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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, June 07, 1906, Image 12

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Rains Northwest, Storms South
west, and Reports of Black
Rust in Texas.
Conflicting Crop News, Some
Good, but Most of it Less
Favorable.
Country Millers Advertising for
Good WheatNews of
the Day.
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, June 7
Wheat went up this morning, with many trad
ers unable at first to account for It, for the
weather was bright and the northwest outlook
rery favorable even tho there was rain again
In 'the Red river valley where not needed. It
W really the southwest that caused the
strength, for, while there were bad reports
from the vUe\, the trade knows that conditions
there are already very unfavorable and it is
doubtful If the market would have jumped a
cent on that alone, but, taken In connection
with stoims thru the southwest where har
'Testing Is getting under waj and where good
weather is most needed, it was enough to
scare the shorts pretty badly. Te^as sent In
Mack rust news, and the Indian Territory sent
omplalnts. Just how badly mixed the situa
tion Is may be Judged by a message to whal
rlon from Severence, Kan which place, with
*the' grain trade worried over too much rain,
ends word that only half an inch has fallen
there in eight weeks and that the lack of it
ha* made the hay crop a failure J. D. Fraser
bad advices from Bowen of Des Moines and
from Aiken St Louis, that were, not especially
bad, and one very reassuring raport from Hen
nlng, 111. Farmer City sent Lewis a favorable
message on corn and tho crops generally. Har
risonville Mo, wired Eiper that 2% inches
f rain fell, making everything look fine, and
McPherson, Kan., sent another reporting i
inches \1 Chambers had a wire covering
Sumner county, Kan and saying that the
farmer* in the county, especially on lauds
just northwest of Mulvane, are becoming
alarmed over the ra\ages of the army worm
"which is in the crop Bartlett haB a represen
tative. Fuller by name. In the spring wheat.
He wired Chicago today, from Glenwood, Minn
as follows. "Great bulk of the wheat looks
fine some low spots yellow looks like more
Marfleld was a leading buyer here and In
Chicago Woodworth sold considerable Jul
McDonald and Daggett were buyers of July, and
Watson was a seller of September and aJuje
of July In Chicago Gardner and Paddleford
were buvers of wheat supposedlv on the rust
In Texas" Slaughter had a message making the
crops around York, near Omaha, 10 per cent
less than last year
Another 25 000 bu came out of store since
yesterday, enough to keep the stocks on the
slide but less of a dailv falling off than ex
pected. So far this week there 1B a decrease
of 300,000 bu. When it is considered that
i receipts here have for some time been running
well under last vear more wheat ought to come
out of store and would, but for the present
moderate rate of production ot the flour mills.
I Only 104 cars were received here today com
pared with 237 a year ago Other comparisons
were 15 and 6 at Duluth, 6 and 6 at Chicago,
20 and 79 at Winnipeg, St Louis 38 000 bu
against 17,000, Kansas City 49,000 against
80,000
Cash demand was not quite up to the mark,
Tu the wheat moved at unchanged prices rela
tive to Julv, No 1 northern l%c over and
No 2 northern at July price
Foreign markets helped the bulls. There were
advances of %@%d in Liverpool, %c in Berlin
and %c in Budapest Broomhall had advices of
torrential rains in Bulgaria damaging to the
wheat crop, and an unfavorable report of weath
er conditions in portions of Russia came from
Odessa
The Price Current notes improvement in win
ter wheat generally as result of the recent rains
Indications are for showers tonight in the
northwest, including the valley. A complete
summary, covering the weather at 10 a toda\,
at thirty-five points in Minnesota, the Dakotas,
Wisconsin, Iowa and Manitoba was issued bv
Cummings. and read as follows Fargo cloud\,
raining verj hard. Vallev city, raining hard
Oomstock, cloudy southwest wind, rain during
night: Breckenridge, part cloudv, strong south
west wind, Morris, clear, strong southwest wind,
Winnipeg, eloudj, heavy rain last evening, Graf
ton, part eloudj, brisk northeast wind rained
part of night, Sioux City, clear, light south
east wind, 68, had strong wind storm last night,
Lamberton. clear southwest wind, 60, Grafton,
part cloud}, brisk south wind cold. Marshall,
cleai, Madison clear, southwest wind, 60,
Sioux Falls, "clear light southwest wind, Lu
verne, clear light southwest wind, Parker, cleai,
light southwest wind, Yankton, clear, light
Southwest wind Vlbors, clear, light soueswest
wind, Springfield, clear, cool, southwest wind
Viroqua, clear, warm, 75, had cvclone twelve
miles from here, Red Wing, clear, fine. La
Crosse, clear, hot, 70, had big electrical and rain
?2
9
Higher^ Prices'^far?#iWheat hi
torm from 8 to 9 last night Winona, clear.
Alma, clear, 72, Huron, clear, heavy south
west wind, 68, Watertown, part cloudy, heavf
wind, Waterloo and Dvsart, clear, warm,
southeast wind, Mason Cltv, clear, cool, south
wind Dawson and Boyd clear, light southwest
wind, 58, Fairmont, clear fine light south
wind, 64 Mankato, clear, fine, eoor, 156 New
L'lm, clear, calm 62, St James clear cool
58 Winnebago clear, light southeast wind, 70.
An Important help to wheat was the* strength
In coarse grains,' oats especially l
July..
"Sept..
Dec,
i
Millers in the country are advertising for
Wheat. Baldwin's Moorhead mill has
an advertisement in the Fargo Forum for 00,000
bushels of good milling wheat.
Primary receipts, 245,000 bu, against 294,000.
Clearances, 402,000 bu
The New York Journal of Commerce has the
following "I am bullish on the stock market,
bearish on wheat," is the gist of advices from
H. V. Jones to Watson of New York, after
traveling extensively thru the west.
THE FLOUR MARKET
STRONG AT YESTERDAY'S ADVANCESOME
TRADE DEVELOPS,
Prices as quoted are very firm and patents,
advanced 10c yesterday, are likely again to fol
low wheat closelv on any further rise. Millers
said today that there was no change in the gen-
considerable had been stirred up by the advance It*
in wheat, and some buyers that had been hold
ing off sent In orders because of the strength
displayed.
Shipments, 36,298 brls.
First patents are quotable at $4 35@4 45* sec
ond patents, $4 20@4 30 first clears, $3.50
8.60 second clears, $2 40 @2 55.
THE CASH TRADE
PRICES HIGHER ON CORN, OATS AND ON
GROUND FEED.
FLAXReceipts, 9 oars, against 2 cars last
year. Shipments 7 cars Duluth. 22 cars. Clos
ing prlceB Minneapolis, cash, $1.11%, to ar
rive, $1.11%.
OATSA strong, active and higher market.
Futures higher and cash stuff In line. No. 3
\*hite oats closed at 84%c Receipts, 88 cars
shipments, 2 cars.
CORNUp almost a cent at the close on
strength due to advancing futures. No. 8 yel
low^corn closed at 47%c. Receipts, 8 cars ship
ments, 1 car.
FEED AND COARSE MBALPriees higher, in
Une with coarse griins. Good business report
ed. Coarse cornmeal and cracked corn, In sacks,
sacks e"ttra, [email protected] No. 1 ground feed,
2-3 corn and 1-8 oats, 75-lb sacks, sacks extra,
$18@18 25, No. 2 ground feed, corn and
oats, 80 1b sacks, sacks extra, $18 50@18 75 No.
