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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, December 21, 1906, Image 14

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-12-21/ed-1/seq-14/

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$1
^,5.5
6ptBALL^M
AH ML FARGE
Walter Camp Selects "All-Amer
\r ican" Without Visiting the
Western Gridirons.
Mr. Camp, vso
*4
EASTERN CRITIC^ STILI, |gKING ALL-AMERICAN TfcflISt
"MEWliECElViES THE LUTTlSIbS.
GOOD CARD FOR THE ICE RAOINQ TOUORROW.
lll1lll
By O'Loughlln.
a box of good cigars
shows taste and judgment.
Our stores are particularly
attractive now to the gift
buyercigars of famous
brands in holiday packings.
There's the RICORO
Saratoga (Porto Rican) at
$3.33 for a box of 50if
it came from Cuba instead
of her island neighbor you
would pay $11.00 per 100
for its equal in quality.
iClGARS
And our HAVANA
AMERICAN Universal
at $5.00 for a box of 50.
It's a cigar we're veryproud
ofso will your friend be
to get it
All the Standard brands
,\,\.of Imported Cigars, too
.Your choice from fresh im
portations.
Novelties for dens and
smoking roomslots of
smokers' articles every man
wants.
In all the-town there's no
such display.
Mail Orders filled at store prices
delivery charges prepaid. United
Cigar Stores Co.. Mail Order Service
Room 100.14M45 West 17th St.. N.
UNITED
CIGAR STORES
412 Nicollet Ave. 234 Hennepin Ave.
4 5 South Fourth Street, Nicollet and
Washington.
Eight-lamp Christmas Tree Lighting
Outfits to Operate from dry batteries,
complete with batteries for oper
ating, price $3.25
Outfits to operate from^Ughtli%
service^-* ^t,
8-iight outfit..r:.-.hr/f:..$5.0&
16-light outfit... 8.50
24-iight .outfit 12.06
Gugler Electric''
f5me'west.to,see
i1?
,P
la
gone
all-Amer-
Once more has Walter Cai
thru the farce of picki ng an
lean" football tea m. Th organization"
which he selects should be called an all
eastern, but it is termed all-American,
a and goes at that.
GOPHERS WON FROM
THE SAINT'S Y.M.C.A.
The University basketball" team de
feated the C. A team of St
Paul last nig ht by a score of 55 to 7.
The "TJ" team went into the game
with a rush and from the beginning
had their opponents at their mercy.
The ga me was played at the University
armory before a large crowd. The
teams lined up as follows:
University. Y. M. C. A.
..%Iui left forward Tolson
Cheering right forward Davidson
^Anderson center Peterson
Cabaley left guard Hanson
Larson right guard .....Johnson
ESIDES appropri
ately expressing the
Yuletide sentiment
cllf
223-225 South 5th Street,
Minneapolis, Minn,
aifc3p of the ^fesieanis
y For,, this reason-he^/has
~%$-$it gg&V from any standpoint,-"to place
Anrn TTIIO lirTPJT" J^waM.^ltoa aM^Marahall upon
111 I I I W HII JH8 second or Gawels of Michigan,upon
VUl 1111J IlLJUll *Vi tMrdteam,^.ft is complimentary,
-r^j
not justified' upon an,y,ground* as.
Mr. Camp did not see the men in "Action
wiltfi the possible exception of Gar
rels. Th writer .agrees that Marshall
and Garrells are "entitled to even bet
ter than Mr. Camp gave them, but as
a sportsman he is reachi ng far to act
upon opinions of others rather than his
own iudgmenti
I Walter Camp and Collier's Weekly
are to persist in the picking of all
American teams, the publishers should
insist that Mr Camp see Michigan,
Wisconsin, Chicago and Minnesota in
one game at least each season. The
selection of an all-American' under
any other conditions is farcical.
The selections as maeb the Yale
MKF
far as known, did not 1 football critkTare "asTfoTlows
First Eleven
EndForbes, Yale.
TackleBiglow, Tale.
QuardBurr, Harvard.
CenterDunn, Penn. State.
GuardThompson, Cornell.
TackleCooney. Princeton.
