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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, November 05, 1906, Image 7

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-11-05/ed-1/seq-7/

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A.'"
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&
29-31-33 South Fifth St.
853Both Phones353
BEN DAVIS
APPLES, barrel
FLORIDA GRAPE
FRUIT, large, 3 for....
FRESH LIMES,
dozen
VALENCIA
ORANGES, dozen
N. Y. CONCORD
GRAPES, basket
BANANAS,
dozen
.75
25c 26c
10c
Prize Cheese
It will be worth your while to visit
cur store and see this mammoth cheese
the largest cheese ever made1,232
pounds. On exhibit until Nov. 15th,
when it will be cut and sold. Orders
taken now for delivery Nov. 15th.
YERXA'S EXTRA FLOUR
98-pound sack
ROLLED OATS,
10 pounds
KEWAUNEE PEAS,
can
$2.15
PURE BUCKWHEAT, *feRf*
10-pound sack WUw
IMPORTED WAL
NUTS, pound
PERFECT SOAP,
10 bars
PURE JELLY,
tumbler
TOMATOES,
can
MINNESOTA CORN,
can
NEW IMPORTED
FIGS, lb
17c
OLIVES, 20C
quart "Vv
IMPORTED MACA-
RONI, pkg
MEAT! MEAT! MEAT!
Pork Sausage
We make a strictly fancy pork
jausage everything used in the
manufacture of this sausage is
tnost carefully selected
Hid handled, lb
We Handle Jones Dairy Farm
Sausage.
Porterhouse Steak, lb 12V2C
Birloin Steak, lb I2V2O
Bound Steak, lb IOC
Shoulder Steak, lb 8
Pot Eoast, lb 5 6 7
Rib Boiling Beef, lb 4 I
Pork Chops, lb 12c i
Pork Loin Roast, lb 12c
Pork Sausage, lb 10c
Loin and Rib Lamb Chops, lb 18c
29-31-33 South Fifth St.
Hennepin and Seventh St,
SHERIFF
J. W. DREGE
Republican Candidate for
Re-Election as
SHERIFF
"The work of the sheriff's office has
fceen most satisfactorily perfoimed.
The numerous duties required of the
deputies have been cheerfully and
faithfully executed."
Extract from the report of the
giand jury.
There is a most excellent system
of accounting in this office and the re
ceipts and disbursements were found
properly entered and the balance paid
into the county treasury promptly each
month.''
Extract from Public Examiner's re
port for sheriff's office, December, 1905.
vbnuil W Trousers
measure P3 PO P
Best Fitting Pants On Earth.
411 Nicollet Av.
Importers of
Oriental Rugs.
1000-2 Nicollet Ave.
Hii**W^aa*^%s%gai
^i^MkrtWihM^iSM^^
-^^^^,^m7\%l, ffi'inli
S2S|
sf*
Monday Evening,f^
City News
TOWN TALK sfcV**
EVENTS OP TONIGHT
Metropolitan Theater
Bell in "The Education
Pipp."
Bi|ou TheaterRose Melville in
"Sis Hopkins."
Orpheum TheaterVaudeville.
Lyceum Theater"Blue Jeans,"
Unique TheaterVaudeville.
Dewey Theater"High School
Girls."
AuditoriumJones good citizen
ship massmceting.
of Mr.
H. O. Roberts will take care of your
furnace troubles. Both phones.
S. A. Morawetz & Co. now located at
Suite 910 Security Bank building.
Eat your noonday lunch at the
Kaiserhof, Minneapolis, finest rejstau
lant.
Four per cent interest on your sav
ings if deposited with the State Insti
tution for Savings, 517 First avenue S.
George W. Rehse, the man who signs
"Rehse" to the Pioneer Press car
toons, left Saturday evening for Paris,
where he will study art in order to per
fect his talent for cartoon drawing.
C. W. Meneilley has purchased the
grocery store formerly owned by him
at Fourth street and Fourteenth ave
nue SE, and will conduct a grocery'on
the same high-grade lines as before.
Tickets for the Leon Cavallo and La
Scala .Orchestra concert, to be given
at the Auditorium Saturday, Nov. 10,
will be on sale beginning tomorrow,
Tuesday, Nov. 6, at the Metropolitan
Music company.
