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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, November 29, 1906, Image 8

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-11-29/ed-1/seq-8/

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4
TWO BIQ STORES.
Utter Ptane 353 Either Phone
We wish to thank every customer
and friend of the Yerxa stores for the
Continued i and ever-increasing patron
age during the past. We want you and
every citizen of Minneapolis to know
that we appreciate your business
whether it be a large or small order.
By consistent, fair, square dealings
and employing the most modern meth
ods Icno'wn to the grocery business
have established a clientele among the
best people in this city. They have
learned by experience that it is not
only economy to trade at Yerxa's, but
that the goods are always fresher and
more desirable than can be found else
where.
Every precaution and care is taken
with each individual order, which
guards against delays and disappoint
ments.
You will be pleased to know that
arrangements are being made to even
improve our almost perfect facilities.
New fixtures are to be installed at an
early date and other departments add
ed. Minneapolis may be justly proud
of having two of the largest, most
modern, up-to-date grocery stores in
the West.
We thank you for your past patron
age and extend one and all a mo3t
cordial invitation to trade with us in
the future.
Specials for Friday.
STANDARD TOMATOES,
new pack, large can
CALIFORNIA PRUNES,
pound
PREMIUM SODA CRACKERS,
regularly 10c pound
FRESH GINGER SNAPS,
pound
PURE GROUND BLACK A A**
PEPPER, bulk, per lb. 2.UG
FRESH ROLLED OATS,
10 pounds
IMPORTED OLIVES,
quart
LYNDON JAM, 25
excellent quality
6c
8o
Bo
25c
20c
In order to clear stock and
make room for new goods, we are
closing out our line of the cele
brated "Club House" and "Lyn
don" brands of canned and bot
tled goods at 25 and 30 per cent
discount. Buy now.
CLUB HOUSE CLAM CHOW
DER, regular 15c can...
CLUB HOUSE CATSUP,
regular 25c
SLYNDON BAKED BEANS,
25c can
9o
18o
16c 17c
jar,
Yerxa's Ideal Meaf Market.
Blue Point Oysters, each Xc
Fresh Cod I5c
Salmon Steak, pound 15c
Halibut Steak, pound 15c
Fresh Flounders, lb 12%
Lake Superior Trout, lb 14c
Lake Superior "White, lb 14c
Pike, pound \4tC
THANKS
Deposits Nov 29, 1906 $1,550,0001
Deposits Nov. 29 1905 1,275,000|
Increase $275,000
We thanfe oar patrons and
friends for causing the
splendid increase in the
bank's business during the
past year.
We hope to merit a con
tlnuance of this kind of sup
port by offering to our pa
trons, as in the past, the
facilities of a conservative
banking institution and the
most liberal treatment con
sistent with sound banking.
The
German American Bank,
Plymouth and Washington
avenues N Capital $100,000
surplus $100,000.
In business twenty years.
Francis A. dross, President.
Charles Gluek, First Vice Pres
Griffith, Second Vice Press
3S. Sterner, Cashier
O. P. Huhn, Asat. Cashier
"HE
MTIDJ
BANK
MINNEAPOLIS
'EST. I664
Capital
$2,000,000
Surplus
MX $1,700,000
INVESTORS"
Desiring a good rate of Interest wits
tfbundant security should call and exam
ffg* tbe first mortgage farm loans for sale
Minneapolis Trust Company
tfturth ana MMuwplit Avenue,
City News
TOWN TALK
EVENTS OF TONIGHT
Metropolitan TheaterJefferson
De Angelis in "The Girl and the
Governor.''
Byou Tbeate*"Texas."
Orpheum TheaterVaudeville.
Lyceum Theater"The Dicta
tor.
Unique TheaterVaudeville.
Dewey TheaterBroadway Gaie
ty Girls.
Y. M. 0. A. BuildingThanks
giving party for Y. W. 0. A. and
Y. M. C. A.
Christmas photos. NOw'g the time.
Sweet's, 515 Nicollet.
An increasing number of people are
each year selecting The Minnesota
Loan & Trust Co., 313 Nicollet Ave., as
executor, guardian or trustee.
Saves coal, saves trouble. Minneapo
lis Heat Eegulator attached to your
heating plant. Ask your heating com
pany or 406 Phoenix Bldg. Main 2151.