8 ground feed 1-8 corn and 2-3 oats, 70-lb sacks,
sacks extra, [email protected].
MILLSTCFFSBran In bulk, [email protected]:
shorts. $15 50^15 75, middlings. $17.25Q17.75:
red dog. $19 50020. all In Minneapolis:
In 200 lb sacks, $1 per ton additional In 100-lb
sacks. $1 60 per ton additional: red dog In 140s,
$18 fob. Shipments, 1,150 tons.
BARLEYFeed grades elbsed at $|042c:
malting grades, 43@50c. Receipts, 17 cars ship
ments 21 cars.
RYEFirmer and a shade higher. No. 2
closed at 57%@58%c. Receipts, 1 car ship
ments none.
HAYTimothy, choice. $12 No. 1. $U$12
N 2. $10@11 No 3 $S(S)9: prairie, choice.
$11.50 prairie. No. 1, $10.50@11 No. 2, $8.50@
9 50 No 8. $6.50^7 50: midland. $5@8 rye
straw. $5(^5.50. wheat and oat straw. 18.50(8
$4.50. Receipts, 100 tons.
CASH SALES REPORTED TODAY.
No. 1 hard wheat, 1 car R5%
'J No. 1 hard wheat, 1 car '841J
''rf No. 1 hard wheat. 1 car .84%
JN-^ No. 1 northern wheat, S ears .83%
No.. 1 northern wheat. 7 cars !s8%
6r* No. 1 northern wheat, part car 88
No. 1 northern wheat, 1 car 3%
JSL No. 1 northern wheat, to arrive, 1 TOO bu. .84
No. 1 northern wheat, to arrive, 600 bu.. .M%
pkj No. 2 northern wheat, 8 cars 81
jjlf NOL 2 northern wheat, 4 cars ni,
MgL. No_2 northern wheat, 3 cars 52%
|f" No. 2 northern wheat, 2 cars S2
U- No. 2 northern wheat, 4 car 81%
DW.uTamf^'oitr%jN
Thursday Evening,
Open.
Minneapolis Oats
Sept.. .31 .81%
Minneapolis I .8383
Chicago 83%
Duluth 84%
St. Louis 81%
Kansas City 75%@%
New York 89%
Winnipeg 83
Oi
No. 2 northern wheat 3 cars 82}
No 2 northern wheat to arrive, 2,400 bu .82}
Xo 2 roithern wheat, to airive, 800 bu
No 3 heat, 4 cars 80
No 3 wheat, 16 cars 80i
No. S wheat, 4 ears 79'
No 3 wheat, 1 car 80!
No 3 wheat, 1 tar, mixed 79
No 3 wheat, 1 car 81
No. 3 wheat, 1 car 81"
No 3 wheat, part car 80
No 4 wheat, 2 cars 79
No 4 wheat part car .80
Rejected wheats 1 car., 65
Rejected wheat, 1 car 78
Rejected.
wheat, 1 car
A
No 3 corn 1 car~ whit" 4'7
No 3 corn, 1 car, mixed 46^
No. 8 corn. 1 car 47
No 4 corn, 1 car, vellow 46a4
No 4 corn, part car 46
No, 4 corn 1 car 46
No 4 corn. 1, car 46%
No. 3 white oats, 2 cars 35
No. 3 white oats. 2 cars to arrive 35
No. 3 white oats, 25,000 bu to arrive 35
No 3 white oats, 10,000 bu to arrive 34%
No 4 white oats, 2 cars 34%
No 4 white oats 1 car 84%
No 4 white oats, 2 cars.
No 8 oats, 4 cars
No. 8 oats, 4 cars.
No 3 oats, 1 car
No 3 oats, 8 cars
Sample barley, 1,000 bu to arrive..
No. 4 barley, 1 car
x.
eral situation, but that burfiUBS amounting to ?2f P"L
,_._,
car
0
No.
5
No grade barley, 1 car 44%
No. 1 flaxseed, 2 cars 1.11%
No. 1 flaxseed, 1 car 1.11%
No. 1 flaxseed, 500 bu to arrive 1.11%
yAllS
RANGE OF WHEAT PRICE IN MINNEAPOLIS
'High.*-**0*
Close.
Today.
$ .88083%
.81%@83 .81%
Low.
$ .83$83% S .81%
.81%@82 .80%%
.81% .80%
.80%% .80%
.81
THE DAY'S REPORTS
Close.
Today.
TODAY'S RANGE IN WHEAT
Minneapolis Options.
*?&> /pao //so /geo/fs
lltl H1
S.'"
ReJecteS Wheat, I eat .i.. #...J...9^rt .80 No. 2 northern. 82%c July $*%c September
No 3 yellow CQ-I, 1 ear A...^iT.S *47if82%c. Flax, to arrive and on track, H.18%?
PUTS AND CALLS.
PutsJuly wheat, 82%@82%c,
CallsJuly wheat, 84%c.
CurbJuly wheat, 83(388%c. "A
Puts:September wheat, 81%c~.
CallsSeptember wheat, 88e.
CurbSeptember wheat, 81%@62c.
STATE GRAIN INSPECTION, JTJNE 8.
Oars Inspected InWheatGreat Northern
No. 1 hard, 1: No. 1 northern, 6 No. 2 north
ern, 12 No. 8, 6r No. 4, 4 rejected, 2.
Ohioago, Milwaukee A St. PaulNo. 1 north
ern, 6 No. 2 northern, 18 No. 3, 18 No. 4, 6
rejected, 2.
Minneapolis A St. LouisNo. 1 northern, 8
No. 2 northern, 1 No. 8, 2 ]fr. 4, 2.
Soo LineNo. 1 bard, 6 No, I northern, 14
-SELL TO ARRIVE ON THE BULGES.''
No. 2 northern, 2 No. 8, 8 No. 4, 1.
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis A "Omaha
No. 1 northern, 8 No. 2 northern, 1.
Chicago Great WesternNo. 2 northern, 2
No. 3, 2, no grade, 1.
TotalsNo. 1 hard, 6 No. 1 northern, 82
No. 2 northern, 31 No. 3, 26 No. 4, 18 re
jected, 6 no grade, 1.
Other Grains Inspected InCarsNo. 2 durum
wheat, 3 No. 3 durum wheat, 1 mixed wheat,
2 No. 3 corn, 1 No. 4 corn, 1 No. 2 white
oats, 2 No. 3 white oats, 10 No. 4 white
oats, 18 No. 3 oats. 7 No 4 barley, 8 No. 1
feed barley, IS No. 2 feed barley, 1 No. 1
northwestern flax. 2 No. 1 flax, 8 rejected
flax, 2 no grade flax, 1.
Inspected Out'CarRNo. 1 durum wheat. 3
No. 1 hard wheat, 2 No. 1 northern wheat, 92
No. 2 northern wheat, 23 No. 4 wheat, 4 re
jected wheat, 8 no grade wheat, 2 No 8 "/el-
low corn, 2 No. 4 corn, 2 No. 8 white oats,
16 No. 4 barley, 1 No. 1 flax. 18.
DAILY WHEAT MOVEMENT.
The following- are the receipts and shipments
at the principal primary wheat markets.
Receipts. Shipments,
Bushels.
New York ......l......-*Si8.000
Philadelphia 1,480
Baltimore 1,026
Toledo 5.000
St. Louis 86.000
Boston j...-..118.418
Chicago 20,000
Milwaukee 4.400
Duluth 9Q,297
Minneapolis 98,800 88.880
Kansas City 49,000 86,000
IWYMAlVIC
QOMWSSJONT^^^
-Bushels.
