OCR Interpretation


The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, May 15, 1906, Image 9

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-05-15/ed-1/seq-9/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 8

1
I
Si
-Hi
II
Piles Cured
A Easily as a CoughPainlessly
Quickly and Without Cutting.
Trial Package Mailed Free.
The agony and suffering in piles is
so great, that if a surgical opf ration
was a certain cure (which it isn't) nnd
there was no other means of relief some
persona might be willing to tak-j the
chance of blood poisoning or lockjaw.
But, now that the Pyramid Pile Cure
has been discovered and has been prov
to be a quick and certain means of
relief and lasting cure,, there is no ex
cuse for risking your life.
Does Pyramid Pile Cure give imme
diate relief? Does it cure? Try it and
prove it for yourself as thousands have
done before you. Then go to your drug
gist and sget a 50-cent box and com
plete the cure.
Pyramid Pile Cure will cure you and
do it with a certainty and a rapilitv
that will astonish you.
Take, for example, the case of Mr.
Ben-jamin. Shaw, Postmaster of Bland
We quote his own words in his letter
1
of Oct. 31, 1905: I was in great ago
of mind and body. I the mean
time, a gentleman told me of the vir
tue of vour Pyramid remedy. I fortu
nately found it at a drug store, and
the next morning I did not feel tnat
any operation was necessary, and in
three days I was able to return home,
and a complete cure was accomplished
to great satisfaction and the sur
prise of the physician."
For a trial package, send your name
and address to the Pyramid Drug Co.
4849 Pyramid Building,, Marshall,
Michigan, and you will get a trial pack
age by return "mail. N marks.
Millions Spent to
Make Glean Beer
Cleanest Manufacturing Process Known
I that of the Leading Ameri
can Brewery.
W regard beer as a food and the
business of brewing beer one of our most
important Industrie s. When we tell our
readers that without exception there Is
no other brewery In the world so abso
lutely clear/ In its process of manufac
ture as Pabst, we speak from exact
knowledge of "conditions. The monster
Pabst Brewery at Milwaukee represents
a outlay of millions of dollars and many
of those millions ha-\ been expended
i make the Pabst exclusive process ab-
^80lutely clean. Fabst Beer stands alone
I)*.'"' today, the only food product that from
the beginning to the end of its manu
facture Is absolutely bejond reach of
even the contaminating germs of the. air
Doctors boil their instruments in water
to sterilize them. Pabst bolls his brew
In closed kettles and thus sterilizes it
From there it passes through sterilized
pipes to sterilized hermetically sealed
tanks where it is fermented. Then
through more sterilized pipes it goes to
sterilized hermetically sealed storage
tanks and when bottled it is pas
teurized. Throughout the entire pro
cess it never is touched by human
Hands and comes In contact only -svitn
sterilized air N other fo od product
known can show such a record of posi
tive cleanliness.
This process of manufacture is the ex
clusive Pabst method It is one reason
& for the "always the same, always the
best" reputation of Pabst Beer
The cleanest beer and the richest beer,
Pabst Beer has no equal as a mild,
refreshing, healthful beverage.
PABST BREWIN CO.
N. W. Main 424. T. C. 424.
Corner 16th A So. and 7th St.
Pabst Blue Ribbo Beer
Order a case for your home today.
DR. FOLWELL READS PAPER
Minneapolis Man Discusses Sioux Trea
of 1851 Before Historical Society.
Dr. W W Folwell of the University
of Minnesota read a paper on A New
View of the Sioux Treaties of 1851"
before the regular monthly meeting of
the State Historical society at the Capi
tol in St. Paul last evening.
Judge Daniel Fish of Minneapolis
was elected a member of the society.
President N Langford was empow
ered to appoint a committee to repre
sent the society in arrangements for
the fiftieth anniversary of Minnesota's
statehood.