To those who sell to the out-of-town
trade: Have you all the customers you
can *ervef If not, Mr. Pollock of the
Clipping Bureau can send you names of
new ones every day. Ask him to call
on you. 510 Sykes block.
The Gustaf Adolf male chorus will
give a concert Sunday evening at Nor
manna hall, Third street and Twelfth
avenue S. The program will be made
up largely of the works of Swedish
composers and will include many of
the compositions that have made Swed
ish songs famous. The chorus num
bers about forty voices and is well
trained.
The Plymouth Rogers-Peet-Clothing,
Knox Hats, Hanan Shoes. For men
who value correct dress.
EARL SHOPPIN IS
BEST CHRISTMA S PLA N
Without considering the convenience
of the merchants qr of the shopping
process, now is the time to do your
Chustmas buying. Never have the
Minneapolis stores held a more varied
or attractive assortment of holiday
wares There are, of course, the allur
ing displays of more expensive articles,
which are always in order, but in ad
dition, the retailers this year seem to
have fairly outdone themselves in sup
plying their counters with big stocks
of less expensive novelties, which are
more than usually attractive.
It is the privilege of having first
choice from these stocks which will be
enioyed to the full by the early shop
per. While there is a full assortment
and a bewildering displav of this kind,
merchants naturally do not order novel
ties in such large quantities as they do
goods which are good this year, or any
year, and again, the early shopper reaps
an advantage by being able to secure
gifts which can not be duplicated later
in the season.
Holiday buying usually begins with
a rush immediately after Thanksgiving,
and Minneapolis retailers were never
better prepared.
But shop early and you will help
vourself.
REPORTS ARE GLOWING
Shareholders of Copper Creek Mining
Company Hear of Season's Work.
Capitalists' and stockholders of "the
Copper Creek Mining company of Ari
zona, representing more than one-third
of the total stock issued, met Tuesday
evening at the office of Judge Best
in the New York Life building. The.
president and general manager of the
company, F. J. Sibley, reported the
progress of development work at the
mine for the last six months, which
was highly satisfactory to the stock
holders
The installation of the large new
engine, ordered five months ago, with
air compressor for the pumps and air
drills, has been completed and is now
in operation at shaft No 1, which had
been sunk to the 200 foot level. This
shaft will now "be sunk to the 1,000-
foot level as fast as possible and ore
mined at each 100-foot level. The ore
taken out at the first level and shipped
to the smelter gave values $SO a ton.
Shaft No. 2, at the depth of sixty
feet, shows a solid vein of high-grade
ore across the bottom of the shaft.
Tunnel No. 1 is now driven about
400 feet and is in first-class shape for
handling the ore which will be reached
about 300 feet further, at a depth of
650 feet below the surface A large
body of rich ore will be encountered
at that point, as the vein on the sur
face is ten feet wide, from which sam
ples of ore at a depth of 100 feet
showed values of more than $250 a ton.
Conservative mining engineers who
have examined the Copper Creek prop
erty, pronounce it the equal of the fa
mous United Verde, Copper,-Queen or
Calumet and Arizona mines, which are
paying their stockholders dividends of
$15,000,000 annually.
The company has built during the
summer its own telephone line, thirty
miles in length, with steel poles, con
necting with the entire telephone sys
tem of Arizona. The company has
also constructed additional buildings
and expended considerable money in
improving the wagon road thru the
mountains^so that the cost of transpor
tation haB been materially reduced.
The Minneapolis investors secured
their stock mostly through Edwin
Clark of this city, who has visited the
mine several times.
NrthwMtern National Bank
Capitol tl.OOO.OOO
Surplus 980,000
Deposits ia,000,00
Accounts solicited from Indlriduals. cor
fxftratlons irad banks SaT(ngv
I
Optician,/
depart*
ment. Ladles' department
HENRY J. 8JERTSEH and
HARRY A. LUND, Atternevs
1015 N, 7. Life Bid*., Minneapelii.
Best facilities for collection of Inherit
ance and handling of legal business in Eu
rope. Twenty-one years' experience In the
general practice of law In Minnesota. Spe
cial attention given to probate and real
estate law.
EYES Examined Free
Artificial Eyes
BEST.
409 Nicollet
PUMHliL'JitllUII'Uil.W
^jQAWOyy
SuOVE, CQ.
