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The Minneapolis journal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1888-1939, December 22, 1906, Image 5

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045366/1906-12-22/ed-1/seq-5/

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"$fc
Huskers Will Play
on Northrop Field Oct.
19, 1907.
Special to The Journal.
ASHIPsfor
.^J^l^pplp^
A-
ball seasons the chief factor of interest
mas spirit* We sell the
cigars.
Some of our best brands
of cigars are packed 25 in
a box especially for the
gift-giving season. Business
nouses which make Christ
mas distributions to em
ployes and customers find
these packings just what
they want.
Any of our stores will
send a man to your office
to show samples and quote
prices. Prompt responses
to telephone-or postal card
calls.
C!GAESi
We handle thousands of
holiday orders in this way.
Mostly our cigars are of
famous brands, so that in
giving the choice is easy,
%f^^SHf^^^^g^^^^^ Saturday Evening,S""'-
GOPHERS AND HUSKERS MAKING NEW CONTRACT.
HARVARD LOSES STAR OP FOOTBALL SQUAD.
-^|EP^RBBS TURNED DOWN AS FICfcH REFEREE.
GOPHERS TO VISIT
NEBRASKA I N 1908
TWO-YEAR DEAL
ON THE BOARDS
in athletic circles at the University of -MoT.
Nebraska is the drafting of schedules.
Despite the series of disastrous defeats
sustained by the cornhuskers, the finan
cial report shows a net profit of sev
eral thousand .-dollars, and Graduate
Manager Eager is diligently at work ar
ranging the 1907 football schedule.
The only absolute pronouncement the
manager is able to make concerning the
gridiron game is that Nebraska and
Minnesota have completed the prelim
inary details for a two-year contract.
The cornhuskers were anxious to inJeurnal
duce the gophers to come to Lincoln
to play football next year on the basis
of a return game in Minneapolis in
1908, but the Minnesota authorities
could not confirm this arrangement, the
result being an agreement for Nebraska
to play in Minneapolis on Oct. 19, 1907,
and the gophers to play in Lincoln on
the final Saturday iwior to Thanksgiv
ing Day in 1908.
Nebraska is to play three games
away from home during the coming
season. Minnesota, and Kansas are to
have two of these contests, while the
third has been spoken for by a "big"
nine" eleven, altho the negotiations
will not yet permit a formal announce
ment.
There are a few other possible
Thanksgiving possibilities. The Car
lisle Indians or Colorado university
may be brought to Lincoln, while St.
Louis university is anxious to book
Nebraska for a game in St. Louis.
The selection of Nebraska's coach
tor next year is still unsettled. Pro
fessor James T. Lees, chairman of the
athletic board, is conducting the ne
gotiations and he cannot file a report
until his return after the holiday va
cation from New Ybrk, where he has
gone to represent Nebraskaat the an
nual meeting of the American rules
committee and at the session of the
National Intercollegiate Athletic asso
ciation. The board is a unit in the de
termination that the cornhuskers are
to have a high-class instructor, one
who has demonstrated his ability and'
has won his spurs, and none else will
be considered for the place. "While Pro
fessor Lees has declined to give any
inkling of the possible result of his in
vestigation, there is a well-grounded
belief in cornhusker athletic circles
that the choice now rests between
i-J'King" Cole, coach at Virginia uni
versity, and Turner, coach at Syracuse
university, with Cole as the most for
midable candidate of all. This is only
surmige, but Cole is so highly recom
mended and his teams at Virginia have
been so consistently strong that the
Nebraska authorities are quite certain
to give his name serious consideration.
The Nebraska board, in connection
with the captaincy, has just- passed a
stringent rule calculated to compel
every member of the varsity football
Bquad to pay his board bill-at the foot
ball training table. No player is elig-
a sailor, a
smoke for a smoker.
That' the Christ-
Minnesota pected to*bring all of the delinquents
into line. This^.rule is an innovation in
western college athletics.1
The spring baseball trip bookings
are engaging the Manager's attention
The cornhuskers are to leave early in
May and be
twoarweeks..
