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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, May 16, 1906, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-05-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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PRIOB
B-
W1
-0 CENT
In
Minneapolis.
Pitchfork Brigade, Apparently,
Has Lost Battle and Inci
dent Is Closed.
Pipe Line Amendment Brings De-
bateBill Soon Ready for
Conferees.
Pass Amendment Up.
Washington, May 16.Upon conven
ing today the senate promptly took up
the railroad rate bill, the anti-pass
amendment being the immediate sub
ject of consideration.
Senator Culberson presented a substi
tute for the provision adopted earlier
in the session. The substitute so modi
fied the provision as to peimit members
of the families of railroad employees,
bona fide attorneys for railroads,
whether constantly emploj'ed or not,
end the caretakers of livestock to ac
cept free transportation.
Senator MeCumber chicled the sen
ate for fickleness, saj'ing that after tak
ing action on the pass question a few
davs ago the senators had been sent
tumbling o~\ er one another by the re
ceipt of a few telegrams in opposition
to the amendment. He contended that
the incident illustrated the influence of
the railroads and the bad effect of too
much paternalism.
By W. W. Jermane.
Washington, May 15.The Tillman
Roosevelt episode failed to create a
lipple in the senate yesterday. It didn't
come up at all until after 3 p.m., when
Mr. Tollman arose and read a part of
the statement prepared by former Sen
ator Chandler covering his side of the
now-famous negotiations between the
president on the one hand and Senators
Tillman and Bailey on the other, when
Chandler was the intermediary.
After the reading, Mr. Tillman in
dulged in a few remarks of his own, the
most interesting being that Attorney
General Moody was not a gentleman.
That officer, it will be remembered, in
stead of resigning from the cabinet in
a huff, as the democrats had hoped
he would do, promptly sided with the
president, thus knocking their case sky
high.
After Mr. Tillman had finished, Mr.
Allison arose and had read the letter
from the president to him and the let
ter from the attorney general to the
president, explaining their side of the
controversy, and here the matter ended.
It is unlikely that it will be alluded
to again.
President Was Angry.
The question of veracity between
the president and Mr Chandler remains
undisposed of, but this is a personal
matter between those gentlemen and
has no bearing on the main case. The
president srreatly surprised his enemies
bv the mild tone of his letter to Mr.
Allison. It had been believed by many
that once the president took up the
question at all, he would do so in his
usual vigorous style. The disappoint
ment of these people was, therefore,
keen when they found the president as
mild as a dove.
For this mildness of manner I under
Thrilling, Every Line of It
First Fiction Supplement Will
Appear Tomorrow
AXES BURIED, SENATE
GOES ON WITH DEBATE
$
TILLMAN'S FIGHT
FADES FROM VIEW
stand the president is indebted to ^ev- counties
eral of his advisers. I was his original
AuroreaT
purpo se to go after the Tillman-Bailey SeadlT
Chandler people hammer and tongs, and 'Brookings111.6
with th is idea uppermo st in his mind Bro^n
it is said that on Saturday evening he Bmie
made a rough draft of a. letter which g"?"1
he intended sending to Mr. Allison. i*"ampbeil
Next day he was labored with by the Charles Mix
attorney general, the secretary of state, Clark
the secretarv of war and by one or two o"
Continued on 2d !?af$e, 2d Column.
&- f- foufflu*Mitu)!A(a,a
state convention.
1
i
T/. S. SENATOR K. J. GAMBLE,
Who Seems to Have Been Indorsed for
Re-election.
1
S.DJACHINELEADS
IN EARLY RETURNS
Reports on Primaries Indicate
Trobable Defeat of the In
surgent Paction.
Special to The Journal.
Sioux Falls, S. D., May 16.Both
factions of South Dakota republicans
at noon were yet claiming to have car
ried yesterday's caucuses thruout the
state.
Regardlesss of which faction is suc
cessful, there appears little doubt but
that Senator Gamble will have sufti
cient votes in the state convention to
carry an indorsement of his candidacy
for re-election. In several counties
claimed by the stalwarts to be with
them on congressmen, governor and the
remainder of the state ticket, it is
known that some of the delegates will
be supporters of Senator Gamble and
will vote for him in the convention.
This is the case in at least Charles Mix,
Campbell and McPherson counties
Crawford,, insurgent candidate
The stalwarts, on the other hand,
claim to have captured 709 delegates
and concede to the insurgents an ag-'
gregate of 616
Spink county is conceded by the stal-1
wnrts to have been carried by the in
surgents.
