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Richmond times-dispatch. [volume] (Richmond, Va.) 1914-current, January 04, 1918, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045389/1918-01-04/ed-1/seq-3/

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SOUTH SIDE CITIZENS
WANT OFFICES RETAINED
Oppose Retrenchment Tlan of Abol
ishing Unnecessary, Dupli
cating Jobs.
PROMISED UNDER ANNEXATION
Will Stand on Their Legal Rights,
Pulliani Tells Commlttco on Char
ter Changes?Wyatt Wants Fees
as Process Server.
Vigorous protest usalnst the removal
of the Hustings Court, Part II., the
limiting of its Jurisdiction to strictly
*?l.vl 1 proceedings, and the abolition and
?vmoval of other municipal offices now
?ocatod in South Itlchmond, was mado
last night at the meeting of the Coun- j
ell Committee on Charter Changes. j
Representatives of the South Sldo dc
elarcd that the annexation agreement]
when the old city of Manchester was I
consolidated with Richmond provided j
for tho permanent retention of tho1
court and olllces south of tho James
River. i
Samuel A. Anderson appealed as'
counsel for the South Richmond dele
cation, and while he had not studied
i-~o report of the subcommittee, he said,
no believed that several rccomnienda
tlonu wcro unlawful. Tho annexation
agreement tv-as a contract, and all of |
Its provisions were binding upo;i (lie
city of Richmond. "Annexation was
agreed to by the citizens or Manches- ,
ter." lie said, "with the understanding
that these otllecn were to be retained."
Mr. Anderson diovu^ed at length
in a general way tho l^gal phaso of
tho matter, confining himself princi- !
pally to the question of a contract, and
the obligation of Ulchmond faithfully
to observe its provisions. Because of
several points which he believed to be
Illegal, he 'preferred preparing a brief
for presentation to tho committee, and
suggested that City Attorney Pollard i
also look Into the provisions of the
law.
WANTS SEPARATE VOTE
on soitiiside (iLKsnox?
In support of the South Richmond
delegation's protent appeared David u.
I'ulllam. who declared that the contract
was binding and irrevocable. The Hus
tings Court. Part II., according to the
annexation agreement, wan to be per
manently retained. and Its Jurisdic
tion was to include civil and criminal
proceedings, registry and probato mat
ters. Tho agreement also provided j
for a police etaiion and court, and other
municipal offices In that section.
"But should the committee decide to
recommend these matters," Mr. Ptil- j
llam said, "we think It should be first ?
approved by a vote of the people, and. ,
we believe, this portion should be vot-j
ed upon as a single item. It also seems
to that this question should also be :
corvfined entirely to tho voters of the ?
old city of Manchester."
Members of the committee had pre
viously declared that the meeting last
night had been called especially to hear
from Interested citizens. Captain Mor
gan R. Mills asked Mr. Pulliam if any
other recommendations were opposed
hy citizens in South Richmond. In re
ply, Mr. Pulliam said several small mat
ters had been laid before Alderman ;
Workman, and would be presented by j
him. Replying to further queries, he ?
said he could not voice the fenti- I
nients of the community as to the aboil- !
lion of the Administrative Board, but j
favored tho appointment of depart- j
mcnt heads by the Mayor, which would
tend to remove such offices from poli
tics.
As a result of the protests, the sec
tion of the City Charter dealing with i
the South Side courts wsa passed for j
further consideration by the committee,
piendlng Its consideration by City At
torney Pollard.
WTATT WANTS FEES
AS PROCESS SERVER
?William H. Wyatt, High Constable of!
the cltyftf Richmond, also appeared be- i
fore the jommlttec-, and susuestcd that '
his office be designated as the official i
process server of the Civil Justice i
Court. During the past four months
his business had been reduced CO per <
cent, he said, and his office had little
or no status, with his powers Indefi
nite. Either the Sheriff or the City
Sergeant could at any time step in
and serve his papers, he declared. The
offico had never netted him more than
16,000 annually, his record year being
only ?5,S00, which decreased to ?o,400 :
last year.
The subcommittee of the Charter!
Change Committee recommended in its !
report that all warrants for civil mat- '
tors of the character handled by the j
High Constable be Issued by the jus- I
tlco of the Civil Court, and tho fees i
bo turned Into the City Treasury. .Mr. j
Wyatt offered to provide a clerk and j
bailiff for the court it he was made Hie
official process server. Under such cir
cumstances, however, tho issuance of
warrants would continuo to bo made
by a magistrate In his office, from
which he would receive the fees, and
tho objects of the subcommittee de
feated.
