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The Washington herald. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, June 23, 1912, Image 1

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THE WASHINGTON HERALD
Prebaijy fair to-day and to-
The Herald lias tie Urges!
taotwtt Home drenlation. aad
prints all tie news of tbe world
each day, in- addition to many
exclusive, features.
no ROW.
Tentoeratures ? yesterday Max.
(iiassi, 8a; ininnnunv 61I
NO. 208T
w
WASHINGTON. D. C. SUNDAY, JUNE 23. 1912. -FORTY-FOUR &AGES. .
FTrTE ge$ts.
Toft and Sherman Renominated on First
Roosevelt's Followers Sulk and Form New Party
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M '''ma B a 9 - M
RENOMINATED FOR PRESIDENT OF U. S.
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William If. Baft
ROLL CALL BY STATES
ON PRESIDENTIAL VOTE
. .. Roose- La Cum- Not
State. TafL velt Follete. mlngs. Voting.
Alabama 22 .. . .
Arizona ..,............ s .. "I ". .7
Arkansas . 17 .. .. J." 1"
California 2 .. .. .. 21
Colorado. ........... 22 ., , , ,, mm
Connecticut....,...... .."I- . .".---?.. -.
i?,sUware-x-:""- ' -..-.. '?-..
r Ioriua.r.. .., . ...13i ...T Wh . .- - yv
Oeorgia.-". ...... ... 2" ..''.. ..
Idaho .-C. H .. 7 ..
Illinois 2 5S .. .. 2
Indiana 20 J 7
Iowa IS .. .. 10
Kansas 2 .. .. 1 .. 18
Kentucky 24 2
Louisiana 20 .. ..
Maine .. . .. .. . 12
Ma 1 land ...... J "9 .. . . 5
Massachusetts 20 .. .. .. ? 16 .
Michigan 20 9 1
Minnesota .. .. 24
Mississippi 17 ... .. .. 2
Missouri 16 , .. .. .. 20
Montana S .. .. ..
Nebraska .- .. 2 .. .. 14
N-ada 6
Sew Hampshire 8 .. .. ..
New Jersey .. 2 .. .. 36
New Mexico 7 1.. ..
NewYTk 76 8 .. .. 4
North Carolina 1 1 2!
North Dakota .. 10
Ohio 14 .. .. .. 34
Oklahoma ... 4 1 .. .. IS
Orrgon 8 .. .. 2
Pennsylvania 9 2 .. .. 6:
Rhode Island 10
South Carolina 16 .. .. .. 1
South Dakota S 5 ..
Tennessee 23 1
Texas 31 .. .. .. 8
Utah s
Vermont 6 .. .. .. 2
Virginia 23 .. .. .. 1
West Virginia .. .. .. 16
Wisconsin .. .. 26 ..
Wyoming 5
Alaska 2
District of Columbia 3 .. .. ..
XiaWdll .. ............. ......... . O .. .. .. ..
Philippines . 3 .. .. -..
Porto Rico 3
Total 561 10: 41 17 344
For Hughes. Pennsylvania, 3: Absentees Illinois. Maryland. Penn
sylvania, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia. 1 each. Total. 8.
.Salient Points in the
G. O. PI Platform
Renews allegiance to principles of Republican party.
Favors limiting hours of labor of women and children and protection
of wage-earners in dangerous occupations.
Upholds the authority and Integrity of tbe courts.
Favors new anti-trust legislation that will make monopolies crim
inal. Reaffirms belief in a protective tariff, but promises reduction In some
Import duties. Praises tariff board.
Condemns Democratic tariff bills of Sixty-second Congress as In
jurious to business.
Favors scientific Inquiry Into high cost of living, and -promises to
remove abuses that may exist.
Favors revision of banking system to prevent panlcs.and. need of
better currency facilities for movement of crops in West and South.
Urges agricultural credit societies to loan money to farmers.
Wants an extension, of the civil service law. .
Wants law to prevent contributions to nomination and -election of
President, Vice President, Senators, and Representatives in Congress.
Favors treaty with Russia and other countries to crevent'dUcrlmlna
tlon against American citizens.
Favors the parcel post. 0
Promises conservation of natural resources.
Believes In maintenance of adequate navy -and a revival of the mer
chant marine.
Believes that F.ederal government should assume -part control of
.Mississippi River and help prevent flood disasters.
Favors reclamation of arid lands and the Improvement of rivers and
harbors.
Pledges -new laws for relief of evils of undesirable immigration.
Favors ample equipment for life saving on ships.
Calls on public to condemn and punish lynchtngs and-to strengthen
respect for law.
Regards the recall of Judges as "unnecessary and. unwise."