EndWlster, Princeton.
QuarterEckersall. Chicago. Jones, Yale.
HalfMayhew, Chicago. Hollenback, Pennsylvania.
HalfKnox, Yale. Wendell, Harvard.
BackVeeder, Yale. McCormick, Princeton.
Second Eleven
Dagen, Annapolis.
Draper, Pennsylvania.
Ziegler, Pennsylvania1
Hockenberger, Yale.
Dillon, Princeton.
Osborn,. Harvard.
Marshall, Minnesota.
^d^
Third Eleven
Levene, Pennsylvania.
Weeks, We st Point.
Kersberg, Harvard.
Hunt, Indians.
Christy, West Point.
Northcroft, Annapolis.
Exendine, Indians.
E. Dillon, Princeton.
Morse, Yale.
Manier, Vanderbilt.
Garrels, Michigan.
MANAGERS MUST BE
DP IN STUDIES
Madison, Wis. Dec 21.Not only
must intercollegiate athletes be well up
in their studies, but alao all students
who hold any office of honor in conne
tion with University of .Wisconsin ath
letics must be candidates for scholar
ship prizes. This is the late st stop tak
en by the faculty here in the process of
reforming athletics.
I accordance with this new rule, the
athlet ic council, which consists of a
number of members of the faculty with
voting power and also a number of
students, with power to give informa
tion when called upon, but who have
no votes, has dealt with the recent elec
tions of student 'athletic association of
ficials, such as managers and assistant
managers. G. A Benedict, manager of
the basketball team, and Austin Wal
line, manager of the cross country
team, were approve d. Both come well
within the limits of scholarship desig
nated by the faculty. However, there
were three other student officers who
were held up on account of having been
reported by some of their instructo rs
as not having all their work in classes
and laboratories strictly up to dat e. The
faculty council declared that if these
three studied and made up their work
satisfactorily during the comi ng holi
day recess, they might be approved af
,ter the resumption of school.
This is a new -wrinkle in college ath
letics. Heretofore the rules of scho
lastic sufficiency were applied only to
those athletes who participated in in
tercollegiate contests, and not alwavs
then, but now the faculty proposes that
even the assistant managers, whose
principal duties are to carry luggage
and take tickets, must be of excellent
repo rt as scholars.
The generosity of the board of re
gents in appropriating $1,000 for the
salary of Coach Te Evck of the crews
is appreciated by the students, as such
action was hardly expected, althr Pre s
ident Van Hise favored it The regents
a? year or jriora ago refused %o par the
salary of George Downer, graduate
manage r, and have been generally re
luctant to encourage athletics by draw
ing upon the exchequer.
GOOD SATURDAY CARD
AT THE IGE MATINEE
There are three events booked for
the Lake of the Isles racing matinee
tomorr ow afternoon, a^3:00 trot, a 2:25
trot and a 2:2 5 pace. The officials of
the driving club have decided, to begin
the races at 2 o'clock sharp an all
horse owners are requested to assist in
enforcing this new rule. Last Satur
day marked the opening of the season
and the even ts were pulled off without
a flaw. Followi ng are the lists of en
tries:
3:00 TrotSylvia Sphynx, Fred Cnilds Pansy,
Jf. Mooney Red Alma, Dr. C. C. I/yfora
Myron Rex, O. M. Brundage Tom Peak, Frank
Day.
2:25 TrotLady Bell, Wm. COnvers Red
Alidla, Dr. O. O. Lyford Radial, Carl Kottke
Jim, Marvin Porter Bill Poster or Ida Harbell,
W. W. Porter Sam Jay, Dr. H. B. McOolkragh.
2:25 PacePussy Wilkes, Earl Best: Bessie
C, B. A. Shelley. Belle K., J. F. Slnney
Jordan Sphynx, F. S. Charles Teddy Bruin, B.
D. Best.
TOMMY BDRNS AS
OFFICIAL REFEREE
New Yor k, Dec 21.Tommy Burns,
heavyweight fighter, is another promi
nent pugilist that has become a referee
of fistic battles. has just been se
lected as the official referee of the Pa
cific Athletic club of Los Angeles, and
will judge all the battles that are
fought at that club with the exception
of those in which he will figure as a
principal.