Beesolutions testifying to the charac
ter of the late Joseph A "Wheelock
and to his worth as a member of the
society, his connection extending over I steel" wilf "enter Calumet
a period
adopted
of forty-six years, were
E
Spread Rapidly Over BodyLimbs
and Arms Had to Be Bandaged
and Scalp Looked Dreadful
Suffered Untold Misery for Threp
YearsBetter in Two Months
MARVELOUS CURE BY
CUTICURA REMEDIES
"My son, who is now twenty-two
years of age, when he was four months
old began to have eczema on bis face,
spreading quite rapidly until he was
nearly covered. W had all the doctors
around us and some from larger places,
but no one helped him a particle.
The eczema was something terrible,
and the doctors said it was the worst
case they ever saw. A times his whole
body and face were covered, all but his
feet. I had to bandage hik limbs and
armsbi scalp was just dreadful. I
used many kinds of patent medicines
before trying the Cuticura Remedies,
all to no avail.
A friend teased try Cuticura.
A last I consented, when boy
was three years and four months
ol d, having had eczema all that time,
and sufferi ng untold misery. I began to
use all three of the Cuticura Remedies
the Cuticura Soap helped as well as
the Ointment. was better in two
monthsi six months he was well
but I gave him the Cuticura Resolvent
one year, using twelve bottles, I
think, and always used the Cuticura
Soap for bathing, and do now a good
deal. was four years old before
he was -well, and his skin became per
fectly fair when cured. I give you per
mission to publish this letter for I a
always glad to do good when I can. I
think I have told you all there isneces
Bary to tell." Mrs. Risley,
Oct. 24,1905. Piermont, N
7t2i? -of to), majrbe hadot all drnggut*. A. (ingle set men rara
HSi She 0 Utreiio cae, -when all other remedies and
*enthebetphyilelanifaU. Potter Drug It Chem. Corp,
lole Propi., Boiton, Man.
Mailed Fre, _" How ttqCuwDlrfflmng-Htt Cure Dirtgnrtag- HttfflOir
"Ait About the akin, Soip, mix, aaa H*ad*.
SOUTHWES ROADS
WA OVE EAGLE S
WHAT O CHARGE BIRDS CAUSES
MERRY ROW.
One Line Fixes $11 Round Trip Kansas
City to Milwaukee, and I Promptly
Jumped O CompetitorResult,
Probable Rate of $ 8 to Chicago.
Special to The Journal.
Chicago, May 15.While the eastern
lines are warring 'over the differential
question and tho Chicago-Minneapolis
loads are badly mixed over the steam
ship business, the southwestern lines
have decided to step into the limelight
and give a little exhibition of rate-cut
ting. A a result, a rate of $ 8 Kan
sas City to Chicago is likely to be an
nounced at any minute.
The trouble between the southwest
ern lines arose over the proposal to
move a large body of Eagles from Kan
sas City to Milwaukee for a July con
vention. I was proposed to put in a
rate of one fare plus $2, but finally one
of the lines announced a rate of $11 for
the round trip. I tried to defend its
action, but it could not convince the
officials of the Milwaukee and North
western lines that it was justified and
those officials notified the line that they
would require their full proportional of
the one-fare plus $ 2 rate on all business
handled.
Overlook a Bet.
A these two roads are the only ones
having lines from the south and west
reaching Milwaukee, it appeared as tho
the situation was well in hand. But
the road that proposed the $11 rate
found a way to solve the difficulty and
submitted to the members of the West
ern Passenger association, a rate of $ 8
from Kansas City to Chicago, while the
Eagles are in convention. This would
allow passengers to buy regular local
tickets from Chicago to Milwaukee and
return. a.rtd -would result in an $11 rate.
But the trouble among the south
western lines comes just when another
fight in the Western Passenger associa
tion was narrowly averted over the
movement of the B'nai B'rith society
to Minneapolis. The Great Western
road contracted the movement, which
was not large, and then put in a rate of
$13 against a previously agreed rate of
$16. Tho Illinois Central to retaliate,
announced a rate of $ 4 to Minneapolis,
but withdrew it and the Great Western
will go unpunished for contracting busi
ness on a rate to be made later.
ROA TAPS WILDEMESS
KEWEENAW CENTRAL, IN UPPER
MICHIGAN, TO BE PUSHED TO
COMPLETION THIS SUMMER.
Special to The Journal.