Tho meeting last night lasted for
several hours, with members expressing
a determination to carry out their work
as quickly as possible. For this rea
son, Councilman Peters, president of
the lower branch, offered a motion for
another meeting of the body Tuesday
night, with nightly meetings until its
work Is completed.
Practically tho entire session last
night -was occupied Vy tho talks of the !
South Richmond delegation. Among
those from thi3 section of the city at
tending the meeting were Judge Ernest
H. Wells. Augustine Royall, A. D.
Adamson, T. P. Pettigrew, J<\ I. McCon
nell, John C. Saunders, IT. A. Maurice.
Willis D. Pulliam, George Paul and
others.
MOOSE ENTERTAIN
I.oenl Chapter Give* Dance for Gather
ing Soldier* and
Friend*.
Members of the local chapter of the
Moose lodgo last night entertained a
large gathering of soldiors and friends
at one of the pleasant bi-monthly
dances which tho organization has in
augurated this winter. Music was fur
nished by the Moose Orchestra for
dancing in the ball room, wWlo on tho
first floor of tho Mooso I-Iome, 325 East
Franklin Street, refreshments were
served.
The lodge holds one of these danccs
on tho first, and third Thursday of each
month. under the direction of tho so
cial committee, of wljlch Ray Bugg.
Thomas W. Moore, W. C. Crozler, and
Joseph Long are the mcmbors. The
affairs are well-attended and have
proved very delightful.
nritUh Capture 71^40.
LONDON, January 3.?The Pritish
took' 74,349 prisoners on tho western
^front during 1317, according to figures
?to-nigKt. Of th?iae 1,572 were officers.
They captured 542 guns of all eallbors,
647 trench mortars and .2,422. machine
guna.
t
Hun Imperialism
Again Shows Claws
Pclrograd Press Declares Ger
mans Ifaoe Thrown Aside
Mask..
Illy Associated Press. 1
FETROGRAD, Wednesday, January
I 2.?Petrograd newspapers aro nnanl
j inous In declaring that tho Gcrmano
I and tho Austrians have, after one week,
: thrown ofT the mask and mado it clear
. Hint tho central powers do not want a
i real democratic peace. Tho i'ravda
isays:
J "German imperialism la again be
I ginning to show its claws."
i Germany's apparent unwillingness to
! give I'oland, Lithuania, I-dvonlu, Cour
j land and Esthonta the privilege of free
j seif-dclinlllon la the rock upon which
; tho negotiations have split. Other
j peace conditions arc ignored by tho
I Uolshevik leaders, who say that Ger
many opposes tho most vital princi
ples underlying the Russian revolution.
In an interview with newspaper men.
Foreign Minister Trotzky bald that
pcaec negotiations probably would not
l?e rcnurnrd at Ercst Litovak, as tho
Russians oppose stoutly the principle
of annexation.
On Tuesday evening at a joint meet
I ing of the central executive commit
tee of the Congress of Soldiers' and
Workmen's Delegates, representatives
[of the peasants' deputies, the I'etro
grud Workmen's and Soldiers' Council
and representatives of tho General
' Army Congress for tho mobilization of
! the army a resolution was adopted
unanimously declaring that the Ger
man peace terms were unjust. It de
i nounced Germany's attitude toward the
' Hal tic provinces as tyrannical, and au
thorized the government to take steps
to transfer future pcace negotiations
to a neutral country.
Russians generally favor Stockholm
an the place for the pcace conference,
but it is said the Germans are not will
ing to go to Sweden.
TO CREATE POSITION
Di.Mlonnrc* In Military Probe Brings
llrijiicnt for Secretary of
Munition*.
I Ey Associated Preys.1
WAaMINGTON*. January 3.?In fur
ther investigation of clothing and
other army supplies contracts nego
tiated by the Civilian Supplies Com
mittee of the Council of National De
fense. the Senate Military Committee
to-day received from Charles Eisen
man, vice-chairman of the contracting
committee, a statement of merchandisb
bought from firnu whose members or
employees are or were connected with ,
the convmittec. |
Of supplies worth about 5SOO.OOO.OOO ?
bought during the last eight months,
Mr. Eisenman's statement discloses that i
J12S.S30.000 worth came from such con
cerns. but that all e.tcept $14,830,064
worth was contracted for before the
contractors' representatives became 1
connected with the committee.
