OCR Interpretation


The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, March 31, 1906, Image 3

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-03-31/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

A4"r
Sattfi
.^te-f
4-
i
ROOT SEEKS NEW
CANADIAN PACTS
United States and Dominion to
Resume Settlement of In
ternational Disputes.
trade relations between the United
ot to this country and Canada in thei
i
ex
a
e-i 1 0 mis country ana Canada in me}"".' V"
hope of scti'.ing points of difference ^c
to be broken off suddenly and engen-1
not inl)Mde until a mixed tribunal fixed
thc buundan- between the British and^lS
American mineral lands.
A :n- ass of the senate persuaded
Secretary Root that reciprocity would
not "onsilfro 7 thi session eon
gross, and that republican leaders had
agiced to accent the counsel of the
"standpatters.''
Canada and Germany.
A the state depaitnent is under ob
ligations to secure concessions for Ger
nianv_ in return for the favor showu
the mted "States permitting this
country to remain among the favored
nations in snite of the discriminatory
tariffs recently put into force the
Ot rman government. Secretary 'Root
tec 1^ th.it it otil.l not wise under-
tal other propositions at a tiire when
legMat- r* spom so little inclined to
tar- ff changes.
Moreover, the demand for reciprocity
between the United States .-id Canada
lo~ TI4 ^i-st to the deajreo that it did
tvlien thy joint high commission began
the consideration of the subject in 189S.
Canadians 'nave cooled in their ardor
an-1 do not show any great desire to
have American manufactured articles
admitted at a low rate in exchange for
a .nlia raw materials.
score of mooted question's were un
do) congelation when the Alaskan
boundary dispute ended the negotia
tions. Sreretar'- Root feels that the
has cone foi taking the broken
Ft-in,Is where the lomt high commis
sion lott tliem
Preserve Niagara.
The p^srnation of Aiagara falls is
ned
KWsgr
.i.*iiii!Li'i
ft
i,
*4
S'-^ifc
*'IS '5''8?'
.Mtho tho ioint high commission lias
no\cr foimallv dissolved.* it has been
moribund loi so many years that neither
Croat Britain nor tho United States
regards it a- still in existence, and it
is not bkelv that any effort will be
iraile revn this commission or to
1-ring a similai one into existence Ne
gotiations Mill be conducted Secre
tary Eoot and Sir Henry Mortimer Du
rmd. the British ambassador, with the
eoopeiPtiou of some representative of
the anddiciu government.
Harmony I Expected.
The issues have become so well de
fined ami the iehltions between Great
intain ana the Lnited btateg are so
harmonious at this time that but little
dulKultv is expected in framing
treaties satisfactory to both powers.
In spite of the friendly relations ex
isting: 1 etween the United States and
Oieat Britain, international disputes
like the lecent tioublcs between Amer
ican and Canadian corporations as to
the contiol of the S Johns? river be
tween New Brunsv lek and Maine and
uniust discriminations against Ameri
can fishermen along the east coast of
Canada remind statesmen that treaties
aie neeessaiv for a more satisfactory
definition of water rights and for the
ieulation of fisheries in the Atlantic
and Pacific ami in the waters of the
common front lei.
The Bait Question.
Tiie refusal of Canadians to permit
Anieiuan fishermen to bin bait in
British tointoi\ and other restrictions
legarded as unp-st fishermen f.-o
tins cnun1r\ caused tho slato depait
ment to ha\c the bureau of fisheries
eend Ihe steamer (jiampus into the
"wat^r* along the east Canadian coast
to make A foil investigation of the fish
ing nidustr\. The buieau has reported
Se(retai\ "Root and it is believed
that this information will enable the
"United States to discover the source
of the alleged wrongs suffered New
Kngland fishermen who \isit New
foundland. New Brunswick and No-^a
Scotian wateis
Seal Fisheries Dispute.
Seal fishing Bering e a and tho
no'-th Pacific is another subject of dis
pute between Canada and th" T'nited
States vlnI'h dema.uls settlement.
ter the T'nited States acquired Alaska
it ?t tempted to prevent the "laughter
of ,eals in Bering a. just as Russia
did when it controlled Alaska Seizure
of British vessels the United States
resulted in international entanglements
extending over a number of \ears, and
in 1892 th" subject was referred to arbi
tration, #nd the Paris tribunal of arbi
tration, decided against the United
States and ruled that the taking of
seals in the high seas was a legitimate
end lawful occupation, but as the
United States and Great Britain had
looth declared themselves in favor of
protecting seals, the tribunal promul
gated a series of regulations for pelagic
sealing which were deemed adequate to
protect the seals of the Pribyloff herd.
The regulations have proved inade
quate, and th*1
ereased rapidly.
United States to sustain its position
against seal fishing.