Calumet, Mich., May 15.C. A
Wright, general manager of the Ke
weenaw Central railroad, is authority
for the statement that the road will
be in operation within four months if
present plans are carried out. The con
tract awarded to Byers & Co. of
Houghton, for grading that portion left
unfinished last season, covers less than
half of the entire grading work, and
the stipulation is that it shall be com
pleted xn August.
The progress of operations in build
ing the road cannot be closely watched
by copper-country people, as the line
is practically inaccessible, only a wag
on road being the present means of
transportation thru Keweenaw county,
but Mr. Wright savs that the grading
was well on toward completion when
work ceased last fall and that track
laying had been prosecuted almost as
rapidly as the grading.
The tracklaying started at Lac a
Belle, the northern terminus of the
road, and is being worked rapidly down
toward the Calumet terminus. The
tracklaying will be pushed as rapidly
as the grading will permit, and the
almost as
p~^''rTriifiiiM^rMaiiiiil^^
Tuesday Evening,
-^r
ling gangs,
of the road, as being
soon as the gradin
The terminus
the outlet of the trade of Keweenaw
county, will be of material assistance
in promoting the growth of that part
of Calumet in which it is located.
FIGURE O N SIDE TRIPS
Railway Officials Plan to Give Visitors
Something Extra.
For the first time in ten years pas
senger representatives of tUe twin exty
terminal lines will meet May 24, to con
sider side trips in the territory for del
egates to the numerous conventions to
be held in the two cities this summer.
The last meeting was at the time of the
GK A E national encampment in St.
Paul. Trips to Duluth and the Minne
sota lake country will be included in
the list to be made out.
HILL GOES O WINNIPEG
Magnate Gets First Glimpse of Manito-
a Capital in a Decade.
James Hill, president of the Great
Northern road, left for Winnipeg yes
terday on a special train, and will re
turn Wednesday. Henry Little was
taken aboard in Minneapolis. This is
Mr. Hill's first visit to Winnipeg in ten
years, and the people there nave been
looking forward to seeing the man who
is reported about to build the fourth
Canadian Transcontinental. Darius
Miller, first -vr.ee president of the Bur
lington, accompanied Mr. Hill.
FOREST FIRES SWEEP
DISTRICT NEAR VIRGINIA
Virginia, Minn., May 15.A de
structive forest fire has been raging in
the vicinity of the Mud Lake district,
southwest of this town, for several
days. There are several farmers in
that vicinity and it is feaied some of
them have suffered from the fire, tho
nothing definite has been learned.
The fire is only a few miles from the
Virginia Lumber company's yards. Last
night's rain checked it, but the dan
ger is still very great.
W. H. BRANDT IS DEAD
Business Man of Barron, Wis., Took
Poison Mistake.
Special to The Journal.
Barron, Wis., May 15.W. Brandt,
a highly respected business man of this
city, is dead, having taken a half-ounce
of belladonna mistake for brandy.
was about 5 0 years old.
DEADWOOD, S. D.Great preparations are
being made by the local Odd Fellows for the
thirty-first annual session of the grand lodge
In conjunction -with the grand encampment, the
annual session of tbe Patriarchs MiUttant ana
the ajeventeentn annual session of the Rebehab
assembly, to be held In Hot Springs tola
week.
r^si^iMs^?^^%^1^4shPMs^
\J :SsM!rfifi
^P^^^^P^^P^^IPi^^^^^PPn^^^^^^p^^^^^^^P^^^^^
Dahlias should not be planted out-of
doors until May 15, and excellent re
sults have been obtained from roots
planted June 15. The dahlia is natur
ally a late-blooming flower, and, while
a few blossoms may be seen in August,
it does not produce its full crop until
September. Often, however, in early
Septmbether comes ros,whic
killse therdahliae while itaisf attits' toest.
This destruction may be prevented
either selecting a location which is
naturally sheltered, or placing tall
stakes around the plants, and covering
stakes and plants either -with paper or
some cotton material during frosty
nights. A a result of thpse precau
tions, dahlias were cut last fall on
Nov. 12.
The cultivation of dahlias is simple.