[VERY SHADE SHAPE 8PRin
i ,n
1
Evening, $fc IE* MtftNEABOUS -JOURNAL
HAPPY COMPANY
HOMEWARD BOUNBACHED
SCANDINAVIANS START FOR OX*D-
COUNTRY G0QP CHEER.
Party of 350 from All Parts of North
west Leave Union Station for Father-
landFour Minneapolis Babies Be
come Mascots and Special Care of
Enthusiastic Excursionists.
Joyfully anticipating spending the
holiday season with friends and rela
tives in "th old country," 350 Scan
dinavian Americans left ^Minneapolis
last night ifor Sweden, Norway and Fin
land. They were members of the fourth
Christmas excursion arranged by the
Cunard line and their homes are in
Minnesota, North and South Dakota,
Washington, Montana and Oregon.
In the party were more than 100
residents of Minnesota and the four
^small members of a Minnesota family
will act as mascots- during the trip.
Mrs. Matt Tuori of Chisholin, with her
four children, all under the age of six,
will eat Christmas dinner with her
parents in Helsingfors, Finland, and
when her husband at the Union station
explained to the excursionists that he
would be unable to accompany his wife,
but that she wished to venture on the
trip alone rather than disappoint the
waiting grandparents he was assured
that the five members of his family
would be well eared for on the way.
The four babies of the Tuori family
were at once made the recipients of the
choicest morsels in the well-filled pro"
vision hampers of the excursionists.
Henry Tuori, three months old, wai the
feft
roungest passenger on the train as it
Minneapolis last night.
Baggage Is Varied.
Judging from the amount of bag
gage carried by the party many are
planning to stay in Europe for months.
Trunks of every description, home
made wooden boxes, immense extension
vahces, traveling gear of every kind
filled the two baggage cars of the train.
In addition, the aisles were heaped
with rolls of bedding, lunch hampers
and baskets, and traveling equipment
of every description.
A maiority of the excursionists were
Swedes, but all the north European
countries were represented and there
were no nationality lines drawn. It
was lust a happy family party, full of
enthusiasm at the thought or getting
back to the fatherland. Even the peo
ple who stood on the station platform
and said goodbye to the travelers for
got for the moment that they were left
behind and waved a hearty farewell to
the departing kinsfolk.
Thanksgiving Dinner.
Go to the Hotel Maiestic Cafe for
Thanksgiving dinner. Table d'hote, $1.
11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.
FIRE SCARE S ST. PAU
PRINTER IS RESCUED BY LADDER
CBEW, AND 200 TURKEYS SAVED
FOB TODAY'S DINNER.
St. Paul had a fire scare last evening
because of a blaze in the Gorman Elec
tric company's plant at 315 Minnesota
street. There was additional excite
ment when John Bille, a printer with
a plant in the same building, crawled
out on a narrow window ledge to es
cape the smoke and fire and remained
in his perilous position until rescued by
a hook and ladder crew. Fire Chief
Strapp took no chances and sent in two
special calls, bringing out the full
strength of the department.
The loss is placed at $10,000 to $12,-
OOO, mostly th Gorman company,
which is partially covered by insurance.
Bille's printing establishment and Mul
rooney, Eyan & Co. suffered damage to
the extent of $500 each.
While the larger fire was in progress
200 turkeys in the plant of the St.
Paul Bread company took fire in the
oven. The grease from the birds ran
out of the oven and tbok fire. Water
and chemicals settled the blaze and
the turkeys, protected steel roasting
pans, were none the worse for the
experience.
Omega Oil is a Blessing to Rheumatics. It
has lelieved thousands. Try a 10c bottle.
CONCERT I S PLEASING
Varied Program Given at Fowler
Church Last Evening*
The Thanksgiving concert at Fowler
church last night was attended by a
large audience. Well arranged and
pleasingly varied, the program savored
pleasingly of^the Thanksgiving season.
Alfred Spiel, Lee Latta and B. E.
Grady were the soloists. Mr. Spiel
played Wienianski's "Souvenir de Mos
cow" with good effect, and for an
encore played Chopin's nocturne^ ar
ranged for a violin. Mr. Latta sang
"The night of Ages" and "Oh, that
We Two Were Maying," and* was
forced to respond to an encore.
