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Richmond times-dispatch. [volume] (Richmond, Va.) 1914-current, September 01, 1918, Image 23

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REIT OUTPOURINGS
OF FINS IT EXPECTED
orld's Series Games Were Never
Played Under Such Circum
stances llefore.
SUM 1 OR PLAYERS
r'inning Team Members Will Re
ceive $2,000 unci Losers J? 1,400
Each?Part of Proceeds Go to
First-Division Teams.
[By Associated Prrss.]
NEW YORK. August 31.?While
either gate receipts nor attendance
^figures are expected to be broken at
ithe coming world aeries, baseball fans
throughout the country are certain to
jjVatch the daily returns with more than
^ ?.ihe usual Interest, owing to the
^Changed conditions under which the
iierles will be played. Two outstand- :
?Ing features art apparent which have i
;taot heretofore been faced by either tne I
players or the magnates at any time
!nn the history of the baseball classic.
j-J No euch national or international
?j'Crisis has ever prevailed during the
playing of a world series as exists at j
.this time. Under normal conditions the
{"annual clash of the pennant-winning
clubs of the rival major leagues has
*(M.ch season been one of the events oi
i.ihe year. The play was followed each
^d&y by liundrcds of thousands of base- ,
ball enthusiasts in all parts of the
^country. Great cities and little hamlets j
isolated sections of the continent
have witnessed the daily gathering of
^ 'ttfrongs before the bulletin and player
boards to follow the fortunes of the
competing teams. To-day the mind or
?.the public is burdened with great re
sponsibilities and cares, and the world t
/series at best can be but a momentary
[diversion.
tf&UTPOLItl.NG OF I'ltK VIOL'S
VKAItS IS .NOT KXI'ECTEn
SM.Under the circumstances. It appears
certain that, while the games tnay r>e
-tajoll attended, there win be nothing
like -the great outpouring of ran* .
which have each year rtlled the pari;*
ic capacity and swelled tn<* coffers or
? the clubs and players, strange to say,
thla Will make little dilTerencc to the
' who will participate in the dia
mond battles, for under the new system
of apportioning the winner's an?l
individual share of the receipts tney
tepn secure but .a liKed sum, regardless
spf the total of the gate receipts.
? As adopted last winter by the two
^leagues and the national commission.
4*he amended regulations provide that
sach member of the winning club shall
receive $2,000 as his share or the world <
lerieH proceeds, while the loser's in
dividual end will amount to $1,400. The
^ftotai of these sums will come from '
?Sthe usual CO per rent of the gate r?--'
Jceipts for the first four games of the
^series. The new arrangement, however,
'iicalls for^ a further distribution of the
{.balance of this 60 per rent fund amon?
ithe players of the three clubs whlcn
?finish the pennant race of both leagues,
^respectively, second, third and fourth.
jfi After the money apportioned to tne
Jplnyers of tin- two competing teams
ihas been deducted from the original CO
per cent, the residue will be divided
upon the following b.-.sis: to tne players
of the National and American League,
clubs finishing second in their respec
tive pennant race. 50 per cent; to the
third place clubs, 30 per cent, and to
fourth place club.s. 20 per cent.
I This new arrangement does not af
i feet the club owners or the national
[ commission, however, for tne old rule
(of distribution still prevails. Of the
i 40 per cent of the gate receipts of the
first four games, the national commts- .
| aion will receive 10 per cent and tiie
i club owners 30 per cent. After ."our
games have been staged the player*
cease to participate in the distribution,
and the national commission will re
ceive 10 per cent and the club ? wners
90 per cent. The winning and losing
clubs are called upon, nowev.-r,
divide 25 per cent of their world .-erii-.s
Share with the other seven clubs .;i
their respective leagues.
$EDGAR MOSS WINS OVER
I WELL-KNOWN TRAPSHOOTER
Time l.escer (Irrmnn 11ns Ever
Ilreii Donned ()?rr Worn
Kml Trap*.
Twenty-four tnen shot ;it the West
End Gun Club yesterday, including six ;
professional trapshots and two out-of
town amateurs', Lieutenant Land, of
Norfolk, and Colonel Buck Langhorn,
of Albemarle County. The high card
was turned In by Edgar Moss, who I
trimmed Lester German, the greatest I
professional shot in the East. This
is the lirst time German was ever '
beaten over the West End traps. Hu
bert Fox, from Lynchburg, was the
next professional to German, Shorty
Storr and Jim Anderson tying on for
ty-five. Jim said it did him good to
beat Sam Goodloe and was sorry Jim
Cornell failed to come to get his. Butrk
Langhorne said he had been working
Sam upon his farm ^his week and
found he was no better shooter than
he was a farmer. The West Enders are !
all going down to City Point Monday J
to participate in the Virginia Trap- j
shooters' annual tourney.
The scores made yesterday follow: j
Weekly scores?class leaders: A, .
Swartwout; runner-up. Boyd. B, Tay- 1
lor; runner-up, Chalkley. C, Street, j
Jr.; runner-up, Rueger.
f Legs on the Grundy. John Mason j
^ and News Leader cups won by Duncan, 1
Cabell, Crenshaw, Street. Jr.
Points on Hotel Rueger, Jefferson 1
and Nowlan cups won by Swartwout,
3; Street and Boyd, 2 each; Crenshaw,
Taylor, Duncan, McGrath, Bostock,
Eanes. Chalkley, 1 each.
Hercules long run. Boyd.
'l " .ont surprise, Taylor.
? Kioss broke 49 out of 50; 'German.
48; Swartwout, 4S; ?Fox, 4"; Cren
shaw, 45; Lieutenant Laird (visitor),
45; *Storr, 45; 'Anderson, 45; ?Goodloe,
44; Boyd, 44; Taylor, 44; Chalyley, 44;
Cabell, 43; Duncan, 42; McGrath, 42;
Bostock, 42; Grundy, 41; Street, Jr.. 41;
Eanes, 39; Jones, 39; Rueger, 3S; Flip- j
pen, 35; Langhorne (visitor), 34; Had
erslnk, 33.
?Professionals.
Next shoot Saturday, September 7. 1
P. M.
SARATOGA RESULTS
Vlrnt race?six furlongs?Sandman II., 122
(Lunnford). 6 to 1. ft to 2. 6 to 5, won; The
Masquerader. 121 (I,yke). 4 to 1. 8 to 5,
7 to 10, second; Cliolr Master. 112 (Johnson),
8 to 1, 3 to 1, 8 to f>. third. Time, 1:14 2-5.
