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The Salt Lake tribune. [volume] (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1890-current, August 01, 1910, Image 2

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- 2 ' - THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, MONDAY MORflTrN'GrT AUGUST 1 1910. I
HN
lH After Violent Drops and Erratic
B Advances Market Settles
Hj Down Fairly Well.
BIG DEALS HELPED TO
STEADY THE SPECULATION
H Earnings of Steel Trust Were
R - Unusually Large for the
M' Last Quarter.
I1 NEW YORK. July 31. The Important
! financial and railroad news which he-'
came known .last week went far to ex
plain ihe recent turmoil and unsettlo
ment In the stock market and served, at
the same time, to relievo It by the sot
1 tlement of a threatening situation. The
surrender to an International syndicate
headed by Kuhn. Loeb &. Co., of holdings
accumulated by tho so-called Pearsons
syndicate to the formation of a railroad
combination, reaching from tho Atlantic
to tho Pacific, transformed the specula
tive position. The transaction In Its
first . bearing, relieved the stock market of
a necessity for forced liquidation, such
as the Tuesday stock market gave an
example of.
Rapid Fluctuations.
The selling out of loans to the hard
pressed holders of ihe stock designed to
form the combination threw the market
into demoralization that day. An excited
rise In price of corn raised the tempor
ary apprehension that prospective par
tial failure of that crop and fears for tho
country's general credit position were
Involved In the acute depression of tho
stock markot.
While the trouble which overtook the
ambitious project for the formation of a
new railroad combination might be traced
primarily to the market depression grow-
Iing out or general causes, tt was recog
nized that probably It was much ag
gravated by tho attitude of powerful
groups whose Interests were likely to be
Impaired by the proposed now project.
The obvious absence of any protective
measures in the stock market for some
time past was explained by the unwill
ingness of these opposing interests to af
ford support, for the extrication of the
embarrassed party. The moment choson
for the relief of the perilous stock mar
ket situation was the moment of surren
der of the aggressive new projectors in
the railroad world. The antagonisms In
volved lay not only In the railroad Held,
but In the industrial as well, touching
some of the most powerful financial in
. crests lu existence.
Money Situation.
The surface showing of improvement in
the banking position was allowed Its due
inlluence on sentiment. The private set
tlements of the week Involved placing
of large blocks of securities abroad and
there sprang up an Important demana
in the open market for foreign account.
The foreign credit account of the New
York money, market was correspondingly
strengthened.
The Quarterly earnings of the United
States Steel corporation were unexpect
edly large and the heavy decrease In un
filed orders while significant of shrink
age In trade activity, was viewed In the
light of the reduced prices at which or
ders must now be booked. Reports of
agreement by the principal copper pro
ducers to curtail output were revived.
I Tribune Want Ads.
J Bell Main 5200. Independent 360.
I PRESIDENT ATTENDS
AUNT DELIA'S REUNION
BEVERLY. Mass.. July 31. President
Tafl had a long automobile ride today.
Starting out a little after 10 o'clock this
morning, he motored to Worcester, in the
Interior of the state, and proceeded from
there to the little village of Mllbury.
Mass., where he attended a family re
union at the home of Aunt Delia- Tor
rey Returning to Beverly tonight, the
odometer on the car showed a total for
the day of a fraction over 150 miles.
Accompanying tho president to Mil
bury were Mrs. Taft. Henry W. Taft. a
brother; Master Charlie Taft and Capt.
Archibald Butt. At Miss TorreVs home,
Horace D. Taft. another of the presi
dent's brothers, Joined the party. 'Ocunt
Delia"- had personally supervised thr
preparation of the meal and had baked
another of her famous apple pies.
After dinner "Aunt Delia" took "Will"
to call on some of the neighbors. At
the two passed out of tho Torrey place,
arm In arm. and walked along the street,
the president could be heard chuckling
and laughing
"Aunt Delia" was as happy as could be.
; The president has a busy week before
him. Frank B. Kellogg of St. Paul and
Governor Eberhardt of Minnesota will urge
the president to speak at . the National
Conservation congress In St. Paul early
In September. Gen. Leonard Wood will
also be here tomorrow.
I ESPERANTO CONGRESS
TO BE HELD IN CAPITAL
WASHINGTON. July 31. The sixth In
ternational congress of Esperanto will be
T,ileSJ!.mnKthe.t,we5k1bc?,nn,,,B August 1.
This will be the first time that the con
gress has met in the western hemisphere.
Burop- "a meet,nj's having been In
frtPera?t0 l11 y3 sP,cn n Washing
ton by clergy In the pulpit, by actors in
' K Shakespearean play, part of the police
i Lnd Inr-a,I,hc Proceedings of the
ron0ress Furthermore, for tho first
ftin hlbabIyiln the history of the world,
tt will be used at a baseball game.
I Will Eenew Probing.
1 , SPRINGFIELD. III.. July 31. A new
Ji?iB,.at,Yc lrlb7.y 1" vesication Is sched
uled to begin this week. Stale Attorney
1 BiirJce said today he had Issued t we ve
J hEEa?..,,ale &'turlay '"Sht and sent
hem to Chicago by special delivery.
