OCR Interpretation


The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, December 07, 1906, Image 15

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-12-07/ed-1/seq-15/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 14

OWENS TALKED
OF HIS TROUBLE
a&-* __
1J: Sporting Writer
?l:-*K*.'^1 ^''f Story.
'^v*~,w."t-i.
at^Toledo'gTells a Belated but Interestin
Journal Special Service.
Toledo, Ohio, Dee. 7. Richard
Meade, sporting editor of the Toledo
Newa Bee, prints the follbwing story,
which was given him by Umpire Owens
a few days after the sensational gam
bling story out of Minneapolis, which'
implied that Owens had thrown the
game to Columbus. The story was held
up pending the association's decision.
The following interview took place:
"Well, Owens,' you've got yourself
and everybody else into a nice mess of
trouble,'' Meade remarked.
"They tried to get me," retorted
Owens, "but I showed 'em where I
stood. I'll put 'em where they won't
do me any more harm."
Then followed a long recital of
Owens'. grievances, originating in Louis
ville, where Kelley is alleged to have
accused this umpire and Kane of tip
pine? off the millers' signals. The writer
casually remarked that Owens wasn't
looking verv strong.
"I'll tell you Owens admitted,
I haven't been able to do myself
justice for a week. I've hit it up
harder than I should and admit it has
hurt mv work. But I've cut out the
booze, and I think you'll find my work
better than ever."
"And this was only four davs after
Owens had caused the trouble in Min
neapolis," continues Meade. "Thru
this statement Owens admits he was
not himself during his session in the
miller city and puts a rather shadow
ing complexion on the situation at- that
time.
"Now, if Owens was drinking, as he
says he was, he was not capable of
handling a ball game where two 'clubs
were fighting for the lead, as were
Columbus and the millers that fateful
afternoon.
"As to the charges of crookedness,
the writer knows nothing, as the mat
ter had not been brought up at that
time, and subsequently, when it was put
to Owens, he merely laughed and said
nothing."
MINNEAPOLIS MAN
IN THE LONG GRIND
New York, Dec 7.The western
delegation of cyclists who will take
part this year's international six
days' bicycle race, which will start at
Madison Square Garden Sunday, at mid
night, arrived in town yesterday, seven
strong. They are Floyd McFarland,
-Hardy Downing, Norman C. Hopper,
W. E. Samuelson, C. L. Hopper, E. A
Pye and A. J. Clark.
Following the lead of the foreigners
the westerners went over to finish their
training for the race at Newark. Nor
man C. Hopper is the well-known Min
neapolis long-distance plugger.
The champion Portland club of the Pacific
Coast league will train in the Hawaiian Islands
next spring. That sounds some in the east,
bnt they think nothing of it on the coast.
TOEMSIHROWfil
BY FRED BEELL
'12M,
GORDON FURS
De Luxe Caps
For men who afe satisfied with
nothing less than a thoroughbred.
Get jours
$3.00
BOYS! BOYS!! BOYS!!!
Look at These Prices
Small Hand Sleds, each.. .15c i Medium Hand Sleds 45c
Black Beauty $2.50 Bobs, from $7.50 to $25.00
Manufactured in Minneapolis by the N. A, Novelty Company.
5-foot Norway Skiis, 89c per pair. 6-foot, $1.20 per pair.
Men's Steel Skates 49c I Ladies' Steel Skates 69c
Men's Nickel Plated Skates 82c 1 Ladies' Clamp Skates 9o
Hockey Clamp Skates $1-19
GARDNER HARDWARE GO.
304-306 Hennepin Avenue
A. OLSON & CO.
NICOLLET AVE,
Double amount of M. & 0. Trading Stamps
with all cash purchases of $1.00 or over if
you30 bring this coupon Saturday, and........
UNMATCHABLE OVERCOAT AND SUIT SALE
$8.50, $10, $12.60, $16, $16.50, $18, $20, $22.50, $26.
No Misrepresentation Allowed in Selling Oar Goods.
W Stake Our Reputation On What W Say.
M. & G. Trading Stamp Book
including 50 Stamps given away
Saturday. (Call and get one.)
Absolute satisfaction guaranteed or your money back,
$ '&-
New American Champion Wins
from !iowan:in Greco-3f|
Roman Match.
Journal Spdoial Service.