Among the counties claimed by the
Stalwarts are Charles Mix and Gregory,
with an aggregate of forty-seven dele
gates. These counties are also claimed
by the insurgents.
Miner county, with sixteen delegates,
is also claimed by both factions, and
not until more complete returns are re
ceived from the counties yet in doubt
will the result in the state be definitely
known.
Vote by Counties.
0
nnBto
others, with the result that th is original cu-ter
draft was abandoned The letter as Davison
flnallv sent to Mr. Allison is said to Da\
have been largelv the work of Secretary Jo"gi
Root. So the storm has blown over, Edmunds
and nobody has been hurt. The presi-i rail Kiver 13
dent has lost no prestige, and the demo- i Faulk
crats have made no political capita l. jeiegory
Pipe Line Tangle. iK
1
It looks as if the senate has got itself g"J
into a good deal of tangle over two Hutchinson
of its amendments to the rate bill, one Hviip,\?.
making pipe hn^s common carriers, ard Ji',ra
the other prohibiting common carriers
from transporting ^n interstate com
merce their own products.
When the senate, as- such, gets hold
of the rate bill it is now "onsidering, as
committee of the whole, it is likclv
that both these amendments will be
revised.
Kingsbury Lake Law rence
Lincoln
Lyman MarHhnll McCook *Mel'lieison Mf ade
Mine
Senator Foraker cited a case showing. Sf
how injuriously this amendment would Pennington'
work. Cincinnati is raising $5,000,000 Potter
with which to build a pipe line for nat-1 Roberts
*nralI gas from that city to the gas fields %l^Tn
of West Virginia. Should the bill as stinley
it now stands become a law, the city Sulilv
would be prohibited from transporting Tr
ah
a
ie
gas for itself in this pipe line, and VuSJorth":::"'
would be compelled to transport it for ^ul?Vort
all other peisons.
Senator Hopkins of Illinois cited an Totals
instance of how the amendment as at
present worded would afreet the Imion
Oil company, a formidable concern in
southern Californip. which wants to get
into the east as a competitor of the
Standard Oil company.
Applies in All Possessions.
The amendment at present applies
not only to the United States, but to
air territory controlled by it, including
Panama. This Union oil company has
For Doubt
Machine Against, ful.
34 30
44
31
17
14
11
37 33
81
48
19 24 14
SO
21 10
44 42
11
47 27 37 37
.5S6
Machine, but for Gamble for sena'or.
The insurgents captured Minnehaha
county, the home of Senator Kittredge,
with its eighty-six delegates.
The result in Sioux Falls was very
close, the stalwarts having fifty-one
delegates in the county convention
against forty-eight captured by the in
surgents, giving the stalwarts a ma
J'ority of only three. Outside of Sioux
''alls the insurgents had a good lead.
The faction which controls the "state
convention must have 685 delegates.
LOST HIS WEALTH
REWRITING BIBLE
Man, Once Largest Landowner
in Indiana, Goes to
Poorhouse.
Toarnal Special fcervice.
Indianapolis, May 16.William Hed
rick, a pioneer citizen of Madison coun
ty and once the largest landowner in
the state, has been admitted to the
friendly shelter of the poorhouse.
Years" ago, when Mr. Hedrick was
rich, he got the idea that the Bible
had been purposely made mysterious
and he set about to revise it. This work
absorbed him completely and for "several
years his business was neglected and his
property slipped thru his hands.
He had settled his sons on fine farms.,
and they offered to care for him in his
old "age, but he refused, saying that it
would be no imposition upon the county
if he went to the poorhouse, since he
had once been its heaviest taxpayer.
SEYENTY PERISH IN
FLOUNDERING SHIPS
Two German Vessels Sink in Hur-
ricaneSeveral Killed
by Storms.
Journal Special Bervioo.
Berlin, May 16.The German sailing
vessels Ingwar and Emilia Sophia hve
foundered in a hurricane that swept
over the North sea. Their entire
crews, numbering seventy, were
drowned.
Several persons were killed by light
ning and numerous farm houses were
burned and the animals killed in a hail
storm in the neighborhood of Treves.
The field crops were greatly damaged
in the Saar valley thru the flooding
caused by the heavy storms, which con
tinue.