16,012
8,666
J.O0O
27,000
159,304
11,351
#-\.+f S^i'V
Markets
Close.
-July Wheat. -Sept Wheat.
Close.
CLOSING- CASH PRICES
On TrackNo. 1 hard, 85%c No. 1 northern, 84%c No. 2*orthern, 82%c No. 3
wheat, 80%@81%c durum. 72@74c No. 3 white oats, 34%c No. 2 rye, 67%@58%c
No. 1 northern to arrive, 84%c No. 2 northern to arrive, 82%c No. 1 flax, $1.11% No.
3 yellow corn, 47%o, barley, 41c to 50c.
Close.
Tear Ago.
$1.08%
.84%/'^.-*
Yesterday.
.81%
.80% A
.79% i
.81%
5...
80%
Close. Today.
$ .81%82 .82%
.82% .80%
,.74%@%
.87%
Yesterday.
.81%
.81%%
82%
.79%%
.74
.87%
.82%
Close.
Yesterday.
S .80% .80%%
.81 .78%@79
.72%@73 .85%
RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS, JTTNE 6.
ReceivedWheat, 104 cars, 98,800 bu: corn,
7,620 bu oats, 58,620 bu, barley, 17,610 bu
flax, 8,010 bu flour, 300 brls mlllstuffs, 88
tons hay, 100 tons carlots, 191.
ShippedWheat. 38 oars, 88,380 bu corn,
920 bu, oate, 3,140 bu barley, 25,200 bu flax,
6,680 bu flour, 36,298 brls muletuffs, 1,150
tons linseed oil, 651,220 lbs oil cake, 2,722,160
lbs, carlots, 368.
WHEAT BECEIPTS'BY BOASS, JTTNE 8.
Milwaukee, 23 oars Omaha, 0 St. Louis, 4
Great Northern, 42 Great Western, 2: Soo line,
23, Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, 1.
CHICAGO GRAIN
WHEAT OPENS STRONG. THE BUYING BE-
ING BASED ON WET WEATHER.
Chicago. June 7.Wheat opened strong toda.y
on good buying by shorts ami commission
houses, which was based chiefly on continued
wet weather in the northwest. A decline in
receipts at Minneapolis and small offerings on
the price.
at 81%
i. Minne
apolis. Dnluth"and"CMtfajto reported receipts of
125 cars, against 279 cars last week and 249
ca So S e^Wh"t,
a
"cash oats No 2, 85%c No. 8, 85c. Wheat
No 2 red, 87@89c No. 8 red, 82@85c No. 2
hard, 81@83%c No. 8 hard, 77@81 No. 1
northern, 88@85c No. 2 northern, 81@84c
No 3 spring, 77@83c. _,
Oats, July, 86%o September, 88%@83%c
The following was the range of prices
Wheat July
Opening 81%@%
Hlghes Lowest
Close^
Today Yesterday Year ago
Corn-
Opening Highest
88% 81% 83% 81% 86%
NEW YORK GRAIN AND BXOTTR, June 7.
Hour, receipts, 15,596 brls sales, 1200
steady with quiet trade. Wheat, receipts, 18,000
bu, sales. 1,800,000 bu a jump of a cent in
prices this morning followed heavy covering on
excessive rains in the northwest and crop dam
age news July, 87%@88%c September, 85%@
86 9-16c December, 87%@87%o. Rye dull No.
2 western, 67%c 1 New York. Corn, receipts,
40,850 bu sales, 100,000 bu active and about
%c higher on light receipts, bull support and
with wheat July, 57%@58c September, 57%@
57%c December, 56%@56%: steady.
DULUTH GRAIN, June 7,-r-Olose: Wheat,
.to arrive, No. 1 northern, 84%c No. 2 norths
"e July. Sl.14% September, |l.!B% October,
$1.14.T57e. OatsBarley,
Rye,
.83% 88% .33 33% 47% .45 .46 .47 .45%
.49
*K% 2Z.
parley, 1 car..
4 barley 1 car
!!&-
No. 4 barley, 1 car...
No. 1 feed barley, 1 car
No. 1 feed barley, 1 car 42
No. 1 feed barley, 1 car... .45
No. 2 feed barley, 1 car 43%
No. 2 feed barley, 1 car 42%
No. 2 feed barley, 1 car 44
46
to arrive, on and July, SOei
[email protected] Beceipts, S0,28
bu of wheat. Shipments of wheat, none.
KANSAS CITY GRAIN, June 7.Clos4j-
WbeatJuly, 77%c September, 74%0{ Decem
ber, 74%c cash, No. 2 hard, T7@7Po No. '8,
74%@77%c No. 2 red, 88@g)90c No. 8, 84@F
89 Oorn-nJuly, 47%c September, 47%c De
cember, 46% 0. CashNo. 2 mixed, 48%c No.
2 white. 49c No. 8, 48%c. Oats, No.,. 2
white, 86%@87%c.
WINNIPEG GRAIN, June 7.June opened at
80%c, closed at 81%c Jnly 82c, closed 83c
October, 78%c, closed 80c. Gash' close: No. 1
northern, 8l%c No. 2 northern, 78%c No. 8
northern. 75%c No. 2 white oats, 86%o No. 8
barley, 42%c No. 1 flax, $1.08. Receipts wheat,
20 cars last year, 79.
ST. LOUIS GRAIN, June 7.Wheat, No. 2
red, cash, 90 02c July, 81Mc September,
80%c No. 2 hard, 79%@84c. Corn, No. 2 cash,
nominal July, 49%c September, 49%c. Oats,
No. 2 *asb, 34%c July, 45%c September,
34%c No. 2 white, 37c.
GrOS&LP OF THE MARKETS
A telegram just received at noon from a large
grain dealer in southern Nebraska states that
the wheat is not looking well and he Is fear
ful of damage.
tWs motnjBg. rjy^,
SHARP GABS I
OPENING'MABKEf
0 \W*
PRICES HELD DOWN AND AD-
VANCES CHECKED BY REAUINty
Beading Suddenly Xtffted at Noon-
Bise In New York Central Beaching
Two PointsSmelting and Consoli
dated Gas Large Fraction Higher
Bonds Were Steady.
New York, June 7.There were a number of
sharp gains over last night in the opening
stock market today while the general range
Jwas a small fraction higher. Illinois Central
rose 2, Great Northern Preferred, Denver ft
Rio Grande and Locomotive about a point and
Baltimore ft Ohio, Chicago Union Traction Pre
ferred, Smelting and Consolidated Gas, large
fractions.
The market showed strength in spots, but
realizing held prices down or caused reac
tions from advances along with the rise in spe
cial -stocks. During the second hour the gains
were in gieat Northern Preferred, which rose
1%, Kansas ft Texas Preferred 1% and the
common. Northern Pacific, Colorado ft South
ern Second Preferred and Sugar 1. At noon
Reading was suddenly lifted to 145 and the
rise In New York Central reached 2 points.
Brooklyn Union Gas sold at an advance of 10.
Bonds were steady at noon.
The bulge in New York Central at noon
caused some demand for controlled stocks and
there was a further rise in Reading to 145%,
followed by Delaware ft Hudson. The general
effect was slight. Delaware ft Hudson im
proved 3%, North-Western 2%, Republic Steel
1% and Canadian Pacific 1. Tennessee Coal ft
Iron fell back 1%.
