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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, October 02, 1906, Image 7

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-10-02/ed-1/seq-7/

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MONTHLY
per month buys an
per month buysa
per month buys a
per month buys a
Eawaed B.Byer, Pres. & Mgr.
41-43 So. Sixth, St.
Oldest and Largest Piano Store.
The NewThe Stylish
Right Things in
-The
HABERDASHERY
The New Shirts %\M $4.09
The New Underwear, 8aJrent 50c up
The New Hosiery 25c to 53.50
The New Gloves $1.00 up
The New Hats $3 to and $12
The New Vests $1.00 to $6.00
See the lineVariety enough to
satisfy anybody.
W. V. WHIPPLE
426 NICOLLET AVE.
PART OF FALL STOCK OF
Beautiful New Pianos
are now on display in
attractive store.
FISCHERS
FRANKLINS
SCHAEFFERS
CHICKERINGS
and GRANDS
Come in and see them.
(Easy payments)
RELIABLE PIANO DEALERS
853 2nd Av. So., City
Established 20 years.
8000 graduates.
'Business. Shorthand,
Telegraphic. English.
Normal courses, day
and evening.
Circulars Free.
CATON. Pres.
I
707 NICOLLET AVE.
^aton College
Henry J. Gjertsen &
Harry A. Lund
ATTORNEY8-AT-LAW
1015 N. Y. Llf Bldg.. Minneapolis.
i Best facilities for collection of lnherltanes
and handing of legal business In Europe.
Ji
Twenty-one years' experience In the general
practice of law In Minnesota. Special atten
Itlon given to probate and real estate law.
CASH-
I!
EYES
Examined Free
Artificial Eyes.
BEST,
Optician. 409 Nicollet
City News
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3d, 1906,
Is the last day for depositing money in order to draw interest during the
present quarter, beginning October 1st, 1906.
The Farmers and
Savings Bank of
ASSETSConsisting of first mortgages on real estate, state,
county, city and other municipal bonds, etc $13,634,182.03
LIABILITIESConsisting only of individual deposits 12i860,912.08
Surplus and undivided profits $773,269.95
On morning of Oct. 1st, 1906 898,243.61
Number of depositors, 52,646.
Number of deposits made on Oct. 1st, 1906 1,429.
This bank is a savings bank I docs no commercial business and does
not take the risks of commercial banking. Tt is a mutual savings bank.
It has no capital stock or stockholders. I is therefore not compelled to
earn dividends or profits for stockholders. Safety is its first consideration.
The bank invests its funds solely in first mortgages on real estate, worth
fiom two to five times the amount loaned, and in approved municipal bonds.
It pays such interest on deposits as is justified by the safest banking
methods.
TRUSTEES.
E. Moulton,
Win. Q. Northup,
H. C. Akeley,
John De Laittre,
N. Hawley,
T. B. Janney,
Cavour S. Langdon,
Thomas Lowry.
nw
TOWN TALK
-3
EVENTS OF TONIGHT
Metropolitan Theater"The Lion
and the Mouse."
Bijou Theater"OldIsaacs from
the Bowery."
Orpheum TheaterMottern-vauile-
ville.
Lyceum TheaterThe Frawleys
in "Moths."
Unique TheaterVaudeville.
Dewey TheaterCherry Blossoms
company.
Art Gallery, Public Library
BuildingExhibition of paintings.
St. John's Lutheran Chuuh
Central conference of the English
Evangelical Lutheran church.
Lake Harriet PavilionAnnual
meeting Linden Hills Improvement
association.
Plymouth and First Oongrega-'
tional ChurchesGeneral congre
gational association of Minnesota,
semicentennial.
Hennepin Avenue M. E. Church
Northern Minnesota M. E. con
ference, annual meeting.
TOMORROW'S CALENDAR
Art Gallery, Public Librprv
BuildingExhibition of paintings.
Hennepin Avenue M. R. Church
Northern Minnesota M. E con
ference, annual meeting, aH (lav.
Plymouth and First Congrega
tioral ChurchesGeneral Congre
gational association of Minnesota,
semicentennial, all dav.
St. John's Lutheran Church'
Central conference of the English
Evangelical Lutheran church, all
dav.