Lincoln, Neb., Dec. 22.During the Minnesota, Chicago, Wisconsin and
lull, between the football and basket-
fufe le&.
tow
,The Nebraska track, team is already
billed for a meet in Minneapolis -with
Minnesota on May 11, while the corn
husker athletes will go to Lawrence
on May 25 for a meet with Kansas.
0ir +.T
GOPHER SPORTS
PLAN GOCK FIGHTS
Special Berries.
Chisholm, Minn., Dec. 22.A cock
fight, which is scheduled to take place
here next Thursday night, is attract
ing much attention among the sporting
fraternity. The birds will arrive in the
afternoon of the day of the fight and
are said to be in first-class fighting
condition. They will fight at catch
weights. This fight, it is said, is to be
only The beginning of a number of
such contests which it is expected to
pull off this winter
A few weeks ago an exciting cock
fight was pulled off at Buhl. The goodly
proportion of the gate receipts which
went to the promoters of the affair
have stimulated the chicken fight pro
moters and they are now importing
game cocks from Michigan and other
places. A large number of "sports"
from neighboring towns have signified
their intention to be present and con
siderable money is expected to be
placed upon the birds representing Ely,
Eveleth and Hibbing which will be
fought. TEBEAU WANTS DEMONT
FOR TfiE KAW "MUTTS"
Gene Demont to manage the Kansas
City team next "season is the tip com
ing from the west, where Demont is,
decidedly popular. The story goes along
to declare that Armour will be asked
to release Demont from Toledo and
that negotiations are now at a stage
where Tebeau's wishes are practically
sure of being gratified. Demont was
the 'seventh the list of American
association shortstops last summer. He
is credited with heaving good executive
ability, and this, coupled with his
popularityj makes him look best to
Kansas City fans as a successor to
Burke.
President W. H. Watkins of the In
dianapolis team has drafted Third
Baseman Armstrong of the Mattoon
Kitty league club and has sent the con
tract to Secretary Parrell of the Na
tional Association of* Minor Leagues.
Armstrong is anxious to play with the
Indians next season, and' believes he
can make good. Indianapolis boyB
he?is easily theIbest$ third basemen of
the organization.
wereTWittfttTi. W 0 LS 5
tJ^1}^
rce ra
L.T*
a J?,l
tives
team^,whichslate-U
?3?i0naL
race
a.te,LJ
A
and in -getting, satisfaction
is assured.
We don't talk about
cigars because they are
cheap, but sell good cigars
at prices no one matches.
Everything else besides
cigars that smokers want-p
'Humidors, Cigar Cases,
Tobacco Jars, Pipes, etc.
Mail Orders filled at store prices
delivery charges prepaid. United
Cigar Stores Co.. Mail Order Service
Room 100.141-145 West 17th St., N. Y.
UNITED
CIGARSTORES
COMPANY
12 Nicollet Ave., 234 Hennepin Ave.,
45 South Fourth Street, Nicollet ana
Washington.
-.S -x y-r *?-f
j0&
ible for the captainey or to vote for Frank BlUT, the Crimson's Won-
a captain unless his board is paid in v****mw4i a vruu-
full to the treasurer of the board.
Neither will any player in arrears for
board be eligible for any department of
athletics. In past years the Nebraska
authorities have encountered serious
trouble in collecting training table
board bills, but the new rule is ex-
The
games schedulegone to date to be with
universities,a- and Luther col-
Decorah
yea
western representae
CHANCEa FOtR
J?h
*lTi.a chanc
SKATERS..in
Skaie compete the
ac a 1
to
wi bBee senet Saranac
in-
28
iJa1
Prto *toMethateLake,
the
getting th trip
8ld
trial for this section will take place in St.
Paul during the week of Jan. 15 and in Chi
?ag
a r*
w
a
to New York, the western skaters will be en
tertained in the international races at Mon
treal on Feb. 2.
