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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, December 07, 1906, Image 6

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

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City News
THE WEATHER
1 9*be Predictions.
MinnesotaFair, exoept snow north
|fpdrtion tonight Saturday, snow, much
j-iwarmer.
Upper MichiganPair, occa-
!_ siona snow near Lakeexcept Superior
warmer.
'e WisconsinWarmer tonight and Sat-
$ utday.
IowaiFair tonight occasional rain
or snow Saturday much warmer.
*H North and South DakotaSnow to
night and Saturday warmer.
MontanaBainr otonight,
Eeesn
snow tonight and
Saturday warme and in east
portion Saturday.
Weather Conditional
The high pressure area with its at
tendant low temperatures, has moved
farther southeastward and now occu
le the Mississippi valley. There has
precipitation in advance of the
high pressure area over the Great Lakes
and eastward and southeastward to the
Atlantic coast, due to the sharp fall
in temperature. It is below zero in the
upper Mississippi valley and the Cana
dian provinces. The pressure has fallen
rapidly from Colorado northward and
thence to the Pacific coast, attended
by much warmer weather and precipita
tion in the greater portion of that re
gion. It will be much warmer in this
vicinity tonight and Saturday, with in
creasing cloudiness tonight, and snow
Saturday.
Charles A. Hyle, Observer,
Temporarily in Charge.
Weather Now and Then.
Today, maximum 2, minimum 12
degrees a year ago, maximum 42, mini
mum 28 degrees.
AROUND THE TOWN
Few More Stamps Sold.Minneapo
lis bought $126,125.06 worth of post
age stamps in November, 1906. This
sum is only slightly more than the sales
for the same month of the preceding
year.
'Seeks Her Sealskin,Mrs. A. De
Frense. 1952 Dayton avenue, Merriam
Park, has asked the police to look for
her servant, who disappeared last even
ing. A sealskin cloak vanished at the
same time.
Will Close the Books.The Tenth
Ward Republican club will hold a busi
ness meeting tomorrow night in Haer
tel's hall, 4226 LyndaJe avenue N. The
meeting is called to close up the finan
cial affairs of the club.
Frats Ask a Hearing.Central high
school fraternities and sororities have
united in an address to the board of
education to be allowed to plead their
cause in a board meeting before any
repressive measures are taken. The
request for a hearing will undoubtedly
be granted.
Alumni Work for Pipe Organs
Alumni of the University of Minnesota
are planning to install a pipe organ in
the university chapel in place of the
old piano that has done service for sev
eral years. A subscription is being
circulated among the alumni for the
purpose of raising the money. It is
Sossibleththaopeninorgafn roW i
the will be installed
efore college next fall.
Tickets for Hellstrom Concert,Sale
of tickets for the Mme. Hellstrom fare
well concert, to be given at the Audi
torium next Monday evening under the
auspices of the Concordia society of the
Swedish hospital, opened today at the
Metropolitan Music company's store.
Tne demand was strong and indications
are that a large audience will greet
the great Swedish singer.
No Service Tonight.The meeting
last night at the First Baptist church
was one of the best of the series. At
the close of Dr. W. B. Riley's sermon
a large number went forward. Seven
of these, all young women, were ap
proved for baptism and about an equal
number wereu received by letter. There
Will b1e^ht no meeting tonight nor tomor-
Will be resumed.
Sunday the meetings
Students' Glee Club Tonight.The
state university mandolin and glee club
\7ill give its first home concert of the
season tonight at the First Baptist
jourch. The management states that
it will be the best ever given in the his
tory of the club. Popular prices will
be charged. Proceeds of the concert
are expected to be large enough to
make possible a ten-day trip thruout
the state during the Christmas holi-
Pas
Dropped.De.
ane
'Poison Mystery'' _JL/C-
tectives who have been detailed to in
vestigate the death of Mrs. Mary
Gacek, 2828 Second street N, who died
under peculiar circumstances at her
home Sunday, have been unable to find
any clues that point either to murder
or suicide. It was asserted that the
woman drank carbolic acid, but Deputy
Coroner Irvine could not detect the
resence of the drug and as no bottle
been found the case will probably
be dropped.