The bulbs should be placed three to
four feet apart, and so that the crown
of each is fully four inches beneath
the surface. not mix manure with
the soil before or during plantingi
fact, sandy soil is preferable to rich
soil. When the plant has attained the
height of two feet, a liberal heap of
well-rotted cow manuie may "be placed
around each plant. This should be
freely watered every day. Indeed, the
plant will flower far more -freely if con
stantly kept moist than if watered only
occasionally.
When the bulb has sprouted, and the
growth has attained the height of six
to eight/inches, it is advisable to pinch
the crown in order to produce a branch
ing habit. The result will be a dwarf,
bushy plant with loads of flowers.
During the early part of the flower
ing season, a great manv imperfect
buds seem to develop, which should
be removed as soon as noticed. A ap
plication of a small quantity of nitrate
of soda, during the latter part of Au
gust, will advance the flowering season.
The single dahlias flower most freely,
and last longest when they are cut.
Some of the best single varieties are
found in a comparatively new type
called the Twentieth Century, made up
of gigantic flowers, having broad petals
and a small yellow center. Separate
colors of this type are well worthy of
cultivation.
Another new type of a single dahlia
is the Collarette, which was originated
in France. The flowers have an extra,
very small white petal, which grows in
a circle around tho disc, producing a
collar-like effect.
Possibxlxties "of art Out-of-Door Boom.
Only the favored few are able to close
up their winter tents of stone or wood
and get out in the fresh green country.
Those unfortunate ones who must re
main in the citv must make the most of
such goods as the Gods deign to pro
vide, and if there is a veranda or a bal
cony or even a flat roof anywhere
around the city home, then there is
compensation for their possibilities are
limitless.
The first step toward creating this
habitable veranda is to screen it well
from the view of passerby. Vines, with
their suggestion of rusticity and cool
ness, are the most satisfactory for this
purpose, and among the many varieties
of climbers the stately old English ivy
must have first mention, altho of them
all the simple wild cucumber, whose
seeds must be planted every year, is
the most thrifty and altogether satis
factory.
Crimson ramblers, climbing rose,
Baltimore bells, climbing honeysuckles
and a dozen other running plants will,
any one of them, meet the demands.
The vines may be trained so that
three or four window-like openings are
left, and a border of red geraniums or
bright vellow nasturtiums at the roots
[moo
fctf
TKE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL.
NOW IS THE RIGHT TIM E
FOR PLANTING DAHLIAS
Some Straight Information for the Benefit of Those Inter-
ested in the Culture of This Handsome Bloomer.
of the vines is always artistic, and over
head the red-striped awning contributes
to the picturesque effect.
The Perennial Phlox.
Perennial phlox is a most attractive
flower when in full bloom. The roots
can-be obtained quite cheaply from" al
most any nurseryman, at a nominal
price. They are planted and grown
with very little effor t. Plant them in
large numbers, selecting a variety of
colorings and shades. Add to these the
gladiolus, tuberose, canna, tulip, etc.,
all of -which will abundantly repay the
planter for the time and expense of
growing the same.
Scarlet Runners.
A pretty effect may be obtained
planting scarlet-runner beans under
neath peony bushes. the time the
peonies have ceased blooming the beans
will be a foot high and will soon
clamber all over the strong supporting
leaves. All thru August the beans will
blossom freely and will make a pretty
show of color where otherwise there
would be none. Peony bushes, covered
with bright scarlet runners, have much
the same effect as salvias, and will
brighten the garden.
The Front of the House.
The front of the house is for the eye
of the public and for the beauty of the
citv, and a man ought to have pride
enough to do a little something in be
half of both.
What can he do? Well, he can es
tablish a good lawn and keep it well
clipped, for one thing, and it's not as
easy as it sounds, either. More lawns
are spoiled the injudicious use of
water than thru any other cause. The
sprinkler is going every day just
enough to wet the surface. The' grass,
instead o sendxrtg^-its roots deep xn
serch mosture, forms a neork
ofa rootso neari the surface and dietsw out
in winter. One thoro soaking once
a week is vastly better than a dailv
drizzle. Watering should be done in
the evening, rather than in the morn
ing.
N prettier setting for a handsome
house than a fine sweep of lawn has
yet been devised. I has both dignity
and a noble simplicity. Where the
lawn is small, it gains size being
left unbroken shrub or flower.