Late in the aa Amalgamated Copper made
a bid for recognition, moving up 1% under
yesterday's closing in contrast to Its early heavi
ness. Illinois Cental hardened 1%, UepuDlic
Steel 2%, Northern Pacific 2, Republic Steel
Preferred 1.
Stock quotations reported for The Journal by
Watson & Co., brokers, Chamber of Commerce,
Minneapolis. Closing figures are bid,
Sales.
july. 83%c September 82%c.
Sentiment in the pit continued extremely Dan
ish all day. Prices made sharp advances. The,
highest point of the day for July wa* 88%e.
The market closed strong, with July up l%@2c
at 83%c.
Corn was strong on higher cables, small weal
receipts and in sympathy with wheat, Jug
opened %c to %@%c higher at 60%c to 50%@
50%c. and advanced to 51%c. Local receipts
were 280 cars, with 127 of contract grade.
The highest point for July wae 51%c. The
market closed Btrong, with prices almost at
the highest point. The July option being up
l%@l% e, at 51%@51%c.
CoTn-No 2, 51$J3_Jl%e No. 8, 51@51%c.
Corn, July. 51%@51%o September, 51%c.
The oats market was strong and the market
was excited. The opening prices fluctuated over
a range of lo. The report* of damage which
camp in early today caused lively covering by
shorts and!created a heavy demand. Julv opened
to l%c higher at 85%o to 36%c. and sold
up to 36%@36%c. Local receipts were 147
80%@%
81%I%
Stocks-
400 Am. Cot. Oil.
Am. Car
do pr
Am. Locomot
do pr
2,600
16,600
1,700 2,800
10,600
700
78,500 28,900
7,800 A., T. ft 8. F.
300
10,800
100
85,200
4,600 5,400
400
do pr
81%@%
S0%@% 60%% 51% 60%
Lowest 50%
Close
Today BU
Yesterday 50}
Year ago 61%
Oats
Opening 85%Q%
Highest 86%
Lowest 85%
Close
.Today 86%
Yesterday 85%
Year ago 81%
49%
n%
Sit
N. Y. Central.
Ontario ft W.
Pressed Steel.
do pr
Pacific Mail..
Penn. R. R...
People'8 Gas..
11,600
1,800 2,500
800
82,800
2,700
4
It is expected that the Missouri report will
be out late this evening. A condition of 80,
or 7 points decline in May, wil lprobably be
shown.
Harry Champlain -buying Chicago wheat he
has turned bullish on the weather In the north
west.
Wasesrman buying Illinois Central.
Total clearances: Wheat, 186,000 bu flour.
48,000 brls, corn, 20,000 bu oats, 225 bu wheat
and flour equals 402.000 bu.
St. Louis message to Lewis says: "Fear tho
black rust now being reported from, north Tex
as will work up into Oklahoma."
Kneeland was steady buyer Chicago wheat all
day.
Moore to\WatsOn: Think wheat a sale here.
Crowd have all got it.'
Rankin says: This is the start on wheat buy
It all .the time and keep It.
New YorkThe directors of Interboro de
cleared the initial quarterly dividend of 1% per
cent on the preferred stock.
Updyke sold a lot of July wheat.
Estimated Argentine shipments, 2,400,000 but
corn, 3,600,000 bu.
Berlin closed %o higher, Budapest %c higher.
Provisions higher, with Oudahy buying ribs.
Winnipeg weather threatening and cool tem
perature 66 above.
Verhoeft* from Milmlnet "Hot weather with
only local-rains helping on coarse grains. Illi
nois Indiana and Ohio needing rains badly."
Prlngle says. "I hear of reports of
rust in Texas."
According to a cable from Cawnpore, India,
slight rains have fallen and the monsoon Is
expected to be normal.
New York to LewisThe market Is decidedly
strong and speculattlon 1B running to the good
stocks, such ,as TJnlon Pacific and Steel. We
look for a higher market.
LondonEnglish country markets quiet but
steady. French country markets dull. Weather
in England fine, forecast fine.
The "southwestern Grain Dealers' association
gave out the following figures today: Texas, 75
cent cent .increase Oklahoma, 160 per cent In
crease Indian Territory, 200 per cent increase
Nebraska, 10 per cent increase Kansas and
Missouri, same as last year shows an Increase
of 36,000,000 bu of wheat ofer last year In these
states.
Pittsburg, Pa*tAt 9 o'clock this morning the
TJnlon Railway Construction company lata the
last railft on tiie connection with the Wabash
railroad, putting Into effect the famous contract
between George' T. Gould and Andrew Carnegie.
Great Northern earnings for the month of
May Increased $718,480. From July 1, Increased
1*7.343,990. "i
Marfleld best vlnyer Jnly corn on-the advances
f4 Thenorthwea'weather: Winnipeg, cloudy sanM,
cool heavy rabi'last night. Grand Forks. te
cloudy heavy^aln yesterday afternoon aim
night. Oorastojfe very clouda: heavv rain
strong southwew-wind. St. Cloud, heavv, rain
and wind, alsgsnaU, last night clear, hot. ogw,
UbHlsoro, clonafe^very strong ^Sonth,eas% w^Jdt
65 above: ralifigfWt night and looks like- mpre^
Fergus Falls, fSrUjceloudy and cool: hefflrjr Wttff
183%
98%
*145%
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL. June 7r~i90ff.
3 -J-J\i
Close
Bid. I Bid.
June 71June 6
82%
41%
101%
72
115
39%
106%
23
45
136% 158% 119% 109% 271%
90%
102% 110%
93% 84%
161
59% 19% 76%
30% 98 59% 34% 70 51
144 214% 545
47 89% 19
38%
46 79% 71%
172% 806% 181%
98%
184
28 52%
20%
High-
est^
~8 2%
42% 72% 71%
5,000]Am. Woolen, i
do pr
Am. Linseed..
do pr
Am. Sugar...
Am. Smelting.
do pr
Amal. Copper.
Anacon. Cop..
38% I
Bait, ft Ohio. 110% 109%
do pr
Brook. Rap
Can. Pacific
Ones, ft' Ohio.
Chi. Gr. West
do pr A
do pr
C..CO. & St.L
Col.Fuel ft I
Col. Southern.
do 1st pr.,
do 2d pr
Consol. Gas
Del. ft Hudson
D., L. ft W
Den. ft Rio
do pr
DU..S.S. & At
do pr
Erie
do lsi pr..
do 2d pr..
Gen. Eleotric.
Gt. Nor. pr
Hock. Val...
do pr
Illinois Central
Iowa Central
do pr
inter, paper..
do pr
K. C. 4 South]
do pr
Louis ft Nash
Missouri Pac
8,500 M., K. ft T..
D,80O| do pr
2,800lMoxican Cent
700|Nat. Biscuit
1,700 Nat. Lead
85%
161%
5% 19%
700 "ao% "ei%
84%
19,900
5,700
14,500
5,700
147% 216%
14,800
200
"4 7%
89%
15,800
300
1,000
1,500 8,000
200 800
7,100
200 800
1,500 5,200 3,200
49% 48% 47%
34% 84%
84%
i3
83%a
46%
89%
26%
800 do pr
10,800 Norfolk ft W
84%
28%@S9
800 North Am, Co.
ll.OOOlNorthern Pac.