Burns showed up so well I the re
cent battle between Jmmy Walsh and
Abe Attel that Matchmaker MeCarey
immediately offered him the position of
official referee of the club. Burns will
referee the A Kaufmann-Gardner ba t
tle tomorrow night, i
The Eclectic basketball team has reorganized
and wlU hereafter be known as the National
club. Any teams desiring games address E.
M. Osborne, 621 Flrijt avenue S. Both phones.
See That Mark?
STERLING BRAND Stamped
on Your Collar Guarantees Extra
Two for a Quarter Quality.
Sterling Collars
are "Always
Right in Front"
in. style, fit and
wear,
BINGHAM a new Fall style
shown below
Made by
Fellows &C0
VAN TILBURG'S
LUBRICATING OIL
L#i
give perfect lubrication.
AUTOMOBILE OILS
a specialty. Write for prices.
THE VA N TILBURG COf,
M^ Minneapolis, MlnnesotajK
tetfWQ LE1DIGITIZENS^0F fOHGiPAH
JOE GANS AN MANAGER RILEY.
This Is the latest picture of Gans, taken the other day upon his arrival at
Tonopah, Nev., to prepare for his coming battle with Kid Herman for the light-
weight championship.
ULRIGfi WON THRU
KINDNESS OF REFEREE
Curley .Ulrich of Superior won a
questionable decision over Jimmy Kel-,
ley of Chicago at tjhe Normanna hall
athletic exhibition la st nigh t. Kelley
outpointed tJlrieh in the preliminary
rounds, but TJlrich freshened up toward
the close, of the "bout and on this show
ing was deelared the winner. Neither
indulged in any rough tactics, and as
an exhibition the affair, was a success.
Both were fre sh at the end of the bou t.
"Rube," Eatterson of West Superior
was badly matched with "Jimmy Bar
tos of St Paul, the latter proving head
and shoulders, in class, above the im
portation. This was stopped in the
first round, as it was clearly demon
strated that' he had no business with
Bartos.
THIRTEEN SAINTS
.HONORED RY SGHOOL
Thirteen St Thomas football playe rs
were presented with their letters at the
annual banquet last night, and during
the evening officers for the coming
year were elected. The men receiving
their "S. T.'s" were as follows: Han
na, O'Rourke, Kelly, Lynch, Foley, San
born, O'Neil, Sanbor n, Malloy, Pepin,
Laughlin and McGraw.
During the evening speeches were
made and the baseball, football and
basketba ll players came in for praise.
The following men were chosen for next
season's sports: Baseball manager,
A. Sanborn assistant Edward Fitz.
gerald football manager, .L.
Byrnesassistant,Fran Hannabasket
ball manager, T. O'N-eil assistant:
D. A Foley.
INDOOR TEAMS MEET, .f
Managers ot clubs In the Minneapolis Indoor
Baseball league are requested to attend the
meeting Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock at Nol 4
Washington avenue S. The object of this meet
ing is to complete^ all arrangements for the sea
son and to decide upon the eighth'team.
J'UNIORS WIN GAME.
In a hard-fonght game of basketball the
junior section,of the Young Men's:
ciUb of the
Ascension parish defeated the senior section by a
score of 25 to, 17. The quickness and team work
of the winners was the feature of tbeVgame, for
the seniors were altogether too slow for the shifty
Juniors, altho the latter team was greatly handi
capped as to height and strength.
SAMPSON APTEB MATck.
Gene Cole, manager of Fred Sampson, the
1". M. C. A. lightweight wrestler, la out with
an open challenge to all lightweight, wrestlers
in the northwest and is willing-to-bet any part
of $100 on the outcome. Mr. Cole is anxious to
match his man with Professor Frank Meyers
and would be pleased to hear from that gentle
man at once. If the latter accents Mr. Cole
will post his $100 at once.
FOUND DIME AFfMR YEARS
at 7:S9:j
j-jj-'?-:,,-
First Act of a MiUionaire"wiieii Re
turned to His Boyhood Home.