No Smallpox afc American House.
The American house, said yesterday to
have had a smallpox case, is not the
American house for the last thirty
years located at 125 First street N.
That is a hotel largely patronized by
farmers using the hay and other mar
kets, and no smallpox or other infec
tious disease has been there for years.
The American house, or hotel, in which
emallpox was found is a lodging house
at 109 Washington avenue S.
NEOROLOGIC
MRS. SARAH A. MTJRCH, age 50
B.ighland
ears, died today at her residence, 82
avenue. She is survived by
a son and a daughter.
All Things Considered,
Price, location, natural beauties and
surroundings, Crystal Lake Cemetery
offers the "best" one could desire in
a permanent burial lot.
CAR REPAIRER KILLED
Hans Nelson, 38 years old, was killed
Mr a freight engine in the Great
Northern yards near the freight depot
yesterday. Nelson was employed as a
car repairer and was on his way home
io his dinner. The body was taken to
the morgue, where it was claimed later
by Nelson's brothers, who live at 718
Pierce street NE.
&-
TO DAY I N THE
DISTRICT COTJET
Judge David F. SimpsonContinu
ance of jury selection in Susa
man murder trial.
Judge F. C. BrooksChamber mat
ters and petit jury roll.
Judge John Day SmithDivorce
case of Alma Sather against
Peter Sather.
Judge Andrew HoltThomas B.
Moran^life insurance case.
Judge H. D. DickinsonRichard
H. Chute vs. A. T. Jerremy: ac
tion in replevin for logs valued
at $50.
Judge F. V. BrownDivorce suit
of Fred B. Attwood against Nel
lie Attwood
-t
w*
k^S4Sfc4i 'C^i^,
Friday Evening,
SCORES OF BOYS
ROBBING STORES
THREE ABE HELD AS THIEVES,
EACH NAMED ANDERSON.
One Young Prisoner Declares Many
Youths Are Stealing from Business
Places and Planting the LootCoinci
dence in Names -of Trio Locked Dp.
Three bovs, each about 17 years old
and each giving the name of Anderson,
are locked up as thieves at Central po
lice station.
The boys are in no way related and
each one worked independently. The
police say they have made damaging
admissions. One of them told Detect
ives Passolt and Johnson that 'there
were dozens of boys of their own age
stealing from stores and planting their
loot until they can dispose of it easily.
Edward Andeison is charged with
stealing caps and gloves from a cloth
ing store, and Andrew Anderson is ac
cused of stealing fur collais from a de
partment store. Both boys are from
good families and do not look to be 17
years old. As they are a little older,
however, they will have to be tried in
police court.
Henry Anderson, the boy arrested as
a burglar yesterday, is a little under
the age and will be tried in the juve
nile court. In spite of his youth he
seems to take pride in the fact that he
has successfully broken into several
buildings and escaped with his loot.
Tho refusing to tell just what places he
has robbed, he says he is a real burglar
and promises to take his punishment
like a man.
Edward and Andrew Anderson were
arraigned in police court today and
their cases were continued until to
morrow.
ROCKNE GETS HIS
OWN DELEGATION
A. J. Rockne's candidacy for speaker
of the Minnesota house was indorsed
today at a caucus of the third district
republican members held in St. Paul.
All the delegation attended except E.
A. Orne of Faribault Beside Mr.
Rockne there were W. H. Putnam of
Red Wmg, who presided, T. O. Hau
gen of Nicollet county, G-eorge H. Den
zer and C. W. Glotfelter of Le Sueur,
George W. Thompson of Rice.Dr. J.
A. Gates of Goodhue, and W. H. Wes
eott of Dakota.
