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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, September 29, 1906, Image 7

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-09-29/ed-1/seq-7/

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"Tae Pianola with Metrostyle is vatttv
superior to all other piano-playmtr devices,"
Rosenthal.
THE AEOLIAN GO'S.
Metrostyle Pianola
AND
WEBER STECS WHEELOCK STDYVESANT
SOLD ONLY BY
Edward R.H/er P?es.&Mfr.
41-43 South Sixth St.
Largest Piano Store In the City.
VISITORS WELCOME.
Tflfiy^- 'mr 11
i.
PIANOLA-
PIANOS
2M Palais Royale
623-625 Nicollet
The Ideal Shopping Place
I
Mondays
THIS COUPON WORTH 15
SattirHay
Evening,
City News
TOWN TALK
$
-S
EVENTS OF TONIGHT
A Metropolitan Theater Robert
Loraine\u "Man and uperpaan.
Bijou Theater Bedford's
Hope."
Orphetrm TheaterModern vaude
ville.
Lyceum Theater"The Only
Way.
Unique TheaterVaudeville.
Dewey Theater Eeilly &
Wood's company in burlesque.
Art Gallery, Publio Library
BuildingExhibition of paintings.
Portland Avenue Church of
ChristLecture, Professor H. L.
Willett.
I Auditorium, Senator Beveridge.
$ -4
Expert heatingnew or remodeling
H. O. Robertsboth phones.
Several large Andrews heating sys
tems recently sent to Montana.
For catalog of Minneapolis School of
Fine Arts address Public Library
building.
Landis Undertaking Co., funeral di
rectors, 56 7th st S, successors to John
son & Landis.
Saturday any Boston fern in my store
for $1, worth up to $2. Latham the
florist, 83 Tenth street S.
The Gideons will have charge of the
meeting at Thirteenth Avenue Method
ist church, 1002 Thirteenth avenue S,
Sunday evening at 7:45.
Savings deposited with the Minne
sota Title Insurance & Trust Company
on or before the 5th of each month
will draw interest at 4 per cent from
the 1st.
Rt. Rev. Mgr. John S. Vaughan.
canon of Westminster cathedral, Lon
don, Eng, will preach at the hugh mass
at the Church of the Immaculate Con
ception tomorrow.
Winfield R. Gaylor, socialist candi
date for governor of Wisconsin, will
speak on the "Mission of Socialism"
at Holcomb hall, 45 Fourth street S.
tomorrow at 3 p.m.
At the First Baptist church Sunday
Riley will spi
"What It Means to Have Christ
night Dr. W. B. Rile speak on
One's Home." The large chorus choir
will render a special program of music.
A deposit made in the Hennepin
County Savings from now to Oct. 10
will draw interest from Oct. 1. High
est rate of interest paid compatible
with absolute safety. Compounded four
times a year.
All of the men who carried prelimi
narv returns to the county_ auditor's
office after the primary election can re
ceive the money for their services by
calling at County Treasurer Henry 0.
Hanke's office in the court house. The
vouchers have been made out and will
be paid on demand.
Reasons for using Pollock's Clipping
Bureau, FourthIt is the best and feast
expensive means by which public men
and those interested in politics can
keep in touch with what is printed
concerning themselves, their offices,
work or friends. Pollock's Clipping
Bureau, Minneapolis.
G. L. Morrill will preach on "Kil
kenny Cats" at the People's church,
Unique theater, Sunday at a.m. The
antagonism business and social life
of the present day is so prevalent that
the speaker feels a word on the subject
is not amiss. Passing references will
be made to the hotel murder, Atlanta
race war and Cuba.
The Hennepin County Medioal so
ciety will hold its regular monthly
meeting in the public reading room on
the first floor of the courthouse at 1:i5
tonight. The program will consist of
a symposium on Graves' disease, made
up of the following papers: Etiology
and Pathology, Dr. S, Marx White
Diagnosis and Medical Treatment, Dr.