A series of four readings was an
agreeable feature of the evening. They
*era given Miss X.ea.h Cooke, IMW
ter Paul Brown, Lee Latta and Frank
Leslie, and were followed by a pretty
flag drill by little girls. The Fowler
league chorus sang a Thanksgiving
song of gladness to the air of "Solo
mon Levy," and scored a hit. Moving
pictures completed the program.
FESTIVAL TONIGHT
Musical Program Includes Wennerberg's
"HaUelujah."
There Will be a musical festival of un
usual interest this evening at the Swed
ish Tabernacle, Seventh street and
Eighth avenue S. The Tabernacle
chorus of 100 voices -will present Wlen
nerberg's "Hallelujah" and Gounod's
"By the Rivers oi Babylon." it will
be the first presentation of the Wen
nerberg number in this city. The chor
us has rehearsed assiduously and has
attained, a high degree of excellence,
under the painstaking leadership of A.
L. J3k0g.
i The proceeds of the entertainment
will be added to the mortgage fund.
Street and Evening Coats.
Worth $40 tomorrow, $25. At
Pearce 's, 403-405, Nicollet.
A Shorty McOabe Tarn.
Sewell Ford's friend, Shorty McCabe,
Spins another of his inimitable yarns in
the Sunday Magazine with next Sun
day's Journal. It is called "When
Rossvter Got Xiooge.*' and a tale is Tin
folded that is full of eomic interest
and couched in that picturesque slang
for which'th^ professor of physical cul
ture is famous. The capture of two
"tin badgers"as Shorty calls a pair
of private detectiveand what grew
out of, it re related with great unction.
Change Of Time t6 North Wisconsin.
Commencing Monday, December 3d,'
train now leaving Minneapolis via the'
Omaha road at 7:35 a.m. will leave &t
7 25 aJn. for New BichmoncL Spooner,
Duluth ftn Afhla&d,
THINE HUGO HAS
HIS HIT
DTJLTJTH: MAM* HAS ABOUT QHOYTN
HIS
FTJLL"Sm5Nir^S
After Best Today, Content fox Speak
ership Will Be Besomed More Stren
uously Than Ever, with Seventh Dis
trict the Center of Interest Friday.
One thing is becoming apparent in
the contest for speaker of the Minne
sota house. N. F. Hugo of Duluth,
tho he has his own district, four votes
xn Hennepin, and Boattenng support
outside, has about displayed his full
strength. None of the other candidates
are likely to to him, and the indi
cations are that he cannot muster more
than about thirty votes. That is twen
ty-two short of a majority, and if it
becomes apparent that Hugo* has quit
gaining, most of his votes will fade
away quickly and be picked up by the
other candidates.
Truce was called today in the speak
er ship contest. Candidates and their
fnendB all spent the day at home in
observance of the day, as all good pa
triots should. They will be at it to
morrow again, harder than ever. A
delegation will leave for Granite Falls
tonight. The twelve members from the
seventh district will caucus there Fri
day evening, and the little city on the
upper Minnesota will be the political
hub of the state for a day. The dele
gation is reported to be badly split.
It has no candidate of its own for
speaker, and accordingly is a free field
for the other candidates. Johnson and
Eockne are apt to get tie bulk of it,
tho Hugo claims two or three. Elias
Raehie of Lac qui Parle is working
hard for Rpckne.
S. D. Peterson of New Ulm with
drew at the Mankato caucus, but in
St. Paul yesterday afternoon he claimed
to be still in the race. It is under
stood that he and S. O. Morse both
voted for Johnson in the second dis
trict caucus, and# E. H. Jefferson of
Bingham Lake is a strong Johnson
man. The Johnson supporters are now
claiming six out of the ten in the sec
ond district, and seven of the eleven
in the sixth.
Ninth May Not Caucus.
The ninth district is i doubt. N
caucjus has been called, as E. J. Wells
seems unwilling to force an attempt at
getting an indorsement. Elmer E.
Adams is not pronounced for any can
didate as yet. He objects to settling
the speakership before the members
meet at St. Paul for the session. He
calls attention to 'the fact that the
new members have not received any
transportation from the railroads yet,
and maybe never will. They cannot
afford to be running to caucuses And
down to St. Paul every few days, pay
ing railroad fare. If the house organ
ization is settled without giving the
farmers'' a chance to be heard, it will
create distrust and trouble for the ses
sion.