In the lower Rhine districts, however,
the protracted drouth continues. In
most parts of northern Germany the
meadows are drying thru lack of rain,
and the cattle are suffering. Milk is
scarcer in Berlin. The railroads are
taking extra precautions to prevent for
est fires.
HELD AS WIFE SLAYER.
Detroit, May 16Frank Emmett, a painter,
for Is under arrest, charged with killing his wife,
nomination of governor, at 11 o'clock g*. tftg^ 3Vampin!n
claimed that the insurgents had cap- street Mrrse Emmett had sued for divorce,
turcd 750,of a total of 1,369 delegates, Neighbors caught Emmett as he was running
who will be entitled to seats in the
ste
th
dow
*Mwr*nsr vittvrt tsv o-vyysrjr/yyyyysyv^y^yyyfr^^^
railroad rate bill.
4ttaH^**w,x:raa*^^^^^
fv*'^J. *\4
!^!!!^*hi^
mat
^fe *tim
*^SHOWEB
THE MINM10POEIS JOURNA
AN
20 PAGESFIVE O'CLOCK. WEDNESDAY EVENING, MAY 16, 1906. PRICE ONE CENT IN MINNEAPOLIS.
NEW, UNPUBLISHED NOVEL BYROBERT BARR BEGINS TOMORROW
"A RockMthe Baltic"
MAYOR AND COURT
ffiOIN STRIKERS
Municipal Executive Proceeds
Against Telephone Workers
Who Disturb Peace.
Federal Judge Issues an Injunc
tion Against the Electrical
Workers' Union.
I have instructed the-police to dis
perse all crowds and suppress all dem
onstrations in connection jsdth the
strike of the hnernen", said Mayor Da
vid P. Jones. All persons are advised
to remain afay from crowds or bath
erings of strikers, as they may be ar
rested, particularly if anv acts of vio
lence are committed. I am not pleased
with the recent demonstration and pur
pose to hold all parties accountable and
to* use the police force to the limit in
preserving order. The rights of all citi
zens will be protected, and this can be
relied upon.
"Of the merits of either side of the
controversy 1 know nothing, and I
have mad$ no effort to ascertain the
cause of the trouble^ However, the po
lice are paid 6 maintain order in the
city, to protect life and property, and
they will be expected to arry out their
orders. Some one is to blame, possibly
both sides, fdr it takes two to make a
quarrel, but we will take no sides.
"Attention is called to the fact that
the law prohibits the carrying of fire
arms. The practice ,pf dairying con
cealed wee pons is a dangerous one, par
ticularly at times of, excitement. I is I
unwise for anyone connected wrtn the
strike to .carry awn& The police are in-"
Btructed to arrant all those carrying
arms, unless tMe% have the authority to
do so*"
George HowleySof the'building trades
council had an.interview with the may
or at noon today, and the ^ayor made
his policy clear. What Howley's inis
sion was, with Mr. Jones could not be
learned.
Strikers Ate Enjoined.
By securing an injunction from the
United States district court of Minne
sota, the Tri-State Telephone company
has secured, the assistance of the gov
ernment in its difficulty with the strik
ing line anil construction men organ
ized as a branch of the International
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. The
restraining order is effective in the en
tire state of Minnesota, and any viola
tion of the order will subject the of
fending organization and its members
to punishment for ignoring the order.
The injunction was granted byJudge
Lochren in "the federal court at Winona
late yesterday at the request of Harlan
Continued on 7th Page, 4th Column.
fift'
Mt^MmHMWWMM **e
THE UNITED STATES SENATOR
Sent for his summer clothing to finish the He will need his bathing suit before he
-w^^w***%
THUNDERSTORMS TONIGHT AND THURSDAY OOOIER tHURSDASrpTY
Italian and Negro Laborers, Near
Albany, in Fierce
Battles.
Albany, N. Y., May 16.A riot be
tween
Italian'ardandat
negroes
in the brie'1
broktwelv
BLAKE GOES UP FOR LIFE.
Jackson, Mich., May 16 John Blake, the
Brooklyn, Mich., postoffice robber, was convicted
last night of second degree murder for killing
Police Sergeant William Booth, March 26, when
Booth was attempting to arrest Blake on sus
picion that he had committed the Brooklyncly
robbery. The prisoner was sentenced to
I state prison at Marquette for life.
gets thru the Panama canal discussion.
A A
I.T. MILITI A GOE S CONFLICT WITH CZAR
10 QUELL RIOTERS
out
Coeymans^
miles sout of here, today. Sheriff
Pitts and outies and Lieutenant Col
onel Davf* the Tenth regiment, hur
ried to the scene.