6001 North- Western 203% 142%
51%
133
93%
148%
1287001 Reading
do 1st pr...
do 24 pr
Repub Steel..
do pr
Rock Island...
do pr
St. Paul
do pr
Southern Pac.
Southern Ry...
-do pr
18,800
8,200 1,800
800
25.100
700
9,700
3i%r29^
105 I 104
28% 26
67% 39% 99%
BJeoo
20Q 200Tenn. C. ft I
3,100
100
93,200
Tessa .ft Pac
T. C. R. T...
'84% 34
Union Pacifte
do' pr
V. S. Rubbers
iss" 'isi%
60,lKJto S. Steel
16,800 do pr
1,40.0! Wabash
do pr
Va Chemical..
West. Union..
Wheel, ft li.EJ.
do 1st pr...
do 2d pr
Wis. Central.
do pr
2
800
goo
300
900
300
200
41%
106%
21%
49% 41% 92% 18%
41 25 29
50%
"^42%
',99%
19%
42 25%
1,900 1,100
Total sales, 842,400. ._,_
Money closed at 2%@3 per cent high, 8%
low, 2% last loan, 3 ruling rate, 8%.
MININGr AND CMRB STOCKS
Boston, June 7.Massachusetts Gas continued
the center of Interest, selling at 64%c, a new
high record, on enormous transactions. Boston
Consolidated and North Butte were strong feat
ures. The remainder of the market was ta"me
and featureless. The New York market, while
strong, had all the appearance of manipulation
Boston quotations at 1 P-Jn., J~* 7: Adven
ture, 6 Allouez, 38%} American Zinc, 9 bid Ar
cadian, 3% bid Arnoia, i bid Ashbed, 1 bid
Atlantic, 14% American Developing Co.. 14
asked Boston Oousoljdated. 30% Bingham,
34% Bonanza-, 45, ofd* BTi^ck Mountain, 9% bid
Butte Exp., 3% bid Butte & London, 2% bid
Butte Coalition, 33% bid Calumet A Heela, 685
Md Centennial, 28? 5ofpe Queen. 2 bidj Con
solidated Mercur, 9^W4l Calumet
114% Calumet ft m&oa.
4
black
1Arlwroa, _2PT
a ^As
Range, 77% OutobwlaloTBly, 7 bid Dom. I.
ft s". 29 Daly West,'16% bid Dehn-Arinoxa,
20 asked East
Butte%!C10%r bid Elm 2
asked Franklin, IS
by'.,"River
sas ft Texas, 36% New York GftatflA, 145 Nor
folk ft'Western. 91: Norfolk ft Western pre
ferred, J6 Ontario ft Western, 5f% Rennsyl
vanla 68% Hand Mines, 0% Reeding 74%
Heading first preferred. 4T: Reading second pre
ferred, 49 Southern Railway, 40% Southern
Ball way preferred, 103 Southern Pacific, 69%
Union Pacific, 167% Union Pacific preferred,
98 United States Steel, 43 United States' Steel
preferred. 109% Wabash, 22 Wabash pre
fcrred, 52 Spanish fours29% 98%.
J&
rt,ver' u
&\
Guanajuato, 5 W jfteeue Consolidated. 26%
tielvetla, 591 M m? Royals, 20 bid
Junction, 26 bfflf 8. P., 12 bid
Mass. 734 Majflower^50 -Mass Gas, 68%
Michigan, 12% Mohaw*. 66% Montana Coal
ft Coker8% bid NtttaXla Cons, 18%: North
Butte, 94% New Slsbee Consolidation, 19
bid Old Colony, I asked Old Dominion, 42
bid Osceola, 111 Parrot, 28% bidf Phoenix,
1 asked Pittsburg A Duluth. 19% bid Pneu
matic Service, 122% Pneumatic"Preferred, 40%
Quincy, 98} Raten, 4% .Rhode Island, 5%
Santa tfe, 1% Shannon, 8% Shoe Machine,
80% bid Shoe Machine, Dreferred, 30% bid
8wlf* #5 Tsjaaraek. WO: tecumseh, 12
Tennessee, 42
bid? TttfStyi ek United poppfeTd.
64% United Copper, J^few?__*
i_
J_
Fruit,
.j?
"bid Victoria. 8% Washington, 1 bid Wed
verlne, 137 Wyandot, 1 bid Warren -Develop
ment Co., 15% asked Winona, 6% bid.
ARIZONA CO-PERS."i\ ^f~
The market is a little lower today, owing to
limited wire service. Helvetia. Is "*a!h comtag
Into pronilnenee. It Is said that tMjwneltee ,is
about to be started and this has. probably been
responsible for the advance* to the nrlce oftts
shares. Denh-AriBona is a little lower, wojch
seems only right after its recent advance. Bu^te
Coalition Is strong and sells, freely at $34. Quo
tations at l^.in.:*',,
Bid.0
Oalumet ft Arisen*, .^A-!-****'
0
Calumet & Pittsbnrg .p 8000
Lake Superior ft Pittsburg
Pittsburg ft DuluW
Junction w.&^r
American Dev. C0.~..*
Warren Der. Co. vf
Denn-Arisona Black Mountain &,*.'t
East Butte_
Butte CoaltjBon ^st*.,
Butte ft Lflbjdon
Keweenaw, 2.
J'
Helvetia
LONDON CLOSlStir,^T00KS, June 7
sols for money, ,88? oSnsols for account, 8t%^
48^r5'B_frT
wtosim *-J
*lW ^HJ^tMyi*-
& Rio Grande pfa
_fl__l a__as__l Ha1
Defective Page
taln, per ounce. Money,
2@2% per cent. The rate of discount in the
open market for short bills Is 8%_$ 9-ltf jfer
cent The rate of discount in the Open market
for three months' bills Is 8%@3% per cent.
ACTIVE BONDS A ND OTJEBB STOCKS.
New York quotations to 1 p.m.:
Japanese Ists, 99%. 99%.
Japanese 2ds, 98%, 98%.
Japanese 4.%s, 4, 93%.
Japanese second 4%s, 93%..
United States Steel 5s, 98%, 99. 98"%. 99.
Atchison 4s, 103@103%.
Baltimore ft Ohio 4s, 103%@ 103%,
Baltimore ft Ohio 3%s, 97(897%.
Oregon Short Line 4s, 95%@95%.
Union Pacific 4s, 104%.
Brooklyn Rapid Transit 4s 98%@99.
Northern Pacific 4s, 104%_104%.
Reading 4s, 101%@lOl%.
United Copper, 63%@64.
Boston Copper. 31.
North Butte, 93%@9.1%.
East Butte, 10%ffill
Greene Copper. 26% 26%.
Black Mountain, 93% bid.
Utah Copper. 80%@32.
A. T. 4s, 79%, 79.
A. T. 6s, 114@114%.
Bock Island 4s, 78%.
Rock Island 5s, 91.
a B. 4s, 100@100%.
4
MONEY REPORTS
NEW YORKMoney 3@8%
loan, 3% per cent, has loaned at
ST. PAUL, June 7
$1,022,676.92 week,
$6,939,821.24.
cent last
per cent.
Bank clearings today,
$7,730,694.39 last year,
PARISThree perecent rentes, 95f 40c de
crease, 20c.
BERLINExchange on London, 20 marks 50
pfgs for checks discount rates, short bills, 3%
per cent three mouths' bills, 3% per cent.