$
"CBERBY BLOSSOMS" AT THE DEWEY.
Patrons of tne Dewey theater will witness a
fine performance if they will attend the "Cherry
Blossoms," now filling a week's engagement.
Tho management has spared neither expense nor
time to make this one of the best attractions
playing here. The companv is comprised of ten
comedians and twenty handsome women, who
do some fine work in the chorus. Nest week
there will appear Miner's Dreamland, with Dave
Marian as the principal comedian.
Planter's Life Saved by Chamberlain's
Colic, Cholera and Diarrhoea
Remedy.
Mr. D. Powers, a well-known
planter of Adair, Miss., says: I have
relied upon Chamberlain's Colic, Chol
era and Diarrhoea Remedy for ten
^years as a sure cure for attacks of colic
and all stomach and bowel complaints.
Less than a year ago I believe this
remedy saved my life, and it has
always given me immediate relief. I
is tne best medicine made for bowel
complaints.''
Alfred F. Pillsbury,
John Washburn,
O. C. Wyman,
OFFICERS.
JOHN DE LAITTRE,
President.
THOMAS LOWRY,
Vice President.
E. H. MOULTON,
Second Vice President and Assistant
Treasurer.
N. F. HAWLEY,
Secretary and Treasurer.
G. H. RICHARDS,
Second Assistant Treasurer.
F. GARCKEN,
Assistant Secretar^T"*"-
CLAUDE B. LEONARD,
*JP2 counsel. ^^^4^,
TWIN CITIES TO BE
METHODIST MEGGA
in tho P of rh p.
whole of North Dakota
S
H. O. Roberts is expert furnace
Dr. Both phones.
Landis Undertaking Co., funeral di
rectors, 56 7th st S, successors to John
son & Landis.
Souvenir postals, complete line in
views, comics, art and citv views, at
the Century News store, 6 3d street S.
Souvenir postals, complete line in
views, comics, art and city views, at the
Century News store, 6 Third street S.
There will be a meeting of the
Wheaton Hustling club at 219 Bank of
Commerce building at 8 o'clock to
night.
The Minnesota Phrenological associa
tion opens its club meetings for thewhether
winter this evening at Science hall,
514 Nicollet avenue, and will meet here
after legularly every Tuesday.
George Watson, a trusty at the
workhouse, escaped vesteidav and
isto
thought to have gone towards Osseo.
He was mowing the lawn and while
the guards were inside the building be
walked away. He had only three days
more to serve.
The Johnson Undertaking company
are now at 703 Hennepin avenue. J. H.
Johnson, general manager (for fifteen
vears president and general manager
Johnson-Landis company and firm of
Vail & Johnson, established 1867). Res
idence phone, Maine 143-J. Office,
3353. T. C. 9859.
Tom Wilton of South Minneapolis
tried to cross the street in front of a
Fourth avenue car at Twentv-fourth
street late yesterday snd was knocked
to one side of the track. His hesd was
badly bruised and he was taken to
the Northwestern hospital. His in
juries are not serious.
C. E. Bullard has notified Governor
J. A. Johnson of his desire to resign as
commissioner of Itasca park. Mr. Bul
lard has held the position for three
years. He desires now to move to
Wadena. He has consented, on request
of the governor, to withhold his resig
nation till after election.
Every resident of Linden Hills and
Cottage City is expected to attend the
annual meeting of the Linden Hills Im
provement association in the Lake Har
riet pavilion this evening. Officers
will be elected, the reports of the lawn
and garden committees made, and plans
for the work of another year discussed.
Raymond Gillette and Ralph Can
terbury, who live on the East Side,
were thrown from an automobile and
badly bruised early Sunday evening
while riding on Minnehaha boulevard.
The auto ran into a tiee and the occu
pants were thrown to the ground. The
auto was badly damaged, but the boys
were not seriously in-jured.
preachers, it
1\ \rn
THREE CONFERENCES OF M.
CHURCH TO BE HELD.
Northern Minnesota and German Con
ferences in Minneapolis, Minnesota
in St. Paul, and a Semicentennial
Celebration by All Three, with Many
Notables of tho Church Present.