Believes in settlement of International disputes bjr International
court of justice. .,
Delegates Rush Through
Business on Final Day;
Convention Comes to End
Chicago, June 22. William Howard Taft was "renominated for President of the United States
by the Republican National Convention at 9:25 o'clock to-nightv
Less than an hour later James Schoolcraft Sherman was renominated for the Vice Presidency.
The nominations were made on the first ballot. Senator La Follette's name was the onIyname
presented to the convention for the Presidential nomination besides that of Taft, Sherman's was the
only name presented for the Vice Presidency. A motion made to make his nomination unanimous was
objected to and a roll call ordered.
The vote for the Presidential nomination was:
Taft, 561; Roosevelt, 107; La Follette, 41; Cummins, 17; Hughes, 2. Present and not voting, 348;
absent, 2.
The vote on the Vice Presidential nomination was:
Sherman; 597; Borah, 21; Merriam, 20; Hadley, 14; Beveridge, 2; Gillette, 1. Absent, 71; not
voting, 352.
CONVENTION ADJ0UBNS AT 10:29 P. M.
The convention adjourned at 10:29 p. m.- ,
There were two excitinc features of the long session, which began at 10' in the morning and
continued till nearly midnight
lwo hours before the nomination of iaft,. the personal boom ot Ineodore Koosevelt gave its
last expiring gasp in a twenty-five minutes' demonstration.
Roosevelt- hung to his delegates, who had already planned to gather with him in the new mass
meeting in Orchestra Hall.
Idaho alone, of the Roosevelt men, fell away from him, seven of Senator Borah s constituents voting
for Cummins. The expected Hadley boom never raised a whisper. Cummins was not nominated, and
the passing tribute of a cheer from Barnes was the only greeting that came to the two v tes for Hughes
from Pennsylvania.
' When ft was all over and Sherman had been nominated in a gallop, Penrose looked at "Crane
and Crane looked at Root and they all three looked at each other. They had driven Roosevelt out
of the party.
As for the Taft delegates, tired, disheveled, utterly disgusted, without even a word for their can
didate, they began streaming to their hotels and then to their trains, the sickest lot of Republicans that
ever gathered together in convention.
NEAR EI0T TAKES PLACE.
The second incident was a near-riot in the Massachusetts delegation precipitated by. Root when,
during the roll call he began to get nervous about the count.
When the- delegates from the Codfish State, their minds made up to have no hand in the
matter, refused to vote when their names were called, Root ordered that the names of the alternates
be called. He knew that he would pick up a few Taft delegates in that way and just then he fancied
he might need them.
As soon as this order was issued Delegate Fosdyke, a gray bearded man who looks like James
G. Blaine, arose and shouted:
"Massachusetts is a. law abiding State,and you, hadtbetter not attempt that kind of robbery."
BULES VOTES' MUST BE CAST.
After the yells and cheers that greeted this defiance had subsided, Root strode to the edge of the
platform, a couple of husky secretaries beside him to prevent trouble, and said:
"If a delegate to this convention refuses to do his duty by casting his vote his alternate must do
it for him. The names of the alternates will be called."
When he walked back he said to the secretary: "Send the police to that aisle."
The police went there, thirty of them. The Massachusetts men were in the exact center of the
building, standing on their chairs, shaking their fists, hissing and hurling execrations at the chairman,
who had retired to his desk. Presently they quieted down and voted. They lost four votes, but they
gained one point of more importance.
Root never again during the roll call insisted on the call of alternates. Once or twice they were
called, but they never voted against their principals' desires.
RENOMINATED FOR VICE-PRESIDENT OF
Roosevelt Is Nominated
By Progressive Party
Automobile Races at Laurel. MA,
June n .and S3. Special train via Balti
more and Ohio R. R. leaves Union Sta
tion 1-0 p. m. both days. 75 cents round
SO&AS Round Trip to California.
Return different route. Tourist sleeping
cars personally conducted without change.
Berth. t9. "Washington-Sunset Route. A.
J. Poston, 3. A 90S F- St. 705 JJth St.
Dr ntlGIT S. MILLER.
Chicago, June 22. The third party la
here.
An hour after William Howard Taft
had been renominated by the Republi
can National Convention to-night, Theo
dore Roosevelt was the nominee of the
National Progressives, assembled In
Orchestra Hall.
A little later he had accepted the
nomination and had asked those who as
sisted In launching the new movement
to convene again In six weeks and ratify
their Indorsement of his candidacy.
The fight was on.
It was Roosevelt's answer to tue
bosses.
Assembled In Orchestra Hall were the
delegates who had been Instructed to
come to the Republican National Con'
venUon and nominate Roosevelt. With
them were the contestants whose cases
had been thrown out by tbe National
Committee.
They were determined, enthusiastic.
and- they were flanked by a great gath
ering oi Kooseveit supporters a snout
ing, cheering, singing, screaming, de
fiant crowd that could say but one thing.
We want Teddy."
Hadley and Others Missing.
