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The Washington herald. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, February 15, 1918, Image 11

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TODAY Advertisers Are In THE MORNING HERALD for Results too ay
The Only 1c Dally in Washlngton-or Delivered, Before Breakfast, 30 ctn" a MoSth
Amount Tallies with Fig
^ ures of Private Experts,
| It Is Stated.
OAcials of the United States Ship
ping Board told the House Naval Af
fairs Committee yesterday that the
total new tonnage In 1918 will be
around 3.400,000, Instead of the 000,000
oringally estimated.
This amount tallies with the figures
submitted to Congressional commit
tees by private experts. The board,
however, has. up to now. consistently
held to its first estimate, despite all
critlciams.
Two members of the board?Com
missioners Page and Donald?announc
ed their opposition to the plan of
manning ships with Naval Reserves.
With them came Harry Howard, di
rector of recruiting for the board.
Questioned by committee members,
he said that he had been instructed
to recruit only enough men to man
a tonnage of 3,418,000. He admitted
this "appeared*' to be the board's
"Inside opinion" of what actually
could be done.
The Shipping Board men testified
that plenty of skilled sailors could
be found to man ordinary vessels.
They admitted that transports and
munitions ships could best be han
dled by crews In uniform and under
discipline. j
Representative Britten, of Illinois,
a.-ked Commissioner Page if it were
i*ot true that the chairman of the
board. Edward N. Hurley, favored
the naval crews plan. He replied
that he thought a majority of the
board favored ordinary crews.
ReafrTM Called "Slavea."
Andrew Furusath, president of the
**careen's Union, protested vlgorous
lv against the proposed innovation. I
He and several associates referred
to the Naval Reserves as "slaves."
because they could not quit their
jobs when they wished. Intimations |
were given that the reserves were
landsmen who had gone into service
to avoid the draft.
Rear Admiral Palmer's recent tes- i
t mony that the seamen were In- I
competent, undisciplined, many times ]
drunker., and beyond necessary dis
cipline, he characterised as preju
diced
"Thj kernel of the situation," said
Furuseth, "is that If you do not de
velop sailors during the war, you
will have no one to man the mer
chant marine when the Naval Re
serves have gone home."
No More Rice Showers
For Newly Wed Couples
Wilkes-Barre. Pa.. Feb. 14.?The I
'showering of rice upon newly weds'
was prohibited today by the local food
Administrator. The next move looked
for Is a ban upon the casting of old
shoes, for leather is valuably too.
"The stars incline, but do not compel.'
HOROSCOPE.
r
| Friday, February 13, ltl8.
Astrologers find the stars in kind
ly aspect today. Venus and the Sun
rule with benefic power, while
Uranus changes from good to evil
place.
Theaters and places of amuse
ment come tinder a most encourag
ing rule today. It should be favor
able for the introduction of a new
play or a new star.
Actresses should make the most
#f this configuration, which pre
aages for them favor with all who
have power to help them toward
success.
It is a most auspicious rule for
all who seek employment, especial
ly In the artistic lines of work.
Rulers, whether in civil or mili
tary life, should benefit greatly to
day from the friendly power of the
Sun.
There Is a very encouraging sway
^or politicians who seek recognition
?or preferment.
1 Congress has a direction making
Wor many exciting days in the next
[month. Clashes of opinion between
?legislators and army commanders
Fappear to be indicated.
I Changes in important offices in
\ the government are foreshadowed.
Some of these may be caused by
sudden deaths.
Women as organizers will attain
success from now on and a few will
even gain commissions of recogni
tion in the army and navy. It is
prophesied.
There Is a good augury for the
wearing of silk and fine materials,
which are supposed to have a spe
cial significance at this time.
Occultists also see in the impulse
that causes women to wear their
hqjlr over the ears a survival of j
fjme ancient war custom and they |
call attention to the fashion of
^lvll War days.
?""Persons whose birthdatc It is have'
happy outlook for the year. Busi- j
ness and financial affairs should be
satisfactory. The young will court
and marry.
Children born on this day will be
actiye, strong and successful. These
?objects of Aquarius are usually
much loved. Girls are usually fa
vorites with the opposite sex and
k marry happily.
(Copyrisbt. MU.)
||0XATED IRON
X
This Y.IHCA. Secretary
Proves He's Real Barber
Among other thing* I I, II. C. *. I
camp secretary mast be versatile.
Rev. R. E. Simons, pastor of a fash
ionable church In Camden. N. J.. for
example, was not averse to turning
barber upon one occasion recently.
Mr. Simons Is at Washington Bar
racks.
One day after writing a letter to a
soldier boy's mother?for the boy's
arms were crippled by rheumatism
he asked whether he could be of fur
ther assistance.
??yes," replied the boy. "I want a
shave more than anything else just
now."
So the pastor turned barber and
gave the young man a shave. Taking
him for a barber several other boys
made a similar request. So Mr.
Simons went right ahead with the
work.
"It was as good a way as any to
?get next' to the boys," he said.
\m
The Poor Married Mas.
I "Jedge. Ah ain't had a clean shirt
(ter wear since last 'nauggeration. Mah
I wife Jes* woan stay In de house en ten
? to huh bisness."
j "But, ray dear man." said the court
to Carroll Brooks, "does that give you
a license to try to kill her?"
?Now listen, Jedge," answered Car
roll; "nawthln* on dis earth could kill
dat woman. Not eben de whole Ger
man army. Her hild is too hard."
It was the same old. old trouble,
Carroll said. His wife was a feminist
Whatever that was to Carroll, he
! didn't approve of it.
He insisted that his wife. Katherine.
stay in the house, cook his meals,
darn his socks and do what she prora
| ised on the altar to do.
| Katherine would, however, go to
1 the movies, attend lectures, gossip over
| the back fence, go to church six
| times a week and do all those little
I things which the modern woman
i thinks she must do whether or no.
One day Carroll got tired. He!
actually spanked her. Then he used
I a stick on her "haid." with the stick
] getting the wortst of it.
He has promised never to do It I
again. If he does he must serve out'
a sixty-day sentence.
Carefml There Mamie.
If people would only look where'
they were going, or else go when
they are looking, there would be
less trouble in this world.