Either Minneapolis or St. Paul will
be the Mecca of every Methodist
preacher in Minnesota this week, and
mO
Minneanohs will AS dmw frnm^fe
mmneapons win also draw trom tne
western halt of Wisconsin
111191
3
ferenc week" for the Minnesota con
fcrence, the annual session of which
will be held in Cential Park church,
St. Paul, presided over by Bishop C.
C. McCabe of Evanston, 111. for
the1
Northern Minnesota conference, which
will be held Hennepin Avenue
Families Apprehensive.
held in the Central German Methodist ItE^l^iZ^Jl" ^"P^SJSSSl
church, and presided over by Bishop
Thomas B. Neely, who is in general
charge of the South American mission
conferences, with headquarters in Bue
nos Aires, Argentina.
Preachers who aie members of other
For Northern Minnesota.
denominations, and the great body of the afternoon there will be a Bible
laymen, can scarcely appreciate the study, conducted by Rev. C. W. Hertz-
importance of the annual conference ler. followed ^bycommittee sessions. I
to the Methodist preacher. The Meth
odist preacher, theoretically and gen
erally in practice, holds his charge only
from one annual conference to the next.
He may be reassigned by his bishop to
the same charge for another year, and
so on indefinitely, but there is always
the chance that, in rearranging the
work of a body of 150 to 200 or more
maJy b-e necessary
men who expected to remain where
they were. The change may be to a
better charge or it may be into a small
town, where the work of the preacher
is all but hopeless, and where the sal
ary is correspondingly small and uncer
tain. I this uncertainty the anxiety
of the itinerant is shared by his wife
and family. I is a question, indeed,
the hardship of moving, sun
dering friendships in one town to make
new ones in another^is not harder for
the wife. To many preachers it means
a change that is beneficial, in that it
gives them fresh pasture and a chance
preach old sermons.
The first session of the northern Min
nesota conference will be held in Hen
nepin Avenue church Wednesday morn
ing at 8:30 o'clock. This first session
will be entirely religious in character.
The preachers will be too busy shaking
hands after a year of separation to set
tle down to business, so the first fore
nobn is always given over to the sacra
ment of the Lord's Suppei, followed by
Real Work of Conference.
memorial services in the afternoon will
fill the clay.
The routine" Mfpsk of the Minnesota
conference in Sti Paul will in general
be the same as the Northern Minne
sota conferences The anniversaries of
the missionary societies will be ad
dressed by substantially the same men,
and of necessity will be held at differ
ent hours. A conference of lay dele
will be held Friday and Saturday
in the First church, Dayton avenue
and Third street.
Program of the Germans.
The twentieth annual session of the
Northern German conference will be
held in Minneapolis during the latter
part of this week. Services will be
held in the Central Methodist Episco
pal church and the sessions will pegin
Wednesday evening with a preaching
service.
At 8 o'clock Thursday morning there
will be a communion service and the
will
E.gates
conference will be formally opened.
Btu
hou
ana
oa^n nn Th rv
tHeitzer on "The
TM n it"
con
address by Rev
league', and a committee session.
the evening the conference sermon will
be preached by Rev. D. Pfaff.
On Friday morning Bishop T. B. Nel
will preside at a business session of
the conference. The afternoon program
will include a Bible study conducted
leaeue
an
tamed by the church, and a committee
session. In the evening there will be
a mission service, conducted by Rev.
J. J. Hoffman, and the yearly meeting
of the Woman's Foreign Missionary
society, at which addresses will be made
by Mrs. H. Sauter and Mrs. I. W. Joyce.
Satmday forenoon will be given over
to a session of the conference and in
Professor Hirseh and Professor
H. F. Hoffert.
Preceding the preaching service on
Sunday afternoon, to be presided over
by Bishop Nelly, there will be a love
feast, at which Rev. F. Kopp will offi
ciate. In the afternoon there will be
ordination services, and an* ordination
to shift sermon by
Professorl
the delivery of the conference sermon. born, on the Bobbins farm, four miles
preached this year by Rev. A. H. Mc- i southwest of Wauwatosa, to Wauwato-
j
I sa. He stipulated to the Foster Con-
A preliminary meeting will be held
this evening, when addresses will be
given by T. B. Wlalker, who will pre
side, J. T. Wyman, former Governor
S. R. Van San, Rev. J. B. Hmgley, D.D..
and others.