J. W. Bell Surgical Treatment, Dr. J.
W. Little.
The Johnson Undertaking company
are now at 703 Hennepin avenue. J. H.
Johnson (for fifteen years president
and general manager Johnson-Landis
company and firm of Vail & Johnson,
established 1867.) Residence phone.
Main 143-J. Office, 3353. T. O. 9859.
At the Fowler Methodist church.
Franklin and Dupont avenues, Dr.
Montgomery will speak Sunday morn
ing on the subject, "The Pleasure of
Living." The morning service will be
the nature of a rally day service.
The choir will render "Breast the
Wave, Christian," by Shelly, and spe
cial eolo, 0 Paradise," Mass Olson.
At 12:15 the Sunday school will con*
vene, the new Sunday school orchestra
will be introduced and a special pro
gram of music and recitation will be
given At 7-45 m. Dr. Montgomery
will give a popular address on the sub
ject, "The Poor Man's King." The
selections by the choir will be A
Thousand Shall Fall," by Coombs.
Bung by Mr. Williams and quartet, and
"Art Thou Weary?"
For cuts, sprains, bruises and burns,
use Omega Oil. Trial bottle 10c.
GIRLS ARE DUPED
Circus Manager Deserts Six Maidens
After Borrowing Their Money.
Sit young -women employed In a boarding
house on Fourth street N have asked the police
to look for a bogus circus manager -who hired
them to travel with his show
Thev accompanied the man to St. Paul and
there he said he had only enough funds to take
two of the girls with him and WHS about to
discharge the others The idea didn't please
the would be performers and rather than be
separated they all came back home
As the circus manager borrowed money from
the girls, the police have been asked to arrest
him if he can be found
Clip this coupon, bring it and 10c to this store and you will receive a
25c PACKAGE RED CROSS SILVER POLISH
until stock is gone. Offer good all next week. Done to introduce our popu-
lar new brand of Silver Polish.
W. K. MORJSON CO.
247-249 Nicollet Ave.
Hardware, Cutlery, Tools, Paints, Athletic Goods, Kitchen-war*, etc.
SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES. I SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES.
BUSINESS
GHT SCHOO
Pullman Tourist Berths 91.00 to Chicago
Via Wisconsin Central.
Pullman tourist cars have been put in
service, in addition to Pullman stand
ard sleeping cars, on Wisconsin Cen
tral evening trains leaving Minneapolis
at 7:05 m. and St. Paul at 7:40 p.m.,tributary
with double berths for only $1.
NOW OPEN
Wednesdays Fridays
The Mimson Shorthand Institute
Quaranty Loan Building. RJ SMITH, President.
t*%^rJT
LIGHT THROWN O N
RIVER NAVIGATION
REAL ESTATE BOABD DINNER ED-
UCATIONAL I N CHARACTER.
A. L. Crocker Delivers Illustrated Ad
dress Covering Water Transportation
in General and Dealing in Particular
with Questions Relating to Improve
ment of Upper MississippiDrainage
Is Discussed.
m,
na
j. 13 -J TiiA.1. _i. (3 A T1V
continued a.t 8 Fifth street. S untiM Feb.
1, when the lease expires. It may be
decided to continue the work even
longer.
By unanimous vote, on motion of J.
U. Barnes, the board, at its dinner meet
ing last night at the Hotel Nicollet, de
cided to keep the bureau open, and a
standing vote of thanks was expressea
to 0. L. Sawyer for his excellent man
agement of the advertising work of the
bureau.
Congratulations for Chute.
R. D. Cone presided in' the absence
of President W. Y. Chute, who is on
the Pacific coast. It waB voted to tel
egraph Mr. Chute congratulations on his
wedding day, next Tuesday. Rental
of wall space- in the bureau to real
estate firms and other matters of
deobjection.
tail concerning the bureau were re
ferred to the executive committee. It
was reported that the committee had
already laid before the board of tax
levy the request of the real estate men
that a $25,000 appropriation for the ad
vertising of Minneapolis be included
in the year's budget, and that the com
missioners had taken the matter under
consideration.