Before presenting the statement,
asked,for by Senator Mcl?cllar yester
day. Eisenman, in concluding his tes
timony, stanchiy defended the com- !
mittee's work, upheld the policy of
secrecy in advance of letting contracts,
and again insisted that the men given
the much-discussed scrap sorting con
tract would have been limited to a
nominal profit.
Members of the military committee i
to-night were prepared to launch leg- j
islation. the first results of the inquiry.
Chairm .n Chamberlain plans to intro- '
duco to-morrow a bill to create a new !
Cabinet member known zz the secre- j
tary of munitions, to have complete '
charge of all war material purchasing. I
It is promised virtually unanimous i
committee support.
Ordered to Report,
William Eurwe'.l Jnckson, who re
cently re-enlisted in the United States j
Navy, has just been ordered to report
at Norfolk at once for active service.'
Mr. Jackson is a son of A. D. Jackson, j
of 210 East Grace Street.
SUGGEST WOMEN VOTE 1
ON SUFFRAGE RIGHTS
j I/catlers Declar? Such I'lun Wouldj
j Placo Congress In Position of Itcc- !
ognizing "Woman's Rights.
SOUTHERN' WO.MAX 8 P K A K 8 j
I
Mrs. Guilford Dudley Says That j
Tliero Is Intense Feeling of Hu-!
miliatiou Uccauso of Opposition to |
Amendment.
rBv Arsoclatcl Pr*8-.l |
WASHINGTON*. January J.?Argu-!
ments by ofllclal-j of the National Amcr- j
ican Woman's Suffrage Association cc- :
cupicd all of tho first day of the hear
ing by tho House Suffrage Committee
on the constitutional amendment rea- \
olutlon, which the House lias agreed to j
con3idcr next Thursday. Opponents of
the measure, who ccr.P.r.ed their ef- |
forta to-day to circulation at the Cap- i
itol of a statement by Mrs. .Tames W. j
Wadsvrorth. Jr.. will be heard to-ir.or- ;
row, and representatives of tho Wom
an's Party will make their statements
j Saturday.
| Dr. Anna Howard Shaw, honorary
i president, and Mr.". Carrie Chapman
jOatt, pre^id^nt of the suffrage hsso
' elation, wtc tho principal speakers
to-day. They vigorously opposed a
! suggestion by ,Representative Clark, of
Florida, thnt before Congress acts, the !
! question be submitted to a vote of i
[the oin^ti of ihc country, declaring j
.that ihis r.i v 'iod v:as Illegal and un-j
I ncccr.t ary. and would put Consrcs.*? in'
i tho por ition of Baying that It recog-- !
[ niss^d women's right to vote, but had
j proposed the moot difficult methods of
having that right registered.
The antisuffrngists set forth their
principal argument In a prepared state*
| ment by Mrs. J^mcs W. Wadsworth.
Jr., president of the National Asso
ciation Opposed to Woman SufTrrge.
The argument for the antis declared
that KUffrogist3 and Socialists, reek- |
ing to destroy the right of each State}
to settle the question by popular vot*.\ j
had resorted to "the lowest political !
methods." It charged them with cir- ;
culating a canard that President Wil- j
son had promised Alice Paul, leader !
of the White House pickets, that he
would rccretly aid the amendment.
Such a. statement, the argument de
clared. wag an "insult to the Presl- ]
dent's character," and added that the
President had been the foremost friend
of woman suffrage because of his well
known preference to have the States
settle the question for themselves.
SOUTHERN WOMEN AltF.
HUMILIATED, SAYS SPEAKER
Mrs. Guilford Dudley, of Nashville,
president of tlni Tennessee Equal Suf
frage Association, and member of the
executive board of the National Woman
Suffrage Association, urged adoption of
thu amendment.
"I wonder if you have any concep
tion of the Intense feeling of humilia
tion Southern women experleno when
they discover that the greatest opposi
tion to the submission of our Federal
suffrage amendment to tho States
corncs from Southern Representatives
in Congress?" 6he said.