Routine business of the conference
The afternoons and evenings will be
given over to meetings of auxiliaries of
the church and to general meetings on
mission and other topics. Much of the
real work of the conference will be
done afternoons and evenings when the
presiding bishop and his cabinet, com
posed of the presiding elders of the
conference, get their heads together.
The presiding elders, one at the head of
each district, are familiar with the work
in their respective districts, and by
comparing notes and trading men they
are able to figure out what changes
should be made for the good of the
preachers and churches concerned.
The women of the church will be par
ticularly interested in the meetings of
the Foreign and Home Missionary so
cieties. The annual meeting of the for
mer will be held Wednesday at 2 p.m.
in Hennepin Avenue church. Bishop W.
F. Oldham of India will deliver the ad
dress. The same speaker will address
the annual missionary anniversary to
be held Wednesday evening.
The anniversary of the Women's
Home Missionary society will be held
Friday at 2 p.m. in Hennepin Avenue
church, and will be addressed by Mrs.
Anna Kent of Orange, N. J., and Miss
Nellie Snider of Lena, 111.
Mrs. I. W. Joyce on Saturday from
3 to 4 p.m. will be hostess to the wives
of the visiting ministers and other wo
men who come to the city for the con
ference. She will be assisted in receiv
ing by the wives of the ministers sta
tioned in Minneapolis.
Bishop Wilson is national president
of the Anti-Saloon league^and on Sat
urday evening he will deliver the prin
cipal address at the temperance rally
to be held in the church.
The Semi-Centennial.
Of historic interest will be the semi
centennial celebration of the organi
zation of the first Minnesota Methodist
conference which will be held in Cen
tral Park church, St. Paul, Friday af
ternoon. The three conferences then
in session will participate in the anni
versary. Dr. Chaffee, long a
member -of the Minnesota conference,
and of the Northern Minnesota confer
ence after it was organized, will deliv
er the principal address. Other vet
eran members of the early conference
will also speak.
Or minor historic interest will be the
ceremony of opening and dedicating
the new Asbury hospital, Ninth avenue
S and Fourteen street, at 7:30 p.m.
Fridav. Bishops Wilson, McCabe, Nee
ly, and other notables will take part.
The laying of the cornerstone of the
new Fowler church will be celebrated
Sunday at 5 p.m. The visiting bishops
will take part? in {he ceremony.
Sunday will be a full day." Bishops
i and prominent officials of the general
church will occupy the pulpits, of the
leading Methodist churches at the regu-,
lar hours of services, and the consecra
tion of elders and deaconesses and the
G. B.
Rev A Nast wil officiateAddicks.e at th
evening preaching service.
Rub your poor, tired, aching feet with
Omega Oil. Trial bottle, dOc.
PRESERVES OLD HOME
PRESIDENT D. UNDEERWOOD
OF THE ERIE REMEMBERS BOY
HOOD DAYS I N WISCONSIN.
will transacted at the morning sessions. storage purposes, but the exterior has
It is the usual custom tofixarbitrarily
the "bar" of the conference, which
corresponds to what was originally the
bar of a court of justice, a space in the
front of the room reserved for the mem
bers of the conference. Visitors will
always be welcome to any other seats
in the auditorium or gallery. There
are no star chamber sessions of the an
nual conference. If a member js to be
tried for any violation of rules it will
be done after his character has been
up for passage. If charges are made
the examination will be made by a reg
ularly appointed committee, and the"
trial, if one is ordered, will be con
ducted under the direction of his pre
siding elder, not in the annual con
ference. However, in case anything se
rious is charged against a preacher
when his character is questioned, he
can be suspended pending his examin
ation. So far ats is known there will
be nothing again'st the character of any
member of any of the three conferences
which will meet this week.
Frederick D. Underwood, president
of the Erie road, formerly manager of
the Soo line and a resident of Minne
apolis, is going to show WairwPtosa,,
his early home village in Wisconsin,
that he is still loyal to the region in
which he spent his bovhood. where his
parents and immediate relatives are
buiied.
