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The Washington herald. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, September 27, 1918, Image 10

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045433/1918-09-27/ed-1/seq-10/

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Tbc ?isa atare?Official Weather
f?a-?ar.?Fair aa? realer. _
r
4-PLY COLLARS
D. J. Kaufman, Inc.
lflOS-tn Pa. Ave.
? ?li 17th St. N. W. J
-lfs aa* tb. pro?t as. male, but Hat as*,ie*
?, ttte. ta?*t? our auccesa. "
THE ANDERSON PRINTERY
lEaiaitT Saslal* Hank Bid?.?
1407 N. Y. Are.. l?t Floor, Rear
Ph.??- IMaia '.?*'?<
Men's Fall Shoes
A complete style
line of men's hich
arrade ahoea. The
season's novelties
3? well aa conserv
ative laata. We'll
lit you?both In
style and price.
?
Sol Herzog & Co., ?
Q.I ? G Mr. < ti . ?* fu-i p
Will Serre Ye?.
Tha Stora loor rhjnoan Reeommenda.
Trusses ??
-ret 9 year* e aparten ce Spettai tremed at
tendante for lid:??. Private rooms.
Tke GIBSON Co., Inc.. 917 G St.
wtfT*
LOANS
HORNING
Diamonds. Watches Jewelry
South End if Highway Bridge.
B,ai,.aa Tranaarteaf t*.xcla.l. ..
There.
Take rara at 12*k Street aad
rraaa. Ivaala aveaae. far .?.ait h
??al ef lllcbiasa Hrlalae. Ose ear
ticket easeh rnrnj.
TELLS RAILROADERS
'TO GO THE LIMIT"
McAdoo Urges Employes to Buy
Liberty Bonds.
Director General McAdoo yesteiday
?t? p#aled to all officers and employes I
o? the railroads in the I'nited State.* -
"to go tne limit" In tbe purchase of
liberty bonds during the new drive,
i p a message to th? regional direc
tors, which he asked to be bulletin
ed, the Director General said, in
pa?rt:
The government must borrow from
the people ??,???.???,???, for which ?
gives its obligation in tbe form of
liberty bonde bearing interest at 4 1-4
per cent per annum.
The government needs this money
to enable our brave army and the
brave armies of our allies to keep up
?he push against the Germans now
so auspiciously begun.
"We can not lick the Kaiser with
? ut this money and the sooner we
Kft this money nmi the sooner we
convert H into the necessary muni
tions and supplies for our heroic bovi?,
who already have the Hun.-* on the
run, the sooner will they finish thn
dangerous job we have entrusted to
them. ?
"I earnestly urge every railroad
officer and employe who loves hL?
country to go the limit of his means
to lend the government by purchasing
liberty bonds."
WEATHER CONDITIONS.
Lower Lakes-Moderate northweat wind? Fri
dar. with fair weather
District o? Columbia and Maryland-Fair.
ctjoier Friday; Saturday fair; gent,e u> moderate
nnrthwest to north winds.
Virginia-Fair Friday, prc-sled *?> ah?, we? in
sofitheaat portion, cooler; ?aturd?, fair, mod
erate nartbwest winds.
GENERAL FORECAST.
Pi-smut* ia moderately low ?a the ?tlantio
Sutea the Intern Lower I*ake Region? sad
along the Gulf Coast and hifh elsewhere east
ol th? Rocky Mountains with th? crest o*er
Ho-ath I>.ik-.ta. There were g?siers! rain? ia
New Engiand, th? Middle ? Uantic Bute?.
light locai rain? ,0 tb? Lower Lake Region sod
the Ohio Valley and showers and thunder
?tnrssa in Tann?e??? snd the Gulf States, Ar
? kaaaaa and OklsT-oma There wer* sia? light
hewer? ia th? Plaias Stata* snd ? an era
Colendo.
It is cooler with temperature? -?ell below the
wsaonsl aie-rag* from tb? Golf States north
eastward through the Laxe_R-*uon and tow trm
perstares continue in tb? Central and Southern
Rocky Mountain ?Regions. In tb? Northweat and
Streme West it is warmer with temperatures
?u^htly aboi? th? seasonal average.
Viera will b? ahassws Friday in th? East
tiatt aad South Atlantic Mat??, continuing Sat
urda y in the Fionda Pen?nsula. Hiere will
?bo b? rain in Northern New England. Other
wia? th? weather ?ill h? fur Friday and Satur
as* east of the >liasusippi Riser. It will be
f-orler Friday in th? Atlanti? aad Eaat Gnlf
?"tat?? snd nirmer Saturday quit? genet?11 t
?ter interior district? eaat ot the Uimmtipmi
mam.
LOCAL TEMPERATURES.
Midnight, *3; 2 s. m., ?; * ? m.. Cl; ? a.
w.. ?: ? L m at; t m. m,, 9; IS a. m., ?E:
1J nooe. G?, Z p. m . 73; t p. m., T?; m p, m.,
tt; a 9. m., at; 10 p. m. ?. Highe?t, TI;
lu??t. to.
, Belatile humiditj-? a. m.to; 1 p. s., t?; I
p. as.. 59; rainfall ($ p. m. to ? p. m.,, trace;
amm ot winshin?, 1.9; par cat o? poaaib-k
ssSMhinr. 11
DEPARTURES.
AcrumuUtad eaetmm ot temperature sinn Jan?