"They have withheld our enfran
chisement for two reasons, which we
for a time ncceptcd?the States' rights
doctrine and the negro problem. From
the States' rights ground of opposition
the Southern men have themselves re
treated. and we.now stand face to face
with this bare and ugly alternative:
cither our men feel they cannot trust
us with the ballot or we must feel
that wo cannot trust their sense of
justice."
Mrs. Dudley declared the negro
phantom ha? outlived its time. In the
fifteen Southern States the excess of
white women alone over twenty-one
years of age, above all negro men and
women of like age, is 1,122,477, she
said.
"Furthermore, during the past year
alone 75.000 negroes have left one
Southern State to go North, and 73.000
have cone from three others.
Writer of Gospel
Hymns Dead
1 ? l
Author of "I AW Thcc Every \
Hour" Expires at Her Vcr- j
mont Home.
BENNINGTON, VT? January 3.?Mrs.
Annie Sherwood Hawks, author of'
many famous gospel hymns, Including
"1 Need Thco 15very Hour," died at her
home here to-day at the age of eighty
three.
With the death of the celebrated
Fanny Crosby some timo ago, Mrs.
Annie Sherwood llawks v.-as left aa
perhaps the last of the noted writers
of the gospel hymns of the past half
century.
From her fourteenth year, when her
first bit of verse was published in a
newspaper In Troy, N. V., she devoted
a largo part of her long lifo to the
production of poems and hymns. Of
her hymns which canic into common use,
the best known is "I Need Tlieo Every
Hour," which is said to have been \
translated into more foreign languages
than any other modern hymn.
Mrs. Hawks, who was born in lloo
eick, N. Y., In ISCj, was educated in
the public schools and in the Troy
Seminary. After her marriage to
Charles Ilial Hawks, member of a New
York banking firm, she lived in Brook
lyn until the death of her husband In
1SSS. Since then she had made her
home with her daughter In Denning
ton, Vt.
Her first hymns wcrc written in 1S68, i
at the suggestion of her paiUor. Dr. |
Robert i/owry, who set several of them |
to music.
Not long before her death Mrs. I
Hawks thus described the writing of j
her most famous hymn:
"I remember well the morning, many j
years ago, when in the midst of the !
daily cares of my home. I was so filled
with a sense of nearness to the Master '
that, wondering how one could live
without Him either in joy or pain, J
these words. "I need Thee every hour,' !
were flashed Into my mind. Seating ;
myself by the open window in the J
balmy air of the bright June day, I ,
caught my pencil, and the words were t
soon committed to paper, almost aa
they are being sung now.
"It was onty by accident, as it woulA
seem, that they were set to music a >
few months later and sung for th*- }
first time at a Sunday school convention j
held in one of the largo Western cities. |
From there they were taken further
West and sung by thousands of voices
before the echo came back to me."
Among other hymns of which she '
was the author are "The Cross for '
Jesus," "Good Night." "Why Weepest .
Thou?" "Who'll De the Next to Follow j
Jesus?" and "In the Valley."
INSUFFICIENT POSTAGE
Many Letter* Are Being Held Up for
I.nek of Required 3-C'ent
Stamp.
Regardless of announcement:, and !
publications of rMlea, tho post-office
authorities complain that a large, num
ber- of letters addressed for ont-or |
town delivery aro being mailed at the !
post-office with a 2-eent stamp. It
has been frequently announced the reg
ulations of the Post-Office Department
demand the placing of a 2-cent stamp
for all foreign first-class mall mat
ter.
First-class mail matter to be deliver
ed within the city can be addressee ;
with a 2-cent stamp, and postal cards j
niufct have a 2-cent stamp before they I
will be delivered at all.
Ball for Sailors and Murine*.
Special invitation has been sent to1
all members of the marine corps i:i j
Richmond and marine corps recruiting j
office attaches to attend the navy ball !
to be given by Richmond Chapter,!
Daughters of the Confederacy, at the j
Grays' Armory Saturday night.
Tho ball is for the men of the navy
and marine corps, whose uniforms will |
be their passes at the door. Civilians ;
and men in khaki will be expected to '
buy tickets at the. usual rate, and the '
proceeds will go toward fitting out the |
Mathew Fontaine Maury cot in a base ,
hospital in France. j
DanKcr Over, l'atrol Guarding Mre
Zone Is Withdrawn by
Authorities.