Ar.nlc Edgar, Dlmliri. Broom Peddler.
Crumpsn.ll, Seagull, King John and Katie
Canal aiso.ran.
Second race?about two miles and a half?
St. Charlcote. 157 (Smoot), 13 to 10. 1 to 2.
out, won: Bet, US (Williams), 16 to 5. even,
out, second; The Brook. ISO (Crawford!,
5- to 2, 7 to 10. out. third. Time. 0:1S 3-5.
Kingstown Pier also ran.
Third race ?six furlongs ? Btrrnal. IIS
(Schuttinger), 1C lo 5. S to 3. 4 to ft. won;
: Daydue, 115 (Lunsfonl), 2o to 1. 8 to 1.
4 to 1. second: War Marvel. 115 (I.oftus).
8 to 1. 3 to 1, 8 tb 5. third. Time. 1:13 3-5.
CennuH, War Pennant, Delaware, I.ady
Rosebud, 8tar Hampton. Mormon. Pigeon
Wing, Vlndex. Sweep On. Star Realm. Ter
entla, Questionnaire. flam Dial, Grimalkin.
Sir Barton, Zulelka and Roii^ri also ran.
Fourth rare-mile and rhree-onarters?
Johren. 113 (Robinson). 1 to 2, Out. out.
won; Roamer, 127 (Schuttinger), S to 5. out
out. recond. Time, i:3i a-5
m'lo-Sands of Pleasure,
? (Pool), I to 1 3 to 2. 7 to 10. won; Peer
less -One. 107 (I.unsfordl. S to ]. 3 to 1
? to B, second; Oypsy Queen. 112 (Smith),'
J3 to 6. even, 20 to 5. third. Timo, 1:41 2-5
Monomoy, Peep Sight and Waukeag also
'"Hongs-Madras Olngham.
vLi;i iip 2. even 2 too. won; Mia*
Bradamant? aUo j-an.
World Series Games Since 1 903 Have Earned
More Than $3,300,000 for Clubs and Players
The following: tabulation shows the
of same each year since 1903:
world series receipts ami divisions
Year.
?1003
19 OS
1906
1907
19 08
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
19 1C
1917
lames.
8
5
6
80
Attend.
100.120
91.723
99,845
78.068
62.232
1 15.295
121.222
179,851
251,901
150,992
111,009
143,351
162,859
186.654
1.887,431
Receipts
% 50.000
68,4 05
106,550
101,728
94,976
188.302
173.980
342.164
490,4 49
325,980
225,739
320,361
385,590
425,878
$3,300,102
Clubs'
Share,
t 17.388
34 170
62,493
36.622
39.363
102,54 7
77,510
180.217
293.832
158.218
81.266
143,426
'184,104
230.101
$ 1,64 l,5a7
Players'
Share.
$ 32,612
27.394
33,402
54,933
46.115
66,925
79,072
127.91 1
14 7,572
135.162
121.898
144,900
162,927
152,888
Jl.333,711
National
Commission.
* ' '6.841
10.655
10,173
9.498
1 8.830
17,398
34.036
49.045
32.598
22,573
32,036
38,550
4 2,587
1324,829
?Not played under National Commissoin rules.
TYRUS RAYMOND COBB !
HOLllS BITTING LEfto!
!
Babe Rutli, und Walker, of Phila
dclpliia, Remain Tied for
Home-Run Honors.
WIIKAT LEADS IN NATION* AI
But Roush, of Cincinnati, Is Pressin ?
Him Hard for Hatting Honors, and
Decision Will Not He Readied Un
til Close of Monday's Games.
[By Associated Prt?8.]
CHICAGO. August 31.?Captain Tyrus
Raymond Cobb, who this w?>? k stepped
from the spotlight of baseball into the
chemical division of the army, took j
with him the 131S batting honors of'
the American League.
Ah the Detroit star stood bowing be
fore the failing curtain of the game,
fandom realized that be had taken these
lirst honors every year since 1912, with
the exception of one occasion, when In
IS Hi Tr.s Speaker nosed hiin out.
Cobb's average, according to figures
teleased to-day. is .377. Burns, of
Philadelphia, is second with .346. and
George Sisler. the St. Louis first base
man, third, with .337.
Cobb, however, did not excel In base
stealing, for Sisler, with a total of
forty, leads by six over the Georgian. ;
Chapman, of Cleveland, sandwiched be-!
tween them with thirty-six. Chapman
is leading In sacrifice hitting, with
thirty-four, while Shean. of Boston, is j
close up with thirty-three, and Me
In n is, .-"bean's teammate next with
thirty.
Babe Ruth, the Boston star, and
Walker, of Philadelphia, remain tied
for honors in home-run hitting with
eleven each. Boston. 191S champion.,
leads the league in club fielding with
an average of . I* 71. but is sixth in
team batting with ."46. Cleveland, the
runner-up in the race, tops the league
in batting with .260. Leading batters:
Cobb, Detroit, .377: Burns, Philadelphia, :
,34tl; Sisler. St. Louis, .337: Speaker.
Cleveland. .321; Plpp. New York, .304;!
Wood. Cleveland, .303; Baker, New
York, .301.
IJECIDE NATIONAL
l.KAfi I 10 HONORS MONDAY
Patting honors In the National
League nee probably will not be de- '
cided until the tinal games of the sea
son Monday. Kddie Roush, the Cin
cinnati star. Is pressing Zack Wheat,
the Brooklyn veteran, for the lead, ac
cording to to-day's averages, which in
clude games of Wednesday. Wheat's
?r.nrk is .341. Roush is three points
behind him. There are only two mem
bers of the Chicago cluo, champions
of the league, in the select group of
3"0 hitters. They are Hollocher, the
youthtul shortstop, and Merkle. who.
considering his playing record of this
season, will forever silence those who
dubbed him a "bonehcad." Hollocher.
with an average of .320. dropped into
fourth place, relinquishing third to
Heinle firoh, of Cincinnati.
Max Carey, of Pittsburgh, is certain
to finish the race with base-stealing
honors. He has stolen fifty-five base3. J
while George Burns, of New York, next
in the list, has thirty-nine.
ROUSH IS LEADING
SACRIFICE HITTERS
Roush is the leading sacrifice hitter,
his total of thirty-three giving him a
lead of five over Mollwitz, of Pitts-,
burgh.