This applies especially to Mamie
Jackson. Mamie is always pointed
one way and headed for another
way, just like a pin.
She was coming out of a lunch
room. Her head was turned. She
was looking at a sporty-looking In
dividual of the masculine sex.
She was considerably shocked
[when she ran plump into Hyacinth
Brown.
Hyacinth's hat was knockcd off.
I Her coiffure was disarranged.
I She smacked Mamie In the kiss
er. She got her in a corner and put
i her foot, (No. 10), in her Jaw.
Then the pair got out on the side
walk and fought it out.
! Three cops ran up and tried to
separate them. They couldn't do it.
So there was nothing to do but
to carry the scrappers to the lock
up.
The girls fought all the way
I there.
j They are both very sorry now. It |
| hurt them more to part with a ten
spot than it did to get into the |
scrap.
The Worn a ? (If It.
Two years ago Matt Jackson and
his wife Isetta separated.
Why they separated doesn't mak*
the least difference now as they stayed
apart just a year and a half and then
airreed to live together attain. * i
Everything was running along!
peacefully until Gertrude Wilson came 1
on to visit the Jacksons from "some- !
where In Virginia."
The minute she hit the front door
Matt began to be uneasy.
Monday nlrht as the three sat
| around the kitchen stove Gertrude be
gan to relate some of her adventures,
which, by the way. were rather spiqy.
When she got to a certain little In
cident that happened In Petersburg.
Va.. Matt got up and left the room.
Gertrude then whispered In Iselta's
car. Of all boneheaded stunts this was
i the limit.
i Isetta jumped up and ran efter
Matt. He refused to say a word. But
wifey understood It anyhow.
It grieved her to learn that Matt
had made love lo a certain woman
while they were separated.
She got after Matt about it. Matt
got after her with a cane.
The court got behind Matt with a
t*0 fine.
The Rea?on Herman Hurried.
| One night as Herman Heavers, son i
of Madeline Beavers, came home, he!
notified everybody that he would!
not stay for supper.
Ma inquired the reason. Herman
sidestepped the question and flew I
out.
He did not get home until mid-1
night. Ma heard him coming in and I
reprimanded him.
An hour later Katie Johnson Her- |
man's girl rushed around to the
Beaver's home and demanded aud
ience with Herman.
Ma let her in and Inquired the
reason for the nocturnal visit.
Herman had taken her watch, she
told Ma. who Immediately got hot
in the collar.
Herman was ordered downstairs.
He sheepishly admitted his guilt.
But because of a previous mlsun- |
derstanding between Katie and her ;
prospective mother-in-law, she re
fused to drop the case, even though
Ma got down on her bended knees.
But when the case came to trial.
Katie softened her heart.
She asked the court to parole
Herman. It was done.
BAND CONCERT PROGRAM.
By the United State* Soldier*' Home
Band, Jodo 8. M. Zinunermann. director,
at 8tin)ey Hall, begfante* at t JS p. wl
"My Country Tia of Thee.''
Kaveh. "The Grand Kni*bf' Boehnleln
Idyl. Ekenor".
SeiecOoo. "Eileen**..... Herbert
Fa* trot, "If To? *?er Get Lonely"....
Manhili
Walts gait*?. "IHnabe Way*" Ivanortai
Final*. "I Lsv? Tea, That's One
? TMm
Gilbert
7 *
Dispatchers' Representative
Denies Plan to Discredit
Adamson Statute.
The railroads are net attempting to'
break down the Adamson eight-hour
law, W. G. Edey told the Railroad
Wage Commission yesterday.
Speaking for the train dispatcher*
on the Sea I>oard Air Lint. Edey said
he knew positively the officials of
that system were working night and
day to tar.rruve transportation condi
tions.
Edey to"fc Issue with the recent
statement of W. G. Lee, president
of the Order of Railroad Conductors,
that the railroad heads had com
bined to beat the Adamson }aw.
Edey's defense of the railroads was
made iutlng his plea for higher
wages for train dispatchers. The
Wage Commission also heard, yes
terday, representatives of the dining
car stewards on the Pennsylvania
Railroad, colored helpers and laborers
of the roads In the southeastern dls
wfi and International Union of
Molders. This concluded the number
of witnesses who had requested oppor
tunities to present their cases.
James A. Hennessey presented sta
tistics designed to show that the
Pennsylvania stewards work is
hours a day 365 days a year. He
asked an increase of 20 per cent
with a minimum wage of |1B? a
month. The stewards also want
shorter hours, with at least four
days a month at home.
Edy asked for J2J5 a month for
chief train dispatchers; I2S5 for as
sistant chiefs and 1215 for dis
patchers. The prevailing rates of
pay now are J175. ?1?5 and ?1?0.
In making this appeal he took
CHAPTER VII.
Rations.
Just before dozing off. Mr. Lance
Corporal butted in.
In Tommy's eyes, a lance corporal
Is one degree below a private. In the
corporal's eyes, he is one degree
above a general.
He ordered me to go with him and
help him draw the next day's rations,
also told me to take my waterproof
Every evening, from each platoon
or machine-gun section, a lance eor
I Poral and private goes to the quarter
master-sergeant at the company
stores and draws rations for the fol
lowing day.
The "quarter." as the quarterns*
I ter-sergeant is called, receives daily
from the orderly room (captain's of
fice* a slip showing the number of
men entitled to rations, so there is no
chance of putting anything over on
him. Many arguments take place be
tween the "quarter" and the platoon
non-com, but the former always wins
out Tommy says the "quarter" got
civU Ufeb?CaU8e hS Wa" a bunrlar In
Then I spread the waterproof sheet
on the ground, while the quartermas
ter s batmen dumped the rations on It
The corporal was smoking a fag. i
carried the rations back to the blilet
| The corporal was still smoking a fag
How I envied him. But when the is
sue commenced my envy died, and I
| realized that the first requisite of a
I non-commissioned officer on active
service Is diplomacy. There were
nineteen men in our section, and they
[ soon formed a seml-clrcle around us
I after the corporal had called out
"Rations up."
I The quartermaster-sergeant had
i *iven a slip to the corporal on which
was written a list of the rations. Sit
ting on the floor, using a wooden box
as a table, the Issue commenced. On
the left of the corporal th? rations
were piled. They consisted of the fol
lowing:
Sli loaves of fresh bread, each loaf
or a different sise. perhaps one out
of the six being as flat as a pancake.
