Denver & R1Q
Grande, 46%: Denver & Rio Grande preferred,
91% Erie. 45 Erie first preferred, 80: Brie
second prefercd, 92% Illinois Central, 179 Loo
tsvivlle & Nashville, 152 Missouri. Kansas &
Texas, 85% New York Central. 153 Norfolk
& Western, 89% Norfolk & Western preferred.
94 Ontario & Western, 52 Pennsylvania. 71%
Rand Mines. 6% Reading. 71% Reading first
preferred, 48 Reading second preferred. 50
Southern Railway, 30% Southern Railway pre
ferred, 102% Southern Pacific, 67%: Union Pa
cific, 156% Union Pacific preferred, 100%:
United States Steel, 43 United States Steel
preferred. 109% Wabash, 23% Wabash pre
ferred, 47 Spanish 4s, 91%.
Bar silver, steady 30%d per ounce.
Money, 4 per cent.
The rate of discount In the open market for
short bills Is 3 15-16 per cent. The rate of dis
count in the open market for three months' bills
lb 3% per cent.
Money dLHOK,.. ,SO,* C0seo2sYoungTn
BERLIN, Feb. 21.Exchange on London, 20
marks 50% Pfgs for checks discount rates,
short bills, 3% per cent three months' bills,
3% per cent.
LONDON, Feb. 21.Bullion amounting to
165,000 was taken into the Bank of England
on balance today.
ST. PAUL, Feb. 21.Bank clearings, $1,245.-
283.05.
MINNEAPOLIS, Feb. 21.Bank clearings to
day, $3,239,748.34 for the week, S16,KU01.05.
against $13,060,508.03 a year ago New York
exchange, selling rate, 45c premium buying
rate, 15 premium. Chicago exchange, selling
rate, 45c premium: buying rate, 15c premium:
London flO-day sight documentary exchange,
$4.82%.
PARIS. Feb. 21.Three per cent rentes, 89f
92c for the account exchange on London, 25f
16%c for checks.
MISCELLANEOUS
NEW YORK COTTON, Feb. 21.The cotton
market opened barely steady at a decline of 14
points on the active months under local bear
pressure, March liquidation and stop-loss orders.
Prices went to another new low level for the
movement, but a better demand developed around
10.36c for March and 10.57c for May, owing to
reports of a big spot demand in the south, and
prices rallied during the middle of the morning
to within 3 or 4 points of last night's finals on
covering and trade demand. Private wires from
Now Orleans reported spot sales of 4,000 .bales
early in the morning and more wanted.
Cotton futures opened steady March, 10.42c
April, 10.52c bid May, 10.64c July, 10.80c Au
gust, 10.70c September, 10.38c October, 10.27c
November 10.28c bid December. 10.32c.
At midday the market was fairly steady with
prices about 4@5 points net lower. Spot cotton
quiet middling 'uplands, lie middling gulf,
11.25c.
PROVISIONS
CHICAGO PROVISIONS,*Feb. 2LA 10c de
cline in the price of live hogs caused an
easier tone in provisions. Trading, however, was
quiet. May pork was oft* 7%c at $15.60. Lard
was down 5c at $7.70. Ribs were 2%@5c lower
at $8.JO.
Close: Pork, May, $15.60 July, $15.27%.
Lard, May, $7.72%@7.75 July, $7.82%@7.85.
Ribs, May, $8.17%@8.20 July, $8.22%@8.25.
NEW YORK PROVISIONS. Feb.
101
72%
"6%
45%
108
-24
140% 163 124% 111%
283
00
102% 110%
97 81
172%
56% 17%
56% 21 78%
37
100%
14% 36
63%
33%
73 52
176% 213
45%
88%
BEAUTIFUL IN OLD AGE
LondonNothing in the way of
America's'wholesale absorption of the
world's art treasures has so annoyed
England as the fact that J. Pierpont
Morgan owns Sir Thomas Lawrence's
portrait of the beautiful Miss Croker.
The possession by a foreigner of
this masterpiece has always been
regretted, but ^the regret was es
pecially emphasized on the death,
which- has just occurred, of the
Dowager Lady Barrowwho was Miss
Croker^when England 'a loss of the
Lawrence was actually characterized as
a national calamity.