In home-run hitting Cravath, of
Philadelphia, tops the list with seven.;
Cincinnati is in first place In team hit
ting with an average of .27S, while
Chicago is second with .267. Chicago
also is second in team fielding. New
York leading with .971.
Leading batters:
Z. Wheat. Brooklyn, .341; Roush, Cin
cinnati, .338; Groh, Cincinnati, .333;
Hollocher. Chicago, .320; J. C. Smith.
Boston, .313: Daubert. Brooklyn. .313;
Merkle, Chicago, .304; Burns. New York.
.290: Young. New York, .234: Hornsb/,:
St. Louis. .292.
THREE-ROUND BOUT
WrMtllni; Match to lie Stnjced To-Mor
row Mght in I)u Pout Club
at Hopewell.
Three six-round bouts and a finish
wrestling match will mark the open
ing to-morrow night of the Du Pont
Club at Hopewell.
Paddie Mills, of San Francisco, lit
tle aggressive ' Westerner and former
pupil of Tom Sharkey ana Frankie!
Kice, whose home is in Baltimore, are.
t'o meet in the main bout. Mills has '<?
been in the ring ten months and has'
defeated every opponent lie has faced.
Reports of Rice carry all the indi
cations that Mills will have all he
wants for six rounds.
Mickey Brooks, of Baltimore, who
has been acting as Kid Williams's
sparring partner for some time and
who is a right and hard-hitting little
scrapper, will take oti Buck Stone.
Stong is a willing mixer and never
fails to give mat fans a good, fast
fight.
Billy Wollsieffer, the fast and clever
little Richmonder, whose prowess is
well known to local fans, will tackle
young Ketchell, of Newark, N. J., now
with the United States Navy at the
Norfolk Navy-Yard.
The wrestling match will be between
Fritz Hanson, one of the toughest,
cleverest and most scientific grapplers
in the game, and Zeke Smith, who
some months ago wrestled to a draw
with Hanson before a packed house
In the Academy of Music.
Indications point to a large attend
ance of Richmond fans. The first bout
will be staged promptly at 8:45 o'clock.
TWO RICHMONDERS TIE
FOR CHAMPIONSHIP
Pope Senln, of Hermitage Club, and
S. M. Morton, at Country Club.
Meet nt Ijynrhburg.
J By Associated Prosn. J
TiYNCHBURO, VA., August 31.?J.
Pope Seals, of the Hermitage Club,
Richmond, present title-holder, and S.
M. Morton, of the Country Club of
Virginia. Richmond, each with a score
of 169, tied for the Individual State
championship in the iVirglnla State
Golf Tournament, which opened h4re
to-day, Tho tie will be playeo orr
Monday, when 'the team championship
' also will bo played.
RED SOX ARE PINNING !
FAITH TO "BABE" RUTH
Manager Ed. Barrow Counting on
Big C'loutcr to Oirset Chi
cago's Strength.
CUBS HAVE EDGE IX HURLERS
Behind Plate Windy City Aggrega
tion Is Again Supreme?In Bar
ting Boston Seems to Be Much the
Stronger Team.
NBW YORK, August 31.?It's an even
money bet to-day that "Babe" Hutu
will be the home-run hero of the 191S
world's series.
Although the curtailment of tne
baseball season this year robbed the
Boston southpaw swatamlth of an op- j
portunity to break the nomer records,
lie has promised to equal or surpass ;
Benny KaufT's circuit clouting I" the
annual classic this year. Ruth's
mighty bat must be reckoned with as
a factor in comparing me relative
strength of the Bed Sox and Cubs as
they line up for tile fray.
Manager Kd. Barrow Is counting on
Buth to do double duty during the
series for the championship. Tie will
probably ask Ruth to pi ten at least one
of the games, and to take his place ?n !
thp line-up. either in center Held or at
the initial sack on his "off" days.
The pitchers who will work for the
Cubs will be big Jim Vaughn. Lefty j
Tyler. Claude Hendrix ana Phil IJouc- i
las. Carter as a fifth choice may be'
used If needed Manager Mitchell i?.;
reported to think well of this youngster
and may start him in one of the con-!
tests afw'r his "aces" have been given!
a trial.
Opposed to this pitching staff. Bar- j
row will have "Bullet" Joe Bush to
lead off. Mays, Jones and Ruth. As
substitutes he may call upon Kinney,
and Pertica. Jones has had the best
season of his major league career, and'
will probably be given an early airing
against the Cubs. If Barrow was a
little better supplied with dependable
twirlers. he would be able to allow!
Buth to devote his attention to his bat-j
ting eye instead of his pitching arm.
After a survey of the opposing:
pitchers, it might be said that the Cubs
have the edge on their Eastern oppon
ents in this department. But. of course.
It cannot be guaranteed that the "In
vincible three"?Vaughn. Tyler and
Hendrix?will be able to stand up under
the fire of the American League bats
men.
CI" IIS AG AIX SII'RKMF,
UBIIIND THE PI.ATE
Behind the plate the Cubs are again
supreme. There is no doubt that Bill
Killifer is the best backstop in the
game at the present time. In this
position the Sox will have Agnew as
the regular, with Mayer or Schang for
relief. O'Farrell will be comparatively}
evenly matched with either Mayer or
Schang as a secondary defense in this i
position.
The Sox infield line-up is yet a little
uncertain. That is. It is uncertain
whether Ruth will cover the initial
hag or play in the outtield. In the
event he is used as a fence guard. Bar
row will be compelled to depend on
Truesdale or Cochran to cover third,
shifting "Stuffy" Mclnnis to first. Scott
and Shean will occupy the two remain
ing positions of the first line of ae-!
fense.
Against this line-up in the infield'
the Cubs will have Merkle at first.
Zeider at second, Hollocner at short
and either Deal, McCaoe or Pick at
the far corner.
As to the comparative strength or
the infield, there can be very little
said, except that, if Ruth is covering
first for the Sox, they will have tne
edge.
In the outfield the Sox will have
Harry Hooper, Amos StrunK and Ruth,
or one of the utility players. Prob
ably Schang will lie assigned to tne
parade grounds in the event that Rutn
is used at some other place in the
line-up.
The Cubs will have Leslie Mann, Max
Flark and Paskert in the outfield.
While the Cubs present a strong
force in the outfield, none of the three
Mitchell will depend upon are as strong
at bat as Hooper or Strunk.