I tne result of an Army Service Corps
| man placing a box of bully beef on
| it during transportation.
| Three tins of Jam, one apple, and
the other two plum.
Seventeen Bermuda onions, all dlf
ferent sizes.
A piece of cheese in the shape of a
wedge.
Two one-pound tins of butter,
j A handful of raisins.
A tin of biscuits, or as Tommy calls
them "Jaw-breakers."
A bottle of 'mustard pickles.
The "bully beef," spuds, condensed
milk, fresh meat, bacon, and "Ma
conochie Rations'* (a can filled with
meat vegetables, and greasy water),
had been turned over to thfc company
cook to make stew for next day's din
ner. Ho also received the tea. sugar,
salt, pepper, and flour.
I Scratching his head, the corporal
[Studied the slip issued him hy the
I vnf [' j? ln R ?low- mystified
voice he read out: "No. 1 section. 1?
men. Bread, loaves six." He looked
i voice^ 8nd *olnor'"l*ed in * musing
"Six loaVes, nineteen men. Let's
| see. that's three in a loaf for fifteen
men?well to make it even, four of
you U have to muck In on one loaf."
The four that got stuck made a
howl, but to no avail. The bread wis
(dished out. Pretty soon from a far
j comer of the billet, three Indignant
i Tommies accosted the corporal with ?
"What do you call, this, a loaf of
! plate*.' L??kS m?re "ke a 8nlpln*
| The corporal answered:
Ikdon'L ?,ame me> 1 didn't
I w somebody s got to get It so
1 shut up until I dish out these bllnkln'
rations.
I Then the corporal started on the
, Jam.
, **5am- - tins-apple one, plum
two. Nineteen men, three tins. Six
m.akf" twelve men for two
'in?- seven ln the remaining tin "
He passed around the Jam. and there
was another riot Some didn't like
apple. While others who received plum
were partial to apple. After the dlf
?er* ~?u?ted, and the Issue
went on.
"Bermuda onions, seventeen."
fu0?1^0?1 *vo'<ied a row by say
inn t . * dld ""t want an onion,
smell JTr th*T m>ke y?ur breath
smell, so I guessed I would do wltk
gratl?tuae.t<>0 Th* looked hi,
"Cheese, pounds two.?
boTow?d ? Jackknife
aSl L. Rrt borrowing).
b^Mftitt. *?eh titer
l^k?r2V. ,? ."J*""1 rem"11 *">"> on
" *? th? <*>rporal's tves'riit
Raisins, ounces, eight."
occasion to refer to the statement*
before the commission of W. s.
Stone, representing the engineers.
The engineers already are receiving
high wages, he pointed out. En
gineer* on the Seaboard draw |M0
for twenty day*' work, he said.
One engineer recently earned l?0
in a. alnrle month, he stated.
College Women to Find
Work in War Activities
The Intercollegiat* Intelligence Bu
reau yesterday announced the ap
pointment of Miss Louise Shepherd,
of Vasaar College, to organise a di
vision to place coUege women and
women of the college type In positions
of war aervlce.
BREAKlLlWrH,
NOW AIM OF SUFFS
Vote Stekeri Claim Two States Be
low Line.
Following favorable resolutions
from both Republican and Demo
cratic National Commltteea con
cerning woman suffrage. It Is as
serted that Bouthern Senators are
gradually coming over to the side
of the suffragists.
Two Southern States. Arkansas
and West Virginia, will give a solid
vote for euffrage in the Senate.
The vote of one Senator Is pledged
In six ofher Southern States, Mary
land. Mississippi. Louisiana, Tenn
essee. Missouri and Texas.
According to suffragist leaders,
the situation Ms now squarely up to
the Democratic party. With more
than two-thirds of the Republicans
pledged to suffrage, the Democrats
alone would be responsible were the
measure defeated.
Senator Vardaman, of Mississippi,
gives as one of his reasons for sup
porting suffrage, his belief that it
will help solve the race problem.
He says: "Instead of equal suffrage
complicating the race problem, I be
lieve that women will help us solve
that difficult questton In the South."
Y EMPEY
By this time the corporate nerves
had gone west, and In despair, he
said that the raisins were to be
turned over to the cook for "duff" j
(plum pudding). This decision elicited
a little "grousing." but quiet was
finally restored.
"Biscuits, tins, one."
With his borrowed Jackknife, the
corporal opened the tin of biscuits,
and told every one to help themselves
?nobody responded to this Invitation.
Tommy la "fed up" with biscuits.
"Butter, tins, two."
"Nine in one, ten in the other."
Another rumpus.
"Pickles, mustard, bottles, one."
Nineteen names were put in a steel
helmet, the last one winning the pick
les. On the next Issue there were
only eighteen names, as the winner Is
eliminated until every man in the
section has won a bottle.
j The raffle Is closely watched. be-(
cause Tommy is suspicious when it
comes to Rambling with his rations.
When the Issue is finished, the cor
poral sits down and writes a letter
home, asking them if they cannot get
some M. P. (member of Parliament)
to have him transferred to the Royal
Flying Corps where he won't have to
Issue rations.
At the different French estaminets
In the village, and at the canteens.
Tommy buys fresh eggs, milk, bread,
and pastry. Occasionally when he is
flush, he invests In a tin of pears or
apricots. His pay is only a shilling,
a day. 24 cents, or a cent an hour.
Just imagine, a cent an hour for be- .
lng under fire?not much chance of
getting rich out there. j
When he goes Into the fire trench j
(front line). Tommy's menu takes a
tumble. He carries In his haversack
what the government calls emergency
or iron rations. They arc not sup
posed to be opened until Tommy dies
of starvation. They consist of one tin
of bully beef, four biscuits, a little j
tin which contains tea, sugar, and j
Oxo cubes (concentrated beef tablets). |
These, are only to be used when the
enemy establishes a curtain of shell j
Are on the communication trenches,
thus preventing the "carrying In" of |
rations, or when In an attack, a boay .
of troops has been cut off from its.
base of supplies.