MINNEAPOLIS, June 7.Bank clearings to
day, $2,068,326.08 for the week, $17,642,492.28
corresponding week last year, $16,564,063 63
New York exchange, selling rate, 40c premium
buying rate, 10c premium Chicago exchange,
selling rate, 40c premium buying rate, 10c
premium London 60-day sight documentary ex
change, $4.82%. Local money slightly easier,
but rates unchanged at 5%@6 per cent for se
lected paper.
NEW YORK METALS, June 7.Lead, quiet,
[email protected]. Copper, firm, 18.75@19c,
NEW YORK OIL, June 7.Petrolewn, firm
refined, all ports, [email protected].
MISCELLANEOUS
NEW YORK COTTON, July 7.The cotton
market opened steady at a decline of 2 to 4
points in response to lower cables, continued
good weather and expectations of unfavorable
week-end figures. The market rallied on cov
ering by July shorts and bull support. Prices
about unchanged to 5 points higher during the
middle of the morning. The market was quiet
at mid-day and about four points off from the
best at practically the closing prices of yester
day. Spot quiet middling uplands, 11.20c
middling gulf, 11.45c.
Cotton futures opened steady June, 10.47c
July, 10 52c, August, 10.45c September of
fered at 10.40c October, 10.84c: November
offered at 10.34c December, 10.36c January,
10.39c bid February, 10.40c March, 10.17c bid.
PROVISIONS
CHICAGO PROVISIONS, June 7.Provisions
were firm, partly In sympathy with grain and
partly because of a 8c advance for five hogs.
July pork opened 7%c to 12%c higher, at 49
$16"65'to $16 60, and "sold at $16.22%. Lard
was up 6@7%c, at $8 [email protected]%. Bibs were
5@7%o higher, at $8.52%.
ClosePork, July, [email protected]% September,
$16 50 Lard, July, $8.82% September, $8 97%.
CHICAGO PH0BUCE, June 7.--Cheeae steady
daisies. 10%ailc twins, 10$10%c loung
Americas 10%@10%c. Poultry, live, firmer
turkeys. 9c: chickens, ll%c. Potatoes, steady
Burbanks, 61@65c. Rurals. 68@72c red stock.
52@54c Veal, easy 50 to 60-lb Weights, 5%
@8fi 60 to 75-lb weights, *8@7e 85 to 110-
lb weights, 7@8%c. Butter, firmer creameries.
14@19%c dairies. 18%@17%c. Eggs, steady
at mark, cases Included, 12@14*
NEW YORK. SUGAR AND COFFEE, June 7.
^-Sugor, rav. firm fair refining. 2 15-16
2 31 82c centrifugal. 96 test, 3 15-82@8%e mo
lasses sugar, 2 1116@2 23-32C refined firm:
crushed, 5 30c, powdered, 4.70o granulated
4.60c. Coffee, steady No. 7 Rio, 7%c Molas
ses, steady New Orleans, 80@38c.
M_W YORK PRODTCE, June 7.Eggs* 16%
@17c cheeks, 9@12c Receipts. 24,570 mar
ket steady. Butter, creamery, 20c Imitation,
17c ladles 15@15%e ex-renovated, 17c reno
vated, 15%@16c. Receipts, 10,852, market weak.
NEW YORK FROVISIONS, June 7.Beef,
firm. Pork, firm. Lard, firm prime western,
$*[email protected].
REPUDIATES HIS D. D.
English Preacher GHves Up Degree Con
forred by Temple College.
New York Sun.
One of the moat prominent noncon
formist ministers in England is the Rev.
Mr. Clifford, who is always spoken of as
Dr. Clifford. A newspaper raised the
question as to Clifford's right to call
himself doctor. This brought ou the
announcement that the decree was con
ferred on him by Bates university, in
the United States.
This has aroused general question of
American D.D. degrees. Many virtu
ally of a bogus nature are held by non
conformist ministers. Another promi
nent nonconformist divine, the Rev. Mr.
Aked of Liverpool, now announces that
the time has come for him to repudiate
the degree D.D., which Temple college,
Pennsylvania, conferred on him.
When it was first given him he en
joyed it for twenty-four hours, but has
regretted it ever since.
I wish I were free from the exasper
ation of spirit it involves," he says.
"When an anonymous critic cannot an
swer my arguments he can always sneer
at my degree. Accordingly I ask all
to call me mister."
When the Rev. Dr. Russel Conwell of
Temple college was asked for a state
ment in regard to Mr. Aked, he replied
quickly: "The system of conferring
honorary degrees is faulty all thru, but
I don't believe Dr. Aked said what he
is reported to have said. He was anx
ious for the degree, the petition for
which, signed by many learned men,
was presented thru Dean Gordon of
Temple college. He has used it re
peatedly in signing articles in American
and English publications, and did this
only a month ago in contributing an
article to a New York magazine. Tem
ple college has conferred only one
other degree in Europe. It never con
fers a degree at home or abroad except
upon petition by men of unquestionable
learning.
I think some system should be es
tablished providing for greater certain
ty that those upon whom degrees are
conferred are worthy of them. They
should be proved men of learning.''
HONEYMOON IN PAR NORTH
Colonel Flelschman and His Bride Will
Ch) to Franz Josef Land.
New York Times.
Colonel Max C. Fleischman of Cincin
nati and his bride, Sara Sherlock,
sailed Friday morning on the Kaiserin
Auguste Victoria en route *o Tromsoe,
Norway, for a summer honeymoon trip
to Franz Josef land. They and friends
who are going with them* will meet at
Tromsoe, Norway, the Norwegian ex
ploring steamer Laura, ^^fter complet
the stock of a yeaVs provisions.
and getting the docs for the sledge
teams, the ship will proceed on her
voyage to the far north, expecting to
f'he
et back in October next to Tromsoe.
expedition is not to be a "dash
for the pole,'' but a hunting and fishing
trip on an extensive scale.
Thursday afternoon Colonel Fleisch
man entertained members of the Arc
tic club at the New York Yacht club.
Before sailing poleward every mem
ber of the club receives a silk club flag.
When this is brought back it is sup-
fatitudeoreached.
ose be marked vrixn tho highest
Such a flag was pre
sented to Colonel Fleischmar at. tho
luncheon, and will be carried by him
as far as the Laura will carry the hon
eymoon party northward. The colonel^
assured his guests that he will neither
appear on the lecture platform nor I
print a book of hardluck stories of the
Arctic regions.
sss__|
Pan P^
\J4IIV _
HOO RECEIPTS IiGHT AND QUAL-
ITY SOMEWHAT BETTEB.
.__a__&Mw^aa-
SELLERS AD ONES
NICKEL TO PRICE
Killing Cattle Steady on Light Beceipts
but Stockers and Feeders Bather
SlowVeal Calves SteadyMilch
Cows StrongerSheep and Lamb
Prices Steady to Strong.
South St. Paul. Minn., June 7.Estimated re
ceipts at the Union stockyards,today: Cattle,
500 calves, 400 hogs, 3,800 theep, 200
cars, 68.
Ibe following table shows the receipts from
Jan. 1, 1906, to date, as compared with the
same period in 1906:
Year. Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars.
1906 05,649 24,072 412.505 120,626 9,741
1905 107,380 22,122 437.502 194 364 10,402
Increase 1,950
Decrease... 11,731 25,057 78,728 661
The following table shows the receipts thus
far In June, as compared with the same period
in 1905:
Year. Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars.