Wouldn't it be foolish to run around
inquiring of your friends for some
body's address, instead of looking in
the directory for it? Isn't it just as
foolish to inquire of your friends if
they know of a good servant, a good
house, a good apartment, or a good
position, instead of reading the "Want
Ads." Always refer to Journal "Want
Ads" when you want anything.
The People's church service at the
Auditorium last night was a big suc
cess in point of numbers and interest.
Frank M. Nye spoke eloquently and
the trio by Mr. and Mrs. Carlyle Scott
and Professor Carlo Fischer was well
received. W. L. Hams will make the
ten minute talk next week, and an alto
from one of the leading church choirs
will sing a Bolo.
All interested persons are invited to
attend the 285th meeting of the Minne
sota Academy of Sciences at 8 p.m.,
Nov. 7. The meeting will be held in
the Academy's new museum in the pub
lic library building. Julia B. Clifford
of the East High school will speak on
"Some Modern Conceptions of
Science." H. B. Norton will give a
paper on "The Causes of Earth
quakes." Discussions will follow.
The Plymouth Rogers-PeetClothing,
Knox Hats, Hanan Shoes. For men
who value correct dress.
LID" DAY CELEBRATED
Policy
In Many Churches Mayor Jones'
is Extolled.
Yesterday was the first anniversary of
the Minneapolis "lid" One year ago
Mayor T. P. Jones' famous order closing
the saloons on Sunday went into effect,
and Minneapolis became a marked city
all over the United States, with the eyes
of the entire country on her to see what
will be the result of the municipal elec
tion tomorrow.
The "lid" anniversary was observed in
many places yesterday, especially the
churches. Many pastors spoke on the
subject or referred to it in their ser
mons urging the support of Mayor Jones
in his policy. Mayor Jones himself spoke
briefly in several places, but confined
himself to the part the church plays in
clean government. Every speaker called
attention to the fact that Minneapolis is
on trial before the entire nation, and
that her example will have a far-reaching
effect for good or evil as the cause
won or lost
Something new, intensely interest
ing. A new game just opened, drawing
great crowds wherever installed. On the
order of tenpins, but not so strenuous.
Enjoyed by ladies and gentlemen. Par
lors for this game "have been tastily
fitted up at 318 Second avenue S. From
the manner they are patronized in oth
er towns we predict the management
will not be disappointed in Minneapo
lis, altho they are the first to inaugu
rate the game in this city. 800 is the
highest score than can be made in one
game of ten innings. For a limited
time they offer $100 to any one making
this high score.
CHAT
Yes, quite a good deal of
"Jefferson and Jackson"
BRYAN and HEARSTISM la N. Roger's
platform The candidate for mayor of the city
of ShnnoapoHs, for the public ownership's party.
Modern independent, progressive people can
and should support M. N. Rogers.
1 Who will beneht most bj your Tote for
Hanes
A vote for Haynes la a vote for the BREW-
ERIES.
A vote for Iliynes Is a vote for the JSTREBT
RAILWAY TRLST
A vote for Haynes is a vote for the SALOON
and WHISK\ ELEMENT, OS they ARE ALL
supporting him
A vote for Haynes is a vote for the GAS
TRLST.
For whom shall I be voting if I vote for
Haynes
2 Who -will be benefited br an election of
N. RogersWhat does his platform stand
for?
1 That the city secure the ownership and
management of ALL public Service enterprises
as fast as it can be accomplished in the Inter
ests of the people
2 Free employment agencieseight-hour ser
\ice for all woikers engaged directly or in
directlj in municipal worK
3 Abolishing all contiact system of muni
cipal work
4 Establishing municipal wood and coal
jards and ice houses, with the distribution of
eume at cobt
5 Lse of all public buildings for lectures,
public gatherings of any demonstration when
suid buildings are not In their specific use.
6 Adequate efficient sjstem 01 medical
treatment in an emergency case and for the
noor
7. Free administration of Courts of Justice.
8 Placing under restriction the sale of all
intoxicants in conforming to the new recognized
state law of the liquor traffic.