, INCURABLE. CASE
(A HOSPITAL CASE).
,Uwh0ies Lcc,a.ro kIdfiey disease in
?f?rab V ai. er tne s,sth month. This was
I he situation up to the working out of
1 he new emollient treatment the only
1 I 1,rn.KCn0Wnu.tVat dn,res cJalm PrIn- to
J iure chronic kidney disease.
Evei2 ca,K0 Presented has been declared
incurable by physicians and in some
rases four to six have passed on the fatai
n luignosls.
t Case of I. T. Gibson, No. 521 Oth ave-
auc. Sacramento. Was so low with kld-
H 2??nid,8ewe that nC was ,n tlle ,ocal hos-
! p,tal Was swollen to bursting with
Jropsy that often attends serious cases.
?.hc'n the hospital physicians had failed
has. A. Newton, yard master of the
t " .V.R- Co-' i Sacramento (who had
ilrnself been cured), was instrumental In
retting the patient on the new emollient
treatment. Dropsy began to subside, the
, lid,ncX,u Inflammation gradually abated
, md Gibson fully recovered from a dls-
-ase that is rated Incurable the world
Fulton's Renal Compound, the first buc
cessful treatment for chronic kldnev, dls
. cap. can only be had in your city of
our authorized agents. Schramm-Johnson
. drugs, five stores,
i w desire to hear from and advise with
every aue not yielding.
Secret and
Fraternal Societies
of Salt Lake
Tho G. A. E. Chaplaincy,
.f'ho Grand Annv men in this city
will recall with pleasure r.io name of
Kovereml Thomas Jim-wood, who at the
Rational Grand Army Encampment
here la9t year received 234 volos for
the chaplaincy of the National G. A. 11.
as against (531) for his successful com
petitor. Mr. Hnrwood received the re
sult liko the cme man that ho is. with
cheerful pood nature, hoping for bolter
luck next time.
JIft is a pa in a candidate for tho same
position and is sendinji to the differ
ent departments notices of his candi
dacy. The Tribune ha.i received from
him the following pleasant note:
Albuquerque. N. M., July 27. 1010.
To The Salt Lake Tribune;
Some time after the encampment of the
G. A. R. in your city last yoar. I re
ceived your kind letter of September S.
and the bundle of papers covering tho
week of the national encampment and all
were perfectly satisfactory.
Far be It from tlin M uniiiinre in iw.
unmindful or ungrateful for kind treat
ment. The kindness of your Salt Lake people,
their whole-souled generosity, and tho un
paralleled attention given us by the press
of your city, linger pleasantly In our
memories, "and in our hearts will live
forever."
It was at that encampment the under
signed made his first venture on tho sea
of politics, if politic.-. It may bo called,
hoping the votes of his comrades might
land him safely In the quiet harbor . of
the chaplaincy-in-chief of the Grand
Army of tho Republic, which would have
been done surely, had he had votes
enough.
But for tho votes received, 23-t. ho
wishes to express his sincere thanks to
his comrades for their good will, and
congratulate the other S'M comrades for
the wise choice they made In the election
of Comrade, tho Rev. Daniel Ryan of
Indiana.
Your comrade, hoping that his "231"
will not desert him at Atlantic CItv, and
that others will fall Into line bringing
wldh them for tho young man of SO. a
few flowers of his special proferment,
the emblems of fidelity, known amongst
the florists as the "Forget-me-not." I re
main as ever, yours rospcctfullv In F.,
C. L. THOMAS 1IARWOOD.
Albuquerque, X. M.
Jt is hoped that Mr. Harwood may
realize the full extent of his hopes in
a triumphant win at Atlantic City this
year.
Fraternal Brotherhood.
Utah lodge No. 3C5. T. F, B., met last
Wednesday evening, with a good attend
ance considering the hot weather. After
the regular routine of business It was de
cided by the lodge to have an outing and
basket picnic at the lake Sundav. August
7; lunch at C p. m. Every member of
.No. .ioo. T. F. B.. is requested to be pres
ent with a basket of good things and
antidote for spider biles.
Scgo Lily lodge No. 252. of the Frater
nal Brotherhood, met In well attended
regular session Thursday evening. The
lodge decided to buy new uniforms for
the drill team. Past President Quay of
Garfield was a welcome visitor, who en
tertained with several Instructive talks
that brought forth much applause. Bro.
Dempster, who lias resigned as state man
ager, was present and gave many helpful
suggestions. Brother and Sister White
head will be here soon to take charge of
the work In Utah and Nevada. Supreme
President J. A. Fashoy has granted the
continuation of the reduced initiation fee.
Supreme ice President Emma R. WHdlg
favored the lodge with a fine letter of
congratulation on the work done by the
odges here. The next meeting will be
held August 11.
Royal Highlanders.. . ,
In spite of the warm weather and the
fact that last Monday was a holiday
one of the plcasnntest gatherings of Utah
Castle was held that evening. There
was little business to transact. The sick
committee reported that It had visited
the sick members and found them on
w 'utmury. Later, tne report
Is that they have entirelv recovered. Tho
committee on the contest drill had no
report to make. The Castle adjourned
to meet again Monday evening. A full
attendance of the drill team Is requested
in order that work on the new rlrlll mav
be started. The meeting will be called
to order at 8:15 p. m. Visitors will be
welcome.