Shortly after noon, Sheriff Pitts re
quested that the local militia be sent
to Coeymans, and arrangements were
made to have four companies of the
Tenth regiment, located here, forwarded
to the scene of trouble.
One negro has been brought to the
Albany hospital with a bullet in his
side. The trouble grew out of the im
portation of southern negroes to take
the place of striking Italians.
30,000 BARRELS OF
GASOLENE BLOW UP
Blazing Fluid Scatter to Other
Huge Tanks and Big Fire
Threatened.
New York, May 16.A 30,000-barrel
tank of gasolene, belonging to the Mc
gooey Oil eompany^ at Constable Hook
on the New Jersey shore of New York
harbor,,.exploded today witk a terrific
roar. It scattered the blazing liquid
so as to threaten five other tanks near
by, and a dangerous fire was feared.
The great refinery and storage tanks
of the Standard Oil company, where its
oil is received by pipe line from the
west and loaded on ships was close by
the scene of the fire, as also was the
plant of the Columbia Oil company.
OENEHAL TIDDALE DEAD.
New York, May 16.Brigadier General John
Caldwell Tlddale, retired, first governor of
Alaska, and for many years commandant at
WeBt Point, died In Mont Olair, N. J., yester
day\ aged 81 years. Death was due to general
disability. General Tlddale was born near
Wheeling, W. Va.. and was graduated rrom
West Point in 1848. He wrote a manual on ar
tillery tactics and a history of the., artillery
in the civil war.
the
MINNESOTA
=P
Hi II. PETBOTTNKEVTTOH,
jj President of Russian House of Repre- J*
sentatives.
I 2
rr y. TTJTT vs,f (fcmv/rsTtTtv
WARSHIPS OFF TO
END BREAD RIOTS
Italy Adopts Strenuous Measures
in SardiniaSeveral Killed
Scores Wounded.
Journal Special Service.'
Caglari, Sardinia, May 16.Several
persons were killed and many wounded
in a collision between troops' and strik
ers yesterday and further trouble is
expected. Reinforcements of three
small garrisons have been demanded
and warships with troops have left
Genoa and Leghorn.
The trouble began as the culmination
of the great increase in the price of
food and the anarchistic agitation lead
ing workmen to strike. Thousands oi
men rushed thru the streets to the
municipal palace, where they hooted
the mayor, then invaded the central
market, destroying whatever they could
find. Afterward they went to the state
tobacco factory and other establish
ments, forcing workmen to strik*
smashing windows of shops and upset
ting streetcars and cabs.
Soldiers Are Stoned.
There was another and more serious
demonstration. Preceded by women
bearing a red flag with a large loaf of
bread on top, a parade of strikers
formed and passed in front of the may
or's house, demanding his resignation.
Next the crowd went to the railway
station, which was guarded by troops,
whom they proceeded to stone. "The
soldiers stood their ground without fir
ing until Colonel Count P. Di San Mar
tini and Captain Candini both had been
injured by missiles and twenty-five of
the troops and police agents seriously
wounded.
Then there was a scattering fusilade
from the soldiers and the crowd fled in
panic, leaving forty-two of its number
lying wounded in the street. Of these
two died before reaching the hospital,
four are dying and eleven are in a dan
gerous condition. All the shops are
closed, no newspaper has appeared, and
suspension of work is general.
KNIYEPFWORS
CAUS E SEA WRECK S
Peculiar Temper of Blades Found
to Deflect the Compass
Needle.
Jjurnal Special Service.
London, Mav 16.There have been
numerous wrecks of fishing vessels for
some time past owing to inexplicable
errors 6f the compass. This led the
underwriters of such craft sailing from
Grimsby to make an investigation with
the result that they discovered deflec
tions of the compass were due to a
special type of large clasp knife that
is popular with local fishermen.
The method dr tempering the knife
confers upon it magnetic properties
that are so powerful that when it is
in a wheelman *s pocket it deflectB the.
needle two or three points, and as the
man moves the needle gyrates in the
oddest manner. JPhe knives are now
recognized as dangerous and the "skip
pers are forbidding anybody to enter
the bridgehouse with one of them.
HEADLESS BODY IN CESSPOOfci
Granite City, Ills., May 16.The head
less body of a man was found today in
a cesspool In the rear of a Madison sa
loon, not far from where John 'Hlckey,
an overland traveler to Oklahoma, was
sandbagged and killed last week. The
body bad evidently lain In the cesspool
for several months.