After he left Minneapolis last week
he went to Wauwatosa, near Milwau
kee, and made arrangements for tht
vemoval of the house in which he was
strnction company that it be moved in
tact. He wanted every portion of the
old building, to the boards where he
carved his initials as a bov, pre
served.
For many years the old building has
been usedn achanged, a corncribdantd folr others
P?
nof
an i stil bear
a semblance to the structure that Fred
Underwood called home when he was
a carefree boy. Evell "the chimneys
still stand, and they will1 be boxed in
before being moved.
Since Mr, Underwood rose to his
position as one of the leading railroad
magnates of the epst he has not for
gotten his old friends, and there are
many nvirks of his generosity visible
in the Milwaukee suburb. He has con
tributed money for church improve
ments and for the armorv for tho
minute men, next to which his oldwho
home will stand. His private car issample
named Wauwatosa.
The old house will be fr?ed up and
made habitable, and a caretaker will
be installed to look after the old place.
ENGLISH LUTHERANS
TO HAVE CONFERENCE
The seventh annual conference of the
English Evangelical Lutheran cturch
will begin tonight in St. John's Luth
eran church, Seventeeenth street and
Chicago avenue S, and will continue
its sessions thru Wednesday. Manv
important matters are to be taken up
and in consequence a large attendance
is expected.
The conference program is as fol
lows:
TUESDAY, OCT. 2.-8 P.M.
Chief service with holy communion.
Sermon Rey. G. H. Trabert, D.D.
WEDNESDAY. 9 A.M.
Matins. Reports of president and treasurer.
Report of standing committees.
Reports from the field.
Augsburg Confession, Article VI. (Fruit of
FaithCood Works) Rev. John Keehly
WEDNESDAY2 P.M.
Devotional service.
Israel lx., 11, "Practical Exposi
tion" Rev. J. A. Zundel
"Baptism, the Entrance Into the Kingdom
of God" Rev. W. H. Gable
"Confirmation and Membership in the
Congregation" Rev. Frank S. Beistel
WEDNESDAY 8 P.M.
Vespers.
"Need of Mission Fields, Both Home and
Foreign" Rev Frank E. Jensen
"Our Young People and Mission
Work" Rev. A. J. D. Haupt
THURSDAY9 A.M.
Matins. Business.
Study of Mark vii., 1-23 Rev. J. J. Clemens
THURSDAY2 P.M.
"Whither Is the Church Drifting? Rom. xil., 2,
"Be Not Conformed to This World."
Exposition Rev. C. L. Warstler
Discussion Rev. J. L. Murphy
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy One of
the Best on the Market.
For many years Chamberlain's Cough
Eemedv has constantly gained in favor
and popularity until it is now one of
the most staple medicines in use and
has an enormous sale. I is intended
especially for acute throat and lung
diseases such as coughs, colds and
croup, and can always be depended
upon. I is pleasant and safe to take
and is undoubtedly one of the best in
the market for Ihe purposes for which
it is intended.
"Wha W Ar Doing."
Our new booklet will tell you how
to secure a good paying position
anywhere. Send for a free copy.
S. A. MORAWETZ &- CO.,,
500 Kasota Bldg.
A Wise Woman
will try and preserve her beonty. A fln
nead of bair is one of the highest charms.
Imperial Hair Regenerator
restores Gray or Bleached Hair to
any natural color. It is clean, dura
ble, when applfed cannot be detects
ed. Sample of hair colored free.
Privacy assured.
IMPERIALCHEMICAL MF6.CO., H!i W Ui Sf ,N%v York.
fioM by BROWNLEE DRTJG COMPANy",
101 Washington av 8.
|0ARD SWINGS MIGHTY AX
"-($** ________
TAX LEVY OFFICIALS CHOP OFF
,$10,000 JUGGLES I N TRUNING
I APPROPRIATIONS, Chips are flying where the board of
tax levy is at work. The board has cut
out a special appropriation for trunk
line sewers and holds that they should
be included in the other sewer esti
mates. This lops off the proposed Bryn
Mawr extension, the Logan avenue ex
tension, and a sewer on Eighth street.
The sum of $10,000 has been cut from
the eewer repair fund, $10,000 from
the bridge repair fund and $10,000 from
the good roads fund.