Order of Owls.
The Order of Owls met last Wednes
day night at 67 East Second South. A
good crowd was present and much busi
ness was talked over. The president.
Brother Nelson, has gone to Butte. Mont..
and the next meeting will be a special
call to elect a new president?' Broth
er Marcroft. who was on the sick list
ror the past three months, has reported
for work again. Dr. Light, the nest doc
tor, has returned from a trip to Wash
ington, p. C. where he was called to
the death of his father. The next meet-"
tng will be held on August 10 and all
members are requested to be present.
Fraternal Union of America.
V-Th,e regular meeting of Evtergreen lodge
No. lol will take place on Mondav evening
at the Odd Fellows' hall. A large at
tendance is desired, owing to the faat
that the special rates and inducements
Tor the month of August will be an
nounced, and will excel all former Induce
ments previously offered. Members on
the sick list and desirous of receiving vis
iting members are George R. Garbelt at
the St. Mark's hospital. Mrs. Marie Ave
son. 334 East South Temple, and Mrs.
Vandervort, 1024 West First South.
Maccauees.
Banner Hive No. 11 will hold regular
review next Tuesday, August 2, '3o
p. in. Last Tuesday the ladles had an
enjoyable outing at Wandamcre.
Salt Lake City Hivo No. 1 will hold
regular review next Wednesday even
ing at I. O. O. F. hall, and all members
are requested to attend the review. Past
Commander Causer nromlsM a irnxH
time.
Lillian Holllster hive No. 15 will hold
regular review In Eagles' hall Thursday
evening, August A. All members' are re
quested to be present. Visiting Macca
bees welcome.
Maccabees.
.uT.he,laflc,s r. Liberty hive No. 0 and
their friends will meet at Liberty park
Thursday afternoon, August 4, for their
usual weekly social. All Maccabees and
their friends are welcome. Meet at band
stand at 2 o clock.
Foresters of America.
cdnesday evening in the Jennings hall.
;Le?liI7rat, &0l,th All members are
requested to be presont, as several im-
rtant..fnatt?i'R aFe t0 he attended to.
vlted I'orestera arc cordially in-
I. O. O. F.
Salt Lake lodge No. 2, I. O. O. F.. under
the good of the order" last Friday night
enjoyed a literary and musical progrnm
In lieu of the regular degree work. Ev
ery one present voted it an Immense suc
cess. Next I-riday night the Initiatory
degree will be conferred. .iuijr
Royal Neighbors.
mFA1. 'Shbors Camp 4DSG will meet
this (Monday) evening at 8 o'clock in
the I. O O F. hall. All members
requested to be present. Visiting mem
bers are cordially invited to attend.
Noblo Grand.
The Naomi Past Noblo Grands Club
and Degree Staff will meet at Mt Olivet
on Tuesday morning, August 2. at 10-30
o clock. ,ul'
Canadian Association.
Tllp Canadian association will meet
Wedncjiduy evening, August 3, In k!o
ICut our this Coupon fill out 4
as directed and send to Jl
-J ihe Contest Manager
THE TRIBUNE an i EVENING TELEGRAM
$10,003 Prize Voiing denies!
For Mr., Mrs. or Miss ;
Address
CONTEST DISTRICT NO
nnmSJlrShf?11, llca cliPP0fl namo, address and district
T , c?ITPrp?0Arfl"d brought or sent to Contest Department of
one vot TRIBUNE and EVENING TELEGRAM will count as
NOT GOOD AFTERJgUtX93T
C. hall, 1.17 East First South strcot. All
Canadians invited.
Ladies of the G. A. R.
Gordon circle No. 1, Ladles of the G.
A. R., will hold their regular mooting at
5 p. m. August 0, in Odd Follows" hall.
DOCTOR CRIPPEN CAUGHT
AND POSITIVELY IDENTIFIED
Continued from Pac One.
ended. They havo been approhenslvc of
some untoward fate, and are convinced
now that the woman can prove hor In
nocence. Her mother, in an interview,
said sho was certain that Crippon hnd
hypnotized hor daughter: otherwise she
would never have donned boy's clothes.
Her father equally believes that she
was the dupe of Crippon.
It Is suggested hero that Crlppen mav
claim American citizenship as a means
of delaying the course of the law.
Mrs. Lcnever cabled a pathetic ap
VeaI l.0 her daughter, imploring her to
tell the police everything and not to
allow her affection for Crlppen to stand
n the way of her duty to herself and
to her family. The cable concludes "Bo
brave, little girl, and havo no fear; we
arc confident of your Innocence."
STORY OF CRIME WITH
WHICH DOCTOR IS CHARGED
Tho crime which had Its dramatic de
nouement In the arrest of Ilr frlnnon
and Ethel Clare Lcneve aboard the
steamer Montrose Is destined to become
pno of the most notable In criminal his
tory. Not only the circumstances of tho
crime but tho remarkable detective chase
across the Atlantic with wirclesn teleg
raphy contributing for the first time as
a decisive factor In detection and with
the people of Europe and America eager
ly Intent upon the quest, have combined
to make tho case one of extraordinary
Interest.