M06 2.227 1,235 17,565 M3 353
1905 2,519 1,145 14,136 1,317 290
Increase 90 8,429 02
Decrease.. 292 474
Official receipts for the past week are as fol
lows.
Date.
May May
June June June June June
Cattle.
358
850 212
707
725
416
Calves. Hogs.
155 8,229
147 8.159
137 3,308
72 8,889
171 2,848
714 3,872
141 4,130
30...
31...
1...
2...
4...
5... 6...
Sheep.
475
363
85
6U
445
90
154
Cars.
81
W 54 56 79
88
76
Railroads entering the yards reported receipts
for the day by loads as follows: Chicago Great
Western 1: Chicago, Milwaukee A St. Paul, 11
Minneapolis A St. Louis, 9. Chicago, St. Paul,
Minneapolis ft Omaha, 14 Great Northern, 28
Chicago, Burlington A Quincy, 1 Wisconsin
Central, 1 Northern Pacific 2 Chicago, Rock
Island A Pacific. 1: total, 68.
Disposition of stock Wednesday. June 6:
Cattle. Bogs. Sheep.
Swift A Co 216 3,621 129
W. 10. McCornlck 9 27
W. G. Bronson 21 15
Leo Gottfried 18
Cudahy Bros 612
City butchers 16
Slimmer A Thomas ..32
Evans A Lauderdale.. 20
8. J. Meladj & Co.... 20
Louis Becker 32
H. H. Brackett 8
Other buyers 36
Country buyers 636
Totals 784 4,123 186
HOGS
Date Av.Wt. Av.Cost. Price Range.
May 30 221 $6.80 $6.2006.35
May 81 229 6 28% 6.208 35
June 1 227 6 28% 6.15Q6.35
June 2 22C 820 6.10(86 25
June 4 230 6.14% [email protected]
June 5 230 6.19 6.10(86 25
June 6 224 616 6.17%a 30
Hog prices rale 5c higher than yesterday's
best time. Receipts moderate. Quality good.
Prices range from $6.20 to $6.85 bulk, $8.30.
Light, common to fair, $6.20 to $6.25 good
to choice, $6.80 to $6 85 mixed, common to
fair, $6.20 to $6.25 good to choice, $6.30 to
$6 35 heavy, fair, $6.20 to $6.25 good to
choice, $6 30 to $6.35 rough sows. $6.50 to
$5.75.
Hogs60, 231 lbs, $6.35 70, 190 lbs, $6.35
lbs, $6.85 44, 282 lbs, $6.30 108, 219
lbs, 86.30 70, 236 lbs, $6.30 80, 1741bs, $6.30
78, 213 lbs, 6 80 30, 191 lbs, |6J27% 57,
233 lbs, |6,25 66, 268 lbs, 86.25 44, 219 lbs,
86.25 47, 287 lbs, $6.25 51, 274 lbs, $6 20.
Pigs, Roughs and Underweights4, 125 lbs,
$5.25.
Stags and Boars1. 810 lbs, $5.26 1, 410
lbs, $6.25 1, 400 lbs, $6 2, 500 lbs, $5 2,
650 lbs, $4.75 1 boar, Q10 lbs, $2.75.
CATTLEKilling cattle prices rule steady.
Receipts rather light. Demand good for grain
fed stuff. Stockers and feeders rather slow and
prices steady at the week's decline. Veal calves
steady. Bulls slow at decline. Milch cows of
best quality stronger, common kinds dull and
slow.
Butcher Steers10, 1,875 lbs, $4.75 2, 1,275
lbs, $4.00 3. 1,086 lbs, $4.25 1. 1,120 lbs,
$4.25 6, 1,366 lbs, $4.15 2, 1,000 lbs, 88 75
2. 1,186 lbs, $3 75.
Butcher Cows and Heifers1, 940 lbs, $3.80
1, 980 lbs, $3.75 1, 1,080 lbs, $8 1, 780 lbs,
$2.75 1, 935 lbs, $2.76.
Cutters and Canners1, 1.000 lbs, $2 60 1,
1,000 lbs, $2.50 1, 960 lbs, $2.35 1, 910 fts.
$2.25 1. 1.060 lbs, $2.
Veal Calves81. 182 lbs, $4 2 24. 137 lbs.
84.25 41, 120 lbs. $4.25: 8, 128 lbs, $4 7, 105
lb*." fc.50 81 98 lbs, $8.26 8. 140 lbs^$8
Stock and Feeding Steers-^.'
1 lbs, $4.15':
1, 980 lbs, $4 15, 727 lbs, $8.60 18, 810 lbs,
$8 40 4. 1,075 lbs, $3.86 2, 850 lbs. $8 8, 726
Stock COws and Heifers8, 505 lbs, $8.85
1, 850 lbs, $2.75 8, 670 lbs, $2.75 1, 540 lbs.
$2 60: 2, 635 lbs, $2.50 1, 940 lbs, J$2.82% 1.
814 fbs, $2.85 2, 780 lbs, $2.25 7, 741 lbs.
$2.25.
Stock and Feeding BuUs1. 870 lbs. $2.75
8. 500 lbs, $2.50 3. 450 lbs, $2.50 1, 930 lbs,
$2 40 5, 914 lbs, $2.86 4, 840 lbs, $i25.
Milch Cows and Springers2 cows, 1 calf,
$70 2 cows, 1 calf. $58 1 cow. 1 calf, $88 1
cow, 1 calf, $30 1 cow, $27 1 cow, $26 1 cow,
1 calf. $21 1 cow, $20.
SHEEPReceipts light. Sheep and lambs,y
prices steady to- strong. Demand is good.
Killing Sheen and Lambs2 spring lambs, 60
lbs. $7.50 51 lambs, 86 lbs. $6.50 2 lambs,
55 lbs, $8.50: 7 lambs. 76 lbs, $5.50 9 eww,
151 lbs, $5.50 2 e*es 120 lbs, W.40 2 ewes.
105 lbs, $4.75 1 buck, 150 lbs, $2.50.
Among the shippers on the market were:
Louis Bros., Hadlej J. G. Prichard. Maiden
Rock, Wis. L. A. Dodge, Truman George
Peterson, Jndson Ole Olson, Clements C.
Hansen, Bloomer, Wis. W. Sowneon, Sheldon
H. Dunwoody, Long Lake W. J. Rausch,
Howard Lake John Johnson, Litchfield.
SIOTJX 01TT LIVKSTOOK, June 7.Receipts
Cattle, 400 noVs, 6,600. Hogs. BQlOc high
er. Sales, 62, 220 lbs, $6.25 70, 248 lbs. $6.30
64, 286 lbs, $6.36. Cattle, "trong etoekers.
steady. Beeves. 17. 1.040 lbs, $4.20 16, 1,188
lbs, $4.65 14, 1.820 n. 6 Cows and belters,
10, 870 lbs, $3.40 14, 980 lbs, $8.75 8. 1.620
lbs. $4.35. Stockers and feeders. 10, 700 lbs,
$8.40 16, 780 lbs, $8.76 10. 800
Calves and yearlings, 8, 480 lbs, 88.20 10,
580 lbs, $8.85 S, 610 lbs, $4 10.
