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The Minneapolis journal. (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, December 22, 1906, Image 3

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-12-22/ed-1/seq-3/

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USED ROUND THE WORLD
Baker'sCocoa and Chocolate
47
Highest
Awards
in
Europe
and
America
ABSOLUTELY
PURE
ftt, Offlo*
Made by a scientific blend
ing of the best Cocoa beans
grown in the tropicsthe
result of 126 years of suc
cessful endeavor.
A new and handsomely Illustrated
Beclpe Book sent free
WALTER BAKER & CO,, Lid.
Established 1780 DORCHESTER, MASS.
When every good dealer everywhere
sells the genuine
UEBIG COMPANY^
Extract of Beef
why be content with adulterated imita
tions or inferior brands
This signature
InH^
blue on every jar
of the genuine
BURLEY SUGGESTIONS
FOR HOLIDAY GIFTS
Fine Table ChinaGenuine Cut Glass
Distinctive Pottery WaresBronzes
Hand Wrought Copper French
Enamels or Lamps. Each and every
article an ideal sift.
0
Rlirlov Rr Cn
11
8
&
12
uuuey v-o., CHICAGO.
BETTER THAN SPANKING
Spanking does not cure children of bed
wetting. If it did there would be few
childr en that would do it. There is a
constitutional cause for this. Mrs
Bummers, Box 426 Notre Dame, Ind.,' will
send er home treatment to any mother.
6he asks no money. Write her today if
your children .trouble you in this way.
Don't blame the child.
it can't help it.
Virginia Farms and Homes
Free Catalogue
of Splendid Bargains
R. B. CHAFFIN& CO. .Incorporated.
Richmond, Virginia.
JM Palais Royale
623-625 Nicollet
1 he Ideal Shopping Place.
PARKER'S
HAIR BALSAM
ADIRONDACK FIBE 1N8TJHANCE COMPANY^ years\Iofhf plnlT^''
Principal office. 66 Broadway New York,
N. Y. (Organized in 1906.) G. A. Mitchell,
President R. H. McKelvey. Secretary. Attor
ney to accept service in Minnesota. Insurance
Commissioner. Cash capital, $200,000.
INCOME IN 1906.
Rents and interest. $142.46
From all other sources, surplus
contributed by stockholders 100,000.00
32
Premiums in course of collection
Total admitted assets.....'.'
LIABILITIES OCTOBER,
Unpaid losses and claims.
Reinsurance reserve
Expenses due
Capital stock paid up
7419
31, S
Total HaDilities including cap
ital $264,307.20
Net surphis 109,883.24
Risks and premiums None
BTATE OF MINNESOTA,
Department of Insurance.
Whereas. The Adirondack Fire Insurance Com
pany, a corporation organized under the laws of
New York, has fully complied with the provis
ions of the laws of this state relative to the
admission and authorization of Insurance com
panies of its class.
Now. therefore, I. the' undersigned. Insurance
Commissioner, do hereby empower and authorize
the said above-nr.med company to transact its
appropriate business of Arye in the
state of1 Minnesota, according to the laws tnere-
?L-
thirty-firs da oinsurance January A
tn
Unt1
1907, unless sajd authority be revoked ot oth
erwise legally terminated ptfor thereto.
In testimony whereof. I have hereunto set my
hand and affixed my official seal at St. Paul this
fth ay~ of December. A. D. 1906. -v
THOMAS D. O'BRIEN,
insurance Commissioner/
*:^k^'4'iL.. ,"&t
IS GATEWAY TO THE
San Antonio, Texas, Holds a Com
manding Position in Relation to
the Vast Trade Conducted With
Our Southern* Neighbor.
TREMENDOUS GROWTH OF
COMMERCE IN FW YEARS
Nation Presided Over by Diaz Is
Now One of the Best'Customers
of Uncle SamCapacity of Ter
ritory Tributary to Alamo City.
Special to The Journal.
San Antonio, Texas, Dec. 20.This
month Texas will celeprate the sixty
first anniversary of her admission as a
state to the union, and thfs fact recalls
to mind that one of the stipulations made
by Texas at that time was that she
should reserve he right to be subdivided
into five states whenever er populati on
should attain sufficient size to justify
such action. Her inhabitants now num
er near ly 5,000,000, but it is estimated
that when the state becomes as thick ly
populated as New England there will
be more than 70,000,000 people within
her boundaries. Whether the time will
ever come when Texas will demand the
fulfillment of this compact with the fed
eral government remains to be decided
by later generations, but in the light of
recent developments it is not difficult to
prophesy that, should the division ever
occur, one of the riche st of the five new
states thus made will be the one which
embraces southwest Texas.