Upon motion of W. B. Boardman,
who is an enthusiast on the subject,
the matter of the drainage of swamp
lands in northern Minnesota was re
ferred to the legislative committee to
act. The committee was instructed also
to confer with the St. Paul and Duluth
real estate exchanges, as all are equally
interested in having the state legisla
ture make the necessary appropriation
of $15,000 to secure the survey of theelectricity.
swamp lands. Drainage Is Imperative.
It is necessary to get the legislature
to appropriate $15,000 for the survey
of the state lands," said Mr. Board
man. "The government appropriated
$15,000 to survey the Indian lands and
other states have appropriated money
to continue similar work which the gov
ernment has been doing elsewhere.
State surveys, it was found, were not
satisfactory. This appropriation must
bo secured early in the next session it
the services of the government survey
ors are to be used. 1 believe we could
get $2,000,000 government appropria
tion to drain the lands if the survey
work is done. That will reclaim 110,-
000,000 acres of good land for settle
ment by farmers.
Light on Navigation.
The special feature of the evening
was an illustrated talk by A. L. Crock
er, who is prominent in the movement
to make Minneapolis the head of navi
gation on the Mississippi. With lan
tern slides and maps he showed the
reservoirs at the head waters and
illuminated his subject fully. The ad
dress aroused great interest in the sub
ject among the real estate men and was
a strong move by the navigation pro
moters as preliminary to the Convention
of the Upper Mississippi River Im
provement association in Minneapolis
next month.
Some of the Points.
Mr. Crocker said in part:
Of all the elements of commercial
prosperity, freight is undoubtedly the
most sensitive. It follows the line of
least resistance, and it is remarkable
how great a difference a minute change
in freight rates will produce. The av
erage cost per ton a mile of all theI
railroads of the United States is 7
mills. Last year on the Ohio and Mis
sissippi rivers, 70,000 tons were drawn
by one tug boat the empty barges re
turned to starting point, and a hand
some profit made at a cost of one-third
of 1 mill per ton per mile. The cele
brated Philadelphia engineer, L. M.
Haupt. says the cost of transportation
by artificial waterways is about one
third only of that by rail, while by
open water it is lower and that a na
tion that ignores an economy of 66 per
cent in transportation is wasting its
resources and imposing onerous burdens
upon its people.
From Keokuk north on the Missis
sippi river, and its branches, up to its
head waters In Wisconsin and Minneso
ta, ar numerous water power Bites, af
fording cheap power for manufactur
ing. Some of these are already util
ized, but the great use is yet to come
and it means manufacturing and
freight tonnage. The growing indus
trial energies of the west will be satis
fied with nothing less than the canali
zation of its rivers and the building of
artificial waterways to bring to its
mills the raw materials and to carry
away the finished product.
Cheap and Free.
The greatest authorities on earth say
Minneapolis can easily and cheaply
have an open water channel worth
many railroads and free to everybody,
Further, that when waterways are
properly improved, no interstate com
merce commission is needed for protec
tion against undue rates. The water
ways do that.
Narrowing our discussion to our local
commercial point composed of Minne
apolis and St. Paul, we find a railway
mileage centering here equal to that
which centers in New York, and a vast
country rapidly growing, as
yet comparatively sparsely settled
that as it fills: will steadily build up
and increase this already great twin
city traffic gateway to the new north
west. This center is as visibly a focal
trade point as Chicago, Pittsburg or
New Orleans. I do not believe there
is anv one thing that can so promote
the future prosperity of Minneapolis as
the practical improvement of our river.