Indianapolis News.
Attica, Ind.After an absence of
sixty-five years, Frank Bookwalter, a
millionaire of Springfield, Ohio, has re
turned to his tld home, in this county.
One of his first acts was to recover a
silver dime that he had lost when he
was 5 years old, just before he went
away/
The dime had been given to him by
his grandfather and he was playing
with it on the doorstep. dropped "it
and it fell into the crack of the stone
steps. I was thought that it could hot
be recovered without damaging the
steps, and no efforts to get it were
made.
The boy's parents, were p.oor when
they went to Ohio. They boy'had his
own way to .make, and he soon devel
oped a love for mechanics. A a young
man he made some inventions that
made him wealthy, and. now he is sev
eral times a millionaire.
Last week he .came back to his boy
hood home. His business and his
wealth had not made him forget the
dime he had lost sixty-five years, be
fore, and as soon' as he got to *the old
hduse, he offered- manT$l to "get tlie
dime. A crowbar "was brought, the
stone steps were -lifted- -from" their
foundations and the dime was recov
ered. On side of it was black, hut
the other was untarnished-'* M. Book
waiter said that ih'$. iecqyeiiy of that
dime-ga ve him as^O^h^Jea^ure as the
ina-king of many ^tfi6$s^'o& had done.
The house is one "oif""the landmarks,
of the county. -?It is. atone,, .and was
built in 1833 It.ia:Btill good.f,
-#$?*,' _2 VifM *i Hs'
PM jt MaW."
1
British' soldiers wHt*i.W"no trade tare to the
taught one during-their term...of service ,A
committee is now studying out a plan at Alder
shot. it-....
3
In order best to Influence the British. gov
ernment a. meeting, of Hindoos, .opposed to the
partition of Bengal decided the other day' to
observe the anniversary of ^'-'Partition Hay"
i
"ORGANIZED BASEBALL"
MAY STRIKE SNAG
.-':&
Special to The Journal.*
Sioux City, Iowa, Dec 21.State
Senator John-.H Jackson of Woodbury
county, has received" letters the -Jpast
few days, making certain the plan of
the anti-Sunday amusement element in
the coming legislature, to pass a bill
forbidding Sunday, baseball and thea t
rical performance's,' The bill, last year
was sidetrack ed in committee aft er a
lively fight, but Senat or Jackson, who
is one of those opposing the Jmeasurty
admits it will be,*Impossible, with' the
present legislature, to prevent-the pas
sage of the bill.
This will mean" th&'death knell, of or
ganized baseball "th 'Iowa, unless the
penalty is piade 1"ew that the owners
of franchises c&n ""afford to" pay the
fines, rather than tyliffse' their gates. Des
Moines and Sioux^ity a*e membe rs of
the Western' leJag^eV B'es Moines, be
ing centrally located will be compelled,
Senator Jackson -says, -to cease playi ng
Sunday basebfb%"J3vu City,' tow
ever, has an
v, oppwrtunity to continhhe
for .the reason that a park can be built
en the Nebraska-lsideof the^'Missbiiri
nver, about a mdla&vfrom the Sunday
baseball park now^in use here. Presi
dent Duncan of thV Sioux Cit^'^Westefii
league club, states-he will play Sun
day gam es in a Nebraska pafk.'if the
bill passes., Althd Nebraska'lias a law
again st Sunday baseball, it "is not ob
served in Lincoln^ AH' Sunday ,games
are transferred. 'With an anti-Sunday
baseball -law in
"Iowa, De Moin&s.
Sioux City and Lincoln, three" out ""of
the six towns in the Western league,
will'be unable to* play Sundays. 'This
may mean the disbanding of the West
ern league as yfb\\ as theVAU-Ibwa
league, which has eight clubs hereto
fore depending for,.existence jipon Sun
day baseball.
4*^i,. 4-,...
BOWfeNG
Mattson Gerfcsen
GRBA^SefrTHERN,
First. Second., Third. 111 112
149
151 14T
140 147
Lt'bertick ,w.. 115'
McMahan 162
Hillyer l?l
Totals
10
119.