As to batting, the ?all-important fac
tor. it looks as though the Sox will be
supreme. While the Cubs have been
hitting hard all season, one of the chief
reasons for their ability to hit may be
attributed to the low quality of pitch-]
ing they have faced in the National i
League. Unless the Cubs do some ex- 1
traordinary swatting in the. series, it
seems the offensive of the Boston club
will be the stronger of the two.
GRAND CIRCUIT RACES
Meeting nt KrnUvIllr CIo?m nnd "Ilig
Line" Trnttcra (io to
llnrtford.
[Bv Associated Press. I
READVIL.L.E, MASS.. August 31.?
Bay State and circuit driving club
horses had the track tn themselves this
afternoon, when the final day's meeting
of the grand circuit was held here. In
order to reach Hartford for the grand
circuit opening Monday and the big
Labor Day stakes, the "big line" trot
ters and pacers had to be shipued this
morning.
Forest B. won the 2:14 trot in
straight heats, coming to the front in
each heat after trailing to the last
turn.
Patrick Duluth won a seven-heat
race in the class for 2:1S trotters, lead
ing Kosa Watts home in the final mile.
The Metropolitan for four-year-old
trotters, owned by members of the Met
ropolitan Driving Club, of Boston, was
won by Leonard C., driven and owned
by E. S. Crossman.
Summaries:
2:14 class, trotting; purse, $500:
Forest B (Gillies) 1 1 1
Earlwood L?. (Dore) 2 2 3
Sir Todd, II. (Proctor) 5 5 2
Worthy Blngen (Crozier) 3 3 3
Prinelda (Ralston) .4 4 4
Best time, 2:10 1-4.
2:18 class, trotting; purse, $1,000:
Patrick Duluth (Crozler).4 3 2 1 1 4 1
Rosa Watts (Dore) 2 1 3 2 3 1 2
Mary Magowan (Cross
man) 1 2 4 3 4 3ro
Peter Hopeful (Gillies)...3 4 1 4 3 2ro
Atlanta Peter (Atkin-.
i son) die
Best', time, 2:10 1-4.
PHILLIES AND BRAVES
DIVIDE DOUBLE BILL
Cubs, Pennant Safe, Slacken Speed
and Are Beaten Again
by Reds.
GIANTS AND DODGKItS SPLIT
Philadelphia Hut One Point Behind
Supc:*bns in Fight for Fifth Place.
Pittsburgh-St. Louis Contest Can
celed by Ha in.
2 ]
1 0
1-13 0
riJV Associated Press 1
PHILADELPHIA. August 31.?Phila
delphia and Boston divided to-day's
double-header, the Braves winning the
first, game. 5 to 2. in the eleventh in
tdne and the second game ending ?j to
2 in favor of the Phillies. Score:
I**I It ST (i A.UK
lto.nl on
AB. H. O. A. E.
Herzog. 2b a " it 1
Taggart. If 4 ?> 3 0 0
Chadbourne, cf 4 1 3 0 1
Terry, ss 4 0 4 5 0
Smith. 3b 5 0 0
Konetehy, lb 5 l 17
Wagner, c 5 1 4
Kawlings, rf. 3 1 0 0 0
Nehf, p 4 1 0 5 0
Totals 33 y 33 25 3
Philadelphia
AB. H. O. A. E.
Bancroft, ss 2 0 4 7 2
Williams, cf 5 0 2 0 0
Stock. 3b 4 2 5 7 0
l.uderus, lb 5 1 12 10
Meusel. 2b 5 4 2 1 1
Cravath. rf 4 0 2 1 0
Fitzgerald. If {.. 5 0 2 0 0
Adams, c 5 1 4 0 0
Prendergast, p. ......... 4 0 0 1 1
Totals 30 8 33 18 4
Score by Innings: 11.
Boston Ooo 0200000 3?5
Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0?2
Summary: Runs?Taggart. Terry.
Smith, Konetehy, Wagner. Buderus,
Meusel. Two-base hits?Meusel (2).
Home runs?Konetehy, Wagner, Meu
sel. Stolen base?Smith. Sacrifice hits
?Chadbourne, Kawlings. Double plays
?Terry. Herzog. Konetehy and Terry;
Bancroft and Buderus, Stock and Ban
croft. Left on bases?Boston, 5; Phila
delphia. 'J. First base on errors?Bos
ton, 2; Philadelphia, 1. Bases on balls
?By Nehf, 5; by Prendergast. 2. Struck
out?By Nehf, 2; by Prendergast, 1.
Wild pitches?Prendergast. 2.
SECOND GAME.
Boston.
AB. H. O. A. E.
llerzog, 2b 4 3 3 7 0
Taggart, If 4 1 1 0 0
Chadbourne. cf 4 0 3 0 0
Terry, ss 4 1 3 ti 0
Smith, 3b 4 0 1 2 0
Konetehy, lb 4 3 13 0 0
Wtgner, c 4 1 0 1 1
Kawlings. rf. 4 1 0 1 0
Crandall, p 4 0 0 1 0
Totals 36 10 24 18 1*
Philadelphia.
AB. H. O. A. E.
Bancroft, ss 3 0 4 4 2
Williams, cf 4 3 1 0 0
Stock. 3b 4 3 3 1 0
Luderus. lb 3 0 12 1 0
Meusel. 2b 4 1 1 1 0
Cravath. rf 4 2- 3 0 0
Fitzgerald, If 4 3 1 0 -0
Adams, c 4 0 2 0 0
Hogg, p 4 2 0 5 0
Totals 34 14 27 12 2
Score by Innings: R.
Boston 0 0010001 0?2
Philadelphia 1 1000130 *?6
Summary: Runs ? Herzog. Smith. Ban
croft < 2), Williams. Stock. Meusel.
Cravath. Two-base hits?Herzog. Ko
netehy, Williams. Three-base hit?
Stock. Home run?Cravath. Sacrifice
hit?Luderus. Double plays?Herzog,
Terry and Konetehy (2). Hogg, Ban
croft and Luderus (2), Hogg. Luderus
and Adams. I.eft on bases?Boston, 7;
Philadelphia, C. First base on errors?
Boston. 2. Bases on halls?off Cran
dall. 1. Struck out?by Hogg, 1. Wild
pitch?Hogg.
REDS BEST LEADERS
(By Associated Press. J
CHICAGO. August 31.?Cincinnati
got an even break on the series with
Chicago by batting out an S-to-4 vic
tory in the final game. The score:
Cincinnati.