I
FREE to Journal Readers
^%l
London, May 16.The Rt. Rev. Henry
BJckersteth, D.D., bishop o{ Exeter, died
here today. He was born in 1825.
aa
1
PRICE
CENT|
In
Minneapolis'.
The Greatest Literary Under
taking of the Century.
IMPENDS IN RUSSIA
REBELLION THREAT
IS MADE IN DOUMA
Delegate Declares Spark Will
Kindle Conflagration of An
archy Among Peasants.
Even Bourse Is Affected by the
Growing Fears of a Revo
lution.
The peasants are so revolution
ary that only a spark is required
to kindle a conflagration and an
archy and destruction are certain
if their demands are not satisfied
immediately.Extract from speech
of Seminoff in Russian douma to
day.
Cries of "Land and Freedom"
rang out as he spurred the dele
gates to do their duty to their con
stituents in their reply to the speech
of the czar.
Zahilotny of Podolsk province
spoke passionately in favor of the
abolition of the death penalty, say
ing that the country already had
too many catacombs. The daily
carnival of horrors must cease.
4-
St. Petersburg, May 16.Fear that
the reply of the lower house of parlia
ment to the speech from the throne por
tends a conflict demoralized prices on
the bourse today, imperial 4s losing
point and closing at 75.
The-opinion is general today that
parliament's adoption of the reply to
the speech from the throne will make a
conflict with the crown inevitable since
it contains a number of points upon
which the supporters of the govern
ment say it is impossible for the em
peror to yield.
The Novoe Yremva regards the replv
as a purely revolutionary document. On
the other hand, the constitutional demo
cratic leaders, while boldly -asserting
that the reply is intended to make clear
to the emperor that the country will
be satisfied with nothing less than a
constitutional monarchy on_ a demo
cratic basis, nevertheless insist that it
is not an ultimatum.
May Offer Compromise.
They consider the replv to be ex
ceedingly temperate in tone and say
it required all their ability to prevent
the introduction of more radical ex
pressions.
There is every indication that the
emperor and Premier Goremykin's cab
inet desire to avoid a conflict and that
by a compromise on the question of
amnesty they will seek to gain time.
It can be asserted on high authority
that partial amnesty will be proclaimed
May 19, the emperor's birthday.
The constitutional democrats in addi
tion to being much concerned over the
increasing radicalism developing in
their ranks find that the Poles are in
clined to cause trouble. The latter, at
a meeting held last night, adopted a
resolution in favor of the "historic po
sition of Poland and the international
guarantees."
Fear Revival of Kingdom.
The constitutional democrats feat
that this may raise the specter of a re
vival of the kingdom of Poland and
tend to weaken the constitutional dem
ocrats in the country, where undoubted
the predominant feeling is in favor
of the preservation of the integrity of
the empire.
The group of peasants which sup
ported the motion to postpone taking
action/ on the address yesterday based
their position on the alleged fear that
it meant the separation or Poland.
In Deep Earnest.
The excited frame of mind of the
members was evidenced by the long list
of speakers submitted even before
President Mouromtseff had called the,
house to order. This was not so much I
due to Russian love of talk as to the
fact that every member seemed to feel if
himself charged with a message from
his constituents which he must deliver.
The speeches of the peasants were
delivered in the simple language of
the -villages which was more easily com
prehended than the utterances of the
city members, who were inclined to in
dulge in high-flown eloquence and hy
perbole, airing their "erudition in the
use of* foreign phrases and dialects,
which the little Russians, members from
the Baltic provinces and Poles some- i
times found it difficult to understand.
The leadership in parliament is be
ing rapidly assumed by the Tver group
of members, whose ability thus far has
stood out in relief. The contingent
from the Volga provinces is showing I
the greatest radicalism. \None of the
members from the Caucasus or Siberia
has spoken, up to the present time, but
it is noticeable that they applaud the
most radical utterances.
i
-A
-4
READY TO RISE IN WAS
Wear Quaint Costumes. *~*l*fty\
Altho the Mussulmans took' their" i
on the right, the majority are act-
ng with the constitutional democrats
and the Poles. Most of them wear
picturesque native costumes. $
The members from the Baltic prov
inces also wear their national costume
of white. These latter are radical to 1
Continued on 2d Page. 4th Column.
iift
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I
L-
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