Do not throw away your vote. The Repub
lican and Democratic purties have heen for 40
.Tears the party of the big capitalists. This
ea they are getting uneasy over the exposure
of the 'graft" in the insurance companies, the
filth in the packing houses, the extortions of the
railroads, e*c
The people are manythe men of millions
who piev upon them are not many, but the}
have clever lawyers in their employ to tell them
how to it
Is It the wish of the average skinned citizen
to have one of these clever lawyers In the
mayor's chair? That is a plain question to
which plain men are competent to give an
answ er.
Are you going to do your voting according
to the nod, of this monster on the money pile
OR ARE tOtT GOING TO VOTE AS A MAN
standing on your own feet, THINKING FOR
BOURSE-LI", and your welfare ..n for your
children's future?
Stand firm, one and nil. for the man who Is
for good, clean city improvement.
MARCUS P. HOBABT,
302 Phoenix Building, Minneapolis
^fV iTfiilnlilil Vilify"1''
/liinfriii'
ELECTION NEWS Tit
BE MIXED WITH FDN
JOURNAL ^ILL GIVE BOTH AT
AUDITORIUM.-
Hot Stuff from City, State and Other
Elections Will Be Flashed on Screen
and Time Between Bulletins Will Be
Given to Music and Vaudeville Di
versions. Judging from the manner in which
purchasers of reserved seats have gone
after choice locations, the Auditorium
will be filled to its capacity before the
election returns begin to appear on the
screen in the big music hall tomorrow
night. The Journal's election
night entertainments have acquired a
great reputation, and now that the per
fect Auditorium has supplanted the
old Exposition building as the place
where complete returns may be gotten
without discomfort or inconvenience on
the part of the^public, there is promise
of a greater rush than ever to the
place where the returns come quickest
and best.
Hot from Wires.
Not only will direct wires be runhas
from The Journal office to the Au
ditorium, but the pick of The
nal 's bulletin_service
me.n
r-
will 1
will be
assigned to the Auditorium end of
election night news distribution sys
tem. The campaign is red hot. Every
one is on tiptoe over the outcome of the
race between Mayor Jones and former
Mayor Haynes. The campaign for the
governorship here has been fierce and
in New York state Hearst and Hughes
are turning things over several times
daily. All the news of these battles and
many others will be flashed before the
Auditorium audience within the minute
of its making. The Journal has
held the record for first and efficient
election night service for many cam
paigns. It proposes to establish a new
record tomorrow night.
Fun Not Political.
The election returns will be the thing
tomorrow night, but incidental to their
announcement The Journal will
present an informal program of amuse
ments calculated to make everybody
happy, no matter which way the wind
blows. Miss Eulalie Chenevert will
demonstrate the capabilities of the
mammoth Auditorium organ in a series
of brilliant selections. For the first
time in the northwest the public will
be permitted to hear the latest marvel
in sound transmission, the auxeto
phone. The guwanee Quartet will be
on for a few of their southland melo
dies the Journal newsboys will con
tribute a pie-eating contest, a boxing
match, and a tug of war there will
be miles of moving pictures, impromp
tu selections on the organ by Eev. G.
L. Morrill, and the Journal band will
proceed to "stir 'em up" now and
then.
The Auditorium will be decorated
for the evening by the well-known dec
orating firm of J. A. Fillmore & Son,
refreshments for the hungry and thirs
ty will be furnished by the Sunshine
society. The returns will be coming
from 7:30 in the evening until well
along in the next morning.
A general admission price of 25 cents
will be charged at the door, and a few
seats which nave been reserved at 50
cents each, are being sold at the Metro
politan Music company arid the Journal
office. The proceeds of the entertain
ment will go to the Newsboys' club.
"QUILLS" PLAN FEAST
Literary Co-eds WW Enjoy Themselves
Around Bonfire.
"Far from the maddening men" is the
slogan of the Girls' Press club at th
state university Tonights
ne
is
Bowl-at-it Parlors.
ROW OVER DITCH PROJECT
Residents of Corcoran Township Argue
with Commissioners.
Corcoran township is in the throes of a fierce
local war, and the members of the board of
county commissioners will decide the contro
versy. The commissioners met today, and the
morning session was taken up with a discus
sion of the proposition to build a drainage ditch
thru Corcoran township at a cost of $5,000. The
residents In the township are lining up for or
against the ditch project The commissioners
refused to act on the evidence presented and the
matter was continued.