LIFE PRESIDENTS
WILL ORGANIZE
Th$y Meet in New York to Form
Association for Policyhold-
ers' Good.
New York, Dec. 22.The first steps
were taken yesterday toward the for
mation of an association of life in
surance presidents. Broadly stated,
the purpose of the organization will
be to further tho interests of policy
holders and to bring about more uni
form methods in the management of
life insurance business.
The meeting was held at the sug
gestion of President Paul Morton of*,
the Equitable Life Assurance society,
and brought together representatives
of twenty-four companies, while three
other companies sent communications
approving of the proposed association.
Mr. Morton presided, and Thomas A.
Buckner, second vicepresid'ent of the
New York Life Insurance company,
acted as temporary secretary.
A committee appointed to draft a
constitution and by-laws subsequently
reported a tentative p-hin of organiza
tion. Copies of the plan, which met
with general approval, "were distribut
ed, but final action was deferred until
Dec. 28, when it is proposed J,o effect
a permanent organization.
Presidents# and vicepresidents repre
senting their companies will be elig
ible to membership. The following com
panies were represented' at the meet
ing:
Aetna Life, Berkshire Life, Connec
ticut General Life, Equitable Life,
Mutual Life, Manhattan Life, Mary
land Life, Massachusetts Mutual, Met
ropolitan Life, Michigan Mutual Life,
Mutual Life, National Life, New Eng
land Mutual Life, New York Life,
Provident Life and Trust, Provident
Savings, Prudential, Security Mutual
Life, State Mutual Life, Travelers,
Union Cential and United States Life.
Eepresentatives of the Washington
Life of New York^the Equitable Life
of Iowa and the Pacific Mutual Life of
San Francisco expressed themselves by
letter ,as being favorable to the pro
posed organization, but were not rep
resented.
SENATOR BROWN'S WILL
It Seeks to Forestall Claims by Mrs.
Bradley.
HARVARD MAHOSE
ALL-STAR PLAYER
derful Punter, Will Go Into
Business.
Journal Special Service.
Cambridge, Mass., Dec' 22.Frank
Burr, the general choice for left guard
on this year's all-American football
eleven, yesterday gave Harvard a hard
Sill
to swallow in an announcement that
may not return to Cambridge next
fall. He is considering an offer to en
gage in business in the west.
Should Burr leave it would be a great
blow to the crimson. Brill's decision
not to play this year was felt keenly,
but Burr is the* greatest punter Har
vard ever had and one of the greatest
all-round football warriors who ever
wore a Harvard suit of moleskin. Many
agreed that but for his punting in the
game at New Haven last month, Yale
would have scored twice and perhaps
three times..
It now appears that since the close
of the season he has had his doubts
about playing again, and his friends
have been trying to induce him to com
plete his course. He refused to listen
to the proposition to have him rdade.
captain for next year, and his reason,
it is now realized, was that, he might
not return to'college. Principal among
those who want Burr is Captain Parker.
Burr is one of the most popular men
in his class, and last year was elected
president of the freshmen a vote
that was almost unanimous.
YOUNG GORBETT'S XMAS
GIFT FOR RELATIVES
Denver, Col., Dec. 22.Only the
kindness of neighbors prevented- the
father and sister of William Eothwell
(Young Corbett) being evicted from
their home. Just after his victory over
McGovern Corbett bought a fruit
ranch in the suburbs of Denver. Last
July, when Attorney Benedict was in
New York, Corbett placed with him a
small mortgage on the place. A few
days later Corbett came to Benedict
and said: 'Say, Benedict, can I press
that mortgagcea the place foBenedict" $500.
7
non
't, said Mr
The place is more of a home than a
producing piece of property, and I
aon want to advance any more money
on that security. You only want that
$500 to play roulette with, sinyhow."
Recently Corbett offered Benedict
the place, worth $,3000, for $500 spot
cash. His offer was accepted. When
Benedict went to take possession the
elder Eothwell and his daughter wept
bitterly. A wealthy neighbor induced
Benedict to sell the place to him for
$3,600 and the Bothwells were saved
from eviction, but they cannot possiblv
buy back the home.