Lady Barrow wheal she died was in
her 97th year, and those who had the
opportunity of comparing the charming
old lady with the copies of Sir Thomas'
painting of the young original, declare
that while there is no doubt the latter
well deserved the title of the Beauti
ful Miss Croker, there is equally no
doubt that the former was the lovely
Lady Barrow.
Lady Barrow's record of lasting
beauty is unparalleled. She lived" a
beauty in the reigns of five English
monarchs, was a belle of the regency,
a reigning toast in the gallant days of
George IV, was presented at court
when William IV. was king was a
favorite all thru the Victorian era, and
a beloved old lady in the reign of
Edward VJJ.
Despite all this record as a belle and
beauty, Miss Croker had no more van
ity than a child, and it is on record that
at the time her loveliness was univer
sally talked about, she made a vow
and kept itnot to look in a mirror
for two years. As Lady Barrow, she
was not only a grande dame, but was
a most benevolent woman and will be
sincerely mourned by the poor as well
as by members of her own admiring
circle.
NEW BOON TO BACJBLELORS
I have been wondering for some
time,''" said the girl in the white shirt
waist, who uses all of those little hand
sewing machines that we sell nowa
days, l'esterday I found out. It is the
men. I had noticed for several weeks
that the masculine shoppers investing
in those handy little contrivances far
exceeded the feminine, but I set their
ponderance down to good-natured obe
dience which impelled them to buy at
their wives' or sisters' behest.
"But yesterday afternoon a good
looking, helpless Hercules came in and
made inquiries about a machine. His
manner showed me he was not hamp
ered with many women folk, so I fin
ally plucked up enough courage to ask
him for whom his purchase was in
tended.
'For myself,' he said, innocently
'I've seen so many of the fellows up at
the school fooling with thenf this win
terI'm a medical student, you know
that I thought I would see what kind
of a stagger I could make at my own
mending. You have no idea what ex
pert sewers some of the boys have be
come. I believe they could make a
whole suit on one of these little ma
chines. I've seen them make all kinds
of repairs. They were all pretty awk
ward in the beginning, but they perse
vered until they got so they could turn
the crank with- one hand and guide the
cloth with the other as well as any
woman.'
"The young man's breezy explana
tion nearly floored me, tout in the light
of preceding experiences I knew it must
be so, and I fancy that if seams had
voices a goodly number of them couid
tell "of their origin on hand sewing ma
chines that have been run by the bachc
lors of New York.'?,--
LIBERAL RECEIPTS
LOWER HOG PRICES
SOUTH ST. PAUL PRICES RULE
10c LOWER.
Cattle Receipts Rather Light, with
Prices Generally SteadyGood De
mand for Killing CattleSheep
Prices Generally Steady, with Light
ReceiptsDemand for Good Grades.
South St. Paul, Minn., Feb. 21 Estimated re
ceipts at the union stockyards todav: Cattle, I
700 calve*, 100 hogs, B.500 sheep,* 200 cars,
106.
The following table shows the receipts from
Jan. 1, 1906. to Cate. as compared with the same
perio in 1005:
Y,5!Lrd i^ ibr
De
1
Cattle Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars.
1 29,376 4,735 153,201 73,975 3.440
Jn,J5
24,506 2,847 166,293 153,716 3.664
Increase.. 4,870 1,888
Decrease.. 13,092 79,741 215
The following table shows th, receipts thus
far in Jebruarye,' asal*es.
period in
Feb. 20/. ...1,35b5y
tJ^&i^OKA
compared with the same
1905a:$,C,
t"
en
Hogs* Sheep. Cars
11,683 1,910 54,930 9,306 1,214
Increase.. 2,462 834 38
f," 1.774 18,016
Official receipts for the past week are as fol
Cattle. Calves.
Date
Feb. 13..
Feb. 14..
Feb. 15.
Feb. 16..
Feb. 17.
Feb. 19
Ives 280 111
OS 60 12
149 332
1.154
477 629 388
74
Hogs.