The circumstances of the finding of
the mangled and burned body of Belle
Elmore are of recent occurrence, Ihe sa
lient features being as follows:
Onco in Salt Lake.
Dr. Crlppen and his wife, known by the
stage name of Belle Elmore, had for the
vV?.', ,two yiirs occupied a house at 39
Hllldrop Crescent, North London. He
was an American dentist, born at Cold
water. Mich., educated In Indiana and
pursuing medical study later In Michi
gan. California, Ohio and New York CItv.
He had managed a patent medicine busi
ness in Philadelphia and In Columbus,
and had appeared as a specialist at many
Other nolnts. DMrnll en nioci en
Lake City. St. Louis and Brooklvn.
Belle Elmore was a well known vaude
ville actress, about 35 years old. formerly
of Brooklyn. Sho was an attractive wom
an and an officer of the Music Hall Ar
tlHts Guild of London. With the Crlppen
pair at Hllldrop Crescent lived Miss Lo
nove. a young typist of French birth, who
served as amcnuensls to Dr Crlppen
Mrs. Crlppen disappeared from her ac
customed activities last February. To
her friends. Dr. Crlppen explained she
had gone to California. Later an adver
tisement appeared In the London papers
saying she had died In California. But
Belle Elmore's former actress friends In
London and America began to doubt.
Their Inquiries led to the belief that Mrs.
Crlppen had not died In California, and
their suspicions were communicated to
tho police.
Said Wife Ran Away.
Tho clues of Scotland Yard gradually
began to encircle Dr. Crlppen early in
July. Sir Melville MacNaughton, chief of
the criminal Investigation department,
took the matter personally Jn hand, and
then for the first time appeared on the
scene Inspector Dew. It was Dew who
subjected .Crlppen to the ordcnl of a mi
nute croHs-examlnatlon. The doctor fin
filly admitted that his wlfo had not gone
to California, but asserted that shft had
run away as a result of family bicker
ings. The suavity of Crlppen led tho police
to give conditional credit to his state
ment, and they took his word of honor
that he would remain subject to call
until his story could bo verified. This
was on July 12.
The next day Dr. Crlppen and the
pretty young typist. Miss Lencvc. disap
peared, leaving no trace of Nielr where
abouts. The house at Hllldrop Crescent
was hastily searched. This time Inspec
tor Dew and his staff ransacked cellar
and garret. In the cellar n misplaced
brick led to a ghastly discovery. Beneath
tho floor was found the battered body of
a human being. It had been placed In
quicklime and was burned beyond recog
nition. Even the sex was undetermin
able by the doctors at first, although the
body was finally established as that of a
woman.
Then Camo the Search.
Immediately a search of almost world
wide scope began, at. first In London and
England, then through France and con
tinental points and finally to America,
, Many falso clues were followed to a fruit
less end. Dr. Crlppen and his tvplst
appeared to have vanished completely.
Police descriptions were cabled through
out the world. One circumstance of the
lllgbt proved to b most Important, name
ly. Dr. Crlppen purchased a suit of bov's
clothing, evidently to disguise his corn
nan on ftK .1 llflV In fVlftlr- ninlw
The first real clue came on sailing of
tho Canadian Pacific steamer Montrosf
from Antwerp on July 20. A couplo of
strange appearance took hasty passage
on the steamer two hours before It sallod.
They gave the names of "Rev John Rob
inson and John Robinson. Jr.," said to
be father and son.
Credit Duo Kendall.
Two days out, Captain Kendnll of the
Montrose had his suspicions excited. Me
boenme convinced that the younger Rob
inson was a woman and then that the
pair were those for whom London and
the outer world had been searching In
vain. By wireless he communicated his
suspicions to Scotland Yard. A minute
description or Ihe pair sent bv wireless
19 tlQ...shi "L sea confirmed Captain
Kendall s suspicions. The two wore kept
under surveillance, but not under arrest.
Then began tho sensational detective
chase which culminated yesterday. In
spector Dew, balked In his first attempt
to apprehend Crlppen, hurrlod to Liver
pool, where he caught tho White Star
steamer Laurentlc. She was faster than
the Montrose and both wore headed for
tllP R.ITnp rlpcf In.-i Mnn TI- T o i
overtook pnd passed the Montrose at sa
and two days ago Inspector Dew landed
at Father Point, one of the remote out
nosts on the St. Lawrence, and awaited
his quarry. Meantime the wireless had
been busy In furthering tho work of de
scription, fo the identity of Dr. Crlppen
and Miss Lencvc became practically as
sured as the Montroso drew nearer tho
wnltlng officers.
NEWSBOYS OF LONDON
REAP RICH HARVEST
LONDON. July HI. London, rnrorlr
waiting, got the first news of the Iden
tification and arrest of Dr. Hnwley TI.