Sixty, even ten, years ago no one would
have ventured to make such a forecast,
for all that vast region lying southwest
of San Antonio and he Nueces river, as
far as he Rio Grande valley, was re
garded as "dead land," fit only for graz
ing purposes. The discovery of the great
artesian belt underlying this territory
opened a new epoch in its history, and
added another empi re to Texas, for with
an abundant supply of water from these
wells for use in ^irrigation, the land has
prov ed to be marvelously fertile. The
climate is so warm and genial during the
winter months that work out of doors'is
not interrupted and several crops Jn a
year can readily be grown upon he same
plot of ground. Cotton, corn, sugar cane,
alfalfa and rice yield abundantly through
out this section, and so ^reat is the
variation in he types of soils that it is
possible to grow vegetables of all kinds
known to our markets.
Adapted to Citrus Fruits.
made personal test s, which prov ed so
eminently satisfactory that they pui
chased large trac ts of land and have set
out thousands of these fruit treep
Bananas, dates, and figs grow exceedl^
ly well in he Rio Grande valley, and
produce large crops each year. There
is no reason to doubt that many other
varieties of fruits will thrive, becoming
within a few years of great commercial
value.
Without transportati on facilities, how
ever, all he marvelous fertility of ex
treme southwest Texas, the inexhaustible
artesian water sujnjly,^ and, th*. fine cli
mates could not have caused it to de
velop into a
Wabash Av.
rt
A
and cattle, to be distributed far and
Sf iTUF*
The fact that the rich ranchmen who,
until recently, have held undisputed
sway through this territory raised orahges
and lemons sufficient for their home
needs proved beyond question that these
and other citrus fruits could be grown, i
and experts from the great orange sec- Minneapolis people at New "York hotels are
tlons of California and Flori da became so i
much Interested in he matter that some Cadillac, E. M. Jones Murray Hill. B. Gardner'
power lri he progressive lif
of this great state. But, fortunately for
this section, the railroads followed quick
ly after the discovery of the artesian belt
and now every effort is made to provide
for he shipment of all the produce in th
quickest and best possible manner. This
of the greatest importance to truck
and fruit growers, enabling them to put
their produce on the northern, markets
from four to six weeks before similar
commoditi e" ao be obtained fr oh other
P
w*utK, and in tis way
they reap the benefit of the higher prices.
AH of southwest Texas is onlsy
recognized as a gre am cattle-raisi nig cou
wo^,
on
al3
ther
an
eents
& hoet mot
S e
el na who-clamth ant
wonderful agriculturalg sections oeft the
UB'
ar
reatest vegable
before ma ne yars have passed it will
a $n
?f
ditd ae
and fruivt garden :ihn hiet Unied States.
ViL?
wheter attains to this
distncion or not, it will certainly have
i 1t i
reas
,n l!
ti tS?Li.
"influenct upon the
'iiS
MF*
countr
nf otw'
and upon
mat
the power'
the trade with Mexi ch a nagriculture
foreignl
.r Ii
a ^-ffl
Un
cun ot
&
rea
hat
baotsi3
ft
i rea
of other indus es may aarently be
wA
,t
find
at fJSlW
The chances are
*php
tUrn.t
of enduring prosperity, and the great
agricultural community must be a gigan
force the onward movement of the
Center oof Southern Texas.
San Antonio, the largest citIfcs inProducs
I1
this rich, southwest sed
Texa
tion, and throgh its markets each year
la seul
portio
?5?
$ Ilne
J2j&
Re
ot railroad
great
trun
enter he city,3 a nc there artei everal more
HHTO"
1
roa
ontempla
ns
the build
ing of connections in order to have direct
communication with sources /of supply
and to facilitate the handling of perish
able freight. iA wou lod, baen of greatad
m
tfc,
S aT ntonidt all the
southwest, for development is progressing
so rapidly thaT transportaOon SSStief
are of severely taxed under the pres
ent conditions.