EAST DEFEATS SOUTHf
Crimson Basketball Team Was Too
Strong!
j.uIn-J"
%**ne
folr Orange and Black.
^f1
ave a game of basketball
CockburnP:)\\\\\\\\VTght centerguard
'who
wh ^and7ca
o 41 to
the East high team defeaterd the South
?o m
by
a
seo
gregatl0
18. This ganw was the crimson's first
game and the second'for the South
team. The game was played at the
Liyndale gymnasium and the teams
lined up as follows:
Bast South
wES 'e,
--^ederickson
forwar
forward ...Flynn (cap)
H!S
Kendall...: left gu^rd .'.TpfSS
SubstitutesBast, Hawley, Everhard" EUiott
Broolj8 Cbellgard, Etrelow, Dldricksen.
he is easily the best third basemen of Hawiev. w^w* mX5S? mild form." So^Substitutes-Bast.
lh'.
BasketsEast, Werring 7, Green 3, Everhard
8. CocSburn i, Hawley 1. Fouls, Green 4, Ken
dall 2. Points awarded, 2.
South, Frederickson 6, Flynn 1 fbnls. Freder
ickson 4.
Referee, Booth umpire, Pope.
J"t""
TT IPIII'I^. _ De w.e7
.tt.1
8
S?,m?5! bet"of"$100
A* J?.e.
S^R" "KJ*
0
style foreigner at catch-as-catch-can
the document, which was written Aug.
24, 1906, four months before Mr. Brown
was shot down in Washington, was filed
yesterday for probate.
I do not devise or give or be
queath anything to any of the chil
dren of Mrs. Anna M. Bradley, is
the language of the will. "I, do not
think either or any child born to Mrs.
Anna M. Bradley is or are mine, but
whether such child or children is or not,
I expressly providt that neither or any
of them shall receive anything of my
6SDtb6w _, "J,-have never married Anna, M.
-Bradley and never intend to. If she
should pretend that any such- relation
ever existed between us as to justify
such inference I direct my executor to
contest any claims of any k^nd she
may present, and I direct that she re
ceive(nothing from my estate."
The testator bequeaths all his prop
erty, valued at $75,000, to Ijis two chil
dren by his first and second wives.
DEAD BABE IN HIS BUGGY
Second Case of Alleged Infanticide
at Stoughtdn, Wis.
Madison, Wis., Dec. 22.Chairman
N. K. Eeindahl of Dunkirk township,
found the body of a dead baby in his
buggy on returning home from Stough
ton yesterday afternoon^ A doctor ex
amined the body and said the baby
had been born alive three days ago.
This is thex second case of the kind re
ported in Stoughton recently.
NEW ICE TRUST
Salt Lake City, Dec. 22.Had the
late former Senator Arthur Brown fore
seen his death at the hands of Mrs.
Bradley he could have devised no more Rober on., St. Paul 60 j*ieoiiec
ingenious retaliation than the post- ave., Minneapolis, or Union Depots in
aaortem revenge contained in his will. I both cities. JlK
Western Company to Control Business
in West.
Journal Special Servioe.
New York, Dec. 22.It is intended
by the controlling interests in the
Western Ice company that the newa
company shall be a controlling factor
in the ice business, not only of Chicago/
but of other cities of the middle west.
Holiday Excursions
Via North-Western Line.
Dec. 20th to 25th, 29th, 30th, 31st
and Jan. lftt. Excursion tickets will be
sold from, Twin Cities
-To Duluth and Beturn $5.75
To Marshfield and Beturn.... 6.50
To Green Bay and Beturn 11.00
To Fond du Lac and Beturn. .11.20
To Milwaukee and Return.. 12.95
'To Chicago and Beturn.' 15.35
To Des Moines, and Return. .10.70
Huron and. Return 11.35
To Redfield and Return 11.40
To Sioux Falls and Return.. 9.30
To Sioux City and Return 10.50
To Omaha and Return 13.70
also to many points in Wisconsin, Illi
nois, Mjmnespta, Iowa, South' Dakota,
Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas and Okla
homa, at corresponding rates. Final re
turn limit of tickets Jan. 7, 1907.