AB. H. O. A. E.
Groh, 3b 5 1 2 0 0
Neale. cf 4 3 5 0 0
Cueto, If 5 110 0
S. Magee. lb 4 3 12 0 0
Griffith, rf 4 1 2 0 0
L. Magee, Sb 3 0 0 2 1
Blackburne, ss 3 12 4 0
Wingo. c 4 1 2 0 0
Luque, p 4 2 1 3 0
Totals 36 13 27 9 1
Chicago.
AB. H. O. A. E.
Flack, rf 5 1 3 0 0
Hollocher. ss 3 1 4 3 0
Mann, If 5 3 0 0 0
Paskert, cf 4 0 3 0 0
Merkle. lb 3 0 15 0 0
Pick. 2b 3 0 0 2 0
Deal. 3b 4 0 1 4 0
Killifer. c 3 1 1 2 1
Douglas, p 3 1 0 3 1
?Barber 1 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 7 27 14 1
?Batted for Douglas in ninth.
Score by h nings: R.
Cincinnati 4 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2?S
Chicago 1 0000020 1?4
Summary: Runs?Groh (2), Neale
(3). Cueto, S. Magee. Grifiith. Hol
locher (2). Mann. Douglas. Two-base
hits?S. Magee, Griffith, Mann. Neale.
Stolen bases?Neale, S. Magee. Hol
locher (3), Mann. Sacrifice hits?L.
Magee. Neale. Sacrifice fly?S. Magee.
Double play?Luque and S. Magee. Left
on bases?Cincinnati, fi: Chicago, D.
First base on errors?Chicago. 1: Cin
cinnati. 1. Bases on balls?off I u<pK\
fi; off Douglas 1. Hit by pitcher?bv
Douglas. 1. Struck out?by Doughy,
1: by Luque. 2. Wild pitches?by Lu
que, 1; by Douglas. 1.
EACH CAPTURES ONE
I By Associated Press.1
NEW YORK, August 31.?New York
anil Brooklyn to-day broke even in a
double-header at the Polo grounds.
Tho Giants took the lirst game, 3 to 1.
and the Brooklyns captured the second
2 to 1. The scores:
rmsT game;.
Brooklyn,
AB. H. O. A. E
Johnston, rf 4 1 1 0 0
Olson, ss 3 1 1 3 1
Daubert, lb 4 0 12 0 0
Z Wheat. If 4 1 1 0 0
Myers, cf 3 0 2 0 0
O'Mara, 3b 3 0 2 3 0
Doolan, 2b 3 0 3 5 0
M. Wheat, c 3 12 0 0
Grimes, p 3 0 0 1 0
Cheney, p 0 0 0 I 0
Totals 30 4 24 13 1
New York,
AB. H. O. A. E.
Burns, cf 4 0 3 0 0
Young, rf 4 2 2 0 0
Doyle, 2b 4 2 1 1 0
Fletcher, ss 4 1 1 4 0
Zimmerman, 3b 3 I t l 0
Compton. If 4 1 7 0 0
Klrke, lb 4 1 10 0 1
McCarty, 4 2 2 1 0
Toney, 4 1 0*4 o
Totals 35 11 27 11 1
SiTnro by innings: r.
Brooklyn 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0?1
New York 10000002 *?3
Summary: Huns?Johnson. Young
(2), Doyle. Two-baso hits?M. Wheat.
Three-base hit?Younff. Sacrifice hit
?Olson. Double play?Doolan and
(Continued on Seond Page.)
By Taking First tianie of Double
Header They Assure
Leadership.
NATIONALS DEFEAT YANKEES
Cleveland Also Wins, Taking Listle9.
Contest From White Sox, W'.it
Ixjse Top I'lace of Second Division
to St. Louis?Itrowns Win.
fBv Asaoctat'd Press.!
BOSTON, August 31.?Boston clinch
ed#the American League pennant the
tirBt game of to-day's double-header
from Philadelphia, C to 1. with Ruth
holding the visitors t,o three lilts. Wat
son, who was hit freely throughout the
opener, pitched all of the second game.
He held Boston to one hit and Phila
delphia won. 1 to 0. The scores:
FIRST CAME.
Philadelphia.
AB. H. O. A. E.
Jamieson, rf 4 1 - 1 0
Kopp, If 4 0 1 1 0
Aeosta, cf 2 0 2 1 0
Burns, lit 4 - 11 1 0
Gardner, 3b 3 U 0 1 0
l'erkins, e 3 0 3 4 0
Dykes. 2b 3 0 3 a 1
Dugan, ss 2 0 2 1 0
Watson, p 3 0 0 3 U
Totals 2S 3 24 18 1
Ronton.
AB. II. O. A. E.
Hooper, rf 3 1110
.Shean. 2b 3 1 3 3 1
Strunk. cf 2 2 3 0 0 1
Kuth, p 4 2 0 4 0'
Melnnis, lb 4 3 14 0 0
Scott, ss 3 1 2 6 0 ;
Cochran, 3b 3 1 0 3 0
Schang, c 4 0 4 1 0
While man. If 1 1 0 0 0
Totals 27 12 27 18 1
Score by innings: R.
Philadelphia 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0?1
Boston 01113000 *?6
Summary: Huns?Kopp. Hooper,
Kuth, Mclnnis (2), Whiteman (2). Two
base hit?Mclnnis, Whiteman, Kuth.
Stolen base?Kopp, Aeosta. Sacrifice
hit?Hooper. Scott, Shean. Double
play?Hooper to Scott to Shean: Dykes
to Burns; Shean to Scott to Mclnnis;
Burns to Dugan to Burns. Left on
base?Boston, 0; Philadelphia, 4. First
base on errors?Boston, 1; Philadelphia,
1. Bj.se on balls?oft Watson, 5; off
Kuth. 4. Struck out?by Kuth. 3; by
Watson, 1.
SECOND game.
l'lilludclphla.
AB. H. O. A. E.
Jamieson. rf 3 0 5 0
Kopp, If 3 1 I
Aeosta, cf 4 1 4
Burns, lb 5 1 11
Gardner, 3b 5 4 0 4 0
Perkins, c 4 0 2 I 0
Dykes, 2b 4 1 0 2 0
Dugan. S3 3 0 4 1 0
Watson, p 4 0 0 2 1
Totals 35 8 27 12 1
Ronton.
AB. H. O A. E.