The action of the third was entirely
expected, and makes no "change in the
situation. The chief interest lies in the
meeting of the ninth and seventh at
Breckenridge tomorrow. The candi
dates and several of their friends are
going up tonight. Johnson of Henne
pin is hoping for an indorsement at
this meeting, and if he gets it will have
little more to do to be a winner. If he
fails the contest will be drawn out for
another week or two. Mr. Johnson will
be accompanied by B. H. Timberlake
and Sherman S. Smith, R. J. Wells of
Breckenridge, a quondam candidate for
speaker himself, is also working for
Johnson.
Some lively work for Johnson was
done last evening in St. Paul. Confer
ences were held with Rockne and No
lan, and the reports say that an attempt
was made to fix up a triple combination
with Johnson at the head of it. No
definite results came from the delibera
tions.
W. A. Nolan had quite a first district
following with him in St. Paul today.
There were "William Foreman of Kel
logg, James P. Spencer of Rochester,
Burdett Thayer of Spring Valley and
0 N. Thundale of Harmony. O. J.
Simmons, John Bifigham, John Furlong
and John Scott, all of Austin, were also
on hand, saying a good word for Nolan.
MRS. H. P. BROWN DIES
Woman Well Known in Club Circles
Passes Away at Her Home.
Mrs. H. F. Brown died today at the
family residence, Seventh street and
Fourth avenue S. Mrs. Brown was
born in Herman, Me., in 1846, the
daughter of John and Mary Fairfield.
In 1866 she marned Henry F. Brown in
Saco, Me. Mr. and Mrs. Brown came
immediately to Minneapolis, where they
have lived ever since in the house
which they built and in which she died.
Mrs. Brown was a woman of fine
mental endowment and naturally be
came a leader in affairs engaging the
attention of women. She was for many
years president of the Impiovement
league: she served as president of the
E. E. Kenyon club and was one of the
organizer of the Nineteenth Century
club, for which she gave the use of her
house for many years as the club home.
She was appointed by President Harri
son as one of the women commissioners
to represent Minnesota at tho Colum
bian exposition at Chicago.
Mrs. Brown suffered a slight paraly
tic stroke about three years ago, since
which time she had gradually failed in
health and strength, but never lost
courage and good cheer until the end.
The funeral will take place at the house
Monday at 2 p.m. and will be con
ducted by Dr. M. D. Shutter of the
Church of the Redeemer.
BEE MEN SPLIT GASH
New Society Keeps $75 and Gives
Like Sum to Old Association.
The sum of $150, originally belong
ing to the Minnesota Beekeepers' asso
ciation, which has been the bone of
i
contention ever since it was carried Pany, was fatally injured today by6Joeing
into the newly formed Beekeepers' so- .run
BUILD CONNECTIONS
Street Railway Company Prepares to
Care for New Suburbans.
CTOWS are at work today construct
ing curves from the Hennepin avenue
and the Twentieth avenue N lines to
connect the street railway system with
the recently acquired suburban roads,
the Walker line to St. Louis Park and
Hopkins, and the Bobbins line to Bob*
binsdale.
It is not the intention'of the company
to operate thru cars this winter. The
curves are put in so equipment now on
the lines may be run into the company's
shops for storage and repairs and so
snowplowa and repair and construction
cars may be run over the new lines to
keep them open and in order. Both
lines will probably be operated with
their present equipment this wiate*,
Km
SDSSMAN JURY I S^
ALMOST COMPLETED
1
THREE CHAIRS NOW REMAIN TO
BE FILLED.
More Relatives of Prisoner Appear to
Cheer and Advise Him During Trial
-Courtroom Filled with Morbidly
Curious Who Patiently Await Open
ing of Case.
8USSMAN JURY TO DATE
Qulst, painter, 1020 Eighth
Carl J.
street s.
Frank H. Akely,
First avenue SE.