San Antonio has been called the "Gate-
rT,1i
ub
i
of Mexico," and the
i sjfn'ncance of, hg appellationn ist often
21 'Ji.
R
eca
!3L
Wha
enerally do real
xi stands for today. Their
ideas of this country are a hazy.mixture
or the romances'of the early davs of irs^'
history, and the later seines of tumu
lst-
revoluti on and bloodhe d, lend er he wise
government ofx er able president, Por
l,P
0 as
laz,
?o ftAA
A~?
grown into a pro
l0
rderly Progressi va nation. Ove
railroad
hv
Jhn* Vvw
Clenruej and $eantifles the halt.
Promote! a luxuriant growth.
Never Fails to Restore Gray
.Hair to lte Youthful Color.
Cores mala dlwaes & hair falling.
fiOdgfad $1.00 at Pruggittg
been built,r
thus giving a great impet uass taol commer
cial activities. The trade between Mexi
Snr S
ite
States\ready as-
sumed gigantic proportions and each year
A
eptima
$100,142.46
None
Total income..:..-..
Disbursements In 1006
Excess of income over disburse
ents $100,142.46
ASSETS OCTOBER 31, 1906.
Bonds and stocks owned......... $203,562.50
Cash in office and i bank.... 137,126.79 for consideration, "thV^rrVhp
Accrued Interest anH rents 854.1 7 wa
^out thirty
SP/HA country
amounted to about $6,000,000, and now
they are near ly $SO,000,000.' For the same
period the value of the merchanaise^rn
ported intoc hes UnitdState Worn MeX
OOO.OOO8
lnreae oe $4,500,000 to $90,
lnvestments of American Money.
that over $700,000,000 *ot
American capital has been invested in
mining railway and- various other enter
prises in Mexico within the past twenty
flve years, and there is always a great de
mand for American products in
all't Mexican cities With such fac
646
9
8
3
190,4
tt
ran'lTW?"' htm te rrnnmmoT '.'Gate-
%&ll I
a
yv. i+
Mei
2.378.05.fi great southern republic. The soil
200,000.00
ver
hesl
maes
co" assues a shtea- weighty significancex San Anonio whJ dfrefe
0 _t"V"l__
.V_-*
en tn
0 44! communication with Mexico, but it Is
4 ''Ther/wThi
0
a
VeP
shor
mere wll b"eg an imperative need iot
$13,720.86 r'^l VJLAULA*
im
era
ea dl i
48.208.20' $
a
"ve need iot moro ^fctly to the large cities
ml
productive and yet Mexico pur
chases almost all of her corn, meat (es-
pecially hogs)/ cotton and many of the
necessaries of life in this country.
The position of San Antonio in this
great volume oc tradey can ery readi lt be
seen cosulting a good railroad map
l,
nb
ng
4n
ar
J*
1
efullt hve connecions
Atomo city has with hteh mar-
4 1* ii rtf,
m,ddI
west
east
ou .an
west in. this country, and then following
out the^ network of Mexican ra lroadf
Mexico has great products to offe us in
exchange for all we send t0thh^rrER
out our stores yc-f plenty. Her^ rubber
trees are famous and coffee grows lux
uriantly there. Her. mineral -wealth in
gold, sliver, coppeV ?nd fnany other ores
&*% w^d.tha
lic^ ^0$fidgSraf ofou'r S
est sources of, commercial wealth before
mayears are gone, and San Antono
Saturday Evening, *-$^S^JSBS3& -THg MINNfeAPOUS JQTjTRNAL.
News
of
4 $
Society
Miss Florence Brazie grave a tea this
afternoon at her home on Clinton ave
nue for the Misses Dunsmoor, two of
the debutantes of the season. One hun
dred invitations had been issued and
the guests called between 3 and 5
o'clock. Receiving with Miss Brazie
were the Misses Dunsmoor and Mrs.
W Brazie and the assisting young
women were Misses Mary Band, Mar
garet Jackson, Lelia Winston, Alma
Hanson, Kate Buchanan, Dunwoody,
Ruth Djunwoody, Mary Stebbins, Wini
fred Westlake and McLaughlin of St.
Paul.