POMCE HOLD TWO SUSPECTS
Theaters and Other Public Amuse
ment Placcs Are Again Thrown
Open, and Norfolk Settles to Nor
mjjl State.
rnr Associated Press.! ut..
NORFOLK. VA.. January 3.?After
the shock caused by tho disastrous
fire of tart Tuesday. destroying the
Monticcllo Hotel anJ other buildinR3
or, Granby Street. In tho retail
of the city. Norfolk ho* s,tllcd down
again to Its normal state. Tho bat r
zonM havo been restricted, and onl>
a few of tho enlisted men aro now
keeping people away fron: buildings
that aro thought to bo dangerous.
Tho building inspector, the chief of
the tiro department and tho chief of
t ollc?* to-day Itspected tho walls of
the Montlcello Hotel, and found them
to be secure. As a result, tho patrol
tha. ha:? been guarding that property
?=inc-> Inst Tuesday afternoon as a safe
guard against accident, has been with
drawn. For tho first time slnco tho
fire In the Monticcllo started, pedes- ,
trians aro allowed to walk at will1
through the streets of tho downtown
section.
All of tho suspects arrested by the
polico and the agents of the Depart
ment of Justice sinco Tuesday, with
two exceptions, havo been released.
The two exceptions are Johannes
nmmor" and his son. Otto, who aro be- j
ing held bccauso they have not ob
tained their naturalisation papers and
have no military permits. All of the
men were examined by United State?
District Attorney Mann. Dmmor is a
family connection of M. WintcrmaDtel,
proprietor of a delicatessen near the
Monticcllo Hotel, who, with his wifo,
Ida Wlntermantel, wao also arrested
as a suspect. Wlntermantel has a son
in the Naval Academy at Annapolis,
or.d thrt son's diploma was found in
tho houso with a book of memoirs of
Germany, with a picture of the Kaiser
and much German literature. This son (
married the daughter of Emnior, who j
cannot speak English. Emraor arrived !
In Norfolk only a few days ago.
The theaters, which have been closed
bccatiso of tho military guard and the
requirement of permits to pass through
the downtown section, aro now open
again.
POLES TRANSFERRED
Germans Itcportfd to Flave Forcibly
Taken Tlicm Into German
Euplre.
f Bv Associated Press.1
PKTROGRAD, Wednesday, January1,
2.?The Germans arc reported to have I
transferred 300,000 civilian Polea and J
Lithuanians forcibly to Germany.
General Korniloff, foi-mor coinman
der-ln-chief, and one of the leaders In
the movement against the Bolshevik I,
has arrived in the district of the Don
Cossacks. (The death of General Kor
nllolT was reported unofficially on
Tuesday.)
The members of former Russian gov
ernments who are unler arrest in tho
fortress of St. Peter and St. Paul have
abandoned their hunger strike.
TWO DEATHS IN FRANCE
General Pershing Xotlflea War Depart
ment of Fatallliea From
Natural Caaaes.
WASHINGTON, January 3.?General
Pershing has reported to the War De
partment the following deaths from
natural causes:
First Lieutenant William Hague,
engineers, January 1, broncho-pneu*
inonia; New York.
Private Dudley Carrington, steve
dores. January 1, pneumonia; Zelino
Carrington, mother, Molina, Fla.
Facts, liKe rivets, hammered
Home Hold fast.
When the body loses effici
ency, it is time to remember
that coffee drinKing' does
Hurt many.
Then is tHe time to change to
the delicious cereal drinK?
POSTUM
"There's a Reason"
>0
FIRST -
'SATISFACTION
The Problem of Saving Money
Is Solved at This Old Store?
Remnant Fridaf
Reduces the Cost of Living
It's an old say
ing that only one
leg is necessary to
determine wheth
er or not the dog
is biting. In the
same sense it is
merely necessary to look
about you to determine
which store, week after
week, is able to provide
the city's biggest money
saving attractions.
Friday Rem
nant Day has
been a weekly
event at Cohen's
for half a cen
tury. It has not
only endured the
most exacting
tests, but has served to
win a following that could
not be diverted to other
channels. Others may imi
tate our methods, but are
not able to duplicate our
unapproachable values.
?