Crlppen and his companion. Ethel Lo
neve. throuch the Associated Press dis
patches, which were receh-ed here far
ahead of scores of other messages an
nouncing the event. ,
Special editions of the Sundav papers
with the Associated Press dispatches
were Issued by the thousands and were
eagerly hought up. It Is a long time
since the newsboys had such a harvest.
Old Timer of Western Kansas
Recalls Changes of Forty Years
BY W. B. (BAT) MASTERSON.
NEW YORK, July 31. In coming
down the Arkansas valley from Pueblo
to Dodce City, on board an Atchison,
Topeka & Santa Pe train bound for
Chicago, two weeks aco, I could not
help wondering at the marvelous change
that had come over the country in the
last twenty years.
As I looked from the car window
alter reaching tho Kansas line at Cool
ldge, I saw in all directions groves of
trees, orchards and fields bearing abun
dant crops of corn, alfalfa and wheat.
The country reminded me of old settled
communities in Illinois and the grand
state of Ohio. I was still wondering
when the train reached Dodgo City.
Wonderful Transformation.
The idea that tho plains of western
Kansas could ever be made fertile was
something I had never dreamed of. I
was familiar with every foot of tho
counfrv. havinrr nr. nn timp np nnntlm.-
in years gone, pitched nry camp and
hunted buffalo over its large expanse of
territory. This was almost forty years
ago, bpforo the Santa Fo railro'aff was
built. There were no shady groves of
trees, no orchards and fertile fields then.
Instead thorc were buffalo and antelope
aplenty, and the only sign of vegetation
fo be seen anywhere was the nutritious
buffalo grass. ,
In these days the country I am speak
ing about was considered outside th.j
rain belt and such a tiling as growing
a crop or raising an orchard was never
thought of. Rut it is all changed now.
They are having rain out there with
as much regularity as in other states
and. are raising about everything in the
lino of crops that is produced any
where. T arrived in Dodge City about 8
o'clock in the morning. The train slops
there thirty minutes for breakfast. If
is provided by the Harvey system of
eating houses, and there are no better
eating houses anywhere, lot me tell
you.
I hurried up so that I would have a
few minutes to look over the old town.
How different it looked from what it
did when I Iivod there. J remember
when tho first tent was pitched on the
present townsilo in the hummer of 1872.
It was in the fall of that year that
the first train on the Santa Fe reached
tho town.
Dodgo City's Glory.
From then to 1884 Dodge City was a
typical frontier village and without a
doubt t"he liveliest ever built in the
entire west. Everything went to Dodge
City in those days, nnd many a thrilling
atory haB beeu written about the place.
Some were in the main true. A great'
many of f.htni, however, were inventions
of writers of western romance. I lived
I
there during .ill of these years and per
haps know as much about what hap
pened there as any man living.
Mike Sutton, who was prosecuting at
torney at Dodge City in those days,
often accepted dance hall keepi-rs and
gamblers as jurymen when prosecuting
a criminal caso and Mr. Sutton will tell
you today that he never had occasion to
find fault with the manner in which
these men rendered their verdict, and
Sutton was looked upon as one of the
ablest prosecutors in the west. But it's
all different now at Dodge. There arc
no more dance halls, at any rate the
sort" that flourished when I was a resi
dent of the place. Dodge City is now
a thriving country village, surrounded
bv a thriving farming country.
There are many of tho oldtiniprs still
living there and it is doubtful if they
would caro to livo elsewhere. They are
all well-to-do and happy. And may they
live long and prosper.
"RAILWAY ECONOMY"
BUREAU ESTABLISHED
WASHINGTON. July 31. A new phase
of railroad development will be marked
by the Installation in this city tomorrow
by the railroads of the United States of
a "bureau of railway economv." formal
announcement of which was "made re
cently from Chicago. Logan G. Mc
Phcrson Is director in charge.
"The bureau," said Mr. McPhorson to
day, proposes to build up a complete
railroad library and to become a reposi
tory and a source of Information for mat
ters of railway Interest other than those
of a technical nature. It will not con
duct polemic discussion nor Is It a pub
licity bureau, although It Is hopod It may
be of public service, as well as of use
to the railroads."
Chilaren Cry
FOR FLETCHER'S
O A3TO R 8 A
Tribune Want Ads.
Bell Main 5200. Independent 360.
Boise and In ferb urban' Railway
Company, Limited.
Cars leave Bftjso for Caldwell. 'CIS
8:00. 0:00. MOiOO. 11:00. 12:00 a, m. and
1:00, 2:00. 3:00, 1:00. 5:00. 0:00. 7-oo
8:00, 9:00, 10:00 p. m.
CarB leavo Caldwell for Bolso 6:20
7:30. 8:3, 0:30, 10:30. '11:30 a. m. and
12:30, 1:30. "2:30, 3:30. -4:30. x5;30. 6:30.
7:30. BtfO. 0,30 p. m.
Baggage and express.
Baggago for Boise, and Caldwell only.
x'ExpreBH to Euglo and lntormodJato
points only,
y
AMUSEMENTS
f A
-j ATTRACTIONS FOR WEEK. .J
Vaudeville. 4
I ORPHEUM THEATER Advanced -"r"
vaudeville. Matinee, 2-1!). Even- -I-r
Ing, S:lii.