The permanent bathhouse appropria
tion of $25,000 is likely to go, as is
also the request for new engin.e houses.
conducted by Rev. C. H. for the money he has advanced for the
Tvrn+hnVHo+c ThdeVafternoon service includes a Bible Alderman Gerber will be compensated
ComingofMunz,HInn
th Spir
F~-pe4-fce
lining the new work of th
a
the
lon
out
Epwort-.
cmit tee session
hatha iaian/i Tho ha^ o^
baths on Hall's island. The board may
reommenTrail's, to the armory commission for complet
ing the national guard armory, the
money to be refunded after a settle
ment with the bonding company.
It is likely that $25,000 will be ap
propriated for the purchase of lamp
heads with incandescent attachments.
Increases in salaries, even for the
police officers, hardly seem probable at
present.
It Is Not Difficult.
If you have a room or two,that you
would like to rent, the Journal Want
Pages stand ready to help vou, as they
are helping many others.
The cost is trifling, only a penny a
word. How can you afford to be with
out an ad in these columns? If it is
not convement for you to bring or send
your ad to the Journal, iust call No. 9
either phone. Ask for the Want Ad
Department, give your ad and it vnll
appear as you give it. No extra charge
is made for this accommodation.
GINSBERG RELEASED
Without Pain, Cutting or Surgery,
'distant Relief.
If
that $45,00 0 be advanced
Man Accused of Torturing Rats Not
Employee of Max Cafe.
Sam Ginsberg, arraigned in police
court last week on a charge of cruelty
to animals, has been discharged by the
court because of a flaw in the com
plaint. On the date mentioned in the
complaint Ginsberg was attending
church services all day and was able
to show that he had not tortured any
rats on that day.
Ginsberg was not employed as a por
ter at the Max cafe, as was stated, but
at a saloon on Sixth street The pro
prietors of the cafe say they do notNext
know Ginsberg and that he has never
been employed thre.
We Prove It. Sample Package Free.
Seven peopl out of ten are said to
have Piles. NOL one man a million
need have them and we are proving it
every day at our own expense, we
send a sample package of the wonder
ful Pyramid Pile Cure to any person
absolutely free.
We don't do this as a matter of
amusement or philanthropy, but be
cause it is to our interest to do so. We
know that the sufferer from piles, tor
mented and driven almost crazy by this
wretched trouble, will find such imme
diate relief that he will go at once to
his druggist and buy a box and get
well.
We know that we have got the great
est remedy in the world for piles, and
we are ready and willing to stand or
fall by the verdict of those who make
the trial. We have been doing this for
some years now and we never yet have
had occasion to regret it.
And the remedy at the drug store is
exactly the same as the sample we send
out. As, for instance, here is a man
got such immediate relief from the
that he at once bought a box.
Was it just the same? Undoubtedly,
since it cured him after all sorts and
kinds of things had failed.
Here is a sample of the kind of let
ters we get every day and we don't
have to ask for them:
Received your sample of Pile Cure
and have given it a fair trial and it
has proven the best I ever tried and
effected a complete cure. I can rec
ommend you highly in this vicinitv.
Have used your sample and one box
and it has been a complete cure. I
has been worth $100 to me.
Thankinp- you for the sample and the
cure, I will recommend you to every
body. Yours respectfully, Julius Mayer,
Dealer in Feathers, Ginseng and Hides,
Bedford, Ind.
Pyramid Pile Cure is for sale at
every druggist's at 50 cents a box or,
if you would like to try a sample first,
you will receive one by return mail by
sending your name and address to The
Pyramid Drug Company, 59 Pyramid
Building, Marshall, Mich.
to Bam
Grocer
$5.00
Best Suit 6ase
Bargain Ever
THE LION AND THE MOUSE
Bv Chas. Klein, author of "The Mu&lc Master."
Thursday night "THE UMPIRE."
Sunday, Fay Templeton in
"45 MINUTES FROM BROADWAY
4
Quickly at Home*CHI
NIGHTS Beginning
MATINEE WEDNESDAY,
CHAT Ge.- M. Cohen's Musical Play
^^'^s^^^i^^^^^^^^^
$1.56
I tht Qae-Prlce Comiptoi*
I R9B**fmralikrs.
ti E Raymond
Bes Mftr
MODUR.N VODEVIL
Evenings, 15c 25c, 50c. Prices never chance
METROPOLITAN
A am Minutes
from
Broadway,
WITH FAY TEMPLETON.