4,284 3,871
2.998 2,769 2.20follows:
er
rn
21.Beef,
steady. Pork, steady. Lard, barely steady
prime western steam, [email protected].
NEW YORK OIL, Feb. 21.Petroleum steady
reflued. all ports, [email protected].
NEW YORK PRODUCE, Feb. 21.Butter,
firm receipts. 3,778 lbs official prices, cream
ery, common to extra, 16@28c state dairy, com
mon to extra, 15@26c renovated, common to
extra, 15@20c western factorv. common to
firsts, 14@17c western imitation creamery, ex
tras. 21c: firsts, 18c. Cheese, firm receipts,
2,974 pkgs state full cream, small and large,
colored and white, September fancy, 14 %c
October, best, 13%@13%e late-made, small,
average best, 12%c large, 12%c: fair, 11%(J2
12c skims, full to light. 3%@ll%c. Eggs,
steady receipts. 13,397 cases state. Pennsylva
nia and nearby, fancy selected white, 20@21c:
choice, 18@19c mixed extra, 16%@17c west
ern firsts, 14c seconds, 13@13%c southerns,
ll@14c.
CHICAGO PRODUCE, Feb., 21.Butter.
Pteady creameries, 17g27%e dairies, 17@24%c.
Eggs, weak: at mark, cases included, 11 %c.
Cheese, firm daisies, 13c twins, ll%@12c
Young Americas, 13c. Poultry, live, easy tur
keys, 13@15c: chickens, ll%c springs, ll%c.
Potatoes, weak Burbanks, 50@53c Rurals, 81
@55e red stock, 50(fj!54c. Veal, easy 50 to
60-lb weights, 6%@7c 65 to 75-lb weight*, 7@
8%c 85 to 110-lb weights, 9%0'lOc.
115.
the yards receiptJ10
tts
lad
he
da
P?n i
lco, Milwaukee & St.
Paul, 16, Minneapolis & St. Louis. 32 Chicago,
ht. Paul. Minneapolis & Omaha, 27 Grea,t North-So
ni S?
so BwHiKto & Qulncj 1
Line, 5 Northern Pacific, 6 total, 106.
Disposition of stock Tuesday, Feb. 20:
Hogs.
4.U47
Swift & Co
W. E. McCormick...
W. G. Bronson
Leo Gottfried
Armour Pkg. Co...
Elliot & Co
City butchers 11
Slimmer & Thomas,. 214
Evans & Lauderdale. 25
J. B. Fitzgerald 121
Melady & Co 161
H. H. Brackett 54
Other buyers 22
Country buyers 292
Cattle.
576
3
26
9
44
5
Sheep.
4JL
7
75
117
Totals 1,562 4,948 621
HOGS
Date.. Feb. 13
Feb. 14.
Feb. 15.
FeD. 16.
Feb. 17.
Feb. 10.
Feb. 20.
Av. Wt. Av. Cost. Price Range.
207 208 211
212
211 212 212
$5.75
5.65 5.87% 5.83
5.95 5.95 6.01
$5.60
5.75&i3.U0 [email protected] 5.75W.5.95
[email protected] 5.80&46.05
5.95(^6.10
Hog prices rule loc lower. Receipts liberal.
Quality good. Price range from $5.8J to $6,
With exceptionally choice bunch selling at $6.05
bulk, $5.90 to $5.95, with the big end at $5.90.
Light, common to fair, $5.80 to $5.85 good to
choice, $5.90 to $6 mixed, common to fair, $5.80
to $5.85 good to choice, $5.90 to $6 heavy,
fair. $5.80 to $5.85 good to choice, $5.90 to $6.
Hogs43, 339 lbs, $6.05 66,^232 lbs, $6 61,
277 lbs, $5.97% 67, 224 lbs, $5.95 86, 180 lbs,
$5.95 89, 186 lbs, $5.95 84. 209 lbs, $5.92%
85. 198 lbs, $5 90 119, 181 lbs, $5.90: 93, 177
lbs, $5.90 71. 218 lbs, $5.90 70, 198 lbs, $5.90
74, 192 lbs, $5.85 44, 207 lbs, $5.80.
Pigs, Roughs and Underweights1, 490 lbs,
$5.50 4, 825 lbs, $5 12, 103 lbs, $5 5, 90
lbs, $5.