151 117 159
671 734
kee 177- i49
Warnlof *V... 130 ,328
league. 162 i,.107
Williams 131 149
McDonnell 149 144
Totals 089 077
649
KOETHBRN PACIFIC.
First, "Second. Third.
139
1% 150 132
133
'112
,668
MANAGERS TO MEET.
Managers of teams in the Settlement Basket
ball league are requested to meet tonight In' the
committee rooms of the Associated Charities to
complete" arrangements for the opening of itheir
scheduled
games,and--.fev'c^
The meeting
willexpected
be called
o'oIoef team .I to
send a reiresen1
-r='?V".yM'
'-n
QASE OP WlJfrffilTH JAPAN
A Matters Stan^BfowW Should Cut
'^^a Sorry, .Fj^aie at' Manila.
Frederick: E|^IJBR in Collier's.
If Japan ma&e'/wr on tomorrow
sh e. co^ld'-fea^hi^Fanila- in six days
with, eleven battleships ,&nd six armowd
embers. Before t&ir Atlantic fleet could
reach. Cap'e.-Horn 4 she could put a fully
equipfced" army $prps of over' forty
thousand men fflto\ the Philippines.
Against overwhelming naval odds our
four armored cruisers, which are
route to the far east,' would have to
seek a rendezvous with the Atlantic
fleet. The big floating drydb ek which
was tow ed via Suez would probably
have to be destroyed or fall into, the
hinds of the enemy. Ou 10,000' in
fantry and cavalry scattered over the
Islands would be besieged.
the time our- fleet had arrived
Japan would have-made a naval.'.base
at Manila or Subig bay and would be
standing ready in her own doorway to
receive the stranger.
W would have
absolutely no harbor which we 'could
enter. Sh would choose her time and
place for the .fight, allowing its to
st ew on the tropical sea and use up
our coal supply, .All the advantages
of position Togbjhad over Rojestyensky
he would have .over ,ns, Th confidence
of, the Japanese asoenornious. .According
to-naval.precedentunnder suc&a handi
cap we ought tot-outnumber the 'Jstppa.'
ese by four to three, which i the pres
ent, rat io of our^siiperioritv., After we
had won we wo.ujd be securing only
the islands we &a 4 lostand lost be
cause we had nptmade.Manila a se*
cure -harbor a
When the. canal is biiilti ithe Atlantic
fleet Will have, a polite to tfce Pacific
and. with Hawata, ,&n$ Manija w^l for
tified pr.oifec.tedaftakesv will be in *ettdiA
ness... Tnen.it- mayt take jta-tiino to-goj
and, it may, fighiv,with. clean .bottoms.
A.re we .going ,tq &61d the- Philippines?
Are,we' goin^ t$. paajritain oniseiyes ,as:
a great power oh he .Pacific.?g||.
Twe 3erma emperor has more servants
employ than any other monarch. Altogi
observe the anniversary of ^-'Partitio flay" bbyI they number over 3,000, about twtt-thirdV* it
"fasting, praylnjg and bathing in .the Gangea." .them being women. *'|$&*
MAM INJURIES
INTOCKEYPLAY
Trouble and Accidents ..JKtar th
pjeii m Game* of..the Ipw^'i
Special to The Journal.
Calumet, Mich., Dec 21.The
hockey season is op-en, three matches
have been-played in the,,copper country),
and the game is up for discussion. The
most virulent hockey, fan should find1
nothing tp,which to object in the open
ing games, except for the fact that ife
is the things for which he finds objec-/
tions that make the game interesting
for him. Th record so far shows one
man with a broken head, one man with'
a disabled hand', two men out for the
count in one game, the" .job of one re
feree gone and one or more players
.shaking in their berths
The game last Friday night was a
fast and furious one. That the teams
were .put to make matters entertaining,
for each, oth er was evident from the
start, and^the play had not gone far^
when Sweitzer and Hudson had'their
mix-up, which apparently has ended'
the career of the latter in this league.
Laviolette put Bru ce JStuart to' the
boards a little later, la nd Dr Gibson
shortly thereafter met ed out the same
dose to Laviolette with painful sudden
ness. Men were frequently penalized,
and it .was qn a question of referees'
authority to thus punish a player that
the game finally broke iip.