For tickets and information call at
39 6 0 Nicolle
THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL
WODLD ABOLISH
TRAINING TABLE
-p-
New York, Dec. 22.Tames E. Sulli
van issued his first official statement
as president of the Amateur Athletic
union. He says
thaty
changesr pecessaWathiss adjuncteand
ldJeness,
mild form.
BURR, LEFT GUARD. WH O QUITS OOTBALL FOR A BUSINESS CAREER.
there will be no
in the polic of the organiza
tion during his administration.
He purposes, however, an aggressive
campaign, particularly in regard to
minor athletic organizations. He urges
all officials of the union to encourage
small clubs, small colleges and organiza
tions which are formed to develop
boys mentally, physically and morally.
Mr. Sullivan announces the intention
of the A. A. to contrpl basketball.
Clubs holding membership in the union
are urged to hayjB.ttiei*.basketball play
ers registered. Organizations failing to
do so will be expelled.
The only abuse Mr. Sullivan can see
in vogue in athletic clubs at present is
the training table. He will urge the' Holcomb Team Wins in Twin
A. A. it next
annuaaibreeder,
meeting to
of
eliminate terms an'"un-
if not professionalism in a
EICKAE.D FINISHES FIRST.
Wallace Rickard won first place in the semi
final races at the Casino rink last night beat
ing Joe Munch by a few feet, and 'making the
ifle in 2:17 2-5. Harry Bell of St. Paul came
in third and Herbert Franson finished in last
place,.nonors Franson was a likely candidate for
first honors and was skating witlh the leadingeH.
AlnOS. nr8t an a was skatintr wit tbp ipnrHno
week. Felkey is Tonigh Riokar end Munc wil meet in th
that "he can
,o* flnaiB an
ftournament he we
ternationadl at flereland as a rep
resentative of thmen Casinom rink Ben
0
tfle ln
PEOPLE MUST GOME_
INTO THEIR OWN
But Judge Grosscup Is Indefinite
as to How It Is to Be
Done.
Springfield, Ohio, Dec. 22.Judge
Grosscup of Chicago, discussing "Con
trol of Corporations'' under the aus
pices of the Commercial club and Wit
tenburg college, said in part:
I have a friend' who votes his party
ticket,- but waits for the returns, his
heart'full of the. wish that the other
pay has won. There are many men
in public life today who have just that
kind of fealty to the president and his
policies. My respect for him is not of
that k^nd.
foundations
reat an opportunity to lay Anew the""
on which our country's
future peace and prosperity must
rest to the extent that he is jBffect
lvely using that opportunitygetting
results out of the popular *awakening
I follow him as my leader.
"The reform to bring back the
people of the country into the owner
ship and control pt the property of
the country must not rest upon a cor
poration policy as it exists today,
changed in ho particular except that
the corporations^are to be subjected to
little additional scrutiny at Washing
ton.
"The jtnere prosecution of corpora
tions that are disobeying the law will
not'fulfil that end.
No mere policy of,curtailing great
fortunes will fulfil that end.
"All the power the nation needs the
nation has now. What is wanted'is not
more power what is wanted is a
clearer vision that at the bottom of
the people's unrest lies this fact. That
under conditions as they exist today
the people at large are ^wactically de
nied admission into the great property
inheritance that the genius and indus
try of this generation is buildinga
fact that ferments, and will continue
to ferment, and will cause the whole
bpdyfpolitic.to-ferment, until it is re
moved.