Shrubs belong at the side of a house,
rather to the rear, where they have
the effect of a background. -A. group
of stately foliage plants looks well
3&
ANTY
DRUDGE
Gardening for Pleasure Zand Front
against a background of shrubbery, if
subordinated to the house.
The spring flowering spireas, and the
common but pretty barberry are shrubs
well adapted use against foundation
walls, since their branches droop grace
fully and give good lines. The foliage
of both, too, is handsome, taking on
lovely tints in autumn.
Variety may be given to an ivy
covered house by planting dahlias,
cosmos, or even Alleghaney hollyhocks
instead of shrubs.
Not Too Late for a Garden.
May is not too late in this northern
climate to make a vegetable garden.
The cold and rain of the early spring
gave the early planted seeds little op
portunity to sprout. All gardeners claim
nothing is gained being in top great
a hurry to make a garden, especially in
the north. Nothing is gained work
ing over a soil heavy with -water from
melting snows and early rams. Wait
until this surplus water has drained off,
and the action of sun and wind has
mellowed the soil to some extent.
3?larrt Flo-wer Seeds.
There is hardly a place wheTe there
is a bit of earth," be it city of country,
but what some flower will grow. Clean
out the trash from your backyard, get
a spade and dig up the earth, rake it
smooth and fine. Then get the seeds
of a few old-fashioned flowers and drop
them in the soft earth. Marigolds,
hollyhocks, ragged robins, larkspurs,
four o'clocks, sweet williamsany of
these will grow with little care and
make beautiful the worst sort of a back
yard. Get a moravng glory vine, OT
rather plant the seeds, and train the
vine over that ugly bit of back fence.
Plant a tree, if there is a place for it,
and scatter some grass seed wherever
it is possible for it to grow.
:ifiiHNtriiiiiinMimiiiinuiibiiiiiiiiiiimii
A Public Benefactor.
A individual who improves his front
yard, if he has one, or places window
boxes at his windows, or small ever
greens at his doors, or improves his side
yard or backyard, if he does nothing
else, is yet not altogether egotistic
he is giving pleasure to all who pass.
I he undertakes in a quiet, tactful, but
direct way a movement that will induce
similar improvements along his block,
he is acting in a way that is altruis
tic, but the improvement of his block
will help him egotistically, because his
own house will be more beautiful from
its location on a beautiful street.
The city beautiful is unquestionably
dependent upon the interaction of the
individuals that compose the city on
the one hand and the city in its cor
porate capacity on the other. The more
individuals there are who show their in
terest in the embellishment of their
city by proving that interest their
own efforts, the greater will be their
direct influence when appealing for bet
ter conditions generally, and far greater
will be their indirect influence the
simple power of suggestion offered to
a ll passersby.
Minneapolis Floral Go.
36th St. and Calhoun Blvd.
BOTH PHONES.
Our large plant is now devoted entirely to
Bedding stock. W have the best line in the
cilv of GENERAL BEDDING STOCK, ready
now to be set out, and first-class gardeners to do
the work of setting them out.
E yTr es, Hydrangea in Tubs,
Bo vood, Our Specialty.
N
fA
t.
Anty Drudge's Recipe for Cleaning Soiled Waists
Betty Brighteyes"Oh fury I Claud Careless left the imprint
of his sweaty hand on my best shirtwaist at the dance last
night. I justTsnow the marks will never come out and my
pretty waist is ruined. Ugh! I could scratch his eyes out.''
Anty Drudge "Tut, tut, little one. A little elbow grease behind
a cake of Fels-Naptha soap and your bitterest rival will
never the wiser. Make a suds Fels-Naptha soap, i
either lukewarm or cold water, and wash it out in it. Use
^cold or lukewarm, not hot, and the marks will disappear like
magic."
You can't get it into some people's heads that there is a newer and better
way of washing clothes than foiling, and rubbing them to pieces on a washboard.
The Fels-Naptha way of washing is as big a discovery to the woman who
washesas is the telephone to the business man, or the sewing machine to the
needle woman,
Fels-Naptha soap is meant to be used only according to simple directions. Used
'9A
.-Fs-ys*-^
*.*7^
7m i f.