I have yet to see a man of experi
ence in these matters who has not said
it would be the greatest possible bene
fit to this city. I have yet to learn of
an instance where waterways have been
improved that the cities and tributary
country have not benefited. Chicago,
Pittsburg, Liverpool and Manchester
have and are spending vast sums from
their own taxation and private means
to get improved waterways. A little
more than one-third of what Chicago
is giving away from her private means
will give a great waterway from Min
neapolis to St. Louis, and Minneapolis
does not iaye to pay for it. She sim
ply has to throw her energies into the
work of inducing the United States
government to appropriate the needed
money.
The Mississippi river abbVfe St. Paul
is exceedingly well adapted to water
power purposes. The banks are gener
ally high, making flowage rights com
paratively inexpensive the bed is gen
erally firm, making foundations com
paratively easy the slope of the river
is exceptionally steep, making mill
sites numerous the total fall from
Grand Rapids to St. Paul is about 578
feet: nd a reservoir system at the
head waters of the river greatly ia-
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL
creases its low-water" flow while reduc
ing the volumetof its floods which woula
otherwise tena^ fojdrown out te mill
dams.
Practical Va^ne^of River.
The practical vft&e to Minneapolis
of the river navigation has been
doubted by many, simply because it
does not exist today. Further doubt
has been expressed as .to terminal facil
ities being available. William De la
Barre has lived among us for twenty
eight years, and is the engineering heaa
of the Minneapolis Mill company, one
of the largest in the world. He is a
German by birth and familiar with the
engineering of both Europe and Amer
ica, and his engineering work forms
the basis for vast financial investments.
He says:
"With reference to Minneapolis be
ing made the head of navigation on the
ssissippi river thru the aid of the
+u0 two government locks and dams now
lis and St. Paul, and the expected re
vival of navigation on the upper Mis
"ppi river, I would say that prac
tically the best place for landing and
the erection of depot, wharves, ware
houses and other structures to be used
in connection therewith, is in the vicin
ity of the Washington avenue bridge,
on the west side of the river. Some
men conversant with the local condi
tions at that point have found fault
with the location, claiming it to be un
suitable for the purpose and impracti
cal for handy and up-to-date operation
for the receiving and delivery of
freight, inasmuch as the river banks
are 100 feet above the level of the
water in the river.
Mechanical Appliances.
I maintain that this is no serious
Modern mechanical means
can be provided at a reasonable cost to
raise or lower goods from and to the
boats from the tpp of the bank of the
river, and a practical way has been
found by which the products of the
flouring mills can be transported from
the milling district to the wharf of the
boats.
A tunnel can be constructed from
the water's edge under the public
streets to the mill district, in the white
sand rock underlying the limestone
ledge formation which extends from
the river to some distance above the
mill district. Flour and, other by-prod
ucts of the mills can be lowered thru a
shaft into this tunnel and transported
to the boat landing, either by cars or
other transportation means operated by
I am sure that there is no
special mechanical or engineering dif
ficulty in the execution of this
scheme.'' SAYES HAIR AND LIBERTY
"CLAIRE" WELLS FLIES TO IOWA
TO AVOID BARBER AND TRUANT
OFFICER. "Claire" Wells, one of Minneapolis'
most prominent retail newspaper deal
ers, has fled to Marshalltown, Iowa, to
save the luxuriant blonde curls, which
made him one of the conspicuous news
ies of the city, from the destructive
touch of the barber's shears. Inci
dentally he is escaping from the thral
dom or the schoolroom to which, ac
cording to Truant Officer H. O.
Davis,*he has a chronic aversion.
Dispatches from Marshalltown state
that ''Claire" is being held there by
the police and that he left Minneapo
lis to save his curls, which had been
ordered off by the school authorities.
His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Irving Wells,
1914 Ninth street S, formerly lived in
Marshalltown, and the school authori
ties say that it is a favorite refuge for
Wells, Jr., when he is Aajcl pressed by,
the truant officer* i
"There is no general school order
saying at what age children shall cease
wearing long hair," said Superintend
ent C. Jordan today. "Parents usu
ally exercise sufficiently good judgment
in the matter. I believe that Ba nd
H. Painter, principal of the Adams
school, did suggest that young Wells
would be less conspicuous without his
curls."