The rooms were charmingly appointed
in the Christmas colors and evergreens,
holly and red flowers made a setting
suggestive of holiday cheer. I the
parlors poinsrettias made a pretty orna
ment, the vivid red blossoms contrast
ing effectively with the bright green
of the foliage. Tea was served in the
dining-room by alternating groups of
the assisting young women. The shades
were drawn and branches of red berried
holly wreathed the windows and
rambled over the shades and curtains.
O the buffet stood poinsettia blossoms
and the centerpiece on the table was
a baskot filled with the flowers. The
chandelier was wreathed with holly and
its lights were shaded in red and sus
pended from it was a large holly wreath
with red bows. O the "table burned
candles under red shades, and The ices
and confections were ill red.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Martin gave
a musical last night at their residence
on Mount Curve avenue for Mrs. Pon
sonby Ogle of New York, who is in
Minneapolis for the holidays. Fifty
guests had been invited, and the guests
were received by Mr. and Mrs. Mar
tin and Mrs. Ogle in the drawing room.
Mrs. W N Portcous\ Richard Wood
worth and W Scott Woodworth sang a
program of solos and Mrs. Harriet
Walker Runyan played the accompani
inents. After the musical the guests
were served with refreshments in the
handsomely appointed dining room.
Mrs. W Washburn, Jr., and Mrs. W
S. 'Nott poured- the tea and coffee.
The Cotillion club has sent out an
nouncements for the second cotillion to
given in Elks' hall, Tuesday even
ing, Jan. 1. John S. Pillsbury and Ed
gar Pierson will lead the german,
and as it is the holiday party, it will
be a delightfully arranged affa ir with
no end of charming surprises, pretty
favors and original dances.
Professor and Mrs. W Hoag and
son are spending the holidays in the
east. Mrs. Hoag is visiting relatives
in Boston and in Maine, and Professor
Hoag is dividing his time between the
universities and, the National- Good
Roads laboratory at Washington.
PERSONAL AND SOCIAL.
Minneapolis arrivals at Holland House, New
York, for the week ending Dec. 10 were Mrs.
O. C. Wyinan, R. p. Gillette, Alex Campbell,
and Mi-s. Karl De Lalttre,
Mr.
follows: New Amsterdam. M. Swanbenr-
Mihs Elizabeth Wyman returned today from
Kemper Hall, Kenosha, Wis., for the holidays.
CLUBS AND CHARITIES
A Drnnunond. Hall.
The sewing school of Drummond hall
had a Christmas party this afternoon
and the hall was gay with a holiday
decoration of southern smilax and
bright poinsettia blossoms. There are
136 children enrolled in the school and
under the direction of Mrs. William
Eggleston and her fifteen assistants
they meet every Saturday afternoon to
solve the mysteries of the long seam.
This afternoon needles and thimbles
were put aside and the youngsters
played games', guided by Mrs. William
Sweet. Miss Grace Denton, director of
the kindergarten, told the Christmas
story and the '.Christmas carols were
sung. Chocolate and cakes were served
and then each of the children was pre
sented with a box of candy.
A Oiub Banquet.
The Saturday Magazine club had a
banquet last evening at Donaldson's
tea rooms. A centerpiece of poinset
tias and branches of holly furnished an
appropriate decoration. Covers were
placed for forty-five, and after the
banquet cards were played.
What the Market Affords
Fried apples will be found? a-welcome
change from cranberry sauce. Choose
fine, sound and well-flavored apples.
Wash and Cut them transversely about
a half inch in thickness, and fry till
tender* in butter.
For the Christmas salad, mash two
cream cheeses with a tablespoon of
cream. Chop a dozen large olives
stuffed with pimentos and-add, with a
shaking of cayenne and half a teaspoon
of salt. Press in a small fiat-bottomed
mold and when very hard and cold slice
evenlyarrang a few lettuce leaves on
a platter, lay on the silces of cheee
and- pour over all French dssing,
made by adding a teaspoon of lemon
juice or half as much vineg ao to a ta-
orfe
8:30
to 11 A. M.