Stags and Boars1 boar, 280 lbs, $3.25.
CATTLEReceipts rather light good de
mand for killing cattle and prices generally
steady. Stockers and feeders continue active
and prices steady to strong for the week.
Veal calves dull to 25c lower. Butcher and
bologna buUs about steady. Milch cows steady.
Butcher Cows and Heifers2. 1,295 lbs. $4.50
1, 1,000 lbs, $3.85 2, 1,025 lbs, $3.50 1, 1,210
lbs, $3.50 2, 1,035 lbs. $3.25 2. 885 lbs, $3:
2, 1,120 lbs $2.75 5, 866 lbs, $2.50 1, 1,130
lbs, $2.35.
Cutters and Canners2. 980 lbs. $2.25 1,
1,020 lbs. $2.25 1. 530 lbs, $2 1, 760 lbs, $2
1, 760 lbs, $1.75 2, 815 lbs, $1.65 1, 970 lbs.
$1 50*
Butcher Bulls2, 1,450 lbs, $2.85 I,. 1.600
lbs, $2.75, 1, 1,060 lbs, $2.
Veal Calves20, 131 lbs, $5 1. 160 Bis. $4.75
1. 140 lbs. $4.50 2, 135 lbs, $4.50: 1, 110 lbs,
$3.50 1, 240 lbs. $2,75.
Stock and Feeding Steers2, l,19o lbs, $4.35,
1, 810 lbs, $3.75 4, 952 lbs, $3.65 2, 970 lbs,
$3.35 2, 790 lbs, $3.25 8, 997 lbs, $3.25 1,
720 lbs. $3.25 3, 726 lbs, $3-25
Stock Cows and Helfers-l 1.110 lbs, $2.7o
1' 1 ORO lbs $2 75: 7, 82
lbs,390
$2.60
L,T60l W07lbs,^502j
5$.2866 2. lbs 35
8. 496 lbs, $2.30 X, 620 lbs, $2 1, 640 lbs,
^Sttk and Feeding BuT^-l, 1,270 lbs, $3 1,
1070 lbs, $2.80 1, 930 lbs, $2.75 1, 720 lbs,
$2.50 2, 750 lbs, $2 35.
Milch Cows and Springers-3 cows and Icalf,
$110- 3 cows and 1 calf, $85 i *^k-.
cows, $62 2 cows, $52 1 cow and 1 calf, $27
W^EEP-Re^eiJts^light. .Prices generally
ste
DemTnd
iP
lb8
good good grades of sheep
and lambsSeUand. ewes. Sales.
$5K85l.Un
wes ^V":
4* 3
Stoctels and Feeders-43 lambs, 91 lbs, $4.30
23 ewes. 88 lbs. $4.
Among the shippers on the
markc 4?
w'
rr, Xeison. *Wis.: Joseph Green. Red vying
Farr Nelson ^'ls. Josep _---
L. C. Fairbanks, West Concord b. F. *U"fr.
Faribault D. Brown, Madison Lake Charles
Black. Welchs A. JT Dllllng Delano C. Bales
Ellenwood-
rw
rload
MayerVTciear Loki J. "Keller Rldgeland. Wis
H. G. Dobner. Thief River Falls A. Nording.
Plummer C. Gardner. E. Madson irrogan J. W.
Dodge. Madelia: Gosgrove Co., Le Sueur. Sibley
County Bank, Henderson Wenner & to.. Cold
Springs.
KANSAS CITY LIVESTOCK. Feb. 21.Cattle
Receipts. 11,000, including 300 southerns mar
ket steady: native steers, $4fiti southern steers,
[email protected] sotithern cows. S2.25 native
cows and heifers, $2.25*5(5: stockers and feeders,
$34.90 bulls. $2.65@4 calves. $3ft$7.50: west
ern" fed steers, [email protected] Vestern fed cows,
S2.506B4.25. HogsReceipts. 18.000: market
@10c lower: bulk sales. $6*6.12% heavy. $6 10
6.15: packers. $,[email protected]%: pigs and lights.