"I" ' r
f Mimical Comedy. !
j' SHUBERT THEATER "In Gay -f
Parce." Evening, 7:30 and 0;15. 4
T
T Motion Pictures. 4-
LUNA AND ISIS THEATERS
h All the week. Continuous per- !
h formanco. J
The Orpheum management made no
mistake In selecting tho bill for the sec
ond week of the season, for tho one which
was presented Sunday afternoon and
evening to capacity audiences Is one oi
tho best seen upon the Orpheum stago
for a long while. If the two bills thus
far this season are samples, lovers of
vaudeville will sec the best lino of shows
thin fall and winter that has ever been
shown here.
Tho press agent designated the Aerial
bnllet as the headllner. While there arc
many who will acquiesce in this view,
there arc- others, and they are in the
big majority, that would select other
numbers on the bill as being entitled
to first place. Which one. however. It
would be difficult to say. as all are in
the headline class.
In ' Tho Code Book." which Is desig
nated as a dramatic Incident, opportunity
is given Allen Atwcll. who portrays the
character of Jose, a Filipino servant, to
do some exceptionally clever acting. His
impersonation Is a splendid ono and ho
received merited and deserved applause.
The others in the sketch, particularly
Charles P. Hammond, as the recruit, car
ried out their parts well.
In "The Living Rubber Balls." the
Standards, father and mother and baby,
and II. Krunklln have an acrobatic stunt
that la away up at tho top and is one of
the cleverest seen here. Their work is
new and clean and clever.
"The Soph and the Freshman" Is a
college frivolity that is lllled with clean
fun. and Ed Fennel and Lena Tyson take
advantage of the opportunity given them
to entertain the audience In a clever
manner.
There have been cycling stunts pre
sented here before there will bo again
but the work of Valentine and Doolcy,
cycling comedians, has never been equaled
here. Their stunt Is out of the ordinary.
"Elite Entertainers" Is the way Harry
Fentello and Viola Vallorle arc billed, and
they are billed right. Miss Vallorle Is
BS nrotlv n5 ri nlolllro nvwl n o irtvwnfMt
as can be. and In their songs and their
take-off upon melodrama are exception
ally clever. They wore called and re
called. "Two Singers Who Can Sing and Two
Comedians Who Can Comede" are seen
In the stunt of Fred Warren and Al
Blanchard. Their act Is not only melo
dious, but It is extremely funnv. The im
personation of a colored soubretto by
Warren Is more than well done.
As said, Grlgolail's famous Aerial bal
let, with Mile. Floretta as the premier
aeriallst, Is a beautiful spectacular offer
ing. Tho Dove ballet. In which live pigeons
are used, is very pretty. Tho coryphees
as well as the premier nro handsome
and shapely, and in their flight through
the air there are many pretty effects
seen.
This, with the KInodrome pictures and
the splendid music by Professor Wlllard
Welhe's orchestra, make up a splendid
bill which will run the week.
Threatening weather and summer heat
seem to Increase rather than decrease
the popularity of the Curtis players at
the Sliubert. Tho new play this week
is ncing given to Inrge. good-natured au
diences. "In Gay Paree" is a slight di
version from the previous productions by
the Curtis company. Tho chorus is bright,
good looking, vivacious and as active and
full of barmony as ever; tho principals
play their respective parts In a way cal
culated to grip tho audiences' sense of
the artistic and humorous, tho scenery
Is new and beautiful, producing a most
pleasing efTect; the music Is catchy am
whlstlcy and lingers In one's ears long
nfter tho last curtain falls.
The scene of the play Is laid In the
courtyard of a Parisian hotel, run bv
one Josh Boniface. Two German tourists
land In town with their pockets out and
secure accommodations at Boniface's es
tablishment. Being unable to pay their
bills, their baggage is attached, and thev
are forced to work out their Indebtedness
as attaches of the hotel, one as waiter,
the other as bellboy. Simon Leschinskl,
a wealthy I-Iebrewi and a queen of Bo
hemia take quarters nt Boniface's hos
telry. The queen is out for the coin, and
Leschinskl looks like easy money. The
two Gcrmnn tourists, the Hebrew and
Mile. Flfl. make a combination which.
when worked into the ludicrous situations
called for during the action of the piece,
convulse the audience with uproarious
laughter from the beginning to tho end
of the extravaganza.
Charley Rcllly Is seen as Josh Boniface,
his excellent voice winning scores of new
friends. Henry Auerbach Impersonates
In a mlrth-nrovoklng manner the wealthy
Hebrew. Jack Curtis and Jack Collins
take the parts of the two Germans. Harry
Ford, as a rich man's son. has little to
do. but docs It exceptionally well. May
belle Baker makes a winsome Mile. Flfl,
good looking, sbapolv. graceful and su
perbly gowned. Lillian Sutherland ap
pears as a social climber. The entire
cast, chorus and principals, work over
time to make "In Gay Parce" the most
delightful production of the summer
shows yet presented by the Curtis aggre
gation. By way of a dlvertlsement. not sched
uled on the program, a breath of sunny
Italy. In tho nature of a genuine native,
with an excellent voice, singing a song
of foreign composition, was Introduced,
and not until he had responded to half
a dozen encores would tho audience per
mit tho singing Italian to leave the stago.