Monday
t'v ^uyu. mn to a La- Th i-nn~.* -,-r, North Tlakn+ta 8alt scPr
ter.lS'
a
but no pepper,
When mince pies or a plain ic cream
are served instead of a plum pudding
the elders of the family may be inter
ested in a new preparation of Christ
mas coffee made Creole fashion, sug
gests Good Housekeeping. A tray is
brought to the table bearing a lighted
urn of very strong coffee, a" small bowl
of Jump sugar, a dish of candied orange
peel, one of whole spices, a flask of
brandy, a small ladle and a strong,
wide-mouthed silver bowl. Into this
last is put a lump of sugar for each
person present, a tablespoon of whole
cloves, three sticks of cinnamon broken
up, and a tablespoon of peel. Cover
this .with brandy and let it burn off
stirring it occasionally. When the flame
dies out turn in the coffee till the bowl
is fullsti again, and ladle out a tiny
cup of the Christmas brew for each
guest.
FROM ELIZABETH LEE
8
the
Dear Madam: The sample inclosed
is cut from a knee-length (45 inches)
single-breasted,-tight-fitting coat, black
velvet collar, turnejj back cuffs of the
material on regulation coat sleeves. A
the coat is in elegant conditionbu
the skirt entirely gone thru moths and
wear^.tould you suggest something I
Rttt get for a skirt to harmonize with
tbej|coat, as I cannot match the mate
rial? I thought of cutting off the coat
a few inches at the bottom, making a
three-quarter length, which, I think,
would prove more becoming. I am 5
feet 9 inches in height, weigh 153
pounds, slender, but good proportions
2 8 years old3 8 bust, 2 6 waist, 4 3 hips
lohg-waisted and wear 41-inch walking
skirt frohtr length. '"-NV
gr
from
an
,n-y ^.,.w.x.i boyfc* the material, and try it first
and southwest Texas will profit by the with ,fhe gray and then with dark red
prosperi ty of both countries. before deciding. Elizabeth, Lee.
my. thinking a nice 'dark watm
a would harmonize with the sample
etter than anything else, seeing that
the goods has a faint thread or that
color xunning thru it. Black or brown
.willrnot be sufficient contrast and so
the coat would take on a shabby look.
Navy will be no better, green will look
oddpaltho dark red may possibly be a
success. I should take'the coat, when
$10 Waists, $4.98
Beautiful Waists, combining Cluhy
and Irish crochet lace, with Brussels net
and Point d' Espri-silk lined. Also hand
some silk waists, $10
values
Beautifully painted Japanese vases, in
a variety of new and artistic shapes.
Marked prices, $2.50, $2.75, $3
and $3.25. In Basement, d* f\Q
A go at...............tPJL"0
TOO BUSY TO SELECT?
MINOT METHODISTS HAPPY
Beautiful Church Dedicated, Free of
Debt, at 1 1 O'clock at Night.
A church dedicated at 1 1 o'clock at
night, with the full ritual of the Meth
odist Episcopal church, was the unique
experience of the Methodists of Minot,
N on SundayDe. 1/
Vincent Memorial church of that
city is regarded as the finest church of
tv.o
^lts TheD Methodists of, thac cit6 had 3
ffi~^~-~~i.inn 4-n North Dako.
on a grand scale, and with an optimistic
trust in western generosity. The church
was completed and ready for dedication
but against that ceremony was the bar
of a $9,500 debt, which represented a
few cents more than a dollar for every
inhabitant of the city. The members
of the church prepared for the cere
mony, trusting to. the money-getting
ability of- the dedicating preacher to
secure the amount.
Dr. S Montgomery, pastor of Fow
ler church of this city, who is suspected
of having some ability as a financier in
view of his own building plans, was
secured as the dedicator. Dr. Mont
gomery was feeling well that 4ay and
he did a. day's work.' A the morning
service he secured pledges to the
amount of. $7,30Q, leaving $2,20 to be
raised at the evening serviced A con
gregation that has contributed $7,300
in the enthusiasm of the first and lead
ing service of a great occasion i& gen
erally pretty well fagged by evening
and what is contributed later is gener
ally considered that much found. I
will be understood, therefore, that the
prospects for lifting the remaining piece
of the debt were not particularly
bright.
But Dr. Montgomery's evening effort
was of the same class that character
ized the morning. I was liard work,
and it took time, but a little before 1 1
o'clock at night the last dollar was
pledged, tne $9,500 debt was lifted, and
the beautiful church was dedicated.'