To-Day Will Be a Good
Time to Get Acquainted
There are strangers in Richmond who are not fa
miliar with the merchandising plan of Friday Rem
nant Day?and there are hundreds of people who have
resided in our city for some time who have overlooked
the necessity of making it a point to profit by Friday
Remnant Day Bargains in all departments. Shall we
extend a greater inducement to be with us to-day than
merely to state that Friday Remnant Day values corti?
only on Friday? The savings, therefore, cannot be
enjoyed at any other time.
%kmam&c4midt
Itandolph 101-106
t-fouji-sChcUns?_
A few Xraas goods delayed
in transit just in to sell at
ridiculously low prices Fri
day and Saturday only.
FIGS, 20c
Extra fancy, large layer; just in;
regular 35c quality.
MINCEMEAT, QT. JARS, 40c
Fine New England makos;
regular price, 69c.
PLUM PUDDING, 24c
Fino make; regular 30c.
ENGLISH WALNUTS, SOFT
SHELL, 20c
Regularly 33c.
FRUIT CAKE, LB., 40c
Beat bome-mado, 3 to 4-It>.; will
keep 12 months; regu
larly 60c.
DATES, PKG., Iflc
Persian best; just in.
PECANS, SOFT-SHELLED, 24c
Louisiana; fine flavor; regu
larly 30c.
LATER RAISINS, 12c
California fruit products.
COCOA NUT, 8c
Dromedary shredded; regular
package 10c.
XMAS CANDIES, 17c
Sold at 25c:
SOFT GUM CANDY, 10c
Good quality; regular 35c.
Ja LB., 30c
Regular $1.00 quality.
RICH'S FRUIT CAKE, LB., 41c
A few liappy suggestions
for your meatless days.
FINNAN HADDIE, IjB., 10c
Just in; 1 to 3 lbs. cach.
CODFISH, BONELESS, 22c
Boneless fat middles.
BLOATERS, 2 FOR 13c
Select large, gold-smoked.
MACKEREL, 20c
Extra large, white, salt.
TUNA FISH, CAN, 14c
Medium size; fat meat.
GREEN TURTLE MEAT, 40c
Selocted pieces for soup or stew
quickly made.
LOBSTER, SMALL, 10c
Best Canadian pack.
FISH FLAKES, 17c
Makos delicious croamed or
croquettes.
CRACKER MEAL, LB., 11c
A specially prepared sweet.
EDUCATOR WAFERS, lie
In six varieties and small pack
ages; special price to in
troduce full assort
ment.
PRETZELS, 25c
TRENTON OYSTER CRACK
ERS, 22c
New Camembert
Cheese Just In !
...Delicious"
501-6-8 East Broad Street
' ?i
Homo made. *lv
BUTTER, LB., 51c
Finest quality June Creamery; *
sweet, rich flavor. Try this
at to-day's price. Reg
ularly 56c.
BUTTERINE, PKG., 30c
Made of finest neutral fats and
churned thru fresh rich cream, >i,J.
with good per cent of cream
ery butter added.
WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR,
BAG, 30c
Made of Va.-grown wheat; con
tains all mineral salt and nu- "l
trition of whole wheat; a
perfect food; helps di
gestion.
GRAHAM FLOUR, BAG, 30c
RYE FLOUR, BAG, 80c
BRAN, PKG., 15c
BRAN FLAKES, PKG., 22c
BRAN COOKIES, 17c
Like many others, you will become
a regular user after once tried.
WB LtNt
COFPSE .
CREAM CRISP, 25c
An excellent vegetable shortening;
sweet, nutty flavor; line for all
particular cooking; extra
ordinary product.
VA. BUCKWHEAT, 3 LBS.
FOR 27c
Best quality country ground; reg-"
ular price, lb., 11c.
Buckwheat cakes go fine these
cold days.
PANCAKE FLOUR, PKG., 17c
MAPLE SYRUP, 20c
SOURKRAUT, QT.? 13c
Best quality; long cut.
Evaporated Fruit are desirable, at "
tho system requires and craves
fruit juices.
TEACHES, 23c
APRICOTS, 28c
PRUNES, 18c
APPLES, 10c
PEARS, 23c
GLUTEN FLOUR, LB., 20c
Prepared to eliminate all starch, "
For uses when starchlcss foods
aro necessary and good
for obesity.
3?Ib. Bag, $1.30 * " *ll
Self-Rising, 20c
GRAPEFRUIT MARMALADE, Ue$;
Has tho real fine tart flavor char?
acteristlc of the imported; ? Vt
_ " usual price 20c,

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