Hooper, rf 3 0 3 1 0
Whiteman, rf 1 0 1 0
Shean, 2b 3 0 1 1
Strunk, cf 1 0 0 0 ?
Kuth, cf 2 0 2 0 0
Miller, If 3 0 2 0
Mclnnis. lb 3 0 10 0 u
Scott, ss 2 0 1 2 0
Cochran, ss 1 0 0 0 1
Coffey, 3b 3 0 1 1 1
Agnew, c 2 1 3 1 0
Mayer, c 1 0 2 0 0
Bush, p 1 0 1 3 1
Kinney, p 0 0 0 2 0
?Schang 1 0 0 0 0
Totals 27 1 27 11 3
?Batted for Kinney in ninth.
Score by innings: R.
Philadelphia 00000100 0?1
Boston 00000000 0?a
Summary: Run?Kopp. Double
play?Hooper to Mclnnis. Left on b.iHo
?Philadelphia, 13; Boston. 1. First
base on errors?Philadelphia, 1; Bos
ton. 1. Bases on balls?off Watson, 1;
eft Bush, 2; off Kinney, !. Hits?off
Bush. 7 In C innings. Hit by pitcher?
by Kinney (Dugan). Struck jut?bv
Watson. 1; by Bush. 3; by Kinney, 1.
Passed ball?Mayer, 1. Losing pitcher
? Rnsh.
0
0
0
1 0
1 0
0 0
INDIANS BEST CHICAGO
CHICAGO, August 31.?Cleveland,
beat Chicago. - to 1. to-day in a list
less game. President James Dunn an
nounced to-day that his team will dis
bnnd to-morrow night and not go to
St. Louis for a Labor Day double
header. The score:
Cleveland.
A B. H. O. A. E.
Bescher, rf 3 1 1 1
Chapman, ss 3 0 2 1
Speaker, cf 4 0 4 1
Wood, If 3 0 1 0
Johnston, lb 3 1 10 1
Turner, 2b 4 0 2 2
Evans. 3b 3 2 0 2
O'Neill, c 3 1 7 2
Enzman, p 3 0 0 2
Totals 29 5 27 12 0
ChlenRO.
A.B. H. O. A. E.
Good, cf 4 1 4 0 0
Lcibold. if 3 12 0 0
Weaver, ss 4 2 1 3 0
Gandil, lb 4 0 12 0 0
Collins, rf 4 2 0 0 0
Mostil, 2l> 4 1 4 4 0
Pinelli, 3b 4 0 14 0
Schalk, c 2 12 10
DeVermer. c 2 1 0 1 0
Russell, p 3 2 1 2 0
Totals 34 11 27 15 0
Score by innings: R.
Cleveland 1 0001 000 0?2
Chicago 0000000 0 1?I
Summary: Runs?Beschcr, Evans.
Collins. Two-base hits?Mostil, Schalk.
Good. Collins. Three-base hit?O'Neill.
Sacrifice hit ? Russell. Sacrifice fly?
Wood. Double plays?Pinelli, Mostil
and Gandil; Speaker and O'Neill. Left
on base?Cleveland, 3; Chicago, S.
Bases on halls?Russell, 4; Enzmann.
1. Struck out?by Russell, 2; Enzman,
3.
BROWNS DEFEAT TIGERS
[By Associated Press.]
ST. LOUIS. August 31.?Hard and
timely hitting by Tobln, Sisler and
Smith enabled St. Louis to beat De
troit to-day in the first of a three
game series, 5 to 3. Score:
Detroit.
AB. II. O. A. E.
Bush, ss 3 0 1 3 0
R. Jones, 3b 4 0 2 2 0
Cobb, cf 5 3 1 0 0
Veach, If 4 0 3 1) 0
Griggs, lb 4 2 14 0 0
Harper, rf 4 0 10 0
Vltt, 2b 4 0 2 4 0
Spencer, c 4 3 0 0 0
Kallto, p 3 1 0 4 0
?Cunningham 1 0 0 0 0
Totals 36 9 24 13 0
St. Louis.
AB. H. O. A. E.
Tobin, If 4 2-1-0 0
Johns, 3b 2 0 2 2 0
SlHler, lb 4 2 13 1 0
Demmltt, rf 3 I 0 0 0
Smith, cf 4 2 3 0 0
Gedeon, 2b 4 1 3 4 0
Austin, ss 4 2 2 3 1
Severeid, c 3 0 3 1 0
i Rogers, p 3 0 0 3 0
Totals 31 10 27 14 0
?Batted for Kulllo In ninth.
Summary: Runs?Bush (2). Cobb.
Tobin (2). Sisler, Demmltt, Smith.
Two-bawo hits?Smith (2). Tobln. Sla
[ (Continued on So:ond Pago.)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
YKSTRH HAY'S RRRUl.Tit.
Nnv York. 3: nrookl.vn. 1 (flr*t cam*).
Now York. I: Itrooklvn. 2 (?eeond came).
I'hilailrluliia. 2; Ho-ton. ."> (tlrnt Kumr).
rlillaiifliililu. <>: Boston. 2 (second jump).
Clilcueo. 4: (inrlnnali. K.
I'lttsburcli-St. I*ouin (ruin).
VlAAliiAG UK TtlU CM-US.
'.Von l??l. Prt
Chicago Hi 41 .651
New York 70 5? .571 ,
Pittsburgh CI AH .52.%
Cincinnati 04 00 .510
ltrooklyn 55 ?H .417,
t'lilluileluhlu 54 <>7 .440!
Boston 53 70 .431
St. Louis 51 74 .408
OAMKS TO-DAY.
I'lttsburih at Cblcnco.
St. l/oul.t at Cincinnati.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
TESTKRDAY'S RF.Sn.TS.
Boston. 0; i'lillndclnlilii. I (first came),
llimlon. 0; I'lillMilctiiliiit. 1 (second Kiime).
\\ aslilnutun. 0; >en York. 3.
St. l.otiW. 5; Detroit, il.
Cleveland. 2: CIUcuko. 1
MAAuiAu Or' 1*1 IC CLUBS.
Won. Lo>U Pet.
Bonton 74 ."0 .507
Cleveland 72 .">4 .571
WuslilnEton 70 55 .500
New York M KI .402
St. I.ouis 57 03 .475
CIiIcuko 57 Ui .471
Detroit 52 70 .426
Philadelphia 51 75 .405
UAMKS TO-DAY.
Cleveland at Chicago.