"What is wanted is a clearer vision
that the great new industrial life of
the country is an incorporated life and
in the nature of things, unless we slide
into public ownership, must remain as
incorporated b,fe but thaf door to pro
prietorship is barred' to the people not
because that life is incorporated, but
1 because of the character of the eor-
Defective Page
YALE NOT SO GOOD
AT GHESS FLAYING
New York, Dec. 2.Columbia uni
versity by winning four straight games
from Yale university in the second
round of the intercollegiate chess tour
nament yegterday, materially increased
her lead. over the other contestants. If
she wins a single game in today's events
she will carry off the trophy and the
championship for the current year.
Harvard won 8% points and gained
second place while Princeton fell back
to third and Yale to last place. The
teams comprise four men each from
Columbia, Harvard, Princeton and Yale.
DRUtaMONDS SORE
poration that we have created to hold
and embody "it.
"What is wanted is a genuine
Seople'ss
mvv^
movement that will not lay
own it arms until the battle of cor
porate reform is won."
PERKINS ON^TAND
Grand Jury Probe of New York Ufa
Is Continued.
New York, Dec. 22.The grand jury
yesterday continued its inquiry into the
affairs of the New York Life Insur
ance company, and during the prolonged
sessions examined the following wit
nesses:
George W. Perkins, former vice pres
ident of the New York Life Wood
vf? L/mgdon and James Morrison,
both now members of the finance com
mittee F.H. Shipman, assistant treas
urer M. M. .Mattison,,
chiefAlexande 06
i
"In the character of a great moral
force I look upon Mr. Roosevelt as one
of the great figures of the times. To no
other individual has been given so
December 22, j^oft
FOOTBALL
Olty
Basketball League Play.
The Holcomb basketball team de
feated the Drummond Halls last night
by a^score of 44 to 17. At the end of
the first half the score was 18 to 6
in favor of the winters, But in the
last part of the game the Drummonds
were swept off their feet. Lineup:
Holcombs Drummond
Michaelson left forward Svendson
Weisman aright forward McElmeel
Meeker center Gray
B. Michaelson left gnard Brandt
Arundel right guard Hardesty
Goal from field, H. Michaelson 7. Weisman 6,
Arundel 5, R. Michaelson 8, ""Svendson 1. McEl
meel 2, Gray 4.
clerk in
department
Webb., Jr., former vice president of
the New York Security & Trust com
pany, and J. Carroll Root, secretary of
the same company.
Mr. Perkins, it is said, was ques
tioned regard to the so-called "Prus
sian bond scandal," in which it is al
leged the New York Life made an ir
regular transfer of certain stocks and
industrials to the New York Security
& Trust company in order to get them
off their annual report to the state in
surance department.
ISLAND DISAPPEARS
Earthquake Is Believed to Have Sub.
merged It.
San Francisco, Cal., Dec. 22.The
Oceanic company's steamer Mariposa,
arriving here yesterday, fronv. Tahiti,
brought the news of the change in the
topography of the Paumotu'group.
The little atoll named Hikueru, in
the .group, has disappeared, and scien
tists are wondering what brought about
the sudden effacement of the island. A,
short time before the' atoll was missed
a hurricane swept over that portion of
the Paumotus, but even if there had
been a tidal wave, it is not likely-that
the island would have been swept away.
The_supposition is that.there has been
a severe earthquake which caused the
atoll to sink into the sea.
The island, -of Hikuera was not inhab
ited and was knpwn principally for
pearl fishidg.-
In Line with toe Pore-Food Law.
The National \Food and Drug Act,
which takes effect Jan. 1, 1907, does
not affect Chamberlain's Cough Reme
dy in any manner.. No special labels
are required on this remedy .under that
act,, as it is free from opiates and nar*
cotioe of every character, making it a
safe remedy for mothers to use with
their children. This remedy has been
in use for so many years, and' its good
qualities are so well
ue need hesitate to use
JEFFRIES LOSES
OUT AS REFEREE
Manager of Gang-Herman Fight
May Select Walsh as the
Third Man.
JEFF WILL FIGHT
WINNER TA&E ALL
Champion Gomes Out of Retire
ment to Take Big Share -of
Purse.
Journal Special Service.