Des MoineB, Iowa' Dec. 7.Fred
Beell of Wisconsin, champion catch-as
catch-can wrestler of America, last
night defeated Charles. Hackenschniidt
of \\x\a city in a fast Greco-Boman
match* Beell w6n the first two falls,
taking the first in 38^ minutes and
the second in 39 minutes.
It was the fastest bout seen here this
year. The men were well matched,
Beell having a shade the better of the
affair in weight. Both men were on
their feet most of the time and resort
ed to rough and fast tactics. Hacken
schmidt succumbed first to a half-Nel
son and in the second fall went down
under a half-Nelson, and crotch-lock.
He demonstrated his ability as a Gre
co-Eoman wrestler as well as, at catch
as-cateh-can style.
A
MAROONS HAVE A
GOOD SGHEDDLE
Gophers Are Booked for Two
Games with Chicago Basket
ball Players'.
Journal Special Service.
Chicago, Dec. 7.Announcement was
made yesterday by Dr. J. E. Eaycroft,
a tentative University of Chicago bas
ketball schedule for the winter months.
Two games have been scheduled, each
with Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois,
Purdue and Northwestern, with pros
pects also for games with Syracuse,
Iowa and Nebraska.
The schedule, subject to changes to
fit in with the indoor track dates, is as
follows:
Jan. 18Northwestern at Evanston.
Jan. 26"Wisconsin at Chicago.
Feb. 2jIllinois at Chicago.
Feb. 5Purdue at Lafayette.
Feb. 22Northwestern at Chicago.
Feb. 23Illinois at Urbana.
March 1Minnesota at Chicago.
March 9Purdue at Chicago.
March 15Wisconsin at Madison.
March 16Minnesota at Minneapolis.
Prospects for a strong basketball
team are good. A squad of thirty-five
men has been at work all- quarter.
JUNIOES WIN CONTEST.
The Lyndale Juniors defeated the Henneplns
at the Lyndale gymnasium Thurgdav afternoon
by the score of 21 to 11. Any 13-year-old
teams desiring games with the Lyndales please
address John Brown, 3027 Pleasant av S. Tel
ephone N. W. S. 818-J. The teams lined up
as follows:
Lyndale. Position. Henneplns.
White right forward... Bateman
Wheelock left forward
M. Thompson
Morrissey center Shannon
Brown right guard
W. Thompson
Anderson left guard Qulnn
Bill
EXTRA
FREE
A. A. M. CARLSON.
Correct Tailors, Hatters, Furnishers and Good Clothiers,
227 Nicollet Ave*0fk\i'^t ligsi-Near Waan.
MAIEEAD WOLVERINES
MAGOFFIN,
Halfback,. Who Is in Line for the Cap
taincy of the Michigan Football Team
Next Year.
FAST BASKETBALL.
TEAM FOB IOWA
Journal Special Service.
Iowa City, Iowa, Dec. 7.Iowa's
prospects in basketball the coming sea
son are exceptionally bright., and the
squad, which has been practicing regu
larly during the past six weeks, is in
such shape that to select an unusually
strong team will be an easy matter.
The season, it is believed, will open
on Dec. 13, with the state normal five
as opponents. That a hot game mav be
anticipated is reasonable, when it is
recalled that Coach Seymour of the
normal team is a Springfield (Mass.)
product, and that city is the home of
the first basketball team in the coun
try. The normal's fine "gym" adds to
the likelihood of a strong aggregation
coming from Cedar Falls.
Iowa has no official schedule, as yet,
but it is understood that Northwest
ern, Purdue, Minnesota and one other
conference team will be played by the
hawkeyes. Two non-conference state
universities, and Coe, Grinnell and
other teams will also be met. Trips
east, west and north will be made.
Director Rule, a former Des Moines
athletic star, is coaching the Iowans, ainieti star is coaching the Iowans V"*"* ^"ICUTO. iu preai
and is doing great work, altho he has willg note take an
lost several veterans, including
rme of Burlington. Heath is especially i^gi.
ing an intercollegiate basketball
championship," team
has beenj.nvitedwhichththeAIow.a by
.i&in. IGE SAILORS ARE
READY FOR RACES
Journal Special Service.
Pewaukee, Wis., Dec. 7.Winter sail
ors are at work getting their runner
yachts in shape for the opening of the
ice-boating season, which usually begins
early in December and continues three
months.