FELS & CO., PHILADELPHIA
eck
per'quart$1.5 0
*S/WW^A^/^WW
you.
THO THE SEASON'S LATE
There's still plenty of time to reap good results from LAWN A Nr
FLOWER BEDS.* Extra ine Lawn Grass Seed, J$5c $ 4
$1.15
eF
eck
izer, 10-pound box, 50c.
Finest Mixed Sweet Peas, 10c
All names, varieties and separate colors, 10c
Tall Nasturtiums, best mixed, 10c
ounce.
best mixed, 12c
for the kitchen garden) to be found at
602 Tenth Street So., Minneapolis, Minn.
SEND FOB CATALOGUE.
Ornamental Plants and Shrubs
Our stock is the most complete-ver bet and choicest of hardy
ornamentals, in large specimens for immediate effect.
Peonies, Iris and Roses specialities
Swanson's Greenhouses & Nurseries
MERRIAM PARK, MINNESOTA
BEDDIN PLANTS
All kinds, including Pansies, Asters, Daisies, Salvia, Verbenas, etc. Theso
are all transplanted stock and must not confused with common bed plants,
VEGETABLE PLANTS
Cabbage, Tomato, Cauliflower, Celery, Egg Plant, etc. A full line of summer
flowering bulbs, roots and nursery stock. GAEDEN GUIDE FKEE.
NORTHRU P, KING & CO.
30 Hennepin Avenue.
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER
FRANK H. NUTTER 7 It) Sykes Block, Minneapolis, linn.
Engineer of the Minneapolis Board of Park Commissioners since their
organization in 1883. Sketches, designs or complete workiDg plans for
home grounds, parks, cemeteries or public grounds of any description.
3 5 Years' ~S
Experience in
Paint Making
goes with each package of
paint bearing our name.
Handled principal
dealers in all parts of the
city and country.
The entire time of an ex
perienced artist is given to
designing color combina
tions.
Send us your a/ldress and
will cheerfully serve
Minnesota Linseed OilPaintCo
II0I-I1 South 3 St-Cor. iri-t
Ave
any other way, it's no improvement.
If you will boil your clothes
then don't buy Fels-Naptha. We'd
rather you wouldn't use it. If
you'll follow the directions, you'll
be the happiest woman that ever
washed clothes. Here they are
Soap the white clothes with
Fels-Naptha, and soak them in cold
or lukewarm water about thirty
minutes. Then rub out and rinse
thoroughly, and your wash is ready
for the linecleaner, sweeter and
fresher than ever before.
Fels-Naptha cannot injure
the clothfor it does not contain
injurious ingredients. It saves you
labor and time, and makes your
clothes last twice as long.
Ask for and insist on getting the
soap in the red and green wrapper.
2 All grocers sell Fels-Naptha soap.
Wvsss*-1%
Lu
J2 bushel. Shady Place Lawn Mixture, 5
"White Clover, 3()lc per pound. Lawn Fertil-
ua tD
ounce25 quarter pound.
All high grade Flower Seeds (also choice selection of Vegetable Seeds
MISS C. H. LIPPINCOTTS,
ounce.
ounce. Dwarf Nasturtiums,
Nagei's Greenhouses,
1118 W Lake Street
Call and see our fine stock of Plants
for flower beds, vases and graves.
Take Lake St. Car to Hennepin Av*.
Both Fhones.
BEDDING PLANTS.
Largest and finest stock of
Geraniums in the city. Every
thing for lawn ornaments,
window boxes & flower beds,
SAVANNAH GREENHOUSES,
28th Ave. So. and 88th St
Kitrl Strahle. Msrr. N W. Pfcone So. 436.
fti*ifriffrf fu'iiili'iw'
IPlss5
-tf!^cafc aa^-V"as
T"
Iron and Wira
Fences. All
styles and prices
Balcony Railings.
Stair Work. Fire-
escapes. Window
Guards.
N. W.. M. 267.
T.C., 5190 and 7333.
Flour City Ornamental Iron Works,
27th Ave. 27th St. and 28th Ave So.

xml | txt