Laviolette .refused to leave the ice
for tripping a Portage Lake man.
was then ordered out of the game, and
got out, but took his' team with him..
Manager Ferguson tried to induce the
players to Return \o the game, but
they refused, and it was forfeited to
Houghton. A the time the Soo left
the ice. the vistors were ahead 4,to 3,
and had been playing winning hockey.
The following is the standing of the
teams:
Won.'
Pittsburg 3
Portage Lafce 2
Calumet 1-
American Soo 0-
Canadian Soo
Lost.
O 0
Pet.
1.000
t.000 1.030
.000 .000
3 S
MAURICE SAYERS
DEFEATS McGAR!
Journal Special Service.
Baltimore, Dec 21.Maurice. Sayers
of Milwaukee was given the decision
over Amby. McGary of New York after
fifteen rounds of fighting tonight before
the Eureka Athlet ic club. Altho Referee
Bert Crowhurst gave the western lad
the decision, it was the universal opin-"
ion of the spectato rs that the New'
Yorker was entitled to a draw. was
the aggressor fr om start to finish, but
Sayers was by far the cleverer of the
two, and had little trouble in evading
McGary ?s heavy swings.
PITCHER NEWTON
LEAYES YANKEJBS
Journal Special Service. *x ."'S
New York. Dec 21."Doc" N|W-
to.n, one of the New York American
league pitchers, has been turned over
jo the Montreal Eastern league club:
President Barney Dreyfus of the
Pittsburg Nationals says the deal be
.tween Pittsburg and Boston for the ex
chan ge of Abba,ticchio for Ritchey, and
another player, yet to be named, will' be
consummat ed without trouble.
$1,500 FOR JEFF'S
,:-OFFICI AL WORK
Journal Special'Service.'
BICr SCOSE FOE SOIDIEES.
Company defeated Company A in an indoor
baseball game at the Armory last night, the.
score being 33 ,to 28. The A team was in the
lead up to .the sixth inning, when their op
ponents took' a brace and ran in eleven scorers.
The team will meet Battery band next
.Thursday night and the game Is expected' to
ba a last affair. I
Good Cheer
Please bear.4n mind that your
Christm as wyi-.'jfcot be complete, no
matter how sunjptuous your, dinner,
if your do not hiave aibottle ot,fc=
bLfi 8**E IAO EE
"The Beer with a Snap to It."
^^^d^H35^Mr cas^:.today.
-h^ ^Boiaf- PnoneslS' "t.,
Stain.- 1445-J2. Of *3624.
NEW PRESIDENT FOR I
BOSTON NATIONALS
SKATING A CASINO.
Wallace Rickard finished first in the fonrth
scries of roller slraffiig races at the "Casino rink
last night, defeating Muinin, -who was second by
several tcet. There were four men entered,
Klckard, Clark. Mumm and Cohen. Clark and
Cohen fell behind at the start and were' unable
to make up the loss. Itickard's time was
3:201-5 for the mile. .The semifinals will be
skated off tonight and Pranson, Eickard, Munch
and Eell are entered.
filliil
'7
Tonopah, Nev. Dec 21.Jim Jef
fries is to pick up another easy $1,500
for refereemg a championship fight.
is to receive that amount for of
ficiating in the lightweig ht battle be
tween Joe Gans and "Kid" Hermann,
Which is to be decided before the Casino
Athlet ic club here on New Year's af
ternoon. Manager Riley offered Jeff
$1,000, but when the big fighter wired
that he must get $1,500 and expenses,
Riley has to accept his demands.
Skates
TJLRICH GAINS SHADY DECISION OVER KELLEY.
^MOMMIONKBYING IN ATm*MiC& AT WISCC3&SIN.
NEW OWNERS OP:THE BOSTON NATIONALS.
t 1 1
1
Snow Shoes
Skis., -J.T i
Toboggans
Moccasins Flexible Flyer Sleds
Coasting Sleds
Skating Shoes ^.v.