"He is a persistent truant," said
Truant Officer Davis. "Last Tuesday
got him into school after hunting him
all over town. He stayed .-just one day.
Principal Painter did take up the ques
tion of hair-cutting with his mother,
who expressed her willingness, but in
sisted that the father be consulted."
STATION 0 TOO SMALL
Postal Authorities Seek Location for
New Postofflce.
La:
irger" quarterMinneapolis
are
tion
fr neededpostofflce, of the
for sta-
located at 22 Plymouth avenue N. The
lease does not expire until March 1,
but the postal authorities are already
looking over the ground in the hope
that a suitable building can be found
in the vicinity of Plymouth and Wash
ington avenues N. If one can not be
found there the station will be estab
hshed further north. A building with
2,500 square feet of floor spstce, and
well lighted and ventilated, willl "be
required to accommodate the growth ot
the station.
We have no connection with the
Goodyear Rain Coat Company. Good
year Rubber Co., 375-377 Sibley street,
St. Paul, Minn. AMUSEMENTS
Mattaee Dally,
Every Evening.
DEWEY THEATRE
REILLY WOODS
BIG SHOWS
Next week "THE CHEERY BLOSSOMS"
FAMILY THEATER.
Continuous Vaudeville Afternoon and
Evening. Prices 10c, 20c, 30c Matineei
10c and 30c.
Wednesday Matinee
All Seats SBo
Week of
Oct. 7
M!MfWq$ffl9PW$
81fe1 f&l&ert,
SUSSIVJHOYE D,
IN POLICE COURT
WIFE SLAYER SHOWS NO SIGN OF
REMORSE.
Detectives Guard Prisoner to Prevent
Attempts at Escape or Selfdestruc-
tionHearing Is Set for Oct. 3, and
Accused Murderer Is Remanded to
Prison.
Calm and indifferent, showing no
signs of brooding over his crime, Henry
Sussman appeared in police court to
day, where he was formerly charged
with murdering his wife in the Glen
wood hotel Wednesday morning.
At 10 o'clock Sussman was taken
from his cell in the city jail and es
corted down the enclosed jail stairs to
the "bull pen." Four detectives ac
companied him and kept a careful
watch over him to prevent any attempt
to commit suicide or to obtain his free
dom.
He sat down on a bench for a mo
ment and all other cases were set aside
that he might be arraigned and taken
back to his ceil. The courtroom was
crowded to the doors, and long before
the court opened for the minor cases
a crowd thronged the hall anxious to
get a glimpse of the man who could
shoot his wife down in cold blopd and
show no signs of remorse or worry for
the future.
James Wirtensohn, clerk, read the
complaint charging him with murder
in the first degree. During the reading
he looked about the room as tho ex
pecting to see his friends there.
Examined Oct. 8.
As soon as the charge wasread, At
torney Fred McGee of St. Paul, who
has been retained for the defense, asked
for an examination. County Attorney
Al J. Smith asked that the examination
be set for Oct. 3. He explained that
the grand jury would be in session
Tuesday and would probably dispose or
the case at that time. The attorney
for the defense insisted that he should
have an examination before the grand
jury meets, but after a short argument
Judge E. F. Waite set the hearing for
Wednesday.
Everyone was astonished at the boy
ish appearance of Sussman. There is
nothing vicious about his face, ana
while the complaint was being read he
looked the clerk squarely in the eye.
He was taken back to his cell immedi
ately after the hearing and will be
kepi there until after the hearing Wed
nesday or until the grand jury has dis
posed of his case.