Tn the regulations of seal fishing 9e-
seribed the Paris tribunal was a pro
vision that the regulations should
submitted to a examination every five
years to determine whether there was
reason for modification. The first five
yeai period ended in 1898, and out of
the movement to have these regulations
revised grew the joint high commission,
which came to such a sudden termina
tion without accomplishing any of its
purposes.
Other Problems.
Other subjects considered the .joint
high commission, which will doubtless
be taken up again Secretary Root
are-
her
whet
he
jy
States and Canada areout of the que*- o*, TJw^lt^J? in
tion at this time. S.-retary Root has I
determined to abandon the'tariff ques-,
da TOU1,n
Tvhich bade fair to be settled the terntory of tther:
joint high commission when the Klon-L
"dike gold strike caused the negotiations
ri
ht8
of fach coi
iei
rfl P
th
an
hl'l
1P
a
tho internat-onal waterways commission forced quiet upon them, tearing the
number of seals has tle-
Great Britain Ealked.
Great Britain refused to take part in
tn
international conference held 1897
Japan, Russia and the United Stales
to disci olaus for the protection of
the fur seals. Great Britain consented
to send scientific men to join in a in
vestigation of the fur seals about Pribv
loff islands, and the report of these sci
entists shows a diminution of the herd,
which threatens the extinction of fur
seals. This report was held the
The absolutely pure
BAKIN POWDER
Contains no alum,
lime or phosphates.
ter
an
V1D^
low
a
eI
ere
tr
lDe
tion for the present and is busving him- i J P^VNV w^? in'
self *ith other matters of vitalinter- f,
beyond the frontier,alie labor
Ln,t
th
?l?L^
S enC
itizens of each countrv within the
a revision of the
respecting aval
lt
rea
a
ess
1&
th ree
men
fi
lo
deied feeline of hostility *hich did ment of
Provisions
*o
Pur0Cltpysn
h"e
18
i
th
offlcer
lawflcutod
recl
the conveyance for trial or umsh-
i
other
er
on
one country thro the ter- h*
wrecking and salvage rights.
MINERS EMERGED
LIKE SKELETONS
^Frenchmen Entombed in
Were Near Cannibalism
When They Escaped,
r, A 01 m. =+.,cr
Lens, ranee, March 31.-The story
the thirteen survivors ^ho jester
dav suddenly appeared, having escaped
uould speedily have forced the starving
men to resort to the last desperate
extremity if they had not been
rescued.
The surMvors were sturdy young
miners from 1 to 2 5 j-earq age ex
cept their leader Henn Is em
doeto
uffe
n'
vili douhtlvsq form ihe basis for a Jesuits of fev ec and poisongirom daughter. Her wi brother,'Ed a n'
cnr\ to prote* i i falls President
dl
thei
lu)Osevelt has supplemented the efforts Touchine Scenes 1 from Wells, where they have farm.
of thv statp .lepartmont in this mat- rouchmg Scenes.
its oarlv consideration may be i There were touching scenes as wives' Lves at Marseilles, 111.
epectd
the relatives of those whose bodies have i
not been recovered clamorously de
manded that efforts be redoubled to
bring out any possible survivors.
There ia a report that there were
fi\e others who came almost to the bot
tom of the pit yesterday, but were
unable to continue on account of ex-
naustion.
Ihe total number men missing
after the catastrophe was 1,212. The
bodies recovered numbered approxi
mately 500. The others are still unac
counted for.
Explain Away Failure.
The engineers explain that smoulder
ing firos prevented them from exploring
remote passages of the mine, wnere it
was thought that there could be no sur
vivors. The mine owners also claim
that the strike reduced the number of
available rescuers.
Many engineers and scientists agree
that all in the mine must have died long
jgo Engineer Laur, however, dis
sents, asserting that the salvage work
has been deplorably inefficient, and he
believes that scores died of exhaustion,
owing to the poor work of the salvage
companies.
The families of the miners are
tenselv indignant. They claim that
salvage operations were never under
taken i the part of the mine from
which rSTetr and his companions
escaped and disorders are expected. The
most severe repressive measures have
been takeu.
Crowds of women denounced the di
rectors and engineers, crying: ''If
A OU had gnen tools would have
saved $ ouT oiyn husbands.
fir 8et hu8ba nr
a
7
The party which escaped today orig
inally numbered twenty men, of" whom
seven disappeared during the gropings
in the dirknfs*.
Strike I Renewed.
The strike is being renewed thruout
the mining region. A sanguinary affray
has occurred at Henin-lietard. A
striker was killed, three gendarmes
were wounded, houses were sacked and
i windows were broken.
Over 30,000 strikers are parading and
have engaged in riotous manifestations.
A thousand additional troops have ar
rived here.