Pewaukee sailors have for years tak
en the initiative and usually lead all
other organizations in the racing of ice
boats. The outlook for the sport at
Lake Pewaukee during the coming win
ter is bright, and if the weather man
favors the yachtsmen there will be a
number of interesting races held dur
ing the Christmas and New Year's hol
iday. Most of the last year's sailors
have overhauled their boats or built
new ones, and closely contested races
are expected.
SCHAEFER IS BROKE
Wizard of Cue Has Trouble Finding
LOCALS ABE BEATEN
THE MINNEAPCHflS%OURNAE.
season, is now a formidable rival for Hoppe played against his father. He
the post
guardi. Directoof Rule contemplating join-
Backer.
New York, Dec, 7.Jacob Schaefer
is seeking a backer for a match with
William F. Hoppe for the world's
championship at 18.1 balk line. That
Schaefer could not command the neces
sary financial support for any chal
lenge he contemplated issuing came as
a revelation yesterday from the donors
of the championship emblem. Schaefer
has a provisional challenge filed with
the donors of the championship emblem,
and he is expected to post his forfeit
within the next two weeks, which will
bring the match for competition the
first part of February.
In addition to the 18.1 challenge
from Schaefer there is the prospect of
many other challenges for the youthful
Hoppe after he finishes his, coming con
test with George Sutton for the 18.2
honors on Dec. 18 in the Grand Central
palace. The winner of the class
championship will post a blanket chal
lenge for the holder of the 18.2 title.
Y. M. 0. A. Loses to the Macalester
College Team in Basketball.
The Minneapolis Y. M. C. A. basket
ball team was given a neat surprise last
night when they Vent' iip against the
Macalester team on the latter's floor.
The college team has just been ad
mitted into the Twin City Basketball
league, and was naturally looked upon
as the weak team of the organization.
The locals went into the game over
confident and the contest finished with
a score of 27 to 26 with the associa
tions at the small end. Both teams
played a clean article of and
1 game was one of the mosball, excitingthe of
the season. The lineup:
Macalester. Position. Mpls. Y. M. O. A.
Canning .right forward. Westerberg-
Hirscb.
R. Metcalf left forward ...Baird
Montgomery.......... center WJUcocljson
Johnson left guard Thompson
F. Metcalf.. ....left guard Ne&itt
Goals from the FieldFor Macalester, by
Montgomery 8. Cannine. Metcalfs and Johnson
1 each for Y. M. 0. A., Willcockson 2, Hirsch
2. Thompson 2. Nesbitt 1. Baird Fouls
ThrownBy Montgomery 13, WillcockBon 8,
Westerbere 1.
DRITMMONDS LOSE.
The Drummond Hall basketball team went
down to defeat before the Lyndales last night
at Drummond hall by a score of 34 to 25.
Both teams went into the gam" with/a sjbirit
and alj ho they worked hard the Drummonds
were flnaUy beaten outy, -OJbe following isitheu
lineup:
Cahaly right forward1.',
ifcacaliieel
Nelson left forward Svenflson
O. Schooley center ....,..Gray
McCracken..., right guard -Brand-
Hardesty
J. Schooley .left guard Krugei
CAMERON FORBES
Governor of* th Jtofflppies Is
'*v
Wanted td Ctoftch Crimson
Team.
Journal Bpeoia} Service/'!^
NeW* York Dee *3
7.-W. Cameron
Forbes, now governor of the Philippines,
is wanted as coach of next year's Har
var football team. He will return to
his home in Norwood, Mass., next sum
mer, and it, is probable that he will
be asked to take general charge of the
crimson eleven.
The reformers of the game at Har
vard have ho objection to'a profession
al coach in addition to Mr. Forbes, pro
vided he confines his work to teaching
the game and refrains from any at
tempt to'dictate, or influence the gen
eral athletic policy* of the college.
Forbes is known to every Harvard
graduate as the coach of the Harvard
football team that in 1898 went* to New
Haven and played Yale to the score
of 1.7 to 4.
I AR O N IN THE
BADGER CAMP
Liberals Expect to Put Wisconsin
Back on the Athletic
Map.
Madison, Wis., Dec. J.Monday the
faculty of the university will meet to
consider the proposed changes in inter
collegiate athletic rules and a lively
time is promised. Some of the leaders
of the ultra-reform movement consider
it a step backward that the conference
at Chicago recommended.
It is said Professor Turner, father
of reform at Wisconsin, will be there,
charged to the muzzle with ultra-reform
data, and opposing him will be Profes
sor Victor Lenher and other advocates
of a more liberal policy. The same
fight which went on a year ago may be
continued.' But advocates of liberal
athletips are now more numerous than
they were a year ago.