Knute Neutsen, fire Insurance, 3248
Hennepin avenue.
Richard C, Stanley, grain weigher,
1050 Fourth avenue SE.
John J. Elliott, streetcar conduc
tor, 1053 Central avenue.
J. W. Baird, carpenter, 3539 Ninth
avenue S.
William A. Morton, wholesale ba
ker, 1343 Nicollet avenue.
Frederick Pitts, manufacturer con
crete blocks, 1314 West Lake street.
Henry Coleman, farmer, Blooming
ton.
S
machinist, 803
With only three vacancies remaining
on the jury whose verdict will deter
mine the fate of Henry M. Sussman, in.
terest in the murder trial showed a de
cided advance today. Before the doors
of Judge D. F. Simpson's courtroom
were opened, a large crowd of the idly
curious and morbid filled the courthouse
corridors. These onlookers made a rush
for seats of vantage as soon as they
were given admittance, and waited ea
gerly the hope that a jury would be
quickly secured and the introduction
of evidence begun.
The defendant, his brother, sister.in_
law and counsel, held an animated con
ference preceding the appearance of
Judge Simpson. Sussman seemed even
paler than usual when he came into
court handcuffed to Deputy Sheriff MaL
chow. He was plainly bothered by the
staring and the comments of the crowd
thru which he passed, and showed his
irritation in his discussion with his at
torney.
The tedious task of selecting the re
maining jurors was taken up promptly
at 10 o'clock. Some forty veniremen
summoned yesterday and last night
were on hand. The morning 'a work re
sulted in the selection of two jurors,
Frederick Pitts, who, tho he had read
and talked of the case, swore that he
believed he had not formed an opinion
that could not be laid aside when he
was sworn as a juror and Henry Cole
man, who had no opinion.
More Relatives Appear.
During the forenoon the defendant's
party was increased by the appearance
of Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Sussman, bro
ther and sister-iu-law of the accused.
They took seats back of J. I. Sussman
and his wife, who have been in con
tinual attendance since the opening of
the trial. Mrs. and Miss Rose Messen
ger, mother and sister of Mrs. Fannie
Sussman, the woman alleged to have
been murdered in cold blood by her
husband, were in court and occupied
seats back of State's Attorneys Smith
and Dahl. They were dressed in deep
mourning and heavily veiled. Altho
they controlled their feelings better
than they did yesterday, their hand
kerchiefs were called into use several
times on occasions when their mur
dered relative's name was mentioned.
It is hoped that the introduction of
evidence will be commenced tomorrow
County Attorney Smith will insist upon
the continuance of the trial tomorrow,
Saturday, owing to the fact that the
jurors are locked* up.
SHALL CO-EDS RULE IN
ALIGE SHEYLIN HALL?
Control of Alice Shevlin hall by self
government or committee government
is the question up for settlement by
the co-eds at the University of Minne
sota. They have been solving it thru
the medium of a closed ballot today.
The problem was brought to an issue
by the dedication yestei'day of the new
building, given to the women of the
university by Thomas Shevlin. This
is to be headquarters for all the girls
in the "U," and an elaborate system
of rules and regulations will be neces
sary for their government. The two
methods under disoussion consist of
government under an appointed facul
ty committee or a system of govern
ment by their own officials.
There seems to be a difference of
opinion among the girls, and several
of them have been carrying on a sys
tematic campaign in behalf of self
government. President Northrop has
expressed himself as heartily in favor
of the self-government plan.
The problem was the subject of a
long discussion by all the women in
the university in mass meeting today.
After the meeting a ballotbox was
opened and the matter will be settled
by a vote.
The system of self-government is the
one in use at Wellesley and other east
ern colleges for women.
KILLED BY LOCOMOTIVE
Thomas Whalen. St. Paul, Assistant
Yard Foreman, Run Over.