The parliamentary committee todav
began its investigation here into the
catastrophe of March 1 0 and the strik
ers made demonstrations Jjefore the
committee's headquarters.
24 ARE VICTIMS OF
FATAL TRAIN WRECK
Fort Wavne, Ind., March 30.An
eastbound Ts'ickel Plate passenger train
approaching the town of South Whitley
was wrecked late yesterday. The smok-
r, day coach and five sleepers left the
The woman fatally hurt is supposed
to be Mrs. Walier of Dubuque,
0
'X^'v* Z^- Saturday^'Kvening1, '^mr^iW&WMgfi XLJ MI&NEAP61.TS 'jOURNAV arch '^31, 190&
MURDERS HIS WIFE
THEN KILLS SELF
Jealousy Causes a Double Tragedy
in Home at North
Mankato.
Special to The Journal.
Mankato, Minn., March 31.After
murdering his wife, Martin Ratus com
mitted suicide shooting himself. The
woman was shot in the back while sit
ting at a table. I took three bullets
to Kill the man.
Th3 bodies were discovered late yes
terday b.y a neighbor, who, while pass
ing the house in North Mankato, looked
thru the window and saw the body of
Mrs. Ratus i a chair in the kitchen,
leaning against a table. The police of
this city were notified and it was not
until they reached the house and broke
in that it was known that the tragedy
was a double one. O the bed in a
room adjoining the kitchen lay the body
of Ratus, with a revolver clasped in
his right hand, a bullet wound on his
right temple and one near his heart. N
wound or bruise nas found, on tho
woman's bodv till today at the post
mortem examination when the wound
in the back was found and the bullet
extracted.
Suicide Was Planned.
The following letter, written in Ger
man, tells the story of the tragedy, and
supplies the motive. I was found in
the man's clothes Coroner Merritt:
"Whoever may read this will know
Mill that I killed myself on account of
wife and a man he name of Borne.
What money is left give to Eose. Dated
March 22."
The man referred to is a laborei*.
Rose is supposed to be Ratus' step
daughter. The letter would indicate
that Ratus had made his mind to
take his own life more than a week
du
tout it is uncertain whether the
Mankat fro Well a
di
som 8ud
alive from CouVneres coal mine alter bounds on the man's breas tw Anothr
twenty days cntomoment, discloses
tn temple
that they lived for many days on putrid
horse meat amid total darkness and in i Jealous of Wtfe.
the. stench from scores decaying,
corpses. The presence of human flesh
an fh forme
an mont i i gai
he Uf tJ a revo
he i
years ol ds.- A lh show the terrible
Te
ieaIouBy
Meirit ha foi t0 bullc
Ratu an hi wif cam
.et
Nor thhs eighteen mont
followed li'is trade
brickmason The qua eled fre
tly, Ratus being jealo ursr of his wife quen
accusing her of unfaithfulness. A
threatene
i
ac i wa aeste aw her.
de,d uet'f on ofb ith a
nomina fine? a 8 th auth oritie 8
dr FrHofman, who lives
believed for his
had lived
iblie has
Appleton, Wis., with the youngest
of deayed horsefle sihn Charles A KhnebeJ, arriv es tod.v
1 ht Mr Goi
and mothers greeted those whom they
had long given up as dead. Crowds Kodol Digests what you eat. Relieves
besieged the hospitals to which the mcbgestion, Dyspepsia, sour stomach,
men were taken, cheering the survivors beletlillg.
and imprecating the ineffective salvage!
work that followed the disaster.
The rescue of these thirteen men re
vived the hope that others are alive and
Westbrook
MRS. PEARSONS DEAD
Wife of Chicago Philanthropist Passes
Away.
Chicago, March 31.Mrs. Marietta
Chap in Pearsons is dead at Hinsdale,
111., after a illness of several months.
She was born at Springfield, Mass., in
181 9, and was the daughter of Deacon
Giles
Chapin I 1
year a late oaTIV
8e 7 a hn wa ma
I ried to Dr. Parsos, and ten
west with him, and
~-h
a reside
n-
o-n
Cicago and
suburban towns ever sice. Her life
was full of good deeds, she being espe
cially interested in foreign missionary
work. She was an active siipporter of
her husband,, Dr. Pearsons, who ha^
given several millions of dollars to aid
American colleges.
A Question That Every Man Should
Decide for Himself.
There is one subject in which many of
us are interested and that is, what is
the quickest way of getting rid of a
troublesome cold? I it best to take
some new remedy put out with exagger
ated claims, or' to pin vour faith to
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy, a prep
aration that has won a world-wide repu
tation and immense sale its cures o
this disease?
___OCEAN^STEAMERS___
/forth Cjerman JZtoi/cf.