Hockey Clubs
Sweaters and Jerseys
Fine Shot Guns
Field Glasses..^: .j
GOPHERS GIVEN
Hen
Flasks
Collar Bags
AutomobileBaskets
Steamer Rugs
CoatHangers
OPEN EVERY
EVENING
HOCKEY
ALL CLAMP.
Useful Xma Presents
Pocket Knives
Manicure Sets
Raz or Sets
Poker Sets
Cribbage Boards
Carving Sets
Steam Engines
Ingersoll Watches
Eastman Kodaks
Magic Lanterns
Fancy Rifles
Pocket. Compasses
'I, SKIS
t,STRIKING BAGS
i-.:v
gTHEIR LETTERS
3r fP''
Presentation Was Made in Chapel
by President Northrop
'/'j This Morning.
"M's" were publicly presented to
the lucky thirteen football players at
the University of Minnesota by Presi
dent JMorthrop today in the university
chapel. Th room was packed to the
doors with students, who cheered the
warriors frantically, as each one came
forward to receive the gold letter.
The lucky thirteen are Earl Current,
George Case, John Schukneeht, Arthur
Larkfn, Michael Wiest, William Doane,
Robert Dunn, William Ittner, Dan.
Smith, Robert Marshall, Theodore Vita,
Oren Safford and Fred Snyder.
President Northrop congratulated the
men upon winning the honor, and upon
the manly and sportsmanlike manner in.
which they played thruout the season,
and wished them as great success in all
other objects in life as the yhad at
tained on the gridiron.
ATHAS FAILED TO
MAKE GOOD AGAIN
Athos, the French wrestler at the
Dewey theater, lost his forfeit money
again last nig ht by failing to throw
wo men in fifteen minutes. Fred Samp
son, the Y. C. A. lightweight, was
the first opponent for the champion,
and it took six minutes of the hardest
kind of work to put the little man
down. Tommy Russell then went on
and remained the limit. Athos was
badly handicapped by tonsilitis, but re
fused to call off his matches. Tonight
Ollie Courtamanche will meet the cham
pion, aiid tomorrow nig ht Jimmy Potts
will go on.
KENNEDY BROS-^tK^-l-1
:-.-v- SLJBDS
SKIDOO BOBS
BLACK BEAUTY BOBS
/:'*$- ICE SKATES
-"v\**'- ROLLER SKATES
v" SKATING SHOES
rf\ EXERCISERS
i ^^^-BOXING GLO"VES
-fcSV^M^ AIR RIFLES
BASKETBALLS
0
^*^C^ INDIAN CLUBS
&rm :Sr-
DUMB BELLS
t&f. ATHLETIC SUITS
J"""" TOOL CHESTS AND TOOLS
MACHINISTS TOOL CHESTS
%^M^ SCROLL SAWS
%?m X3RTING TOOL SETS
ft
^.e CHISEL SETS
DRAFTING'INSTRUMENTS
^Wfi*1
CARPET SWEEPERS
FOOD CHOPPERS
-1 ii=-. -/rf* t-tV
11
Boxing Glpres
Striking Bags
White ly Exercisers
Dumb Bells
Indian Clubs
Foot Balls
Sweater Ves ts
Hunting Goats
Gun Cases
Fishi ng Tackle
Pearl Handle Revolvers
Dog Collars
CLOCKS
WATCHES
POCKET KNIVES
CARVERS
SOLID SILVER WARE
TEASPOONS
DESSERT SPOONS
TABLESPOONS
FRUIT KNIVES
BUTTER SPREADERS
PEA.RL HANDLED KNIVES
IVORY HANDLED KNIVES
CHAFING DISHES
v ~f^| SCISSORS
RAZORS
MANICURE SETS
DESK SETS
SHAVING MIRRORS
PAPER KNIVES
'.^S SMOKI
l^f&*S?
-S
W. K. Morison S Co.
v* 47-249 NICOLLET AV,^
12 ?Sr'
MATC HOLDERSSTESGN
PICTURE FRAMES
"V7EW HOLDERS
THERMOMETERS
NUT PICK SETS
'i
Hardware, Cutlery, Tools, Paints,
Athletic Goods, Kitchenware, Etc

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