Whalen,
yardt
fore-
aThomasthe for St. Pauassistant Union Depo com
by a switch engine at 9:4 .Hi
ove
ciety's camp by the treasurer, Mrs. W. right leg was cut off just below the knee,
S. Wingate, was cut in two at the 1 his scalp was badly lacerated and his
meeting of the Beekeepers' associa- right arm crushed and the thumb badly
tionthis morning. Dr. L. D. Leonard, broken. He was taken to St. Joseph's
president of the new society, presented 1 hospital In the police ambulance, and died
a motion offering the division, and as at 1 p.m.
the old association had no choice, it ac
cepted by an unanimous vote.
No time has been lost by the officers
of the new Beekeepers' society in tak
ing legal steps for organization as an
auxiliary of the horticultural society
of this state, and Dr. L. D, Leonard
appeared before the meeting of the
Minnesota State Horticulaural society
today asking for admittance and rec
ognition as an auxiliary. The horticul
turists are in favor 01 the new organ
ization.
COST OF DEFEAT
A. L. Cole Certifies to Expenses of Race
for Governor.
A. L. Cole's statement of his personal
expenses as a candidate for governor
was filed today with the secretary of
state. Mr. Cole certifies that he spent
$555 before the state convention, and
|2,37Q after his nomination. Of this
$2,000 went to the state central com
mittee, $220 for railroad fare, and $100
for hotel bills.
A MISTAKE
THBjjMINNEAPdLIS JOURNAL
DEMOCRATS HAD
IG CAMPAIGN WAD
COMMITTEE SPENT $8,802.99
HENNEPI NOOUNTT.
Investigation of the campaign ex
pense accounts of Hennepin county
committees shows that the democratic
organization had by far the largest
fund. Richard Tattersfield, chairman
of the democratic county committee,
has prepared and filed with the county
auditor a statement showing that the
democratic organization spent $8,-
802.99. More than $2,000 of this
amount was paid to challengers and
watchers at the polls, while nearly' a
thousand dollars went for music, bands
and entertainments. The remainder of
the fund went for printing and adver
tising.
The republican committee expended
$5, 430 and has bills on hand, for
$466.87, for which no funds are avail
able. The statement was filed by E. B.
Sanders, secretary, and it shows that
the county committee was somewhat
handicapped in the matter of finance.
Smaller Party Bills.
Of the $1,540 spent by the public
ownership state organization, $450 was
spent in filing fees and tfce remainder
in advertising. In Hennepin countv
the organization spent only $223.78.
The state report was filed by John E.
Nash and George W. Ostrander, as
treasurer, filed the Hennepin county ac
count.
W G. Calderwood of the prohibition
committee reports the expenditure of
$2,263.02 in the state campaign. Ap
proximately $200 was spent in Henne
pin county.
In addition to calling for itemized
statements from political organizations
the state law called for the filing of
expense accounts by the various candi
dates and yesterday was the last day
for filing. In the auditor's office no
complete itemized list of the different
expense accounts has been prepared,
but a perusal of the accounts shows
that a number of the candidates have
failed to comply with the law. In all
cases the persons who have not filed
were unsuccessful candidates at either
the primaries of the general election.
Among the Mayors.
James C. Havnes admits that he ex
pended $783.85, and his opponent at
the primaries, W. H. Williams, expend
ed $526.50. David P. Jones's state
ment shows an expense of only $15.
U. G. Williams, Mr. Jones' opponent
at the primaries, swears that he spent
$834 in seeking the nomination.
Lettie M. Crafts, the woman candi
date for the library board, spent $35
in carrying on her successful campaign,
but T. B. Walker, also successful, ex
pended not a cent in seeking member
ship on the board. Prank M. Nve, re
publican candidate for congress, ex
pended $799.80 at primaries and elec
tion. TROLLEY SUPPLY CARS
ILLEGAL, IS CflARGE
Asserting tKat the franchise of the
Twin City Rapid Transit* company per
mits the operation of cars for the sole
purpose of carrying passengers, attor
neys for Albert Youngquist, adminis
trator of the estate of Fred Krause,
will endeavor to piove that the opera
tion of supply cars by the company is
illegal and in violation of franchise
rights. The question is involved in a
suit for $5,000 damages as the result of
the death of Krause, who was run into
and killed on Aug. 7, by a supply car.