Forty-third Legislative District Cam
paign.
The day for voting a party ticket
straight has passed, be independent, in
vestigate, vote for your best represen
tative. William L. Gardner and
Frank H. Mellen, candidates for the
house, for character and ability stand
in the front rank, and. are types of our
best American citizens.
Your vote for these candidates will
help toward a better class of legisla
tion for the people of MinnesotaAdv.
DAVID P. JONES
MAYOR
Republican Candidate for Re-election.
Born Minneapolis, 1860.
Northwestern National Bank.
Capital 4 11,000,000
Surplus 950,000
Deposits 12,000,000
Accounts solicited from Individuals, cor
porations And banks Snvings depart
ment. Ladles' department I men
STRUNG AT LARS M.BAND
OPPONENTS OF '"togfcTH WARD
DEMOCRATIC LEADER GET A
HALL AND WILL HOLD A MEET-
ING.
theJohnson,
7
The sixth ward will be a political
hotbed tonight" with the aldermanic
contest as the center of attraction.
The anti-Band forces of the ward are
united in support of John Peterson, the
republican aldermanic candidate, and a
hot fight that has been waged for
weeks will terminate in a blaze to
night. Tho Rand has endeavored to
corner every hall in the ward to pre
vent opposition meetings, his opponents
will hold a rousing mass meeting to
night in Bgridge's hall, Cedar avenue
and Fourth street The principal
speaker will be Fred M. Powers, for
eighth wartl,
it'
mer alderman from the
who served In the council wft LarsM!
Rand and who will handle Rand's
record without gloves. Other well
known men will participate, including
a representative of the state federation
of labor, who will attack Rand's record
on labor questions.
It is asserted by the anti-Rand work
ers that the brewing company owning
the hall, in which their meeting will be
held tonight, called the man who rented
it to the front and severely roasted
him for allowing an anti-Rand meeting
there. It is asserted also that Rand
had every other hall in the ward
under contract since the primaries.
While the Peterson workers are busy
tonight, Rand will be busy, too. It has
been announced bv Rand that John A
democratic candidate for gov
ernor of Minnesota, would be brought
into the ward to pull chestnuts out of
the fire. But at democratic headquar
ters today it is denied emphatically and
absolutely that Governor Johnson will
visit the ward.
FIYE BULLETS FAIL
TO END GIRL'S LIFE
fomecould.
ing.
the twenty-e
four literary co-eds, who call themselves
"Quills,"ewill gathetr in sommarshmallow- remote cor of th campus roast
and tell ghost stories around a bonfire
The meeting was kept secret until this
morning, when it was divulged by a
small brother of one of the girls. A few
of the more daring spirits among the
men have planned to attend the bonfire
wrapped in sheets.
This is the second escapade of the
club, the first having been a banquet at
midnight in the office of the college
daily, with only candles for lights, and
a bribed janitor for chaperon.
Henrietta Reid, 18 years of age, 600
State street, St. Paul, was found in Jher
bedroom last night with five wounds in
her left breast. She was hurried to St.
Joseph's hospital, where it is said she
has a chance to live.
The girl was conscious when found
and told her parents that a young Min
neapolis man, W. Robinson, had shot
her. The police were called to inves
tigate. Four empty beer bottles were
found on a table in the kitchen and a.
32-caliber revolver with all the cham
bers empty.
Dr. Roy Babbitt, police surgeon,
found that one of the bullets had
grazed the breast and caused a flesh
wound the left arm, two were
lodged near the surface and were ex
tracted at the city hospital, and twofollowing.
have not been located. It is believed
they glanced around a rib and lodged
in the back.
The detectives located Robinson' who
Baid the girl had telephoned him to
come and spend the evening with her,
but that he had responded over the
wire that he had another engagement
and not. That, it is thought, an
ered her A note found in the Reid
an written by Miss Reid, seems
to explain an attempt at suicide. It
read as follows "I am tired of liv
It is all my own fault. I love
as well as ever. I want no ex
pense at my funeral, and I wish no
body to go in mourning for me. Myalso
clothes must be given to my sisters."