The success of the Wisconsin team
this year has made a number of con
verts in the faculty. It is said Presi
dent Van Hise is in favor of the resti
tution of intercollegiate athletic con
tests and in general favors the ideas of
the Chicago conference. The
presi
mhowever,
art
"Keddy" Griffith, Center Ramsel], an institution in this line,
Ottumwa expert, and Morrissey. Cap
tain James Barton, a veteran, and HftPPP EATTRIPfi
Buckner, another, are doing excellent USJILMJ LVVAbLl)
work at guard and are throwing bas
kets better than last year, altho Buck
ner has been switched fo center.
New players of merit who are show
ing' up in gilt-edged form are Stewarti
of Des Moines, Norton, a Grinnell star
Heath from Oberlin academy and Per-
v^ a,-auCm au jrer .'^Mi
determinin th policy oactive
New York,Chicago-record
1
8
6 2d^
good. Burkhelmer, who subbed last match with George Sutton.
good Burkhelmer who subbe last bbilliard
the
HIS OWN RECORD
Dec. '7.Willie Hoppe
by averag
last night in practice for hi
lar
match with Georg Suttons
made 500 eigh^' times at the table to QJs
an
A U.'to
father'in 54 with high runs of 24 9
164
4
i
Cold Weather
*'.JiP$4'*ear::%
-t
*:T^Men'sEmpe-
ror Shoes,$3.50
f^fmdi$4. "h&
OT:M0PRft&
ISIHARDLDC
Former Ofcampioii Has Had
End of Trouble Says
Manager.
Journal Special, aervioe.
Cincinnati, Dec. 7.Sam Harris, fori
mer manager of Terry MeGovern, now
managing a theatrical company, arrived
here yesterday morning and, yesterday
afternoon departed for New York,
I am hurrying to' New York on ac
count of poor Terry," said Harris. I
couldn't sleep a wink last night for
thinking what might be happening to
him with me away.
Tewy sure was a great little fighter
and a loyal friend, and I'll never for
sake him. I don't know whether he
has money now or not. I do not be
lieve his present weak mind is due to
excesses. Terry was never a boy for
any of that. His troubles have been
heartbreaking and frequent. His de
feat at the hands of Young Corbett,
his bitter rival, the death of his chil
dren and financial losses weakened his
mmd."
NO EXCHANGES IN
NEW YORK TEAM
New York, Dec. 7.None of the reg
ulars on the New York American leaguo
will be exchanged.
Owner Frank Farrell and Manager
Griffith fully appreciate the fact that
the Yankees" need pitchers,, but any
team that was able to finish such a
good second in such a close and excit
ing race as last season furnished is con
sidered by the management of the New
York club to be strong enough to stand
pat on.
Proposals have been made to Owner
Farrell by President John L. Taylor of
the Boston Americans to trade Jimmy
Collins for several New York players,
but the proportion was altogether too
one-sided to be listened to. Why, the
Boston club even asked for Conrdy and
Williams in exchange for Collins, and
possibly would have taken La Porte
and Moriarity for good measure. Far
rell did offer one or two subs for the
once great third baseman of the Bos
tons, but not a real player was even
considered in the proposed deal.
SKATERS TO MEET
Chicago, Dec, 7.With a yawn
President Charles H. Kilpatrick of the
Western Skating association arose from
his breakfast today and, looking hard
at the calendar, called Secretary E.
Norman Clasen to report.
"Clasen, what is the date?" asked
Kilpatrick.
"This is Dec. 7, sir," replied the
other official, not quite certain that the
old Princeton-Wisconsin champion half
mller had not run away from his
senses.
"It is time to have skating in Chl
ago said the president. "The
weather man must be prodded. He still
has a chance to make his peace. We
will have the annual meeting at the
Sherman House on Dec. 10. Tell him
we must have a cold spell and plenty
of ice. The championship events are
calling us."
Women's Empress Shoes, $3.5Q and
$4.00, with.heavy soles for cold, stormy
days.. I4ght Patents, in'lace and but
ton, for dress wear also the medium
weight dull calf and vici kids for or
dinary wear.
i
WTT
1
1
KM
Decefobef 7, 1900.
**&_.,
$*&'
teMi-zaru
*1f 'i
^-v
PrfKiuces a flame with the greatest pos
sible CANDLE POWER, therefore gives
the best of light. Ask your jobber or
THE VAN TILBURG CO.,
Minneapolis, Minnesota.