The rations are brought up. at
night, by the company transport. This
is a section of the company in charge |
of the quartermaster-sergeant, com-1
posed of men, mules, and limbers *
(two-wheeled wagons), which supplies
Tommy's wants while in the front
line. They are constantly under shell j
(ire. The rations are unloaded at the j
entrance to the communication j
trenches and are "carried In" by j
men detailed for that purpose. Thf
quartermaster-sergeant never goes,
into the front-line trench. He doesn't |
have to, and I have ne- r heard of j
one volunteering to do.so.
The company sergeant-major sorts,
the rations, and sends them in.
Tommy's trench rations consist of;
all the bully beef he can eat, biscuits.,
cheese, tinned butter (sometimes sev-j
enteen men to a tin), jam, or a mar
malade, and occasionally fresh bread
(ten to a loaf). When it Is possible
he gets tea and stew.
When things are quiet, and Fritz is j
behaving like a gentleman, which \
seldom happens, Tommy has the op
portunity of making dessert. This Is
"trench pudding." It Is made from
broken biscuits, condensed milk. Jam
?a little water added, slightly flavor-,
ed with mud?put Into a canteen and
cooked over a little spirit stove known
as "Tommy's cooker."
(A firm In Blighty widely advertises j
these cookers as a necessity for thel
men In the trenches. Gullible people
buy them, ship them to the Tommies,
who. Immediately upon receipt of
same throw them over the patapet.
Sometimes a Tommy falls for the ad
and uses the cooker In a dugout to
the disgust and discomfort of the
other occupants.)
This mess is stirred up In a tin and
allowed to simmer over the flames
from the cooker until Tommy decides
that It has reached a sufficient (glue
like} consistency. He takes.his bay
onet and by means of the handle car
ries the mess up in the front trench
to cool. After It has cooled off he
tries to eat It. Generally one or two
Tommies In a section have cast-Iron
stomachs and the tin Is soon emptied.
Once I tasted treach pudding, but
only once
In sddltion to the regular ration
Issue Tomrdy uses another channel to
enlarge his menu.
In the English papers a "Lonely
Soldier" column is run. This Is for
the soldiers at the front whp are sup
posed to be without friends or rela
tive*. They write to the papers and
their names are published. Qtr)s and
women in England fn*w?r vhem, and
?end out parcel* of foodstuff*. dx
arettaa, candy, etc. I hart known a
lonely aoldler to receive aa many
ona^w?JtarMU *nd eleT,n ??tUra In
to BE OONTINDKD TOMORROW
Law of Supply and
Demand AppKet to Fuh
Although dealer* expect an abun
i. *ufplsr ot "??> on the local
'* the near future, at pres
ent the supply i* onjr f*lr and
price* are high due to the heavy
Lenten demand. Rock and aalmon
trout are being received In fair
? *nd ,haa "d barring
from Southern market* are reported
on the lncreaae, though receipt* a*
ar* con*'derably below normal.
Good supplies of fro*en fish are on
hand to aid In meetlnr the demand.
marriage licenses.
?
, WHITE. I
bEUS* "? c- ?
tST?. I ?ST '? Vkd* *?
?STStt'? ?"?-* *
SmZjSJTaSf "* * *? Whm
Jn^sssr "**? ?
"" *?*???. *?
JjW?Mi H. e and Martha A
I W?SJ*' ?? Gtorf E. ftmith.
,md' *? ???
"d Um ? wklUo
??* A"et ToUfcm
?????? WalUe. Raddige.
."^jSItest* ?? "?
tSSim!uaJLS^ Aud* M ?*?* ?
I m COLORED.
r ZlZSJSIL,*- "d Bno" 11
1 ? *
JSVcJEtf I~?*ln* Ho~!
34. and Ancle u Town*. tt
". wtarij.
BIRTHS REPORTED.
WHITE.
Miehard H and t>*rl, Booth, gin
Jamee A. and Phoebe M. D?t?, mri
^WlllUm Newman and Jlinrai i,.
I w*Md B and MolUa I*. Oordoo. *in.
?dnrnnd U and Etoie M Omber. drL
Frank O. and Una K. Moller. bor.
Richard A. and H. Lsolae Mrnph,. bo*
Bans and Julia Hi*, m
Thoma. J. and Fannie U Rran. fltj.
wuiZ. D ?d vi'*lni? SduDth. (In
W liber B. and Alloe B. Wattfna, jjrt
C-JU?UU).
J"? and Tlola Hill. ipri.
PVedenck L. and Maud Cntwmm. bor
DEATH RECORdT
WHITE.
Ellen Olaik. ? rra.. 1520 CaroBn* at. aw
" Koblen. * jra. X8 H at. r?
l*iarl?a M. Sunn. ?2 via. uu Lamont at nw
22 *<**. " jra.. ?. Eliaabath'a Heap
?' ? m, JW B ?. n?.
**???" I"-. ins N Cap.-at
5-m" 29 y*. *? 8 at. D>.
William B. StlbT. ?: ji*. no 3d at. na
Amy It. Potter. W ,u.. MS O at. nw
> ?Tni? 8hield?. 75 yra.. ISO ?th at. nw
"d M"7 5 ^
COLORED.
Oeorra <~Vrter. 3 j? , IS (I al. aw.
Ham- A Joh?M, 3 m. na lltb at nw.
William (Ti?r>nan, X jra.. m at at aw
Soloman Mottiaoo. 66 jn.. rreedme^', Hoap.
Jam-i A. Kit..,. <3 m> ;ia N)ctloU ?e ^
Panl r..waB. 1 jr.. C/? <;h at nw.
[LfOTHERS ?
Keep the family free J
^fromcolda by using
\
ICR'S: VAPQRUBU
| THETfflfeHERALD
I byP'rhl?hw.*hl*n?ton*,H,er?l5* C^'
I ?t 425-425 Eleventh .tre?t
I Washington,
I 33X0"'? tRne8,lEX,;ia;SO ~ C*" M*ln
1 ar-f.i'SffiiSSrtr
I u Member Audit Bureau of Clrcula
CLASSIFIED RATES
WaDt^d Delp
Wanfad Situations
Wanted Jtooraa and Board..
"or Rent Roctna............
Wanted StiacfUaneoaf
For Kale Miscellaneous
Loat and Found ..*..