"In Gay Paree" continues through tho
week, with usual matinees, and tho plav
will undoubtedly enjoy a crowded house
at every performance.
OKLAHOMA'S CORN
IS BADLY DAMAGED
v
GUTHRIE, Okla., July 31. The report
of the state board of agriculture up to
July 25, made public today, estimates the
damage to the corn crop In Oklahoma
In the Inst month at 21.3 per cent. This
Is against a damage of 25.C per cent In
1000. The board reports the cotton crop
holding up well. Since July 25. the hot
test and driest weather of the year has
been felt and the damage Is said to be
much increased over the figures made
public.
Tribuno Want Ads.
Bell Main .5200. Independent 360.
"STAND PAT" FACTION
MAY BOLT CONVENTION
DES MOINES. Ia,. July 31. An Inter
esting fight seems probable in the Re
publican state convention, which will open
hero next Wednesday-.
The resolutions committee Is "stand
pat" by one vote and the convention Is
"nrogrcssive" by about 2f0. In nil prob
ability there will be two reports from
tho resolutions committee. Tho minority
will Indorse Senators Cummins and ,Dol
Uvfsr. and it Is said Ignore President -Tnft.
There has been talk of the "stand pat" f
faction bolting the convention.
Comparison of Distances.
The distanco between Now York and
San Francisco by tho two lines are.
via Panama. 5305 miles; via Tehuante
pec. 4415; direct by shortest transcon
tinental railway line, 3191 miles, and
by way of Macollan straits, 13,089
miles. Prom the Hawaiian islands to
Now York the distances are, by way of
San Francisco. 52S8 milos; by waj' of
Tehuanlepec, 580G miles; by way of
Panama, 0686 miles, and bv way of Ma
gellan straits, 13,269 miles
Tribuno Want Ads.
Bell Main 5200. Independent 36C' J -
COWARDLY KlUf 0
OF DISARMED VICUM
STEAMBOAT JR&&
SSL'S SSKTiSK
of fierc. Clutter. Jt Is declare &
armed by his son after n Wng away
gun play and .'is he ,YLnan revolver and
Atlller opened Are with a r MeR
Cant with a shotgun. GMtt n In(Uftn,
who is a half-breed Chlcicasn t
came hero from IVaurlha.
six months ago,
CAN CLUBWOMEN SAVE' Htt
SERVANT GIRLS' MORALS?
Rheta Chllde Dorr, in i$2lt$
and accurate analysis of the prooiom
"The Prodigal Daughter nmkes in
startling statement In the ay ?"un:
Hampton's Magazine that at lon onj
third of our Prodigal D6'r-. are
drafted from tho ranks of domestic "wors
era. In a convincing ?P fr0m
her reasons for this charge. nMt ns 'rtm
investigating boards and accurate scion
line reports, and In conclusion she "jes
a plea to tho club women of the coun
try to look Into the matter of their house
workers and see If they cannot mako inc
conditions of domestic servitude better
and more agreeable. Says airs. P0"-.,
"Yonkcrs, N. Y.. a large town on the
Hudson river, points out one way towaru
this end. In Yonkcrs thero has been
established a women's Instltuto, for uic
exclusivo use of domestics. It "as an
employment agency and supports classes
In domestic science for those girls vno
wish to become more expert workers.
There are club rooms and recreation par
lors where the girls .receive and meet
their friends Includinc their men friends.
A group of liberal minded women cs.no
llshed this unique institution, which Is
well patronized by the superior class ot
domestic workers in Yonkers. Tho duos
are small, and members are allowed to
sharo club privileges with friends. It Is
not unusual for employers to present
their domestics with membership cards. It
cannot be said that the women's Institute
has solved the servant problem for Yon
kcrs. but many women testify to Its
happy effects on their own Individual
problems.
"The committee on amusements and va
cation resources of working girls In New
York Is collecting a long list of farm
houses and village homes In the moun
tains and near the sea where working
girls, nnd this Includes domestics, may
spend their vncatlonn for very little
money. The committee made an Investi
gation of tho vacation resources provided
by churches, settlements, business estab
lishments, and philanthropic bodies in
New York, nnd found that only about C000
working girls were helped to a country
holiday in the course of the yoar. Six
thousand out of nearly 100,000 girfci In
trades, not to speak of the hundreds of
thousands of domestics. Is n figure which
makes n protty bad showing for the
greatest city on tho continent. It is
probably at least no worse than other
cities.
"Every summer, as families leave tho
city for country and seaside, domestics
are thrown out of employment. A de
partment In the women's club can exam
ine vn cat Ion possibilities for domestics.
The clubs can also deal with the employ
ment agency. Some women's organiza
tions bnve already taken hold of this de
partment. The women's educational and
industrial union of Boston conducts a
very large nnd nourishing employment
agency. Women's clubs can study the
laws of their own community In regard
to public employment agencies. They
can Investigate homes for immigrant girls
and boarding houses for working women.