Consumers of fresh ovsters should
gurchase
those packed by the Baltimore
'ackmg company, in squ'are" tin cans,
hermetically sealed, They 'have the true
flavor. A
V/f
Gutto
Regular Prices
$25 $22| $20-
EIGHT TO ANSWER
MURDER CHARGES
rfC^4
NQYEMBER COURT WILL
GRAVE OASES.
OrSl THE NE\A/
TipMfNllIIN
CLOTHIERSHATTERS FURNISHERS
W
r.
roken Lot Sale
TRY
Sussman and Quirk Will Be Tried on
Charges of First Degree Murder and
Six Others Will Be Up for Man-
slaughterPeter Blar Again to Face
Jury.,'
p.
Two murder cases and six man
slaughter oases will be tried during the
coming term of, the district court.
Harry Sussman will be tried on Nov.
21 for' the nrurder pf hi,s "wife in the
Glenwood hotel. The trial date for
his case was set todfcy, by Judge David
F. Simpson, who called the criminal
calendar for the November term. Joh
P. Quirk, slayer
vof W. A. Dowelln
charged with murder in the first de
gree, will face trial on Dec, 7.
The Sussman and the Quirk cases are
the only first-degree murder cases to
be tried during the coming term, but
six manslaughter cases will be probe
cuted by County Attorney Al J. Smith
Emil Olson, charged with drilling Al
bert Doree on the night of July 4, will
be tried on Nov. 19 Harriet E. Hatch,
charged with manslaughter and abor
tion, will face trial on Nov. 26 Wil
liam A. Mann, charged with perform
ing a criminal operation which resulted
in death, will be tried on Nov. 23, and
the case of the former policemen, Hun
ger and Quist, charged with inflicting
fatal wounds on Theodore Bradenborg,
will be tried on Nov. 22.
Peter JBlar, the Bridge square saloon
keeper, whose first trial on a man
slaughter charge resulted in a jury dis
agreement, will be tried on Dec. 11.
The trial of a majority of the crim
inal cases resulting from the recent life
insurance company investigation will
be held in December. William F. Bech
tel, former president of the company,
indicted on four counts for grand lar
ceny in the first degree, will face trial
on Dec. 14. Elmer H. Dearth, charged
with receiving a bribe, and Fred J.
Sackett, indicted on three counts for
grand larceny, will be tried on Dec. 17
and the days following, while the cases
against Wallace Campbell, charged with
grand lareeny in the second degree,
have been set for Nov. 15. The case
against Dr. Jacob F. Force was contin
ued until January, pending his appeal
to the supreme court on his recent con
viction.
In the civil calendar for the coming
term, the chief interest will attach to
the cases brought by former policy
holders against the insurance company.
These cases, fourteen in number, are
set for trial on Dec. 21 and on the days
STUDENTS GET HOLIDAY
President Northrop Announces No Les
sons on the Day of Big Game.
"There will be no classes on Saturday,"
said President Northrop of the univer
sity today. The announcement was re
ceived with great applause by the stu
dents, hundreds of whom have planned
to attend the Minnesota-Chicago football
game at Chicago on that day.
Fifty girls have chartered a car and
will cheer for the maroon and gold play
ers Saturday A party of 150 men have
chartered cars, and other parties
are expected to make similar arrange
ments before the end of the week A
thousand varsity students will probably
be present at Marshall field on the day
of the game.
For Sore Throat and Cold la Chest use Omega
Oil. Trial bottle 105
OF
Benjamin
Suits,
Overcoats
AND
Raincoats
Only one to two of a kind,
but most all sizes in the lot
rare opportunity or secure
a suit or overcoat at a saving
of $5 or $10. Better come
in and look this over.
BARNABY'S
Nicollet and Fourth
If it conn from Barnaby's it must be good."
9 W
HON. W.D.
WASHBURN
WILL
PRESIDE
Admittance
Absolutely
FREE!
HoMiter'iIMtirjBaid
6. SorriU
at the organ
"Sawiiee" Quartet
Hmms0fmrmlmk*rM.
i
*mMM*m^MEfe4^tfl
^P
METROPOLITAN
'm jrW
DON'T FORGET THE BIG
MASS MEETING
at the
Auditorium This Evening
ADDRESSES BY
Ex-Gov. Van Sant,
Ex-Mayor Gray,
Hon. F. G. Winston,
Hon. B. F. Nelson,
Prof. J. 3. Carlson,
Hon. W. J. Dean,
Mr. Andrew Henderson,
Mr. J. L. Mc Caull
and Mayor Jones.