In their complaint against the com
pany, the attorneys for the plaintiff not
only allege that the car which ran down
Krause was exceeding the speed limit
established by city ordinance, but they
assert that there were no air brakes in
operation on the car and that the car
was being operated in violation of the
company's franchise. Officials of the
Twin City company assert that it is
necessary to run supply cars in order
to operate passenger cars, and are not
inclined to take the complaint seriously.
WANTS A ROOSEVELT PRIZE
John Schutta Has Seven Sons, All in
Straight Sequence.
John Schutta, a farmer near New
Brighton, wants to know if Piesident
Roosevelt has ever offeied a medal for
the birth of seven sons in a tanuly
without the birth of a girl breaking the
sequence.
Mr. Schutta's seventh son was born
on Thanksgiving Day, and having heard
that the parents with this record are
given medals by the enemy of race sui
cide, he is making inquiries. He has
been unable to find anyone who really
knows whether such a prize has been
offered, but if it has been, he is goinse
after it.
Mr. Schutta is a brother to Joseph
Schutta. deputy sheriff, and is only 30
years old. He has lived on his farm
near New Brighton for several years
and says that the boys will stick to the
farm if he has any voice in their plans.
IVORY McKUSICK DEAD
Last of the Original Family Which
Came to Minnesota in 1847.
Special to Tho Journal.
Stillwater, Minn., Dec. 7.The funer
al of Jvory McKusick, who died late
yesterday afternoon, will be held on*
Sunday afternoon and will be charge
of the Masons. Mr. McKusick was 79
years old and was the last survivor
of the original McKusick family which
came to the valley of the St. Croix in
1847. He had been an invalid for sev
eral years. By occupation he was a
logger and lumber dealer. Two chil
dren survive him, Mrs. W K. "Wurde
man and Herbert McKusick.
Mrs. Christian Anderson, mother of
J. A. Johnson of this city, died this
morning, aged 80.
Judge A. E. Doe, the newly elected
judge of probate, has reappointed Miss
Florence Butts deputy. N. A. Nelson,
the new county clerk, will retain James
G. Foley, the old deputy.
Can very easily be made in the selection of
a piano. There is as much make-believe and
sham in the piano business as in any other.
The best way to avoid the danger of getting, a poor instrument is to go to
a reliable dealer and take hie advice. Your best interests are also the best
interests of the dealer who is building business and looking to the future.
No make-believe in getting such tried and true pianos as the Hardman!
Krakauer, Mehlin, McPhail, Behning, Sterling, "Crownj," Huntington,
Cash or ?7 to $10 monthly,
BEPRE3ENTATTVES FOB THE KNABE-ANGELTJS PIANO.
FOSTER y WALDO,'S^fUSV^
THEY
in
Republican Committee Struggled Along
on $5,430, Coming Out "in the Hole"
Losing Candidates for Mayor
Named Williams Spend $1,360 in
Fruitless Chase.
WROTEWILLS
ON A BIRCH TREE
HUNTERS LOST NEAR GRAND
MARAIS HAD GIVEN UP,
Caught in Woods by a Blizzard, They
Struggled Against Hunger and Cold
Till Hope Was Gone and Then Left
Their Pathetio Message on a Tree.
Despairing of ever getting out of
the woods alive, Lincoln andf ^Caldwell,
the Duluth men who werec lost for two
weeks in the wilds oaf Cook countv
near Grand Marais.e writhe their 3
tree
aJ?il
in .to
cm,S^ ries of wJi
1
W
Wlt
December 7, 1906".
a
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Bm
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police
wM Nort
"t* frosm the oddesnorth
of
tM
a
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u8
6
sa
S?i T?
er i
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^l
MaraS,- 1 ^althesto
rie of wills, theroem is only one aD
Sfrtt?