IOWA GOLFEB IS
HONORED BY EAST
HOW CHAMPION HEAVY WILL RETURN TO RING.
Journal Special Servioe.
Tonopah, Nev., Dec. 22.There is a
new mixup in the question of referee
for the Gans-Herman fight. Manager
Eiley of the Casino club has become
wrathful at Jim Jeffries, who was his
choice for third man in the ring, and
it looks as tho the^re would have to
be*portant
a new arrangement.
Lewis, Herman's manager, is elated
over the prospect, as he sees another
chance to get the job for Siler. Riley
wired Jeff six weeks ago that he was
slated for the job, but the boilermaker
did not see fit to reply, so Riley says
that it must be someone else.
As it looks now, it seems more than
possible that Jack Wielch of Sari Fran
cisco will be the man, as Riley appears
to be inclined that way, and from the
articles what Riley says goes.
Los Angeles, Cal., Dec. 22."I have
como out of retirement and will fight
once more. The only thing that has
brought me out is the $50,000 purse.
I know I can get the money hung up
for a finish mill and am going after it.
One thing I want understood at the
start is that when the fight is over I
will have almost all the purse. No mat
ter who I figTit I want most of that
$50,000, and if I can get the other fel
low to stand for a bout on a winner
take all basrs it will suit me,down to
the Aground.''
The above statement was made by
Champion Jim Jeffries yesterday when
talking about his return to the ring.
Tho big fellow undoubtedly meant
every word of it. He is sick of fight
ing and the ring and were it not fordispute
the enormous purse offered he would
never leave his burbank farm. But
$50,000 is a big bunch of money and if
Jeffries can force his opponent to agree
to let the victor take all he will be
perfectly satisfied.
New Tork, Dee. 22Daniel Chauneey
of the Garden City Golf club has ben
nominated for the presidency of the
United States Golf association. The
findings of the nominating committee
were announced last night as follows:
President, Daniel Chauneey, Garden
City Golf club, New York vicepresi
dents, Fred S. James, Glenview club,
Chicago, and Alexander Britton, Chevy
Chase club, Washington, D. secre
tary, W. Fellowes Morgan, Baltusrol
Golf club, New Jersey treasurer Sam
uel Hebner, Philadelphia Cricket
club, Philadelphia executive commit
tee, Leighton Calkins, Plainfield Coun
try club, Warren Dickinson, Des Moines
Golf and Country club, Herbert Jaques,
Country club, Brookline, Silas H.
Strawn, Midlothian Country club.
This ticket will be presented at the
annual meeting of the association to be
held in Chicago Jan, 18.
WIFE FOUND HIM HANGING
Discouraged Fanner, Who Was Hailed
Out, Kills Himself.
Speoial to The Journal.
Willmar, Minn., Dec. 22.Peter
Lundquist, a farmer, committed suicide
by hanging himself to a rafter by a
rope in his barn. He was found by his
wife. He had brooded over his finan
cial difficulties. He was the son of Ole
Lundquist, an old settler, and was 40
years old. His., wife and seven chil
dren, the oldest a girl of 16, survive
him. His farm property is heavily in
cumbered. He was one of the hail
storm sufferers in Swift county -last
summer, losing nearly his entire crop.
BOOKMAKER IN TROUBLE.
Journal Special Service.
New Orleans, 22.Harry Scott Cin
cinnati,^ a bookmaker was today indicted on a
PJuUse.because
/y of
eb^ie
of
715 NIC
V
known, that no
"'wh'ea-'1--
TEBEAU WANTS DeMONT FOR THE MUTTS.
RULES COMMITTEE
IN SESSION TODAt
Football Representatives from All
Over the Country Meet in
New York. 1 1
Journal Special Service. $
New York, Dec. 22.The
rules committee will meet today to
make minor changes in the regulations
of the game. There have been several
informs} talks, by the members of the i
committee following some of the im-,
games of the fall^nd it these
gatherings the more important alter
ations in the code for next autumn
were drafted in the rough. As a result
of these discussions, it practically has
been decided that the following changes
will be made in the present plaving
rujes:
Substituting a distance penalty for
loss of ball when a forward pass hits
ground.