RALLY FO JONES and
GOO GOVERNMENT!
Your Credit Is Good at the New England
Extraordinary Sale High Grade Sample
Chairs and Directors' Tables
AT ONE-THIR OFF
MANUFACTURERS-Cutler & Sons, Buffalo, N. T.
Gunn Desk Co., Grand Rapids, Mich.
Michigan Chair Co., Grand Rapids, Mich.
Imperial Furniture Co., Grand Rapids, Mich.
WOODSMahogany and Oak, in their'Various Finishes.
DISCOUNTONE-THIRD from Regular Prices.
TERMSAs Desired.
See Display in our First Avenue Show Windows!
AMUSEMENTS AMUSEMENTS '4
ELECTION RETURNS!
Under auspices of Journal. Benefit of Newsboys' Club.
AUDITORIUMThe Tuesday Evening, Nov. 6th
FIRST AUTHENTIC INFORMATION
on the Results of the Hottest Campaigns Furnished by
Unsurpassed Journal Service
Incidental Amusement Features
PIPE ORGAN SOLOS, SUWANEE QUARTET, NEWSBOYS' STUNTS,
JOURNAL BAND, MOVING PICTURES,
and
THE MARVELOUS AUXETOPHONE.
THE REAL COMFORTABLE PLACE TO GET FIRST RETURNS.
General admission at the door 25 cents.
A few reserved seats now on sale at Metropolitan Music Co., and at The
Journal Office at 50c.
Both Phones, 3997.
ea^mo*. THEATRE
MODERN VAUDEVILLE
i BTenlngi. 15c, 86c. 60c. Prleea nearer change
BIJOU Tonight 8:15
J. B. Stirling Presents the Talented
Comedienne,
ROSE MELVILLE
In Her Original and Inimitable Creation,
"SIS HOPKINS."
Extra-Election Night
MIDNIGHT SHOW AT 11 18.
HIGH CLASS VAUDEVILLE!.
COMPLETE ELECTION RETURNS.
SPECIAL WIRE & OPERATOR ON STAGE.
L. N. SCOTT,
Manager
'Tonight. Special Matinee Tomorrow.
DIGBY BELL
In Augustas Thomas' Comedy,
"The Eineatitn f Ir. Pipp."
Thursday "The VanderbUt Cup"
Sunday "The Rogers Brothers In Ireland"
AUDITORIUM ""A
Sals of Beats for the great
Leoncavallo Musical Organization
of 75 Musicians.
Optis Tomorrow Tuts. Nov. 6
at the Metropolitan Music Store.
i POPULAR PRICES
Why "half-advertise" ft? A Journal want ad will fully advertise it.
1/
KS
Furniture &Carpet Cte
3th St., 6th St. and 1st Av. S.
MME. THERESE RENZ
MAY BOLEY
SMITH & CAMPBELL
EATHRINE NUGENT
RICHARD LYNCH
THREE OLIVEIRAS
DONAT BEDINI
E2N0DR0ME
LYCEUM
Tonight, special
ladies'aig-ht. All
seats 26c, for ladies.
The Frawleys
Offer for the First Time,
"BLUE JEANS"
MatineesTuesday, Thursday, Saturday, Sun-1
day. All Seats 25e.
EVENING PRICES60c, 88c, 26c, 10c.
Tomorrow NightElection Returns Announced
During the Performance.
DEWEY Twic Pally.
THE HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS
EXTRA MIDNIGHT PERFORMANCE
TUESDAY NIGHT, STARTING AT 11 P.M.
ELECTION RETURNS Jt
Next WeekGans-Nelson Fight Pictures, with
The Tiger Lillles.
WifflM
FAMILY THEATER.
Continuous Vaudeville Afternoon and
Evening. Prices 10c, 20c, 30e Matinee*
10c and 80*.
CA "Made on honor, sold
1 on merit.'* ,X%d%
O Ask to be shown
Sorensen's High Cut
r^Cd and Viscolized Soles
ii_*3C for wear.
OT 314winter Ilcollet Ave.

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