Gra
fr
Stevenson,d whon told
tha
upo the
and that one was a pure bit of fiction
nl
Loui
ta
ttooe
0b
Wil1
ntk Af
a ^esaTn
young girl
?_
Wh 2
Ca
tai a Hein left Grand Ma
be
fost'*
rViSr
P to
ha
lost. The Indians employed by friends
of the missing hunters beUeved 5 ?m
possible that they could hive lived
Men's Silk Muffler*
75c $1.2 3, $1.75
Silk
Petticoats
13.98
thru the many days of cold and hun
ger, and refused to go on with the
search. They had a superstitious fear
of finding a dead body.
Three days ago. however, a search
ing party of white men found the
hunters, almost exhausted but strug
gling on their way to a cabin they had
left just before a big storm came up.
They had been in camp with two other
men, who had gone to Grand Marais
for supplies. In the absence of their
companions, Lincoln and Caldwell start
ed out with a blanket apiece and a
scanty store of provisions for another
camp about five miles back in the
woods. They reached it, but the storm
came up in the meantime, and realizing
the danger of being cut off, they strat
ed back for the original camp. When
found they had experienced terrific suf
fering and could hardly have won out
unless assistance had come.
MORE LEGS THAN NEEDED
Chicken with Plenty of SupportBut
It's Dead.
In a refrigerator in the office of the
state dairy and food commission at the
state capitol, is a peculiar freak of
nature, a chicken with three legs and
four feet. An extra leg protrudes from
the fowl's tail, and this leg, dividing
ends in two perfect claws.
The chicken is dressed. It was found
among a lot sent to the Eisenmenger
Meat company, St. Paul, and sentby
that firm to the state department.
W. W. Wall, secretary of the commis
sion, says the fowl must be a "stand-
patter,'' and has no place in a demo
cratic state office.
SILK STORE
722 Nicollet Avt.
PURS-Blue Wolf Sets, value. $25, Gray Squirrel Sets, value $16.75
*lo.r5 for $10 95
Jap Mink Sets $15:?5 and$22.50 Blend Squirrel Sets $I3.1$ 19.75
River Mink Scarfs and throws, $2.98 and $3.98
Fur S&SMW^SJ 'fflassras'ftff
Op.osB.rn, NUM., CMnohilU and Ermta. at^SShdS- tS?regS
$4.9 8, $6.75, $8.95 $12.?5anU to $29.75
Winter Coat $
52-mch black kersey and broad
cloth, loose and tight fitting
styles, velvet and braid trimmed,
satin lined some with river mink
collars values 1 A 09
to $25, at $ 14.7 0u
l5
Oat 5~^
Wi
AN UMBRELLA
maket a most appropriate and accept
able gift.
Three Umbrella Bargains on sale at
THE
^^^K^* GLOVE OOMFAVT HO 90
WANT SOM E CLOTHING
Ot
Ladles' Crepe de Chin* Scarfs
$1.98, $1.48, 98c oid 75c
Plaid Silk
Waists
94.98
Fancy mixtures and
black kersey, 50-inch
coats misses' and ladies'
sizes values to $17.50,
W garmentg to be sold at tha
n$9.?less
Kersey
FancyMixturesn
GAMOSSI
No. IWomen Union TaffetaSilk Tape Edge, Pitted
CasesSplendid line of handles, comprising Genuine
Cape Horns, Gun Metal and natural fl 1
woods. Easily worth from $1.95 to $2.25...,Pl.UO
No. 2Women's Fine Quality Union TaffetaSilk tape
edge, cases to match, very latest style handles,
comprising assorted natural woods, genuine Cape
Horns, stylish gun metals and sterling sil- fti a
ver caps. Regular $2.60 and $2.75 values..J1*
No. 3Men's and Women's Taffeta 811kAbsolutely
guaranteedBeautiful assortment of silver trimmed
naturals, gun metal with silver and gold bands, gun
metal and pearl posts, Men's buckhorn ojo Oct
and Cape Horn, etc. Regular $5 value... V*'*'
Umbrellas packed for out-of-town
charge.