It was a simple ceremony, but most
significant when viewed In Its relation
to the country's affairs.
A resolution was passed nominating
Roosevelt. He spoke In reply accepting
It.
The proceeding was marked by wild
enthusiasm.
The party was born. Gov. Hadley of
Missouri. Gov. Deneen ot Illinois, Gov.
Stubbs of Kansas. Senator William E.
Borah of Idaho, and Senator William
Briatbw of Kansas were conspicuous for
their absence, but the crowd cared noth
ing. It gave neither thought nor heed
to them.
The people in the hall men and women,
alike felt they were able to make the
fight themselves and they were content.
And when tne nominating resolution had
passed and CoL Roosevelt had ttken the
platform. It seemed as If human strength
and human voices could do no more.
They showed It when Roosevelt said.
"I accept the nomination."
Fandemonlum is a mud term lor the
demonstration that followed.
We Want Teddy."
"wnen Roosevelt said: "Go home and
find out the. sentiment of tbe people."
be was greeted with a about of "we
know It."
Then, like the beat of a great hammer.
$UZ3 Baltimore and Retura.
Baltimore and Ohio.
Every Saturday and Sunday. Good to
return until 9:05 a. m. Train Monday. All
Trains both ways. Including tbe Roys!
Limited.
the crowd yelled: "We -want Teddy. We
want Teddy."
"I think you do." said Roosevelt, "but
I want to be dead sure."
While the regular convention was nam
ing William Howard Taft as the' reg
ular Republican candidate the extremists
In the Roosevelt following and those del
egates to whom seats In the National
Convention had been refused, met in Or
chestra Hall and outlined their position
In a "declaration" which repeats tne cry
of "fraud"" and robbery which Col.
I Roosevelt himself started, and claimed
(that thty alone represented the will of
the majority of the Republican parly.
Here is their "declaration":
Xevr Party Declaration.
"We, delegates and alternates to the
Republican National Convention, repre
senting a clear majority of the voters of
the Republican party In the nation, and
representing a clear majority of the
delegates and alternates legally elected
to the convention. In meeting assembled.
make tne following declaration:
W'. were delegated by a majority of
the Republican voters of our respective
districts and States to nominate Theo
dore Roosevelt in the Republican Na
tlonal ConvenUon as the candidate of
our party for President, and thereby
carry out the win of tne voters as ex
pressed at the primaries. We have earn
estly and consclenuocsly striven to exe
cute the commission Intrusted to us by
the party voters,
"For five dsyg we have been denied
Justice In the National ConvenUon. This
result probable accomplished by the ac
tion of the now defunct National Com
mittee In placing upon the preliminary
roll of the convenUon. and thereby seat
ing upon the floor of the convenUon. a
sufficient number of fraudulently elected
delegates to control the proceedings of
the convenUon. These fraudulent dele
gates, once seated, have by concerted ac
tion with one another put themselves
upon the permanent roll, where they con
sUtute an Influence sufficient to control
the convention and defeat the will of the
party as expressed at the primaries.
Tried to Head OS Conspiracy.
"We have exhausted every known
means to head off this conspiracy, and to
prevent this fraud upon the popular will,
but without success..
"Ve were sent to this convenUon besr
ing the most .specific Instructions to. place
Theodore Roosevelt In nomlnaUon as the
candidate of our party for President.
Summer Tanra. via B. A O, Tt. R.
Dally to Jersey Seashore. Adirondack
.Mountains and all New York. New Eng
land, and Canadian Provinces Nova Sco
tia and Quebec and Allegheny Moun
tain resorts: also to Western Points.
If contemplating a rail or water trip for
pleasure, or on business, consult agents
at lith St- & N. T. Ave, or 613 Penn
sylvania Ave. They will help you.
and we therefore deem It to be our duty
to carry out those Instructions In the
enly practically feasible way remaining
open to us.
"Therefore, be It resolved, Tha"t we
representing the majority of the voters
of the Republican party, and of the dele
gates and alternates legally elected to
the National Republican Convention. In
compliance with our Instructions from
tho party voters, hereby nominate Theo
dore Roosevelt as the candidate ot our
party for the offlce of President of the
United States; and we call upon him
to accept such nomination In compliance
with the will of the party voters.
"And. be It further resolved. That a
committee be appointed by the cha r to
forthwith notify CoL Roosevelt of the
action here taken, and request him to
appear before us in this haU as soon
as convenient
Only One Condition.
In accepting the nomination CoL
Roosevelt said:
"Gentlemen I thank you for your
nomination, and In you I recognize the
lawfully elected delegates" to the Re
publican convention who represent the
overwhelming majority of the voters
who took part In the Republican pri
maries prior to the convention, and
who represent the wish of the major
ity of lawfully elected members ot the
convention. I accept the nomination
subject to but one condition.