Fast Express Service
track and turned over in the ditch, in-1 A LORRAINE .'.".V.'.'.'.".'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.".'.".".".".'.April 12
juring twenty-four persons, one fatally.!
wahe clothing igfharked Mrs. Cvril
Walker. Her sUPes were purchased
at Dubuque, Iowa. She is very well
dressed. She is about 4 5 years old. Her
skull was crushed. Among the injured.,
are the following
Miss Martha Zurn of Sheboygan,
Wis., right arm crushed and amputated
at tflbow.'
Frank Zahn. 5 years old, nephew
Miss Zurn, scalp -wound and ribs brok
en.
K. Nugent, Chicago, ribs fractured,
head bruis'ed and shoulder dislocated.
Kyander, Duluth, Minn., right hip
lacerated.
Alex 'Werlund. Chicago, severe scalp
wounds.
Pstel Gruthman, Cnicago, left hand
crushed .an arm bruised, thrown into
ditch filled with .water and nearlv
drowlied.
Tfiiliam Fish, Xew York citv, back
badlv sprainedwa also thrown into
ditch and nearly drowned.
Conductor Christian SauerBell6vu'e
Ohio, cut over right eye.
0
LOI DONPARISBREMEN.
Less tban six days across the ocean
Krtmprinz Apr lO, 7 A I Ivalser Mav 1 5 1 0 A
Ivalser Apr. 17, 10 AM I K.VVm.II.Mav 22. AM
K.wm.II, Apr. 24 6 AM I Kronprhiz. .Tun 5. 5 AM
Lronpiiuz, May 8, 6 AM Kaiser, June 12. 10 AM
Twin Screw Passenger Service
Comfort and Luxury at Moderate Rates.
Kurfuerst.Mayl, 10 AM i Kurfuerst.Jun 7 10 AM
Bsrb'sa, May 10, 10 AM I Barb'sa.Junc 14 AM
I .Alice. Mav 24. 10 AM I Bremen.June 21 10 AM
Friedncb.May 20 10 VM P.Alice, June 26 10 AM I
Mediterranean Service
GIBRALTARNAPLES-GENOA.
Fair and warm weather route
BsrtVsa. Mar,31 11 AM I Alhert.Ap 28 11
Irene A 7 1 1 I I' Irene. May 1 2 1 1 A
K.LUIFC, Apr. 14 11 AM K. Lnlse.May 19 11 AM
Wejmar. Ap.21 11 AM K., Albert, Jun 2 11 AM
Gibraltar and Naples only.
OEJJtICHS & CO., No. 5 Broadway. N. Y.
H. Claussenlus & Co.. Gen. Western Agts, Chi
cago. Ill Grode & Stenger, 430 Wabasha at,
St ._Paul.
FRENCH LINE
GompagnSe Generate
Transatlantlque
Fast Route to tho Continent
Qlaoutlo Twin-Scrow and Exprmmm
Mall Steamer*
Unexcelled In Speed and Elegance
Now York Paris 6% Days
I.A PROVENCE, newest of fast leviathans,
having passenger elevator, roof cafe, and many
other innovations. Fleet of modern, gigantic
Twin-Screw and Express Steamers naval offi
cers' man-of-war discipline. Company's vesti
buled trains, Havre-Paris. i% hours.
LA TOTJRAINE April 5
CHAMPAGNE April 19
LA SAVOIE April 26
LA PROVENCE May 3
For plans, reservations and full information
call on, telephone or write to
W. B. Chandler 119 3rd Stroe
A. E. Johnson & Co., 100 Washington Ave., So.
Agent* for Minneapolis
SCANDINAVIAN
AMERICAN LINE
10,000 Ton Twin-Screw Passenger Steamers
Direct to
Norway, Sweden and Denmark
Sailing from Tsew York at noon.
Helig Olav Apnl 12
1'NITED SPATES April 26. Juue 7 July 19
OSCAR II May 10. .Tune 21. Aug. 2
llWtU Ol XV May 24. .Tul\ S A"" 1C
First cabin. $65 an np second cabin $52.50.
A. E. JOHNSON & CO.. 100 WASHINGTON AV
S MlXSEAPOlIS
Texas and Mexico Lands
Millions of acres of land covering every section
of Texas and old Mexico. Any size tract from
20 acres to 9,000.000and price from 40 cents
to $10.00 per acre. Correspondence solicited and
promptly answered.
There are fortunes in these landswrite us.
MULUHS & HILL, Austin. Texas.
572 WORDS'FLASHED
OYER THE ATLANTIC
New York, March 31.On Wednes
day night, according to the statements
of employees and officers of a wire
less telegraph system, 572 words were
flashed across the Atlantic ocean, from
Coney Island to the coast of Ireland, a
distance of 3,200 miles, without the use
of cables, wires or any other medium
than the atmosphere,
This trans-Atlantic achievement is re- 1
garded as marking the greatest forward I
step yet taken in the development
telegraphy without wires.