-Knox Hats. Rogers Peet Clothing. Hanan Shoes.
MERCHANTS OF FINE CLOTHES
High Grad Overcoats,
Party Slippers
Ladies* party and even
ing Slippers, in pink,
blue, white, red and
black. The swellest
thing out, per pair,
$4.00.
VAN TILBURG'S
CREAL1 OF OIL
Ulsters arid Fur Coats for Men
Our assortment of correct win
ter headwear is the most com
plete showing in the city.
$1.50 and $2 Gordon Patent aps in
the latest shapes and materials. Brook
Mink and Nutria lined Plush Kerseys
and Scotch Mixtures.
1 iinn urn-, mi mi iiiimnuii immi 1 i "i
In the designing of these outer garments for men the
utmost care is exercised to secure perfection of fit. The
expert work of skilled tai lors infuses an abundance of ease
and comfort and the deliberate selection of the most appro-
priate fabrics give to these garments individuality of style.
Boys' Overcoats and Reefers
Boys' Moosehide Moccasins, the very
best grade, for $1.25.-
German Sox, 50c.
Boys' Shoepacs, %he' high-cut," tor
coasting, $1:50.
Skating Shoes, for men and boys,
$8,50 youths' sizes, for $3.00.
^t^r 5r4 Jhe Great Plymouth Clothing Home, Nicolkt and Sixth, *& :i
Boys who are out during all sorts of winter weather
should be warmly and comfortably clothed.
Our reefers and heavy overcoats are made with spe
cial reference to the requirements of the most severs
winter weather.
Boys' Beefers, extra long, sizes 8 to 16 years, $5 to $12.
Boys' form-fitting Overcoats, sizes 10 to 17, $6.50 to $18.
Russian Overcoats, sizes 8 to 8, $5 to $15. j]
Boys' School Beefers, sizes 8 to 17, $5 to $8.50. ijj
Young Men's form-fitting Overcoats, $10 to $25 jg|
$1 and 75c Knee Pants, 45c.
This special sale includes about 200 pairs taken from our better
grades of knee pants. There are cassimeres and worsteds, but for the
^most part these pants are the much desired all wool cheviots. This
sale is for tomorrow only.
Caps at *1
Shoes'
JM
an Excellent
Gift.
SEE THEM DISPLAYED AT OUR
NEW SHOE HOUSE
514 Nicollet Avenue.--
,"_ Next to Andrus Building.
Ladies' Gun Metal and
Patent Colt button and
lace, Fifth Avenue
shapes, welted soles,
spade shanks,
$4 and $3.50.
gentlemen's Gun Metal
Calf button and bluch
ers, on the new high
ball last. Price
$4 and $3.50.
Ladies' party Slippers
in the black suede, fine
patent kid with beaded
fronts, many new pat
terns and styles to se
lect from.
$3 to $5.
ss ^X
HOLIDAYCSUPPERS
Now is the time to make your selec
tions for your Christmas Slippers.
Wer show them from, the
Pai
$1.0O to $3.50
Gents' fine tan and black vici
kid Opera Slippers, a beautiful
holiday gift, many styles to se
lect from, pair $2.00
Men
S 3
Clothing Gleanitii^
Be^aircMl tnd 3r^9ed^i?J^|fltoG^'^fpr
"tf.ilgUU. to Villi.-': V'- :'"*fLv'.f"f"'^ f*.'i-g^vv'
HENRY BROS! DTE HODW
^^121^17 Hennepin Avei*^,
S^M^&WiVbih- Phone*,
$ 5
$15 to
Overcoats,
Ulsters,
Fur Lined Coats,
$40.
$15 to
$500.
$45 to
Furlined Caps, good fitting, new and
staple shapes, plain and fancy mate
rials.
$2.50, $3.00, $3.56 BirrbeTTy Imported
English Golf Caps Beaver lined. Perfect
Fitting, Non-Shrinkable, made in the
Finest English Materials, Cheeks and,
Plaids and plain colors.
Full assortment of high-cut Over
shoes for everybody.
Holiday Slippers for -men and boys
in fancy and plain leathers, any- fctyle.
$1.00 to $3.50.
iiFeft' iTtftfets and Felt Slippers for
women and children, 50c to $1.50.
:sg'lpS-..'--
i
1^_^_

xml | txt