Automobfles [ *
? ONE
CENT
A
WORD
fMlnimurn
Charfe. 15c.)
1 All Other Claaalflmtion*?
i I time ... ..
3timea witbin a wte'kV".'.V.'.'.'.'.'.V''.' 'S mi.
3 timra within a week JO JS !
t times CTTneeiTtiTely o!t?.
30 or more time. oonaecntitelT!..."""'" 7 cent"
1 cent a Une eitrm for cU.vi.ned black face ??
and efts.
FORKICX REPPESENT ITIVES
sptci'4t' agency
??r5i:r
Detroit Officc ".".""is^FWd
Third Nation.! Hank HM,
DIED.
EOws "<?Aiffo"S*aa'r' fobruary IS.
1J1?. JAMK.S H. BOYD, father of
year* "a M' William?. aged 74
F!inttrai ,oday at 3 o'clock, from hia
riuaa?Amit a 3221 XVardor street.
1 lease omit flowers. (Pittsburgh
papers please copy.)
RKUNTHAVER?On Thursday, Feb
f?27 1i?ms' ,e"zabeth a..
l>aver. Charles K. Brunt
frot" her late residence, 603
row at l ?,SMr,hW"t' tomor
r"'XT??,9" Wednesday, February 13.
1918, JULIU8 BUTTS, at his resi
dence. Rosslyu, Va.
Chuih fL?? , the First Bapust
SSSLa^rt^a X? ' tomorrow
arternoon at 2 o clock.
On Wednesday. Februarv 13.
Jrih'n ErVLF CLAfik wWoW O^t
Mary Kl'SSd. m?ther ?f Mra
F^ralr'r",^ hsr. ,ate residence,
?hii ^aroJine street northwest,
at S::?- thence to
St. "aul s Church, where mass will
friend. w.t-S'01?^' Relatives and
Invited. Interment at Mount
Olivet Cemetery. Please omit flow
.ers.
DAHLQREN?On Sunday, February
10. 1918, at 2:15 p. m? at the Johns
Sal'lmore, Md..
CAROLINE COLTON (nee Col'
ton), beloved wife of John B.
lJah'gren and a daughter of the
late Gen. David D. Colton, of San
Francisco, Cal.
DIGQS ? Suddenly, on Wednesday,
February 13, 1918, at Sibley Hos
pital. HEIJSN T. DIQOS. beloved
*"e of Olan E. Dlgg* and daugh
ter of Mary Keefe.
Funeral from her mother's resi
dence, ?o Jt street northeast, to
morrow morning. February 16. at
8:30. thence to St Aloyslu*
Church, where mass will be said
.?JL tb? ^^2?* of her soul. Rela
tive* and friend* invited. Inter
ment at Mount Olivet Cemetery.
February 13, isi8,
^..R2I?ST c.i. beloved wife of
Otto C. Hiuaehtld, aged M year*.
SET? . ^?m. her Ut* residence.
7 . ^ ,tr?*t northeast, tomor
row at 2 p. in. Intefracat Con
grcMional- Cemttery,
i i
DIED.
I HONE8TY?Departed this ltfa F#b
1 ruary 11 MV at 1?:? *.
Acker atrnt nortliMSt JUANITA
ALLEN HONK8TT, Um toatorad
daughter of Francis Honasty, aU
ter of Wab.tar and Francis Hon
esty, rranddaufhter of the late
Daniel B. Webatar aad Amelia A.
Webater and the devoted grand
niece and godchild of Nathaniel
Allan.
Funeral from Ebenmar M ft.
Church, Fourth and D atreeti
aoutheast, today it I p. n. Kela
tlvea and friends axe Inrltad. (Har
riaburg, Pa., papara pleaaa copy.)
I HUGHES?On Tueaday. February IX
1918. at 1 p. m., GEORGE A. R..
I beloved huaband of Martha E.
Hughes, In hla Mth year.
Funeral from hla late raaldenc*.
Conduit road and Jewell street, to
day it 1 p, m. Relattvea and
friends Invited. Interment at Glen
wood Cemetery.
! MACBRIDE?Suddenly. at 4:? a. ra..
I February 1?. 191S. ELLEN VIR
GINIA MACBRIDE (nee David
eon). beloved wife of William C.
liacBrlde and mother of Xiat
Jessie MacBrlde.
Funeral aervica at Oawlei's chapel
tomorrow at I p. a. Interment
private.
WEEKS?On Tburaday. February U
1918. at ? a. m.. FANNIE A., be
loved daughter of Frances E. and
the lata Samuel J. Meeka.
Notice of funeral hereafter. (Balti
more papers please oopy.)
MITCHELL ? Departed this Bfe
Thursday, February 14. 1918. at her
. residence. 718 East Capitol street.
MART CATHERINE, the be
loved wlfa of Thomas P. Mitchell
and devoted mother of Mary
Martha Mitchell and Lillian
Phillip* NichoL
Funeral services at her lata resi
dence today at 5 p. m. Interment
at Libertytown. Md.
MORGAN?Suddenly, at the horaa of
her son. Dr. U Fleet Lsuckett. 1419
__ Rhode Island avenue, Wednesday.
February 1*. lftt. KUZABLTH
B. MORGAN, widow of William B.
Morgan. _ ^
Interment (private) Oak Hill Ceme
tery tomorrow at 10 a. m.
FOIND0XTER?At the Tuberculosis
Hospital, on Wednesday. February
IX, mt, EDWARD Q.. Jr., son of
Edward G. and the late Ann L.
Poindezter. , _
Funeral Sunday. February 17, at 7
o'clock, from Mrs. Alexander Hen
son's funeral parlor, 645 Y lorida
avenue north west.
POTTBR?On February 12. 1918. her
lata residence, ?3 O street north
west MRS. AMY R. POTTER.
Funeral services at Lee's Chapel on
Friday, February 15, 1918. at 8 p. m.
Friends invited to attend.
RANKIN?On Wednesday. February
13, 1518, at his residence. MuirkirK.
Md., of pneumonia, JOHN M.,
husband of Jane Frances Rankin.
Interment Covington. Ky.
SAVOY-On Mondsy, February. 11.