The Nolan candidacy in the first
district ties up members favorable to
Johnson and Roekne, but Hugo and
Tighe are both claiming votes down
that way. If all the candidates' claims
of strength are to be believed, the
capitol will not be large enough to
hold the house representatives this
winter^
Hotel Majestic Oafe.
Hennepin-and-Seventh street.3 Eegu-
to%
a m/^^
fife&
U:0a
OMAHA ROAD DEMURS
Follows Example Set by Great North
em Rebate Cases.
Pemurrer has been made to the in
dictments returned against the Chica
go, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha
railway, and EC A.. Pearce, E Obei
and F. 0. Gifford'by the rebate grand
recently in session in the federal
ding.
The demurrer filed with George F.
Hiteheoek, deputy clerk or the
United States circuit court, was simi
lar in form to the four placed on rec
ord by the Great Northern and its
indicted officials, after their arraign
ment Saturday. The Omaha and its of-,
ficials deny that there are facts suf
ficient to constitute an offense, as re
cited in the indictment, and add that
the acts, even if committed, are not in
conflict with any existing law.
jury build
Street and Evening Coats.
Worth $40: tomorrow, $25.
Pearce's, 403-405 Nicollet.
At
,11 i
TOO NOISY FOR PATIENTS
St. Barnabas Directors Ask fOr Change
in Streetcar Route.
Asserting that the passing of street
cars in front of the hospital is annoy
ing to patients, the directors of St. ar
nabas hospital have petitioned the city
council to order the line taken off Sixth
street and placed On Seventh street* It
is said that the company is agreeable
to the change.
The only line which would be affect
ed by the proposed change in ^the
Bloomisgton line wfiich turns at Sixth
street and Eighth avenue, running east
on Sixth street, past S Barnabas and
Asbury hogpitals and turning on Tenth
avenue.
1
Ink
Defective Page
M-*C
ANOTHER BOOST
IS LUMBER PRICE
purees MOST COMMON STOCK
BEING ADVANCED.
Lumber from Other Sections Not Com
peting Much with Fine Because of
Car Troubles, and Northern Lumber
Stocks Will Be Drawn Upon Heavily
by Spring.
Northern pine lumber is up again.
New pricelists are being sent out
by the leading manufacturers in Min
neapolis and. outside -points, making ad
vances on a good share of tho list. It
falls chiefly on common boards and
fencing, and there is no uniformity
about it, but the general movement is
up. Salesmen have not been soliciting
any orders on the old basis for a week
or two They say that the old lists
no longer represents the fair value of
the product.
The increase is not heavy, amounting
to 50 cents or a dollar a thousand on
the items raised. It is not agreed to
by the association, but is the action
of individual manufacturers. Compe
tition doea not worry them any longer
as it used to, and they have no hesita
tion in raising prices without consulting
each other. Within certain limits,
about all the competition there is seems
to be to see which mill can get the
most for its product. Owing to high
freight rates and the freight blockade,
there is no serious competition from the
fir and western pine of the Pacific
northwest, or the yellow pine of the
south, in the territory served by north
ern pine mills. Buyers have to take
either pjne or hemlock. Hemlock is
growing use and is much higher than
it used to be, but owing to slow trade
this fall it has been weak on the mar
ket. This does not worry the pine men,
however. They can sell their product,
and well-posted dealers say there is no
reason why prices could not be put high
er yet, except that advances discourage
building. As far as the market now is
concerned, the mills could get more
money if they asked it.
Business has been slow this fall, but
the mills do not have any surplus of
lumber on hand, and they are expect
ing a bigger spring trade than usual,
because of the late harvest and bad
weather this fall, which postponed con
siderahle bnildinj the country dis
tricts. They are also figuring on de
creased production next year. Several
mills over tbe northwest are going out
of business, and others will take off
night crews. Conditions in the woods
are bad for logging. WageB are high
and the ground is too soft for success
ful hauling, so the cost of logging will
be increased and this will have to come
out of the consumers. The present in
crease in prices is largelv in anticipa
tion of these conditions next year.
Invite Your Friends
To Thanksgiving dinner at Hotel
Majestic Cafe. Table d'hote, $1: 11:30
a.m. to 8 p.m. Service unexcelled.