$5 [email protected]. SheepReceipts, 5,000: market
steady: muttons, $4.25(35.80 lambs. $5 5O@C80
range wethers. $5.40@6 fed ewes, $4.25(g5.25.
ST. L0UI8 LIVESTOCK, Feb. 21.CattleRe-
ceipts. 3.000, including 750 Texans market
steady beef steers, $2-906.15 stockers and
feeders. $2.25@4 50 cows and heifers $2.25
@4.40- Texas steers. $3fg4.75 cov.s aud heifers,
$2.10(ft3.90. HogsReceipts, 7.0(H) weak: pigs
and lights. $5 75f?6.20 packers, |5.755?6.20
bntchers and best heavy. $.106 25. Sheep
Receipts, 500 market steady natives, $4.6oB
5.50 lambs. $5.50(6.85.
SIOUX CITY LIVESTOCK, Feb. 21 .Receipts
Cattle, 1,2'o hogs. 5.700. Hogs. 1 Jpwe
Sales. 68, 210 lbs. $5.85: 67. 258 lbs, $5.90:
280 lbs, $6.25. Cattle, weak: Jtpckers. lc
lower Boeve. 12, 1.250 lbs. $4.50 10, 1.290
lb7 $4 85: 16. 1,340 lbs. $5.35. Cows^ and
heifers* 10. 890 lbs. $2.75: 16. t86 lbs. *3.50
101 O20 lbs. *4- Stockers and feeders. 10,
lm lbs $3: 12, 870 lbs. $3.76 10 785 lbs, $4 o3
Calves and rearltngs, 8, 450 lbs $3: 10. OtO
lbs. $3.75: 10. 670 lbs *3.85- Sheep, receipts,
300 10c lower.
CHICAGO LIVESTOCK, Feb. 21 .CattleRe
ceipts. 20.000 best steady, others( 10c lower:5e
beeves. [email protected]: cows h-iSw* 7II,? T^f
4.80 stockers and feeders.
$2 5
nns $3 5oei4.40. HogsReceipts. 40.00 oc
W tOc^wer: estimated tomorrow 25.000 mixed
and outchers. $5.95@622% good hravy. S6.15
9\- ronirh heavv. $5.9.VT6.10* light, sa.ifa
Se%^X. $^76rrfo!o5: bulk of sales. $6.10
i 20 Sheep^-Recelpts. 22.000 weak sheen,
[email protected]: lambs, [email protected].
OMAHA LIVESTOCK, Feb. 21 .-Cattie-Re-
cciptsS^OO: steadv native steers ggS.80
^Xi^ nA belters $.".94.40 canners. $1.itf?2.8.v
Kerf and fe"de.$3(J?4.50 calves. $3fi?6 50:
uim and stags, $2.754. HogsReceipts
l^OOO market 5c lower: bulk of-sales. $5.90
a 92%. Sheep-Receipts 7.500 market alow to
10c lower. Sheep, $4.76@6.
collection of the heads and .horns
of* practically every variety of big
game to be found in northern Rhode
sia has just been added to the British
South Africa company's jnuseum, in
London.
A soMier had been wounded in the
face. A man asked him in which bat
tle he had been injured, "In the first
battle of Bull Run," he replied. "But
how could you get hit in the face atj
Bull Run Well, sir,' "said the sol
dier, apologetically, "after I had run
a mile two I got careless and looked
toaCt'
-tf*.
Chas. E. Lewis & Co.,
Grain and Stock Brokers
Chamber of Commerce, Minneapolis.
Invite personal Interviews and correspondence
relative to purchase and sale of grain, stoeka.
bonds. Members All Exchanges. Private Wlrea.
Commission Orders Executed jn
All Markets of the World.
BRANCH OFFICESSt. Cloud, Fergus Falls.
Comstock, Dnluth, Minnesota Fargo, Caasel.
ton. Hunter. HiUsboro. Grand Forks. North
Dakota tnd Winnipeg.
WATSON & CO., I
BROKERS I N
GRAIN, PROVISIONS,
STOCKS AND BONDS,
MEMBERS N. Y. 8TOCK EXCHANGE.
New York Office24 Broad St.