1918. at 11:15 p. m.. at the residence
of his nephew, Thomas Queen. 2423 |
Nichols avenue, Anacostia, D. C.t
JAMES A. SAVOY, husband of
Mamie Savoy and father of Au
| gnsta Dickerson. Lyda Miller, i
Charles, Joseph and Raymond Sa
voy.
Funeral services at St. Teresas
Church. Thirteenth and B streeta.
Anacostia. P. C., this morn
ing at 10 o'clock. Relatives and
J friends invited.
SCHMID?On Wednesday. February
13. 1918, at t:40 a. m.. at her resi
dence. 475 H street northwest. ,
MARY VIRGINIA, beloved wife of
I Alex. F. Schmid and mother of
Mrs. H. H. Kid well.
Funeral today from her late resi
dence. Relatives and friends in
vited to attend. Interment private.
SHIELDS?On February 12. 1918. Miss
VIRGINIA SHIKI-DS. formerly of
Norfolk.
Funeral from her lite residence, 1610
Twentieth street northwest, to- |
day at 2 p. m.
SIGOURNEY?On Wednesday. Feb
ruary 13. 191?. WIN FIELD S.
SIGOURNEY, in the ?th year of
his ajpa.
Funeral from 12* G street north
east today at 3 o'clock p. m.
SMITH-On Tuesday, February 12.
1318 at her residence. 18j Sixth
and-a-half place northwest. MARY
SMITH, the beloved daughter of
Maggie Bray. She leaves to mourn
her loas a dear mother, one broth
er and one son.
Funeral from Mount Airy Church
Sunday. February 17. at 2 o'clock.
I Friends are invited.
rWATERS?On Wednesday. February
! 13, 1918, at 8:10 p. m. BERNARD
I J.', beloved husband of Nora
j Waters. ,
j Funeral from his residence, 1715 I
North Capitol street. Saturday.
February 16. at 8.30 a. m. Requiem
mass at St. Martin*? Church at 9
I o'clock. Relatives and friends in
vited. (Please omit flowers.)
WEBSTER?On Wednesday, February
^ 13. 1918. at 9 a. m.. WILLIAM P..
I beloved husband of the late Mary
G. Webster.
Funeral from the residence of his
daughter, Mrs. Edward Shankle.
307 I street northeast, today at 8:30
a. m. Requiem mass at St.
I Dominic's Church at 9 o'clock, j
Relatives and friends Invited. In
terment at MounUOiivet Cemetery. I
FUNERAL DIRECTORS.
JOSEPH GAWLER S SONS
Eiiismio osa
kDV
ASSISTANT
P. Chamber,.
f W. W. CHAMBERS CO.
1400 Ctmptn at. V. XV.
Modern Chapel. Dtj or Nisht. Phone Col. 432.
j We Lse AutnrooHle Srrrtt* ExclnriTely.
FUNERAL DESIGNS.
GEO. C SHAFFER T*Mw.
EXPRESSIVE FL'IRAI, EMBLEMS I'hnoe M.
it MODERATE PRICKS. <416-IT-IS.
Prompt and Careful Auto De!i?ery 8erTioe.
ti
Appropr :!e Floral Tokens.
Arti?*;o-expt??si*??Inesprnr.Tf.
Gnde Bro?. Co., 1214 F Street
Prompt Sato delivery ?erricse.
HELP WANTED?MALL
LABORFHIS?3)0 AT ONCE. TO WORK AT
the Walter Reed General Hospital. Ga. are.
and Butternut at., tor Waahingtpn Gaa Light
Company. fel5-X
WANTED?LABORERS. FIREMAN AND
tankmen. Apply to AMERICAN ICE CO..
15U? and E ata. ne. felS-Si
WANTED - FOUR COLORED WAITERS
with army camp experience. Apply THE
AUSTIN CO.. BTOitr lt_
WANTED?OFFICE BOY; GOOD
opportunity to learn drafting.
Apply TURNER CONSTRUCTION
CO., New Building for Bureau of
Standards. Conn. ave. and Pierce
Mill road. feI5-2t
WANTED?LABORERS; MC PER
hour. Plumber*' laborers. F. C.
STELZER & CO., 1115 14th st. nw.
fe!5 7t
MACHINISTS.
TTir Pfaoaytrania R.iIro.d Company win fin
tmploTBMit at thrti Witminctoa, D.1-, sad BaJ
tlmor. Mn' to Mi who h.T. had maefclaista'
tjahtni aad touitnl at tk. trad. a. JooTTwyrnm.
Apply No. *? New Jrrmj Amn* Sootheaat.
WaaMactna. or 8. X. Oor. Chtvart aad Oatn
?*..
WANTED- WAKFHOl'SE TKUCKKKtj
*Wta or eotowd; B.IS pit day. Apctj Tlmr
toeper. ADAMS EZPBESS CO.. 2d aad I
a? kMt i
HELP WANTED?MALL
to Experienced Retail Stationer?
WE WANT A HRST-CLAM MAM.
one who know* the business from
A to Z and 1* not afraid of hard
work and lone Imura
Oood chance for adrancemant.
Apply to O. P. KERRTWAN, Mr.
Stationery Dept.
R. P. ANDREWS PAPER CO.
727-31 13th Street N. W.
fe 15-tt
Wanted?young man as coC
lector; must be energetic and
hard worker. Apply MR. EAST
MENT. Herald Bldg. fe!5-tf
TINNERS AMD HELPMtB WaMD; HlOlf
M I?M. 11H nth at. BW. UH*
I PLTSllElts AND HELPERS WiSfEC;
hi*b*? <un t*M. 11? l?h *. n?. M4? I
I Roys-tuuee oood jobs open. is irfa
1 ?.??: ??'??
WANTED - EXPERIENCED FUR
I niture salesman; good salary and
permanent position. GOLDEN
BERG'S FURNITURE STORE.
Seventh and K sts. nw.
si
WaNWD-BOT TO 8KSTE MEWePAt-tk
route. Apply MU Pa. >*t. w.
AN OPPORTUNITY WITH TBS PENN6YL
tania Rai'road Company for car repairmen,
freight handlers. maebteiMs. bflpen. freight
brakemen. a bite and colored laborers, and m?
for varkxia other occupationa. Apply tfB M. i.
are. ae., Waabington, or aoutbeaat corner Oal
Tert and Ontn sta.. Baltimore. or with the
H. Y., P. 4 N. 1 R., Brooka an.. Norfolk.
Va.