STREETCAR OVERTURNED
Six Soldiers and Motormau i Peculiar
Wreck -at Snelling Bridge.
Six soldiers stationed at Fort Snell
ing and a streetcar motorman. were in
jured in a streetcar accident at the
fort end of the St. Paul Snelling line
last night. One soldier, Nels Waites of
Company I, Twenty-eighth infantry,
and the motorman, F. E. Jenkins, were
badly hurt and the other five were
more or less bruised and shaken up.
The accident was peculiar. Evidently
the motorman attempted to take the
curve at the loop at too high speed,
with the result that the body of the
car rolled from the trucks and fell to
the ground on its side. Private Waites.
who was sitting with one arm out or
the window, was unable to change his
position in time to escape and was
pinned under the car in such a posi
tion that it was necessary to saw a
piece from the car to rescue him. He
was taken to the fort hospital and
cared for.
Jenkins, the motorman, was penned
in his coop and in addition to some
severe 'bruises, seems to suffering
from electric shock. He was taken to
the St. Paul city hospital. The other
five' soldiers were not seriously hurt,
but were badly bruised.
Mannheimer's thirty-sixth annual
silk sale starts Monday, Wait for it
ST. PAUL CLIPS BUDGET
City Will Spend Less Next Year: than
This by $91,810.
St. Paul will not spend as much
money for municipal purposes in 1907
as in 1906. The budget adopted by the
conference committee fixes the tax
levy for state, county and municipal
purposes at $2,869,158, a reduction of
$91,810 from the appropriations for
this year. On an assessed valuation of
$102,723,408 the tax rate will be 28.5
mills.
The lighting fund gets an increase
of $15,000 and the school fund, $46,000.
A number of funds were reduced, but
the great saving is in the general fund,
which is cut from $366,600 to $243,200.
The committee will recommend an
issue of bonds in the sum of $300,000
for the construction of sewers. There
is great need of a sewer system in St.
Anthony Park, the Midway district,
and the cit-y is under obligation to
supply an outlet for a sewer system in
I the state fair grounds.
.00 Per Week!!
Will Place I Tour Boms a denulne
Columbia Graphophone
Tk* only inaehiiu backed by wrf guaranU*.
Columbia Records make ftite presents for Christ
ina*. Send for Catalogue.
COLUMBIA PHONOGRAPH 00.
13 South Fourth Street Manufacturers.
DOERRS CIGA JARS
A cigar jar for the den or study
adds a touch of real color, to say noth-
ing of its usefulness. We selected
our holiday stock early and secured
some very new and artistic designs.
taA cigar jar 1B always a welcome gift.
S^Winecke & Doerr
*^414 NICOLLET
November 29,1^1996.
$6.95 and
$10.1
The One-Price Complete
Hoaaetarnlnbers,
QB&"S
Thursday, Deo,
at 7c45 p. m.
THEATRE
MODERN VAUDEVILLE
^nlaf, 8c Me, 80c. rricw wtm ciuogt
METROPOLITA N I NfcaS*
Tonight anfl Sunday Night.
Matinee Saturday.
Jefferson De Angells
In the Comedy-Opera Success,
"THE GIR and the 80VERH0R"
3
Nights and Wed. Mat ||Cf O
Beginning MONDAY, Uktli
SEATS SELLING TODAY.
WM. H. CRANE and
HISS ELLIS JEFFREYS
And a notable cast In
SHE STOOPS O CONQUE
I
Seat Sale Next Monday I
Mailorders Now. I
MR. RICHARD
MANSFIELD
6
E2?a?.
PEER GYNT
BEAU BRUMMELL
Saturday Matinee, prrn OVKIT
December 8, 2 p. m* tHK VxlIN I
S&SSf *&. Jekjll and Kr. fljde
AUDITORIUM TB8JB7-
THE
PHILHAR1MONIC CLUB 800 VOICES
in Franek's Saered Oratorio,
ThCesar Beatitudes
Minneapolis Symphony orchestra
Emil Oberhoffer, conductor, and distinguished
Soloists. Ticket sale open* tomorrow at the
Metropolitan Music store. Prices 76c. 11. SL60.
PRISCILLA'S
OFFERINGS FOR
FRIDAY'S
BUSINESS.
Special Sale "White
Lily" and "White Rose"
Washing Machines.
These Wonderful Machines
Clothesand Your Back.