-^sn
\$&t
$4.98
Silk Petticoats, $4.98
$7.50 and $10 .silk petticoats, made of
guaranteed taffeta, with rows /of shir
ring and hemstitching. Plain and
changeable colors, rf* yu g^
Monday morning ^TBy O
$150 Shopping Bags, 99c
Handsome leather lined black grain
leather shopping bags, fitted with in
side purse. Values C\r\
$1.50, for yyc
Men's $2 Shirts, $1.50
Men's negligee shirts in tan and cream
pongee,, w.itbf-r^pft ,collars attached.
All sizes, tfusfj
arrived
$1.50
$3 Vases, $1.98
39c
DAYTON'S. Seventh and,Nicollet
r?
Ta4
December. 22, 1906
Neckwear,
21c
Silks, 18c Yard
Best quality corded wash silks, in
pinks, yellow, niles and reds, regu
lar 60c quality, per
yard
A variety of fancy
stocks, bows and em
broidered collars. Just
the thing for an inexpensive
gifts. Values to A i
39c, for :.|551C
50c Games,129c
Choice of anv of our 50-cent games
in basement, including Pit^ Flinch,
Block and Bunko. Mon- Qrv
day- morning, for... &&C
75c Fans, 33c
Feather fans, hand painted fans and
spangled fans. A variety of styles and
sizes admirable for gifts O O
50c and 75c fans tJ$C
75c Scissors, 25c
Choice of a large lot of finest
steel scissors and shears, all C\ CL
sizes, worth 50c and 75c, for. ^OC
DON'T ENOW WHAT SHE DESIRES?
Then our Gift Certificates &re what you can use and she can select at her
leisure just what she needs or desires.
SEVCNTH AND NlcOUCT
Monday the Last Day
foi* Christmas Shopping
Special Morning Sales
8:30 to 11 A. M.
$4.50 Silk Hose,
$3.00
"Women's beautiful em
broidered, pure silk
thread black hose, $4,
$4.50 and $4.95 per
pair values, Mon-
day morning
at pair
The Editor of COLLIERS WEEKLY Says:
It has for some time been known in {mbliahrng circles that McCfawe's Magazine has the manuscrip* and
documents of an elaborate, painstaking and snprejodiced history of
Mrs. Eddy and Christian Science
done with the careful regard' for accuracy and adherence to documentary evidence which characterised the
history of the Standard Oil Company, The publication of such a temperate history onght to settle, for those
whose minds remain open on the subject, just hqw much of Mrs. Eddy is money-seeking charlatan and how
much is seer."
The opening chapters of this life are in the January number, in which
^number will appear also the following:
Carl Schurz's Reminiscences reach a most exciting piece of description
The Lincoln-Douglas.Debate
This story'has a never-ending charm for all Americans and is told from anew
point of view and in a most intimate way.
Possibly the only Christmas story appearinginany magazine at Christmas
time is the*characteristic Myra Kelly story, A Perjured Santa Claus." Tnis
question of whether or not mere is a real Santa Claus gets a new angle in the
story of the little boy who tried to have Santa Claus brought before the police
magistrate for perjury. ..-.V Jv
I* 'One of the contributions which will be vitally interesting will be the care-
ful account of "The Jewish Invasion," by Burton J. Hendrick, in which is de-
scribed theadvent of theJew in our country and themethods bywhich he obtains
such eminence in commerce, literature, art or whatever he sets his hand to do.
Y-'f^- Other stories, papers and many good pictures make thoJanuary McCjore's an epoch-marker. 3S^
j/JSk news ndii, 1 0 $14K S S McCLURE COMPANY, 4 4 East 23d Street, NEW YORK
Why not a year's subscription to McChu&'s foV a Christatifrgift? there isn't any one other tiling you can buy
for that dollar that will bring so much Joywar friend as de vv
*h*%$i
25c Handkerchiefs,
12&c
Women's, sheer Belfast linen Hand
kerchiefs. A fine 25c Handker
chief at half
price .,.j
Waist Patterns, Vi Price
Enough white English mercerized
waistings for a waist, beajatiful de
signs, worth $1.50, in white if
goods department, boxed.. O
$4 Gloves, $2.98
Women's French glace kid gloves,
in elbow lengths. All sizes in the new
red shades. Regular f&C\ f\
price $4 a pair, for.. t^M* \3KS
$2.50 Damask Cloths,
$1.77
Eeal Irish linen damask table
cloths, 2x2 yards in size,
handsome patterns, with
borders all around
$2.50 value
*1
5&
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