HELP WANTED?FEMALE.
WANTED?YOUNG LADY FA
miliar with handling books;
knowledge of double entry not nec
essary ; neatness and accuracy chief i
requirements. Apply MR. EAST
MENT. Herald Bldg. fe15-tf
WANTED?WHITE OIBL IS O^EN BOOM. |
Apply IIo-i?-keeprr. I>ewer Hotel. fel*?
FOR RENT?ROOMS.
FIR\I9HED
NICELY PTBNI9HKD BOOMS; WELL
heated rneo preferred. PVoue 912 FVmnklin.
MM
WANTED?ROOMS.
QriET YoCso MAN WANTS single I
room; northeast preferred, or near T. If. C. A. j
northwest; electric lighta; apartment or private. j
State terrni in reply. BOX 9. Herald office. i
It 1
FOR RENT?GARAGE.
FOR BENT-NICE. BIG GARAGE; \fTLL
?rcmndate tan cars: rental reasonable. AprU '
i?ewey h^t: i. ?? ! t. t ? vta
REAL ESTATE.
CABIN JOHN PARK.
ATTRACT I \ K SfBUBBAN HOURS.
;j. S. TOMLIXSQW. ?1 BO BLt>~ M. It?8
Careful Investmenta
Of money in Kir* Deeds of Treat (Fli* Mas*
gage*) on Washington, D. C-, Real Estate always
KiTi the full interest promised and the rrtnrn ?f
all tha ptinesrlt doe. regardleea of the varying
iocomea and vahses of other aeeorities. and they
are net aobjact to taxation. We hat* been a?
craafully sngaged hi makint thcae investments
for oar rtlmts for more than a onarter et a
oentory. Investments. CSC. 1300 to SltJOO, at ft, '
W. and ? cast maw ready for delivery. Lar*> I
. iBTcrtmrrta made.
WM. H. SAUNDERS & CO,
Southern Building, 807 15th St.
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS.
: RKcnaDa-TictnR, ouTi xBia. an? i
60N?bongbt. srtd. ana as chanted.
RECORD EXCHANGE.
If rw 7U *b sL aw.
WANTED TO BUT.
' WE BUT ASD SELL FCRNITCBX. A
tlltl i. ill ?e uk SIltKMAN'S. Ill] Ilk tt.
I nw.?W15 N. Y. ave. nw. phone N. 34*. tf
| WILL CALL IN MY UNLETTERED ADTO
mobile. cttj or sobnrban. and pay you highest
! prices for ladies', gentlemen's, cbiVircn's dia
I carded clothing, of all descriptions. Address
poatsi or pbooe. I will caL. E BICE. 128 Txk
st. nw. N ITS
j ?
daai^C OF EVZBY DESCRIPTION, HIS
DUVIVO ^ booa> to entire bhrsr.e^ Man.
MOO PEARLMAN'S BOOK 8BOP. Cl ii
JUNK
WASH. JUNK CO.. 1SU> and D aa. Line. 1
WANTED?MISCELLANEOUS.
FTR5-IlANI?OUE. LARGE. VALl'ABLF.
arte; new, never worn; mniflce for 16 if aold
| at on<*. The PV>drrick. Arartment 3. 814 N. Y.
ara. nw., oppc?ita Public Library. Phone
| Franklin IS*. IrtMt
WANTED-AUTOMOBILE SEDAN BOUi
and top: Cadillac, Buick, Beo or Budaon.
| 1915-1914-H!T modcL State general condition.
l>rice, aud where Irapection mar be made.
Write VIRGINIA KHIPBUILDING CORPO
RATION. Alexandria. Va. ?c?3t
FOR SALE?MISCELLANEOUS.
FO* RAI-it?<*!N!?EKS POR THE HACUNV.,
Applr to AMERICAS ICE CO.. ISth ?n<l C
?U. ot.
CANARY BIRD8 Putt SALE. GOOD B1SO
rr%: *1 A rt. fe IS It
LOST.
t/iST-A BEAVER FIK MH'KriBCI OS
Mass. are. Thnr^day afternoon. Liberal rr
^ard. Tel'-ihon" frl. 44*^. U_
AUTOMOBILES.
FOR HTHK.
SllTAI1 LINCOLN 51
M UoHn 4 *
Cltj _ J
Rhoerlng. I*t boor I *
Tcatring 1*
CENTRAL TAS1 OOMPAST. INC
?
ACTO REPAIRS.
ANT 8EBV1C?, AMI TIME aNT PUCS
Autos cJ act make ta? ur r?p.i?d 01 rrtwiH
fort, flapd <rhU. too w?tt B<:0
BOT MACSIT. SU Mlk ?. m. Uaeob ?
a
ACTOOI"<Oi:8 WIUJINO AND ILADIAIu*
wort, rwlfn . cmrbo. ; .??c
mrnrtoa Bodwo BrrdCa. MtUIS ?t. ??. ?*
PR1C* CAN rtx IT. WELDING O* HZ
mrtib cqmi to m Cxpnt uto fn?<rtn?
Prio.'. Auto Rrp.ll &m. :,a *. Copdlot K.
an m |
"BROKEN CAST IRON
And otter a?Uta ??
WELD IT CO.. W N. J. *"? ?*? '
w, tiaJM rto at* "
FOR SALE?GARAGES.
STT-a-GABiea fair ma nftrat
oj nnn Is tbe Mrtft tn ?>|?sr*iioe. dor.
5 .?1KW T. T. *. BIEN. ICS O ?.
ow. PtKme M. il?
REFRIGERATORS, ICEBOXES.
McCRAY REFRIGERATORS.
Aad Cllas Dmm As. CMfulft
McCRAT REFRIGERATOR CO.
W. b?M (to ortoi sad ",.U jfrteW*
?U W ??. 1. W. FRAftKLIW Wl.
M0T IP i??!L or?
-Jrym >? ?? i' i ?*a? mTv d if
Jtunwi oo, ain.ii mm .
I16MII ta lOiMM TO MJi ?> D A
-------- -
* 00.