For several nights^ past the Coney
Island station has been sounding mes -J
sages across the ocean and these mes
sages have been received large part
by the operators in Ireland. Wednes
day night, however, marked the max-i
imum of achievement. i
O that night a total of 1,000 words!
was sent out from the Coney Island
station. The messages were' sent
various^kevs, pitches or tunes, to usej
the wireless vernacular, in. order as
certain the correct one. Ireland re- 1
ported cable that 572 of these words!
were received and recorded.
Colds relieved without a jar with'
Kennedy's Laxative Honev and Tar.'
Best for Coughs. Moves the bowels.
A liquid cold cure.
Harsh, purgative remedies are fast
giving way to the gentle action and
mild effects of Carter's Little Liver
Pills. I you try them, they will cer
tainly please you.
Cost "no morelast longer. That's the
why of Foot-Schulze Glove rubbers.
Electric-Lighted Sleeping Cars.
I their new Pullman sleepers, fresh
from the greatest earshop? in the world,
the Minneapolis & St. Louis Railroad
is confident that it has reached the
acme of perfection in the equipment of
its Chicago service.
The&e cars being new, represent in
their construction every detail of com
fort, elegance and sa^nitarv excellence
which the best inventive brains of the
country have been able to devise.
Git-La Grippe is a rational treatment
for colds. I kills the grippe germ.
Cures in one day. All druggists. 25c.
0
$
S
OFFICE O CITY COMPTROLLER.
Thursday the 12th day of April, A 1906
eer
Facts
You know a good, beer
when you are drinking it.j
The foam is rich and
creamy. It tastes smooth
and refreshinggood to
the last drop.
Gluek's
Pilsener
Is this kind of beer and
such beer is healthful. It
is brewed by the latest and
most improved methods
and is absolutely a first
class article. Ask for it at
the bar and order a case
from the brewery for home
use.
TEXAS LANDS.
W want land buyers and good agents
Write today and tell us what you want
and for what purpose. Also when you
wi ll visit Texas. "We recommend noth- feenewai premiums
ing to a purchaser that ourselves can
not unqualified ly approve." Don't write
unless you mean business.
THE GILLIAM CO.,
310 CONG. AVENUE, AUSTIN, TEXAS.
get Detter results from Journal
want ads they should be specific. &
Many ads lose much of their force
by being too short and vague. Take $
words enough to tell all the leading
points the reader wi ll want to know.
383J$S$58M*$^
PROPOSALS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR SCHOOL BONDS.Dividends
Minneapolis, Minn., March 15, 1906.
Sealed proposals and popular subscriptions will be received the Commit-
tee on Ways and Means of the City Council of the City of Minneapolis, Minne- Commuting. renewal commissions.
sota, a the office the City Comptroller said city until 2 Mock m.
7
One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000) of School Bonds for High School' MedJSd examinm''" fees' and' in-
Buildings and additions to High School houses, and One Hundred Thousand I spection of ilsks
Dollars ($300,000) of School bonds for Graded School Buildings and additions lle$**J^rs
tt Grradecl School houses, of said City of Minneapolis, authorized to issued I
the City Council of said City by resolution passed March 9th, 1906, and ap-
proved March 12th, 1906, and said bonds will be sold at said time by said Com-
mittee on Ways and Means to the highest responsible bidder or bidders therefor,
end the actual residents of Minneapolis shall be preferred to all other persons
upon such sale.
Said bonds will be in denomination of $50, $100, $500 and $1,000 and will
be dated January 1, 1906 payable January 1 1936. These bonds are issued for
the purpose of providing additioral High School Buildings and additions to
High School houses, and additional Graded School Buildings and additions to
Graded School houses, situated within the- City of Minneapolis, and will bear
interest at the rate of three and one-half (3y2) per cent per annum, payable
semi-annually January 1 and July 1 of each year, principal and interest payable
at the fiscal "agency of the City of Minnepolis in the City of New York.
Each proposal or subscription must state the total amount of bonds bid for,
the denominations thereof, and the total amount offered for the same, including
llie premium and accrued interest thereon from January 1 1906, to date of de-
livery, and eacb pyqpo&al or subscription must addressed to the Committee on
Ways and Means^ care* 0"f Dan Brown, City Comptroller, Minneapolis, Minne-
sota, marked on
i js .ii. l. u--i J.
value of the bonds bid for as a guarantee.
enve!8jje "Proposal for School Bonds," each proposal or sub-
scription must be accompanied a certified check on a national bank, payable to i Claims' resisted
C. S Hulbert, City Treasurer, for a sum equal to two per centum of the par I
~No proposal or subscription "will Tae entertained for a sum less than the par
value of the bonds, and accrued interest to date of delivery of said bonds. The
light to reject any or all bids is hereby reserved.