Detroit nt St. IxiuK
MURRAY WILL PLAY TILDEN
OR KUMAGAE FOR TITLE
C'allfornian Winn Way to Flnnl Round.
Ilia ittval to Be Ascertained
.Mondny.
fBy Associated Press.1
FOREST li IL-US. X. Y? August 31.?
R. Llndley Murray, California, repre
senting the Niagara Kails Tennis Club,
won his way Into the final round of the
annual turf court championships here
to-day, and Tuesday will meet either I
\V. T. Tiiden, Jr., of Philadelphia, or
Ichiya Ivurnagae for titular honors.
Murray won his place In the final by
defeating S. Howard Voshell, national
indoor champion, of Hrooklyn, 6-4, 6-3,
!>-6.
Kumagae advanced from the fifth
round to the semifinal at the expense
of L.yle E. Mahan, winning at 4-6, 0-3,
0-0, 0-1.
The Japanese will play Tiiden on
Monday.
Conditions were far from favorable
for fast play this afternoon. The larg
est gallery of the week gathered for
th? two matches, however, and were
lewarded by homo spectacular playing.
Murray easily held the upper hand in
the first two sets, but with the match
: turning against him in the third set,
j Voshell litted his game to remarkable
I heights. and by taking desperate
chances, In which fortune appeared to
f^vor his play, ran into a lead of 4-2.
It appeared as though the match would
go into extra sets, but at this stage
Murray changed his tactics and an
chored himself as the barrier, and by
spread-eagling first at one side and
then at the other, Murray's great ag 1
ity and net smashing,, combined with
his service acelng, finally gave him the
load at 7-6.
Kumagae's victory over Mahan was
much more easily won. The tall New
Yorker appeared utterly unable to con
trol his strokes during the play, and
the Japanese was not any better in
the Initial set, which 'Mahan won at
6-4.
Earlier in the day H. L#. Taylor, of
Brooklyn, won the Junior national
championship by defeating J. llennes
sy, of Indianapolis, at 0-4, 6-2, 6-2.
INTENSIFIED ATHLETICS
AT V. P. I. THIS YEAR
Coach Bcrnler Arrive* and la .Makine
flans for Active
Seauon.
BLACKSBURG, VA? August 31.?
Coach Charles A. Mernler, graduate
manager of athletics and head coach
at Virginia Tech for the coming ses
sion, has arrived in iilacksburg and is
busy perfecting his plans tor the I
coming football campaign.
Everything is being put in order!
for the opening practice, which is I
scheduled for September 5, two days
after the arrival of the Freshmen,
who have been ordered to report for
matriculation on September 3.
The coaching beginning on the above
date will be devoted entirely to the I
new men. Strenuous physical drills
and the football essentials will hold j
sway for the first week. The old foot
ball men will be expected to report I
for practice between September 15 and
20.
The team this year will be made up
almost entirely of freshmen. The
three-letter men who will return are I
Crisp, the one-handed "phenom;"
Lester, his right-hand man in the line, ;
and Doug. Roden, of Richmond, who !
played such a stellar game at end !
last year. Among the old men who
were on last year's squad and will re- ]
turn are, Jim Hardwlck, of Blacks
burg, who was considered a regular |
last year until he Injured his shoulder;
Kldridge, McCann. James, Hitchen*.
Hutchinson, Copenhever and Rice. All I
of these men received guoii iunua-1
mental training last year under the j
present system of coaching, so they 1
should be in line to fill the gaps mude J
by the loss of so many letter men. |
Coach Bernier has been in touch with
a number of prominent prep school j
boys in different parts of the State, and !
all are awaiting the first call to take !
a "once over" at the material from
which the 191S Varsity is to be formed, j
Football at Tech this year will be !
for the small cadet as well as the |
large. Intensified athletics is Bernler's |
hobby and with his ability to develop i
athletics from green material Virginia j
Poly should have a team well up the
standard this year.
DE PALMA MAKES RECORD
Field Day Exhibit of I'ollre Reserve*
at SheepMltcad nay Proven
lllg Invent.
NEW YORK, August 31.?Ralph De
Pnlma. champion of the 1918 automobile
race, made a new record in a race
against time to-day nt the llnal field
day exhibit of, the police reserves at
Sheepshead Bay. lie drove his car
four miles in 2.03, a rate of 117 miles
an hour, thus clipping six seconds
from his previous record of 2.09.
A crowd estimated at fully 125.000
enjoyed the closing events and i'oni
missioner Enright said the success of
the enterprise was fully assured.
Enrico Caruso. John McCormack
and Pasquale Amato gave their ser
vices to the police and sang before
the vast audience to the accompaniment
of an orchestra led by Captain Nathan
Franko.
MISS ROSENTHAL WINS
Defeata Michigan Plnycr for Woman'*
Wratrrn <Jolf Cham
plonnliip.
I Bv Associate.1 Press. 1
CHICAGO, August 31.?Supremo hon
ors of tho Women's Western Oolfing
Association went to Miss Elaine Ro
senthal, of Chicago, for the second time
when she defeated Miss Frances Had
fleld, of Milwaukee. 1 and 3, in the
Pnal round. The champion won the
title in 1015.
The Ravisloe player. In taking the
mantlo from Mrs. F. C. Letts, of In
dian Hill, who was unable to comple'.*
this year, did not display the spectac
ular golf that had marked her game
during tho preceding rounds. Miss
1 Hadfleld was alao oft hor game.
ffllWH STREET WINS
TWO SHUT-OUTS III ROW
Defeats Buttle Axe, 1 to O, and
Other From R. 13. Leo
Juniors, 4 to 0.
SECOND GAME VERY SHORT
lasers Realized Situation and Threw
Up Sponge?Church Hill Bank
Cops Championship in East End
League, Defeating Chlmborazo.
East End League Standings
Won. Lout. Pet.
Chnrch Hill Rnnk... 0 3 .750
Fulton Uno.itor* . . . H 4 .607
Church II111 Cubs... tl 0 .500
Cliimhornzo 1 11 .083
Exhibiting- a fine brand of ball. play
ing fast and snappy, the Randolph
?Street ntfie, won two shutouts yester
day afternoon, one from the strong
Battle Axe team, the score being 1 to
0, and the other from the R. E. Lee
Juniors by a score or 4 to 0.
The box work of H. Harrelson and
the timely swatting of Gentry for the
winners were easily the features of
the first contest. It was Gentry's heavy
swat that brought Klein around the
bases and across the plate for the first
an done run of the game.