"This has now become a contest which
cannot be settled merely along tbe old
party lines. The principles that are at
stake are as broad and as deep as the
foundations of our democracy Itself. They
are In no sense sectional. They should
appeal to all honest citizens. East and
West. North and South, they should ap
peal to all right-thinking men. whether
Republicans or Democrats, without re
gard to their previous party affiliations.
I feel that the time has come when not
only all men who believe In progressive
principles, but all men who belle In
those elementary maxims of public and
private morality which must underly
every form of successful free government,
should Join one movement Therefore,
I ask you to go to your several homes to
find out the sentiment of the people at
home and then again to come together,
I suggest by mass convention, to nomi
nate for the Presidency a progressive
candidate on a progressive platform, a
candidate and a platform that will enable
us to appeal to Northerner and Southern
Continued on Pnjre Five.
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Photo by Hicrl-EwtB.
Hamzs S. Stjermcm.
ROLL CALL ON VICE
PRESIDENTIAL VOTE
SUte. " -
ArizonA
AruLtisss
" California ...
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana -
lows
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Massachusetts
Maryland
Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota, 'x
Ohio J
Oklahoma
Oregon -;
Pennsylvania -
Rhode Island J
South Carolina la
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
VlrglnU
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
Alaska
District of Columbia
Hawaii
Philippines
Porto Rico
Sherman. Borah. Merriam. Hadley.
8
18
12
14
12
12
:s
io
21
6
26
20
IS
20
20
8
6
S
8
ST
6
23
31
S
6
14
Not
Voting.
2
34
17
2 7
'.'. is
"5 4
3
1 S
24
IS
14
:s
1
10
34
it
3
10
1
s
'i
1
is
Total s" 21 20 1 232
For Beveridfre. Nebraska. 2; for Gillette. Illinois, L Absentee Illinois.
17- Maine 12: Masachusetts. II: Maryland. 5: New Tork. 3: North Caro
lina, 17. Pennsylvania. 1; Texas. 1. Virginia, 1: Wisconsin. 2.
PERSONNEL OF NEW
NAT'L COMMITTEE
131-00 Chlmjto and Return.
Baltimore and Ohio, account N. E. A..
July 4 to. 6. valid for return until Aug.
XL Throuch trains of modern electric-
lighted equipment, morning, noon, even-
, MM4 ,UUW
Announcement Made that Secre
tary Hilles Is to be Made
Chairman.
Chicago, June 2i The new national
committee, with the exception of Massa
chusetts and New York, was announced
to-night These two States have not yet
made their selections. It Is understood
to-nlght that Secretary Hilles is to be
the chairman. The. following are mo
members:
Alabama Prelated Barker.
Arizona Ralph H. Cameron.
Arkansas Powell Clayton.
California Ross Aery.
Colorado Simon Guggenheim.
Connecticut Charles T Brooker.
Delaware T. Coleman Du Pont
Florida Henry S. Chubb, Jr.
Georgia Henry S. Jackson.
Idaho-John W. Hart
Illinois Roy D West
Indiana James F. Goodrich.
Iowa John T. Adams.
Kansas William Allen White.
Kentucky-J. W. McCullough.
Louisiana Victor RoIseL
Maine Frederick Hale.
Maryland William F. Jackson.
Massachusetts Deferred.
Michigan Charles Warren.
Minnesota L. A. CasawelL '
Mississippi L, B. Moselty.
Missouri Thomas K. Neldrinshaus.
Montana T. A. Marlow.
Nebraska R. B. Howell.
Nevada H. B. Maxon.
New Hampshire Fred W. Estabrook.
New Jersey Borden D. Whiting.
New Mexico Solomon Luna.
New York Deferred.
North Carolina Richmond Pearson.
North Dakota Thomas F. Marshall.
Ohio Walter F. Brown.
Oklahoma Georgo C. Priestly.
Oregon Ralph Williams.
Pennsylvania H. G Wasson.
Rhode Island William P. Sheffield.
South Carolina-Joseph W. Holbroolc
South Dakota Thomas Thomson
Tennessee Newall Sanders.
Texas H F McGregor.
Utah C. F Loose.
Vermont John L. Lewis.
Virginia Albah H. Martin.
Washington S. A. Perkins.
West Virginia William C. S. Edwards.
Wisconsin Alfred T. Rogers.
Wyoming George S, Paxton.
Alaska-W. S. Dayles.
District of Columbia Chapln Brown.
Hawaii C. A. Rice.
Philippine Henry B. McCoy.
Porto Rico Sockemas Rehn.
X9U0 to Las Angeles and Reran.
Baltimore and Ohio, June 28 to July 4.
valid for. return until August 27. Ask
agents for particulars.
FREE
BASEBALL
TICKETS
To Sec
Next Wednesday's Great
Baseball Game
Washington vs. Boston
See Page 7
To-day's Herald
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