Bonds will be delivered to the purchasers thereof at the office of the City
Comptroller, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on or before May 14th, 1906, or at the
office of the United States Mortgage and Trust Company in New York City, on
June 1st, 1906, at the option of the purchaser.
order of the Committee on Ways and Means of the City Council.
DAN BROWN, City Comptroller.
ITERNATIONAL FALLS, FORT FRANCES
and the Rainy River Country.
W can, in two minutes, demonstrate to every investor and homeseeker that
far the best locations and the biggest values in Koochiching Falls city property
or Eainy River Valley farm or timber lands are secured through our concern.
FIND OUT WHAT W E HAVE O OFFER.
Call at our office or write us for information.
THE ENGER-NORD REALTY CO.
120 TEMPLE COURT BUILDING. MINNEAPOLIS.
StationeryLoose Leaf DevicesType Writer SuppliesDesksChairs.
Blank BooksSectional BookcasesFiling CabinetsCard Index System
Everything for the Office
Miller-Davis Printing Co.,
The Down-to-Date Bank and Office Outfitters.
Phones 171. 213-16 Nicollet Ave.
PROOF STORAGE
The Largest in the WestThe Finest Anywhere.
Unequaled Facilities for Packing, Moving. Storing and Shipping Household Goods
THE BOYD TRANSFER y STORAGE CO.
Warehouse, 400-410 B. Lake St. Main Office. 46 S. Third St.
TRUTH
NDLIRE
WRITE US FREELY
and frankly, In strictest confidence, tefflng All yeof
troubles, and stating your age. We will send you
FREE ADVICE, in plain sealed eilrelope, and a val
uable book on*'Home Treatment for Women."
Address: Ladies' Advisory Department, Th
Chattanooga Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tena.
065
WARE-
HOUSE
Clipped From
The New York Herald
March 1st, 1906.
foil wish sTiTfr^^^^Tii lurg* hrol
lo he oil* two l tit In t?xre* of
the |tiovlslon 'I n* L'nion Central of Cln
cinmttl N Oo\ernor Pattt-non companj
It hi* tn nod 'Mm nsst nnd wrole In 1904
new huslnexH amounting to J4-' 000 ll
pximise ratio I* onl fui per cent In ex-
Jn,
of the new Inw \irovfilon according hint]
to the tnll^ priMtre nnd tills particular
Ohio coinpnni Mr Dawftnn sa)X has th?
rcpmaitcn now "f l'uln to la policy !|ii
lioldfn the l.irgMt cJhldendu of anv Hfo,!]
Instnanro romimni In the world It is not I
ii iurl muiuHl oom|ai but one of th
nl\iil tTil.n
"JiMtyjjilnHl
Miles M. Dawson is Act
uary For the Armstrong:
Investigating Com
mittee.
IF YOU WANT TO KNOW any
thing about the Union Central
Dividends we can tell you.
V. M. VAN SLYKE, State Agent.
E. P. KELLY, Supt. of Agents.
W. D. OAKENS, City Agent.
Office 704 Quaranty Loan Bldg.
Note the Following State
ment Carefully.
UNION CENTRAL LIFE INSURANCE COM-
PANY. Principal offic e, Cincinnati, Ohio
(Organised iu 1867.) John M. Pattison, Presi
dent, E. P. Marshall, Secretary. Attorney to
accept Bervlce In Minnesota, Insurance Commis
sioner. Cash capital. $100,000.00.
INCOME IN 1905.
11,346,915.71
6,S07,71 95
Flrs ear Drem i
m.
Dividends and surrender values ap
plied to purchase paid-up insur
ance and annuities 573,855.98
Total premium Income 18,228,533.64
Rents and Interest 2,699,595.38
Profit on sale or maturity of ledger
assets None
From all other sources 92,626.52
Total income $11,020,755.54
DISBURSEMENTS I N 1905
Death claims .and matured endow
ments $2,080,568.93
Annuities and premium notes,
voided by lapse 283,856.09
Surrender values to policyholders. 340,854.84
to policyholders 691,876.99
Total paid policyholders $3,397,156.85
Dividends to stockholders.
Commissions and bonuses to
agents, flrst ear's premiums
Commissions on lenewals
Commissions ol annuities.o.
an
alow
Sa if 8
le
for the whole or any part of the Agency superyision and other ex-
Gmployee
disburments
A otner
Net increase 9,278
Issued, revived and increas
ed during the year 17,934
Total terminated during the
year 8,656
Bv deflth S73
By maturity 897
By expiration 293
By surrender 539
By lapse 6,554
By-decrease
68,862.50
182,781.93
8,295 99
537,48.5.83
an
Total disbursements $5,863,5il.95
Excess of Income over disburse
ments 5,657,243.59
ASSETS DEC 31, 1905.