Chicago CorrespondentsJ. H. Wrena
& Co.
Private wire, Chicago and New York.
Telephone*.
N. W. Main 4492. N. W. Main 4493.
Twin City 184.
420-421 Chamber of Commerce.
Branch Office131 Guaranty Loan Bldp.
PiPER- 33S:3
JOHNSON
Ellsworth C. Warner
Denman F. Johnson
Sheep.
767 319
420 423
..1,491inKo
Cars.
99 74 60 52
6 Chicag22
2,343reported7 4,949
1.88
220
& CO.
Broken in
Stocks and Bonds
Brain and Provisions
4CO, 410.411 I PbonesNW. M.
Chamber of Commerce I 3421*3422: T. C. 322
3% Interest
Paid on Certificates of
Deposit.
The Security Bank
Whailon,Case&Co. STOCKS, GRAIN, PROVISION
MEMBERS
New York Stock Exchange
Chicago Board of Trade.
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce.
Private wire to New York and Chicago.
68 CHAMBER Or COMMERCE
NEW YORK LIFE ARCADE.
ARIZONA COPPERS
We are Headquarters in the Twin
Cities for stocks quoted under the ti
tle of "Arizona Coppers" also
Helvetia and Belen. Write for
daily market letter.
CRANDALL, PIERCE & CO.
T. C9283
N..WMain 1650 2
ROOM A
Guaranty Building
901 Boardof Trade
DULUTH.
Win. Dairvmple,
Wnii Dairymple Co.
9c1om.%u.
GrainCommission Receiving a specialty. Advances made
to shippers. Orders for future delivery
executed in all markets.
HGHUG H,
CHRISTENSEN
GRAIN O. flf|
COMMISSION Qb UUl
The Van Dnsen-Harringtoa Co.
Minneapolis, Dulnth, Milwaukee.
Kansas City. So. St. Paul, Winnipeg,
SeU wheat, oats. flax, barley, livestock.
Experts In charge of each department. Olve
closest attention to customers' interests.
Good results for them means more busi
ness for us.
I have returned from a personal inspection of
many mines in Old Mexico,
especially the Cananea mines, and in this coun
try the famous mining camp of Bisbee, Tonopa'o.
Manhattan and Goldfield, and If you want th
latent information write or see me at once.
There is no ned tor me to say that I have
secured ma ay desirable bargains in stock and
property for investors desiring same.
S B. HIGBEE, Mining Broker,
410-411 Germanla Life Bldg., St. PauL
Established 18S.
HAIR AND THE "DRUMMER'
ESTABLISHED 1870.
WOODWARD& CO.
&&&&&&
Creator of the "Ingenue Mop" Coming
After More American Dollars.
Metropolitan Magazine.
Cleo de Merode, whose well-adver
tised visit to this country a few years
ago, which preceded her appearance on
the stage in New York, making her
ephermerallj- noted, is about to "perpe
trate another dash into publicity on
this side of the Atlantic. She has not
yet engaged her press agent, and the
coupling of her name with that of the"
king of Belgium is np longer an inter
esting nor a popular item or news. And
so one is led to speculate upon the
course to be pursued to make her suf
ficiently conspicuous and sound as an
investment for the American theatrical
manager who is daring enough to try to
revive an interest in this petite Pari
sienne.
It should be enough for one woman
even a French womanto have origi
nated and popularized a new style of
hairdressing. Doubtless in the far fu
ture, if her name is recalled at aiL,
Mile. Merode will be remembered as
the creator of the "ingenue mori,M
which for a time held the favor of the
feminine population in a grip equaled
only by the Marcel wave that is now
rippling over the locks of all civilized
wom?nkind that has access to hair
dressing shops.
In the French city of Beauvais a
small vehicle, built with two wheels
and drawn by a man or boy, is in com
mon use. It is called a vinaigrette.
MARFIELD-
GRIFFITHS CO.
QRAIN
1
JL
COMMISSION
DULUTH
'*&"S
CHICAOO
MILWAUKEE
^-jT
5
Grain
Commission.
MINNEAPOLIS
AND DULUTH
335
*%*!^1
'J.
.aim.
,Jfi- i^*ftS
5

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