'Preventive work Is better than reform
measures, but both are necessary In deal
ing with this problem. Women have still
much work to do In securing reformato
ries for women. New York Is the flrst
state to establish such reformatories for
nrllllf" ll'mrtn . T -I . . 1 . t ! .. . v. t
.... Aii.aiu jiiiiuiiiiurupy n.ia
offered refuges and semi-penal Institu
tions. The state stands aloof.
"Even In New York public officials are
strangely skeptical of the possibilities of
reform. Last year tho courts of New
York City sent 3000 delinquent women to
the workhouse on Blackwcll's Island a
place notorious for the low stale of Its
morale. They sent only seventeen women
to Bedford reformatory, whero a healthy
routine of outdoor work, and a most ef
fective system administered by a scien
tific penologist does wonders with its
Inmates. Nothing but the will and the or
ganized effort of women will ever solv
the most terrible of all problems, or re
move from society the reproach of ruined
womanhood which blackens It now."
Here Is a very neat suitcasu for summer
travol. For an extra piece of luggage It
Is especially recommended because of Its
light weight and light price. It will wear
Everything In trunks and leather goods'
MEREDITH'S Sdnsksstaonrde Lcather ,
155 SO. MAIN ST.
Fast and thorounh rennlrs.
UN DENTAL CO. I
212 MAIN STREET.
HONEST WOEK
HONEST PRICES
Painless extraction of teeth or no
pay. All work guaranteed.
Remember Us.
We Treat You Right.
E3E THE
Denver & Rio Grande
FOE
Smoimer -Vacation
'excursions
Railroad and steamship tickets to
nnd from all parts of the world.
Optical Fairness
Our business has reached such
large proportions that we could
not afford, even should we so
desire, to do anything but tho
fair thing.
Our policy Jn business will
mako you feci at home.
Columbian Optical C,
337 Main Street. Phone 5360.
Opposite Postofflco.
Any Ions duplicated in 80 minute.
ANOTHER t Jl
WOMAN I
CORED I
ByLydiaRPinkbam's 1
Vegetable Compound 1
Black Duck, Mirm. "About a year K
ago I wrote you that I was sick and S'
F-i-li-1!';;,) could not do any of w
wSP!i:W n?y housework. My M W
WjfSmf' sickness was called- W
fM0MPM' Betrollexion. When '
jUjfcuffi:' v'on sit down I K
isra B('r: felt as if 1 couIl not m
vm efcup. Itook H
jgj J IydiaEPinkham's . ft
Iffklll Pund did jrS I:
as yon told me and ft
nW( htIy K
Mrs. An"NA Andersok, Box 19, Black k
Duck, Hinn.
Consider This Advice. feg
Eo woman should submit to a surgi- ft
cal operation, which may mean death, . ft
until she has given Lydia E. Pinkham's lft
Vegetable Compound, made exclusive-
ly from roots and herbs, a fair trial.
This famous medicine for women
has for thirty years proved to be the
most valuable tonic and invigorator of
the female organism. Women resid- !
ing in almost every city and town in i P
the United States bear willing testi- p..
mony to the wonderful virtue of Lydia
E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound.
It cures female ills, and creates radi-
ant, buoyant female health. If you .
are ill, for your own sake as well as.'
those you love, give it a trial.
Mrs. Pmkham, at Lynn, Mass.,
invites all sick women to write
her for advice. Her advice is free, '
and. always helpful.
TODAY
Sox at Less J!
Than Cost
All light weight sos today at
prices never offered before. . CaH J
and see our lines;. 1,000 pairs in
the sale. Remember, today is the i
25c Sox '.;..19c H
35c Sox 22i2c H i
50c Sox 35c fl
75c Sox 45c II
The Smstt Shop Co. m
55 SO. MAIN.
Complete Dressers of Men "
Both Phones 3569. jHJ
I Prices. 2So. so" iS. " Klcht
Sbufeert Theatre B
fESSJtonaejr. Jft
THE ALLE.V CURTtq TBk
In llw Laughing Show, JM
"IX GAY PAREE"
HEAR THE GREAT soSs'a BAND ftl
M,,"y s'oht at 7145 " s:i5 -mi
TmM,T?,'h: fs - ftl
" -i -Pml
proposals. In irWlcatQ'm 1S10 Scdle B
here and at o c? nV1U. J53 received H
master at each Lt 11,0 , quarter- . iftft
until n a. m P "amJ?d below. jHV
for furnlshlnir corn S??1 ?" 1910 3HI
ami .straw or boddlnt? Hi bcai' JHI
during the recall yoar .LiV, '.Mulwd -'iHfti
1011. at Forta AdiX wff lUne Vfth. JfHP
Whipple Barrack Sfzon?" svS.V0?
and Denver. Colorado " ffi' ?Pr Sn. 3M
la.s and Duchesne, ijtfih K03 Hl
flees of respective post miofilr tl?f". 'LLflft
Envelopes to bo mnrkeri q.rterast??. -vH
forago and straw at Proposalter
h b, chamberlain ';;;",' OdHV
Quurtomaster. In Charge. Captaln IHjf

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