MONEY TO LOAM OB APPBor*) CTTT
rmi MU M iDVMt ?u> vMI
111 ???? wo t> ?rtv in?.
wwwwnroro.hi.B^tj^
furniture.
riSiT Furniture c^S
HO PWOOD1 p^iln Plk* r?I
Nr> Wm, ?H A K
BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS.
n ikdow Kum>p iBAim
WINDOW SHADES MADE TO 0*E&L
Bat Ovaqo. or H H.
(. a. pbeinkert. na ? a. aa.
PV?> L. <!>
MOVING, PACKING, STORING.
MOVING
w. InM inn hIW ? B4 ?!? M
to handle yotw pnia.
PACKERS of furnitrxre. Nun. *1^ ferto*
6HIPPIHO to all parta ef the wtrtd
KRIEG'S EXPRESS.
SAFETY FIRST. ~
ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 0TOBAO&
Boone. K aad op. Monni and rv?M.
CNITED 8TATES tTOEAGB CO. <B-B MB
?t. aw. m. <m
??> n. no, ?.
uufn THiniru
< ITplAGI CO. IU
a. aiafct n. *. an.
a.
EDUCATIONAL
If U A 1 ACCOUNTAXC~*~
I.N.I.A. ~8HOKTHAXD*'
DRAh-TTKO
W"M?n -. Uqwt PRKPARATOBT
Frtm. IdoA GRADE (TMj-.NaftO
a
PiUST GBADB CIVIL aCBTICE mVIVl'
ttone far departmental delta Tamo* for as
tir* earrm far thaee wtamirattnoa *. TU
CIVIL 8BBVICB PREPARATORY SCHOOL*
? ?r. UU and r ?a Pbona Pranfcbe Vm.
WBt
SPANISH
?CHOOL or
PERSONALS.
IB WELL If*.
der ?aj for as to abovt do?t>)e ev bartm^
aa low prion wfll and moat tnno nan b?aQM
trade wha buy for aa* Some ho? M? (pa
tCtoM and ??* aooqgh to bof nnaaa and
DR. REED
SPECIALIST
804 SEVENTEENTH STREET. ?
OVER 30 TEARS STZZ SaZJl
Hewmm tad Special Pi ? aff ktoa aM ?oaA
Vraai HraHk ?? Taa If Taa ?nffe?
From Chtarrh. Obaaay. Bbwatto. Ca^lfi
too?, PHa* Throat. Lara*. Ht?ic MeaK. Baatf
and Skia PiaaaaM. Nttow Drbllity. KMa?
PI?aa. Bladder Twrhk. Spertfic 1*W*5 Pafc.
ocetlnc. Eruption*. Ikm. ao4 AT] Prirato Dto
maaa Cuaad for Lafe b* Safe
Charge* Law.
CONSULTATION FREE. 1
PHratr Waltlag llaaa far | aBii
"fici Hoora. W to 1. 1 to 4. IMmdapa. B to 11
SPECIAL NOTICES.
HOUSEHOLD GOODS A!ft> PnMUT
rror?r:7 ual in U? r. Jlemni* ntmm wU ba
??id far dun FTBRCABT 7. :*?. ?i :*
oclo*. It !OI C CM north ?w G. a.
Bnnklv. rw Botin. Go KiaelMIA. B. U.
l?o4?. Mm. Rmlrl M.tttir-. Mn. K. a
MitrtwD. F.ul J Smith. Mm. t M. WbofA.
PIDEUTT STORAGE COMPANT. It
the Corcoran
Gallery of Art
SPECIAL KWBITION
OF PAINTINGS BT
Gari Melchers
LEGAL NOTICES.
H.4%IILTO* Jt HAMILTON,
Atlararji.
SI'PRE ME OOUB* OP THE DISTRICT OF
Colombia. holding Probate (Vnt E?ta> at
Praneie Q. New land*. deaemaed No. MM
AdjniaiMra'ioo Docket. K ? Am^oatjoa hartac
br*B ma!o 1?? rein for probate of the la* will and
testament of aaid de?eaard. and for 1 Atari taa
tamestory on aaid eaUte. by Vukm Tmg Oa?
pany. of the District at (Vliacbia. it i? nrd?e?i
thia 15th day at Frbroary. A. D IK*. Ual
>>"dr1cka FVanor? Adelheid woo Bred our In
fant. and Wnldnnar I^opoM vno Brr?io? bar
ruxtodian. and all otlter* anaoernad. appear hi
maid Oburt on MONDAY, tfe* M 4a? *t
March. A. D 1?!8. at W c elook a. m.. to dtaov
caoaa whr auch aiipltaatioo ahonld tr* ba
crnntod. Lrt notire hereof be piihliabed ha #ba
Waaf.inftnn Law Roiwirter and *n>a Waatunrtq*
Horald once in earh of thtre aurwaaj?a wrtti
hrfoie the rrturn day herein mmtiottad. thB
fir.?t jiublioatino to te not Icea than thirty da pa
b fore aaid retarn day. P. L F1DDOXR. Jm
ttor. AttaBt: (Seal ) W. ( LARK TAYLOB.
l*eputr Rcciater of ITIlla tor the Diet net *
Colmr.ivia. of the Probata Court.
THE HERALD AUTO
DIRECTORY.
AUTO ACCESSORIES.
AI'TO ?I >T1 IF.?
NATIONAL ELECTRICAL ICTTLT
ro.?
1S30 New York in.
Main ?IM
ELECTRIC CARS.
BAKKR-HAUl-U-LARG?
BARTRAH ELECTRIC OARAGE.
1204-01 N. H. ara, I10T-11 M at.
Phono* Ww< ?tt-48t
GASOLINE CAR&
AL'BCR.N-PATUri.NDKn?
AUBURN AND PAJHFINL>ER
SALES CO,
MTH AND If BTS. KW. PSoa. WM T?
MAE WELL?
ES LXART. nu
UB Fourteen Ih it. Pbaoa N. MK
North 4114.
6>MMro.wnxraMQiKiMu
HARPER-OVERLAND OO.
lltl-M Conn a*a.
TIRES.
vn?iym??abM? a
?rhau> tires?marathon
TIRES, ?? ti>4 (11 IK Td )UE
1*11 14th it. W K 4l??.

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