"WWte Lily"
Datkiies Spicial friday,
Cub. or $i Pw Weak. Either Kind.
AMUSEMENTS AMUSEMENTS
Both Phones, 3997.
Matinee
Today
25c
Notice to the Public
American Real Estate Company
save Time*
$6.95
$10.00
"WWte Boit
lathiaes Special Friday
Cash, r $2.00 Down and $1.00 Per Week.
Furnltur
5th St., 6th St. and 1st Av. S.
THIS PATTY BBOTHEBS
8VASSAE GIBIxS8
NOBTON & NICHOLSON
OH1NKO
MTtfNIE KAUFMANX
SWOB BEOS.
HAYWABD. OONBOY &
SAyWABD
3QNODBOMB
WEEK:
BIJOU TomqHT 8I1
"TEXAS",HITOBITGREASSEASON'TLAS
Same Cast and Production as Last Year.' "t
SOUVENIR MATINBH SATURDAY.
Next WeekFarewell Appearance ot KBtiLAB.
LYCEUM* Every Evening and Matinees 8aturday
and Sunday.
"THE FRAWLEYS"
offer
"THE DICTATOR."
Evening 60c35c25c10o
Matinee 25c10o
Next Week Captain Swift
DEWEY THEATE.RDailyeTwie
Mm*
A
THE BROADW AY
GAIETY GIRLS
With JOHNNY WEBBER
Next Week 8am Derere's Own Company
290 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY
A RAR E OPPORTUNITY
Slightly Damaged Blankets at 30 to 40 Per Cent Off.
There is no city in the United States -where high grade blankets
can hi bought so cheap as in Minneapolis, the home of the NOBTH
STAB WOOLEN MILLS. We offer blankets slightly damaged in
manufacturing, at prices which save you from 30 to 40 per cent.
Alt hough we call them "slightly damaged," the defect in most
cases does not in-jure the wearing quality a particle.
WB INVITE TOTJ TO COME AND EXAMINBOTXR BARGAINS.
12-4 Heavy, fleecy and warm worth $7.50, at $5.00
11-4 Heavy, fleecy and warm worth $6.75, at 84! 1 5
10-4 Heavy, fleecy and warm worth $6.75, at $4i20
11-4 Heavy, fleecy and warm worth $7.50, at 85i20
12-4 Fine grade wool, very warm worth $15.00, at S9i00
Our bath-robe blankets and steamer rugs make very appropriate
and acceptable Christmas gifts. Make your selection now, while
our stock is complete.
HORSE BLANKETSHORSE BLANKETS &, Z\+
We make a high grade street blanket in plain and fancy colors.
Before buying examine our goods and prices.
PULLMAN BLANKETS. i ^&
Are the best wearing blankets manufactured. For bed use they
will last about 15 years. *^f
WORKING MENWORKING MEtt*
Examine our high grade line of all wool flannel overshirts, flannel
Cloth underwear, and heavy wool reefers.
NORTH STAR WOOLEN MILL GO.
One Block from Milwaukee Station on Third Av. S. and 2d St.
%i
3 Sf
Si
FAMILY THEATER. f!
Continuous Vaudeville Afternoon and
Evening. Prices 1,0c. 20c, 80c Matinees
10c and SOc j* igTJj
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bev. W. B. Riley, Pastor.
Special Revival Services
7:45 P.M. DAILY.
Grand Chorus Choir led by Prof. M.
C. MARTIN, "The Singing Evangel
ist
1-*L-S- Moore ceased to be an agent of the AMERICAN REAL
ESTATE COMPANY on November 17, 1906.
2.The "American Real Estate Company of Minneapolis, Min
nesota, Incorporated," organized November 22, 1906, by
J. R. Moore and others, has no connection with the AMERI
CAN REAL ESTATE COMPANY, of New Yorks City.
3.Moore Bros. & Co. (J. R. Moore'es Arm)' have no connection
with the AMERICAN REAv ESTATE COMPANY, of New
York City.
4.The original American Real Estate Company has been lit
ftytLVJKk i5
1888
an
8,nc
c,t
Yor
Nb
18,864,909.97 and Surplus of $1,185,047.03.
5.-Mr. R. M. Thompson has been appointed agent of this
company with offices at S44 Security Bank Building, Mln-
ha Asset of
Hs

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