CHARITIES MEETING IN
SDMMER, RESORT STATE
Beginning June 12 and remaining in
session until June 19, the National Con
ference of Charities and Correction
will have its annual meeting in Min
neapolis. These dates have just been
fixed by the national executive commit
tee. An announcement to this effect
was received by E. D. Solenberger of
the Associated Charities today. As
soon as Wallace G. Nye, secretary of
the public affairs committee of the
Commercial club, returns to the city,
steps will be taken to form a local
entertainment committee. With the con
vention announcement, which will be
sent out to 15,000 persons by the gen
eral secretary of the conference, will
be a leaflet setting forth the advan
tages of Minnesota as a summer resort
state. The idea is to induce eastern
delegates to combine attendance at the
conference with their summer vaca
tions.
Work on the plans for the state con
ference, which will be held at Red
Wing Nov. 17, are well advanced. The
program committee, which consists of
E. D. Solenberger of Minneapolis,
Frank L. Randall of St. Cloud, L. A^
Rossing of St. Paul, A. J. Eckstein of
New Ulm and C. E. Faulkner of Min
neapolis, will meet in the office of the
board of control in the state capftol
next Wednesday afternoon.
Optician. 409 Nicollet
INVESTORS
Desiring a good rate of Interest with
abundant security should call and exam
ine the first mortgage farm loans for sale
by
Minneapolis Trust Company
Fourth Street and Hennepin Avenue.
AMUSEMENTS
LYCEUM THEATRE.
Matinee* Sunday, Thursday
Chas. E. Blaney Presents the Talented Hebrew Delineator
HARRY FIRST
-IN
A Hebrew lhay with Heart Interest, Pathos &ad Humor.
September 29, I9Q0V
I
EYES
Examined Pree
Artificial Byaa.
BEST,
vid
of Concord, N -H, member of tbe
Christian Science Board of Lectureship
of the First Church of Christ, Scientist,
in Boston, Mass and Cordlallr Invites
the Public to be Present.
SUNDAY, .SEPT. 30, 3:30 P. M,
TONIGHT-LAST TIME
"BEDFORD'S HOPE"
Week Commencing With a Popular Priced
Matinee Tomorrow at 8:80.
Souvenir Matinee
Saturday
ISAACS
^h BOWERY
.P*M* Single Ommdlaa F1SKO O'HARA
J&i^Mfft. BLARNEY OF IRELAND."
3 1
Pieces
$2.00
Or 12.21
DellfiPed tt Any
Ptlnt Within
200 lilei.
Or $3.75 Delivered te
Any Poitt Witbla
200 Miles.
Breakage
Guaranteed.
the 0a#-Pftfw fiaajftftr
UmuMtmtmlmkwm.
ByChas.Klein Author of The
Music Master
Saturday.
THE FRAWLEYS
A TBEMENDOUS BUOOT88in
The Only Way
Next week "MOTHS"
HE AUDITORIUM
Under the auspices ot
First Church of Christ, Scientist,
FREE LECTURE ON CHRISTIAN S8IENCE
By Retlrving C. Toillnson, LM.,C.aB,
Sea Sal Tta-
iir.
[Your Credit Is Good at The New Englandft
EXTRAORDINARY SALE
Initial Dinner Sets!
METROPOLITAN
AND THE
SECOND YEAR in ^m^^^ggju^jjff^L^
A Feast of Fun,
Deaut and Dolo
FRED MACE Umpire
5000 BEAUTIFUL DINNER SETS OF THIRTY
ONE (31) PIECES, DECORATED IN GOLD
AND COLORS. Each and Every Piece Orna
mented with Initial of Your
Name In Gold Letters asi
Above IllustratedALL
FOR$2.0m0
THE EXTRAORDINARY'
PRICE OF ONLY
3 Nights SUSS Thursday, Oct. 4
HARRY ASKIN PRESENTS THE TRIITMPHANT MUSICAL SUCCESS.