BIJOU Tonight at 8:15
Mat. Wednesday. All Seats 25 Cents.
Anothei Blanej Success,
'Old Isaacs from the Bowery'
With the Talented Hebrew Delineator,
HARRY FIRST AS "OLD ISAACS,"
A Hebrew play with heart l.iteiest, pathos
and humor.
SOUVENIR MVTINEE SATURDAY
Next wetk, Fl'.ke O'Hara in "Mr. Blarney
From Iieland."
LYCEUM
Matinees, Sunday, Thursday, Saturday.
THE FRAWLEYS
PRESENT
"MOTHS"
A dramatisation of
"A Story of Russian Social Life."
of Ouida's Novel.
Next week "BROTHER OFFICERS"
$ss*$xe*sx*SKS$s^
Quit the cellar or attic habit" $
advertise the "outgrown things j
Sensible people are not willing to trifle
with the quality of their food. You are
sure of its quality when it is
tJ3ti*"-
Best Breakfast
Food
VIT05
SpecialBargains
Frsm Our Popular Leather goods Dept.
Absolutely none to,dealers.
Final Offering Japanese
L. N. SCOTT,
Man&ztr.
TONIGHT MVTINEE TOMORROW.
HENRY B. HARRIS PRESENTS
Sit*
Special Sale Cowhide Suit Gases.
N
EVER WAS THERE SUCH~ A SUIT CASE
BARGAIN AS THISa fortunate purchase
of 500 of these Cases makes the offering possi
ble. These attractive and heavy Suit Cases are
constructed of genuine Cowhide, with genuine
oak straps all aroundfine brass locks and
catchesbig bell rivetsdouble stitched swing
ing handlesfancy linen lined shirt fold and
extra Inside strapa Ca6e which will compare
favorably with the Suit Cases sold all over the
city at $8.00 and $9.00 CHOICE WEDNES
DAY AT
$5.00
--At
Matting:
Oases.
HERE IS A FINAL WIND-UP PRICE ON
THESE USEFUL FEATHER WEIGHT JAP-
ANESE SUIT CASES Regularly $2.50, $3.00 and
$3 50 UNRESTRICTED CHOICE WEDNES
DAY AT
$1.50
&Ga:rpetQ
5th St., 6th St. and 1st Av. S.
GLOBE OF DEATH
COLLINS & HART
GARDNER & MADDERN
BASQUE QUARTETTE.
WILSON BROTHERS
REIFF BROTHERS
MUSICAL FORRESTS
BJENODROME
Maiinay
Tuday
DEWEY THEATRE
Matinee Daily.
Pillsbury's Best
mouth. It is sold in two-pound packages, honest weight, and a
package, easily prepared, will make you 12 pounds of creamy, white
food, never sticky or lumpy. 12 pounds of the ordinary 10 cent ready-
to-serve food usually costs you about $1.32. Eat Pillsbury's. The deli-
cious, nourishing, white heart of the wheat berrythat's alL No secret
process, and then bank the difference viz: ($1.17).
THE CHERRY-.EveningyEver
BLOSSOMS
Next week DREAMLAND BURLESQUERS
FAMILY THEATER.
Continuous Vaudeville Afternoon and
Evening. Prices 10c, 20c, 30c: Matineet
10c and 30e.
NOW OPEN
Seventh Annual
Exhibition
of
American
Paintings
100 Fine Pictures
Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts.
Public Library Building
ADMISSION 25c
NATIONAL BANK
W^i'"* FTJ*
Established 1872.
I Capital, $1,000,000
Sin 950,000
Deposits, 11,000,000
Progressive conservatism h4
as applied to modern bank-
Breakfast Food enables
you to put money in the
bank, and at the same time
a delicious food into your
4
1
ins has, of necessity, yield
ed us conservative progress
The Story of
ihe White
Heart
mm
P"2?:STEP-
S?
far*
JJ
-.i
K3

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