The second game with the Juniors
lasted only four and one-half innings
when the losers, realizing the use
lossness of playing further, gave in to
their opponents.
Following are the scores:
FIRST GAME
Randolph Street
AB. R. H. O. A. E.
Snellings, 3b 3 0 0 2 3 2
Klein, if 2 1 0 3 0 0
IJauer. rf 3 0 0 1 0 0
Cummins. 2b 2 0 0 0 2 0
Gentry, lb 3 0 X 13 0 0
Morgan, ss 3 0 0 0 3 3
Napier, cf 2 0 1 3 0 0
Woiiselffer, c 2 0 0 5 2 0
ltoblnson, p 2 0 0 0 3 0
Total 22 1 2 27 13 4
Rattle Axe
AB. R. H. O. A. E.
L. Mayfleld, cf 5 0 1 2 0 0.
Carter, rf 4 0 1 1 0 0
Whitfield, 2b '4 0 I 2 1 0
Hotchkiss. lb 4 0 I 5 2 0
F. Harrelson, If 4 0 0 2 0 0
Beeson, ss 4 0 1 2 0 0
Stuart, 3b 4 0 1 3 0 1
Todd, c 4 0 0 6 2 0
H. Harrelson, p 4 0 0 t 2 0
Totals 37 0 6 24 7 1
Score by Innings: R.
Battle Axe 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0?0
Randolph Street ..1 0000000 ??1..
Summary:: Two-base lilts?Hotch?
kiss. Stolen bases?L,. Mayileld, Stu
art, Beeson. Double plays?Todd - to
Hotchkiss to Stuart; Stuart to Hotch
kiss to Stuart; Napier (unassisted).
Bases on balls?By Harrelson, 4. Bat
ters hit?By Harrelson (Robinson).
Struck out?By Harrelson, 6; by Rob
inson, 5. Passed balls?Todd, 1. Wild
pitches?Robinson, 1. Left on bases?j
Battle Axe, 10; Randolph Street, '3.
Time of game?2 hours. Umpire?Mr.
Hogan and Mr. Ray.
SECOND GAME.
R. K. Lee Junior*
AB. R. H. O. A. E.
S. Cully, lb 2 0 0 3 0 2
Dunn, If 2 0 1 1 0 0
Ford, rf 1 0 0 0 0 0
Moles, c . 2 0 0 6 1 1
Rouse, cf I 0 0 0 0 0
Lewis, 2b 2 0 0 2 2 0
J. Cully, c 2 0 1 0 0 0
Pate. 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1
Wood, p 2 0 0 0 2 0
O'Connor, rf-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 17 0 2 12 5 4
Randolph
AB. R. H. O. A. E.
Klein. If 2 0 0 0 0 0
Sneilings, 3b 2 1 1 1 1 0
Bauer, rf 2 0 0 0 0 0
Gentry, lb 2 2 1 7 0 0
Cummins, 2b 2 0 1 1 2 0
Morgan, ss 2 0 0 0 0 I
Napier, cf 1 1 0 2 1 0
Woiiselffer, c 1 0 0 4 2 1
French, p 1 0 0 0 1 0
Totals 15 4 3 15 7 2
Score by Innings: R
R. E. Lee, Jr 0 0 0 0 0?0
Handoiph Street 2 1 0 1 ??4
Summary: Two base hit?Cummins.
Stolen bases?Dunn. Double play?
Napier to Gentry. Bases on balls?By
French, 2; by Wood. 1. Struck" out?By
French, 3; by Wood, 6. Passed balls?
Moles. Left on bases?It. E. Lee, *2.
Umpire?Mr. Ray and Mr. Hojan.
Church Hill Takes Flag.
Defeating the Chimborazo team yes
terday afternoon, Church Hill Bank
won the pennant In the East End.
League by the shut-out score of 4 to 0,>
<>nd their manager is issuing a chal-.
lenge to any amateur teams In the
city. Figg's work In the box was the
feature.
Church Hill Dank.
AB, R. H. O. A. E.
Doherty, 3b 4 0 0 2 1 3
t'ox, ss 2 2 I 0 1 I
l-'ifcfS. P 4 0 2 0 0 2
Hubbard, lb 2 118 11
Johns, cf 3 0 0 1 0 0
Buchanan, 2b 4 0 2 4 0 2
Bagley, If 2 0 0 2 0 0
Caravate, c 2 1 0 10 0 0
Ha.lion, rf 3 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 26 4 6 27 3 9
C'blm bornzo.
? ? , , AH. r. h. o. a. e.
r< Ensley, rf 2 0 2 0 1 1
U. Liggan, ss 3 0 0 0 1 3
I'rlnce, If. 4 o 2 0 0 0
I'ufli, 3b 4 o 2' 2 1 ">
Mc Nance, lb 2 0 011 0 2
Estes. cf 3 0 0 0 0 0
b olkes, 2b 3 o 0 2 0 2
Breeden. p 3 o 0 1 0 2
L. Liggan. 3 0 0 1 0 0
Totals 27 0 3? ~3 12
Score by innings: r
C. H. Bank 10000000 3 4
Chimborazo 00000000 0?0
Summary: Two-base hits?Pugh (2).'
Baso on balls?by Breeden, 3; by Flgg
7* sV"ck out?by Breeden. 9; by
' 'EE. 10. Stolen bases?Caravate, Hub
bard. Prince. Cox. Buchanan. Double
plays?Bagley to Hubbard; Breeden to
?McNance to Pugh.
SECOND PLACE IX RACE
FOK EAST END LEAGUE
Second place In the race for the East.
Knd league pennant was clinched by
the l'ulton Boosters yesterday after-'
?P? when they defeated thi Church
Hill Cubs by the score of 6 to 3. Up
jo a late hour last night no box acora
had been received.
Wilde Hetnlnn Flyweight Title.
LONDON, August 31.? Sergeant
Jimmy .Wilder won a decision ov?r Joe
< onn to-day and retained the flyweight
championship of the world. The ref
eree stopped the contest In the twelfth
ViolflL w,,d? took 60 Per cent ot a.
{12,000 purse.
Fan Nreded Her Fan.
LONDON. August 31.?"English
women certainly are picking up base
ball rapidly," observed an American
oflicer. Why, at the Army-Navy game
the other day I counted about twenty
?. arn0ng the women sitting around
mo.
"W ?ald a charming old lady.
? wished I had taken mine, for
the heat was terribly trying."

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