Umbrellas Engraved Free of Charge.
5
a
i
4 if**
ac
ing
Skinner
Satin. Value to X(\
Some 46 inches long, others and hip length. Lined
$150(ffou
AWt
shipment free' of
610 Nicollet Ave.
[email protected]| GAMOSSI
If you can afford to pay $1.00
a week you caa afford to wear
high grade clothingcome here
and get itwe trust you64
StoresCash Store Prices.
OVERCOATS. 97 to $33
MEN'S SUITS, $ 7 to $20
BOYS* OVEECOATS, S 4 to $12
BOYS' SUITS, $ 3 to $10
WOMEN'S COATS, $XO to $30
WOMEN'S SUITS, $10 to $33
FUR SCARFS, $ 2 to $20
TRIMMED HATS, $2.50 to $10
MENT E
ENTE m*tM
615-617 1stAfiSoV
WHAT IS SO
RARE A QIFTl
& For Christmas as \|l
A Good Book?
In what better way can you con
vey the Spirit of the Merry Christ
mastide to your friend!
What can you give that is of so
great permanent value yet so mod
erate in cost?
WHY NOT^
BOOKSY
for Christmas
We can show you a rarely good
selectionhere are just a few titles
selected at random
I
-*V
FriendshipHugh Black. 'A
splendid gift for any season.
08c and $1.50
Fairest Girlhood Margaret
Sangster. A new and very
attractive gift book.. .$1.50
The First Christmas Tree
Van Dyke. New edition.
Only 42c
HiawathaDecorated by Har
rison Fisher. An epocn-mak
ing book, beautifully illus
trated. Publishers' price $3.
Our price $2.40
The Newne's Art Library
Every volume is a real treat
to lovers of the beautiful.
Per volume $1.00
Col. Crockett's Co-operative
ChristmasIf you have a
friend who takes life too
seriously, give him this book.
It will make him smile for a
month. In a beautiful holly
box. Price 80c
Catch Words of Cheer
Price $1.00
For Thy Good Cheer
Price $1.00
These are two books we never
get enough of.
The Christy GirlThe best
Christy book yet. A .better
gift book would be hard to
findand with every copy
goes a year's subscription to
the Reader Magazine, free.
Both for only $3.00
THE 6
CHRISTJ
HOWARD CHANDLER CHRISTY
THE LATEST FICTION
CorristonChurchill.
Half a RogueMcGrath.
The DoctorRalph Connor.
Jewel WeedMrs. Winter.
Tides of BarnegatHopkin-
son Smith.
These and many other good
titles at, per volume.. .$1.18
An almost endless variety of
small gift books and children's
books, at right prices.
Rarely good and attractive
BOOKS and ART
NOVELTIES at
THE CHURCH
BOOKSHOP
COGSWELL AND COMPANY
513 Hennepin Avenue.
Opposite West Hotel.
NORTHWESTERN NATIONAL BA?!K
Capital $1,000,000
Surplus 950,000
Deposits ...........12,000,000
This bank desires the accounts
of banks, corporations, firms
and individuals, and extends to
them every reasonable facility
ii and courtesy.
Savings Department,
Holiday Gifts!
No gift gives greater pleasure
to both giver and receiver than
a well-selected piece ot
Jewelry,
Diamond or Watch
We can suply any or all of
these. Call and we will be,
pleased to show you. Open/
evenings after Dec. 10.
JNO. S. ALLEN I
110 Guaranty Loan,
Ground Floor. 1

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