MIDWAY B0RS2 MARE
Minnesota Trans
fer St. Paul,. June 7.Barrett & Zimmerman's
report: The market shows Improvement 6ver the
same date last month, but 6 slower than last
week. Drafters are firm. Prices: Drafters,
extra, $206 to $0
*_r,c^- I
1
0
$225 drafters, common to good, $165 to floo,
farm mares, extra. $140 to $,175 farm mares,
choice, $126 to $140 farm nres, cc-mon to
good. $100 to 8126 deUrery, choice. |17| to
$185 delivery, common to good, $185 to $170,
drivers, $186 to $280 mules, according to
slse. $1*0 to $225.
OHIOAGO LIVESTOCK, June 7.CattleRe
ceipts, 5,000 market steady to strong beeres,
$4@6 cows and heifers. *1.65@5 rtockers and
feeders.#$2 [email protected]. Texans. [email protected] calves.
SSBMriAS. HogsReeelpts, 17.000 msrket 5c
higherT esttaated^on-rrow, 14.000 mixed end
butcherA $6 35 6.00 good heavy. f6.30g.e0
rough heavy. |&[email protected] V^-.&ISS'
plgi. [email protected] bulk of sales. *-\f
ih^pJ^Recelpts. 15,000 market 10c higher
sheep, 84.50e6.lP-, lambs. $6.40@7.
KANSAS CITY UVEBTOOX, June 7.Cattle,
receipts, 3,000 strong to 10c higher native
steers, [email protected] southern steers, -*3-28@5.
southern cows, $2.504 native cows tadbe"*"-
|[email protected] bulls, ^"4.15 calves, *[email protected]
western fed steers. $3.50@535 western fed
cows. $2.7504.25. Hogs, receipts. 11.000 mar
ket 2%@5c higher: bulk of sales, [email protected].
Sheep, receipts. 8.000 steadier lambs, $5.50
@7.40 sheep, [email protected]
ST. LOT/S3 LIVZ8T00K, June 7.Cattle
Receipts, 2.000, Including 1,100 Texans mar
ket strong beef steers. $3 255.90 atekers
and feeders, $2.50fi|4.85 cows and heifers.
$2.10@5 Texas steers, [email protected] ^cows and
heifers, [email protected]. HogsReceipts. 8.000: mar
ket 5 to 10c higher pigs and lights. $636.55
packers. $6.2006.55 butchers and best heavy.
|6.45@6eo SheepReceipts 2.000 steady
natives, [email protected] lambs, [email protected].
OMAHA LIVESTOCK, June 7.Cattle, re
ceipts, 2.500 market active to stronger natlv
steers. $4.26@5 50: cows and heifers. f-\25
4.50 Western steers. $3 504L60: csnners, $1.5
@3 stockers, and Wdem B_&^alw.
835: bulls and stag". $2.75@8 25. Hogs re- A
celpts 11.000:^market B^lOc higher bulk.of
sales, $6 35@:37%. Sheen, receipts, 2.000.
strong lambs. $66.50 sheep. $4 75fc0.10
FAMILY RESEMBLANCES
Columbus Dispatch.
SheDid you ever see the Homer
twins!
HeYes. She -Don'} you think the boy is the
picture of his father!
HeYesand I also think the gM is
the phonograpH xt her mother.
I don't believe Blank is going to be
a very successful politician.*%,
/'Why not!'-'
Hef*
altogether too patriotic.''
puV*
'CBAS.E. LEWIS &C0.^
Grain Commission
& Stock Brokers
V-
412-419 Chamber of Commerce
MINNEAPOLIS.
New York and Chicage Correspondents
Bartlett, Frazler & Carrlngtort,
Prlngle, Fitch A Rankin.
Chas. Qatea A O
Members of All Principal Exchanges
WATSON & CO.,
BROKERS I N
GRMN, PROVISIOIfS,
STOCKS jiND BONDS
MEMBERS N. Y. STOCK EXCHANGE,
New York Office24 Broad St
Chicago CorrespondentsJ. H. Wrens
Co.
Private wire. Chicago and New York,
Telephones.
N. W. Main 4492. N. W. Main 44MW
Twin City 184.
420-421 Chamber of Commerce.
Branch Office181 Guaranty Loan Bids.
nTDCD George P. Piper
if MT JsC A Walter D. Doaglai
JOHNSON
Ellsworth 0. Warner *!?_ -/^i**".
Den~tan F. Johnson sy^ V* \Jm
Brokers la
Stocks and Bonds
Grain and Provisions
GRAIN COaf8U8SION
Offices in Principal atarxets.
Live Stock Commission, 80. St. P*nl
Before Baying or Selling Any
Unlisted Stock or Bond
SECURE MY PRICES,
aennania Life
Bni'dlns
St. Paul. Minn.
R. B. Higbee,
WATCH REGULATOR
Hundreds of People Gather Every Day
to Watch the Big Steel Ball Drop.
Cleveland Plain Dealer.
Up on top of the Arcade is a big
steel ball that tells the mariners on the
lakes the exact hour of noon. It tells
the pedestrians on the streets just when
to set their watches. It is operated by
the government, thru the medium of the
local office of the United States hydro
grapher.
Hundreds of people watch for the ball
every day noon. The curb of Buperior
avenue is lined by men with watches
out of pocket Few of them know,
however, what it is or for what it is
there.
The government has taken into its
hands the protection of seamen, and
hedges them about with every precau
tion. Not the least of these is the cor
rect time. So a ball has been arranged
on a tall building that will be raised
at five minutes before noon every day
and lowered at the second of 12 'clock.
The ball measures about three feet in
diameter and is operated along a groove
in a pole twenty feet high. The ball
drops automatically.
Down in the office of the hydrograph
er are mysterious little electrical in
struments that are in constant communi
cation with the naval observatory at
Washington. The ball is connected with
one of these instruments as is a big
clock. Each tick of the clock is re
codred in ink on a paper-covered cylin
der. At 11:55 the ball is raised. The*
current is turned into the mechanism
that controls it, and each tick of the
clock affects the delicate mechanism.
At the stroke of 12 the swing of the
pendulum releases the contact controll
ing the ball and it drops rapidly into
the great bowl built for it.
THE ONE THINO.
Philadelphia Press.
"I admit," began the traveling: sales
man, apologetically, "that my report foe
last month didn't amount to
"V was just about to remark." Inter
rupted the head of the Arm. "that thersV*
was one big thing about It."
"Really? Exwhat was that?"
"Your expense bill."
NO TIME FOR THAT.
Chicago Tribune.
VisitorI see you have spaded up yo~r
back yard. What are you going to plant
there?
SuburbaniteI haven't decided yet. but
It'll have to be something that will grow
all right without needing any attention.
MARFIELD-
GRIFFITHS CO
4HAIN COMMJSSJQfi
MIKNEAPOLI*
DULUTH -'Z SSM'Jf
ESTABLISHED 1179.
WOODWARD& O
V-\
Pheses N.W.K.,
8421-8428: T. C. 821.
409, 310, 411
Chamber of Commerce
Whallon,Case&Co.
Stocks, Grain, Provisions
MEMBERS
New York Stock Exchange.
Chicago Board of Trade.
Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce*
Private wire to New York and Chicago.
68 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
NEW YORK LIFE ARCADE.
601 Board ofTrad*
DULUTH.
901 Cham, ot
Com. klplsJ
Wm. Dalrymple.
Wm. DalrvmpleCo.
GrainCommission
Receiving a specialty. Advances made
to shippers. Orders for future delivery
executed in all markets.
^The Van Dusen
Harrington Co.
rS MtLWAUKBb
&> Braiii
^Commission.
|f*--|_fi.
BataasfeT

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