THE
UMPIRE
Following: Excellent Cast:
EDITH YtfRBINGTOH
GUBLMA BAKER
HELENA SALINGER
RAYMOND WELLS
HARRY HANLON
GEORGE DAMEREL
Bvwjr rissa ui*
EACH SET CONSISTS OF A COMPLETE SER
VICE OF FINE SEMI-PORCELAIN In the
Following Assortment:
Six Cups, S|x Saucers, Six 6-Inch Plates, Stx
Fruits, One 8-lnoh Dish and 8lx Individual But*
tare, which even in Plain White Ware, without
the Initial or Decoration of Any Kind, Could
not be Duplloated Anywhere for Less Than
Double Our Price.
THE SET WHIOH WE OFFER, with the.Initial
Burnt In and Decorated as Above Described, Is
Easily Worth $5.00. IT IS POSITIVELY THE
GREATEST DINNER SET BARGAIN EVER
OFFERED BY ANY STORE
IN THE COUNTRY.
ANY$2.00starvaiiinunnsZ
INITIAL FROM A TO
WHILE THEY LAST
AT i
WE ALSO OFFER 1,000 (OUR FOURTH CAR
LOAD) FORTY-TWO (42) PIECE DINNER
SETS, Consisting of 8ix Cups, Six Saucers,
Six Dinner Plates, Six Tea Plates, Six Sauce
Dishes, Six Individual Butters, One Platter,
Ona Sugar Bowl, One Butter Dish, One Round
Vegetable Dish, One Long Vegetable Dlah and
One Pickle Dish, IN THE SAME FINE SEMI
PORCELAIN WARE, DECORATED SIMILAR-
LY TO THE THIRTY-ONE (31) PIECE SETS
ABOVE DESCRIBED IN
GOLD AND COLOR8,
AND$3.50
WITH YOUR OWN INITIAL
THEREON, FOR..**
SPECIAL NOTICE.
Either of the Above Sots, Securely Packed and
Guaranteed against Breakage, Delivered, Car
rying Charges Prepaid By Us, to any Point
Within 200 Miles of Minneapolis, on Receipt ot
Prloe, Plus 2So.
Be 8UPB, Ordering, to
Desired.
4 fiS TOMORRO W NIGH JE2,
Henry B. Harris Presents
THE LION
ii
rOTJB months in CHICAGO.
Direct From the
Brand, Chicago
LONG
RUN
Record
350 Per-
formances.
ETHEL PENNINGTON
FRANK ALLWORTH
MARGARET M'DONALD
BRADLHE MARTIN
ALLAN RAMSAY
JESSIE HOUSTON
gHE! The Great Football GameThe Famous BroilersReal Beauty Chorus
OCT. 7th.
FOUR NIGHTS. QIT NTH A
BEGINNING 'Wli UJ*
Klaw & Erlanger Present Qeo. M. Cohan's Musical Flay
45
MINUTES
PROM
BROADWAY
Wit FA TEMPLETO N !,?*New
OCTOBER 11, 12, 13Matinee Saturday
AMERICA'S FOREMOST ROMANTIC ACTOR.
JAMES O'NEILL
l* Supported by a Poy/erf ult Company of Players.
Positively Hla Farewell Tour In Dumas' Masterpiece.
"MONTEAlexander CRISTO"
Both Fhonet, 8997.
EI Raymond
Res. Mgr
MODERN VAUDEVILLE
Brenlnfs, 15c, 36c, 50c. Prices aerer cn*tt"
'3
Designate Initial
FiMrn.iturc
&Caix*pct Co
5th St., 6th St and 1st A v. S.j
L. H. soon
MANAGER.
Th Dramatic
Success of
the Centur
MOUSE
MATINEE
WEDNESDAY.
30 Weeks
Chicago.
20 Weeks
York.
WILFEED CLARKE & CO.
CORAM
3 HICKMAN BROS.
IDA O'DAY
GARTELLE BROTHERS
MB. & MBS. EDW. KEMP,
MAJESTIC TRIO
KINODROME

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