Value of real estate owned $537,260 6 2
Mortgage loans 40,311,152.07
Collateral loans ,i None
Premium notes and policy loans.. 6,237,219.73
Bonds and stocks owned 10,300.00
Cash in office and In bank 140,302.52
Bills receivable and agents' bal
ances 186,060 76
Accrued Interest and rents 1,658,459.18
Deferred and unpaid premiums... 432,565.01
Total f*9,469,319.89
Less agents' debit balances 143,410 40
Total admitted assets $49,325,909.49
Assets not admitted. $293,547.82
LIABILITIES DEC. 31, 1905.
Net value of outstanding policies. $40,283,235.00
Preaent value on supplementary
contracts and cancelled policies. 324,984.00
Claims due and unpaid None
Claims adjusted anad no due, and
unadjusted anJ,n,reported 92,676.00
34.000 00
83 768 73
36,854.19
268.6S4 42
"tc
P81*1
em
,u
i Dividends due policyholders
A other liabilities
Total liabilities on policyhold
ers' account $41,122,202.34
Gross divisible surplus
Credited on special forms of
Policies 5,878,373.15
Gross surplus 2,330.400 OO
Capital stock paid 100,000.00
EXHIBIT OF POLICIES, 1905 BUSINESS
No
FAMRIAS, TEXAS,
Present Residents Retain Romantic
Indian NameAggressive Develop
ment Work Now Sole Thought of
People in Interest. -M
Special Correspondence W A Otis. 4,
San Antonio, Texas, March 28.The
Falfurrlas country, some 180 miles south ^3
of this city, retains so much of romance A
as is contained in the name Falfurrlas, *"i
meaning "Heart's Delight." Further than
this romance gives way to aggressive de
velopment.
When I was there a week ago I saw
new cabbages being packed for shipment
Bermuda onions twelve inches high,
which will be marketed early in April
young orange trees that will bear this i
year. Falfurrlas produce gets to the mar
ket a month ahead of that from any other
point in the states. This assures the
highest market prices.
One year ago there was little at Fal
furrlas. Today it is a hustling town sur
rounded by farmers, who have been
brought there by the Falfurrias Immigra
tion company. Every one fthese farm
era has made money from the start.
a northerner It seems Incredible even
when he sees these fanners planting, and
harvesting every month in the year. Yet
that is just what is going on. This feat
ure alone is worth a trip to the Falfurrlas
country. SECURITY TRUST & LIFE rNSTTRANOE COM
PANY.Principal office: Security Trust &
Life building. New York City. (Organized
1871.) Thomas Bradley, president. I. C. Oar
verlck, Secretary. Attorney to accept BerTjre
in Minnesota: Insurance Commisslouer. Cash
capital, $500,000.
INCOME IN 1905.
First year's premiums $193,016.61
Renewal premiums 7ol,982.15
Dividends and surrender values
applied to purchase ptld up in
surance and annuities 10,207.88
Total premium Income
Rents and interest
I*roflt on sale osr maturity
ledger assets
From all other sources
Total paid policyholders
Dividends to stockholders
Commissions and bonuses to agents
flrst year's premiums
Commissions on renewals
Commissions on annuities
Commuting renewal commissions..
Salaries and allowances for agen
cies
Agency supervision and other ex
penses
Medical examiners' fees and in
spection of risks
Salaries of officers and employees
Legal expenses
All otner disbursements
10,000.00
633,979 SO
430,524.71
833.74
15,817.83
aiices fragen
45,889.38 32,685.37
Total disbursements
Excess of income over- disburse
ments
ASSETS DEC. 31.
Valne of real estate cywned
Amount.
Policies in force at begin
ning of the year 115,873 $209,413,203
Policies In force at close of
the year 125,151 228,114,041
$18 700,748
$34,984,994
10,284,246
1.689.451
674..738
558,700
1,222 753
11,412,193
726,411
BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IX 1905
No. Amount.
Policies In force at begin
ning of the year 1,707 $3,068,929
T=sued during the year 338 522.720
Ceased to be in force during
the vear 12*5 216 iOO
In fori Dec. 81. last 1.819 3,375.349
Losses and claims incurred during
the rear $26,938.18
Losses and claims settled during
the year 26,938.18
Losses and claims unpaid Dec. 31 1,000.00
Received for premiums 125 345 3 3
STATE OF MINNESOTA,
Department of Insurance.
Whereas, Th Union Central T.ife Insurance
Company, a corporation organized under tho
laws of Ohio, has fully complied Tvitb the pro
visions of the laws of this state, relative to the
admission and authorization of insurance com
panies of its class.
Now. therefore. I. the undersigned. Insurance
Commissioner, do hereby empower and author
ize the said above named company to transact
its appropriate business of life insurance in the
state of Minnesota, according to the laws there
of until the thirty-first Jay of .Tannary. A D.