Changing the rules so as to allow
linemen to run with the ball, pro
yided they are not used in mass plays
inside the tackle positions.
Limiting the operation of the'five
yard zone on each side of the center,
so- that a forward pass from the out
side may legally crogs the zone.
One more down inside the 25-yard
line.
Extension of playing time from~^
thirty to thirty-five minuljes. t%
These are the principal changes that
are expected to be made, but there is
certain to be 'much discussion over
each change -and it may be that somekl
proposed alterations will be voted down
or at least compromised. Some of the
committee are known to be in favor
of permitting four downs on tries for/
ten yards ID side the 25-vard line
whereas others appear to think that'
the zone of the rule should be limited,
to inside the 15-yard line.
John C. Bell, who represent^ the*
University of Pennsylvania on the
rules committee, said in commenting
on this proposed change: "There is
widespread agreement of opinion that
something should be done to strengthen
the offense inside of 25-yard lines.
JNow, a team is practically compelled
to resort t old style football when
near the opponents' goal line and' the
handicap of only three rushes to make
ten yards i too great. Obviously the
torward pass, and on-side kick are in
advisable here, and many games this
season have proved that at this point
the attack needs strengthening. The
remedy suggested is one more down."
As Mr. Bell states, there is little
regarding the need' of a change
in this particular of the play, the onlv
difference of opinion
beinentirethe
tabl
tr
W
testimonf
by
which he freed two New Orleans detectives of
charges of drugging a number of women. The
drugs were used in* beer as a Joke. Scott took
the blame upon himself.
DARNUM
f*ter\j
.1 i
3SS
l\W
4
football
in yard
line at which it shalle become oper-
length
tn
Those wh0 opposed to permitting
it?
t, ?are
tha
go into effect on the 25-yard eto *J
0 2
1
ll
of the field is only 110 yards and that
to permit four downs inside the
25-yard line would account for nearly
halt the
playingfour
territory.
suggestflimiting the down stylTheyoe
play to within the 15-yard' line and
thus dp away, with the mass play,
which is certain to result, as much as
possible. *&,
r- 17^
A. A. U. IS AFTER
i
BASKETBALL NOW
New York, Dec. 22.James E. Sulli
van yesterday issued his first official
statement as president of the Amateur
Athletic union. He says that there will
be no change in the policy of the or
ganization during his administration.
He purposes, however, an aggressive
campaign, particularly in regard to
minor athletic organizations.
He urges all officials of the union to
encourage small clubs, small colleges
and organizations which are formed to
develop the boys, mentally, physically
and morally. Mr. Sullivan announces
the intention of the A. A. TJ. to con
trol basketball. Clubs holding member
ship in the union are urged to have
their basketball players registered Or
ganizations failing to do so will be ex
pelled.
The only Mr. Sullivan caen see
in vogu?e*imnabusee athletic clubs at present is
A
will urg the
A. A. U. at its next annual meeting to
eliminate this. He terms it an ''un-
necessary adjunct and a breeder of
idleness, if not professionalism in a
mild form." "X
CXHJBTAMA1TOHE wara".-.'/*^
1&st oUsquali-
caU of timetwice and was rather roueh
often^
Refer Co^ about rfiokT
a
resorting to,thteh strangle hod Afterm
wa
me Ao
2P .^OPH?n
-fied, and the Minneapolis boy awarded tte
Jimmy Potts wfll
-fied
match and ."the $25 forfeit
go with Athos tonight.
BARKER LEAVES CITY.
Charles Barker, Boston, Mass., cnampim
checker player of America, will meet all
cam-r erv. fK the Commercial dub tonight afte
which he wUl leave the city. Mr. Barker ba
had a busy week in Minneapolis and has sac,
ceeded in winning all gamesT
Ai\
Sip -i4
sj
mi
r^^i '&4 sa
te%^SsMiuk
mKW&J^gi
I

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