3907. unless said authority be revoked or other
wise legally terminated prior thereto.
In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set
niy hand and affixed my offblal seal at St. Paul,
this 31st day of January. A. D. 1906.
THOMAS D. O'BRIEN.
Insurance Commissioner.
For 60 Years
or more, that pure plant extract, known as Wine of Cardui, has been build-
ing up a reputation for the treatment of diseases peculiar to the womanly
organs and functions. This reputation is founded upon the solid rocks of
Truth and Merit. "I suffered for years, and had to wear a supporter",
writes Mrs. S. J. Chrisman, o Mansville, N. Y., "until I had taken two
bottles of
when 1 gave toe supporter up. I do not now have these bad feelings, as formerly, and can
be on my feet half a day at a time. The doctor who examined me before I took Cardui
said there was nc5 medicine that would help me, but Cardui has done me so much good I
would like to tell it to every suffering voman." Cardui /I i
relieves periodical pains, regulates fitful functions, and has IMA* ff,& &< *flt
restored thousands to health, after all else had failed.
At Every Drug Store In $1.00 Bottles
4^
$9*5,156.69
289,448.63
1.200.00
14,384.91
Total income $1,210,190.18
DISBURSEMENTS I N 1905.
Death claims and matured en
dowments $855,227.19
Annuities and premium notes,
voided by lapse 6,914.41
Surrender values to policyholders 61,796.80
Dividends to policyholders 10,192.96
$44.131.S8
None.
150,693.66
40,642.74
None. None.
1,402.13 7,711.71
12,930.18 50.887.8e-
B.73&ST
236,3S1.*T'~
$941,056.8$*
268,53?.2$l
1905.
vaine ox real estate o*wne a SX,63B0,O0O.OO
Mortgage loans 167.185.0fti
Collateral loans 1,000.0
Premium notes and policy loans 290,230^(1
Bonds and stocks owned Sai,'fil5.4
Cash in office and in bank *ll,820.1T
Bills receivable and agents* bal
ances 59.138-18
Accrued Interest and rents 20,767.61
Deferred and unpaid premiums,. 118,045.85
All other admitted assets 10,046.96
Total admitted assets $2,786,230.08
Assets not admitted, $31.6TQ.24.
LIABILITIES DEC. 31.
Net value of outstandiig policies
Present value on supplementary
contracts and cancelled policies
Claims due and unpaid
Claims adjusted and not due. and
unadjusted and reported
Claims resisted
Premiums paid in advance
Dividends due policy holders
AU other liabUttles
1905.
$2 270,985.00
38,304.00
fsoaa
63.839*4^
4,61r."*
5f v*
Xoiw
11,058.33
Total liabilities on. policy hold
ers' account ?a,38a,Ts*.S3
Gross divisible surplus 403,4^".2S
Capital stock paid up 500,000.00
EXHIBIT OF POLICIES, 1905 BUSINESS.
Number.
In Arce
S of thee
Policies I firc at be
grlnnlug ot tUyea 11,194
Policies in force at close
of the year 10,924
Net .'crease
Net decrease 270
Issued, revived and in
creased during the year 2,123
Total terminated during
the year 2,393
By death 188
By maturity 4
By expiration 186
By surrender 112
By lapse 1,900
By decrease 3
Amount.
$21,004,803-00
21,316,029.00
$311,220.00
4,860,870X0
4.540,644.00
383,210.00
5,151.00
335,578.00
228,079.00
3,451,582.00
146,014.00
BUSINESS I N MINNESOTA IN 1905.
Number. Amount.
Policies in force at be
ginning of the year
Issued during the year... 36
Ceased to be in force dur
ing the year 22
In force Dec. 31. lait 167
LOBCS and claims incurred dnrlnff
the year
Losses and claims settled' during
the year
Losses and claims unpaid Dec. 81
Received for premiums
153 $315,442.00
126,580.0(1
30,450.00
311,572.00
2,000
3,000
None.
14,113.78
STATE OF MINNESOTA,
Department of Insurance.
Whereas, the Security Trust & Life Insurance,
company, a corporation organized under the laws
of Pennsylvania, has fully complied with the
provisions of the laws of this state relative
to the admission and authorization of insurance
companies of its class.
Now, therefore, I. the undersigned. Insurance
Commissioner, do hereby empower and authorise
the said above-named company to transact its
appropriate business of life Insurance In the
state of Minnesota, according to the latv 4
thereof, until the thirty-first day of January,
A 1907. unless said authority be reToked or
other-wise legally terminated prior thereto.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set m\
band and affixed my official seal at St. Paul
this 31st day of January. A. D. 1906.
THOMAS O'BRIEN,
Insurance Commissioner.
Woman's
Relief
rr

xml | txt