1. MC tt; deftcicDCT of temperature lince
1, ISIS. U; sccumnlated defleiency of
prre-hMtStson sine* January 1. 19:?. 4.C8- de?
"eiewj o? precipitation sine* September 1. 1911,
?.
Tesa pera tur? same d*te last year- Highest, 7t;
toveet, aX
OTHER TEMPERATURES
Lowest
Highest previous K*tn
ya*erd*f. night. tmU,
Atlantic SitT K. J. :? -u ?ta
Beato?. Mas?. SS St IM
rhicagv. Ill. M Bg
'V?etaad. Ohio. M U ? ?t
iHimr; Cram. M * ??
I*t**t. Mich. M to
(?aie-astoa. Te?. TI 78 ?W
Indiaaapriia, I 1.. -W ?
l?ctaoaitlle. FU. m ?
Kart.** Oty. Mo. ? '?
tjm Awie? Chi...... m ?
Vfw Tort. N. Tf. a? m tit
Phceaa. Ana.. V ?
P?tt?barth. Pa. 9 m Ms
Portleo?. M?. ? to em
**tt UU CKj, Utah. B M
St. Louis. Mo. ? SS 14?
Sen Fran?*?, *!W. ? M
TIDE TABLES.
'.ompiird rej L cited ?tatea Coast ?cd Oeodetic
Surrey.)
T^titxy?lttm t*k>. 9 ?.m. ind ?* p.m. nigh
Jd?, Mi tn. acd Id p.m.
THB ^C-1? A.\[? MOON
Today?fcia rta?. 4Ji am.: arts, %-Ag p.m
Mine nates, iteri -.m ; ??u. 141 a.m.
ils Mop? ic be iigbted by ' Z? ?*?t
College Cantonment Starts
Year as School for Young
Leaders.
Georgetown University got under
way yesterday aa one of America's
caotonfnents for the training of men
? to bo officer* and soldiers in the
?ever-growing army of the United
'States. Approximately 800 student?
? in the academic department lined
j up yesterday afternoon for the first
. general assembly since the unl
I versify went on a war footing.
With MaJ. E. V. Bookmiller, IT. S.
[A? in charge of student military
? activities, classes were heard for
?the first time In the department of
'arts and science and plans formulat
ed for training and drilling the
'students assigned to this university
?in the war departments system^of
[Student Army Training Corps.
The medical and denial schools
of the university also held their re
spective openings yesterday under
the same military discipline and in
struction which will govern the
main department of the university.
the school of arts and applies
sciences.
70? Per J.mvr School.
The law school will open October 1
v. ith an enrollment of approximately
700 students, it was-announced by the
university authorities.
It was announced that one of the
two new school buildings of Trinity
Parish, constructed last year, has
been taken over by direction of the
War Department to house 500 medical
and dental students who will live In
these new dormitories under the same
discipline.
"Kitchen police," a new term to
which thousands of university and
preparatory school studente will be
accustomed this year, will go into ef
fect at the Hilltop this morning.
Seventy students were chosen from
various classes to serve breakfast
thia morning and assist in the kitchen.
Another quota will be selected for
this service tomorrow.
The task of feeding 800 students in
Ryan mess hall, where quarters were
formerly considered filled with a stu
dent body of 250, must be taken up
by the university authorities this
week. Approximately fiOO men ate I
supper in the hall last night.
It
supper" at the mtsi hall of the uni- j
versity. the noon lunch having dis
appeared as the student body went !
on army rations and under general
military rula.
Instructora have been sent to,the
college from Plattshurg and other,
t mining camps. The students will
? r?jeive their new uniforms by the
tirst of October and will be divided
into companies as soon as drill
?lasses can be started.
Lieut. J. Frew Hall, commanding
officer of the local navy mobilization
office, will have charge of the naval
unit at Georgetown which will num
ber 100 student.??. Students are be
ins selected today for this branch
of the service.
Award? Are fermented
After the assembly exercises yester
day awards wt-re presented to honor ;
students of last year, the presenta- ,
tion being made by the Rev. John B. :
Creedon, S. J., president of the uni- !
versity. Addresses were made to the ?
students by Father Creedon. MaJ. j
Bookmlller and IJeut. Hall. The etu- ?
dents were welcomed In a speech by |
the Rev. Edmund A. Walsh, dean of j
the arts and sciences department.
Officiala of the university ?said last *
ni^ht the enrollment in the arts and i
Fciencp school this term will probably !
be twice as great as any previous en- ?
rol imeni in the history of the uni
versity.
RITES FOR DR. WOLFE
AT ARLINGTON TODAY
Confederate Veteran Died Follow-;
ing Stroke of Apoplexy.
Funeral services for Dr. T. Wolff, ?
74. years old. a ?Confederale veteran, j
?ho died yestcrdi-y morning. Mill be
held from his late residence. 1?-C> Cal
ve rt street northwest, at 2:30 this aft
ernoon.
Dr. Wolff waa stricken with apo
plexy? Monday morning nnd died yes
terday. - He will be buried with full
military honors in the Confederate
'section of Arlington National Teme
tery. The services will be conducted
by the Rev. Dr. J. C. Copenhaver and
Dr. F. G. Prettyman, former chaplain
of the United Statea Senate.
Dr. Wolff enlisted fn the Tenth Vir
ginia Regiment. Company I. August 6,
18*52, from Rockingham County, V?.
He served all through the Shenan
doah Valley campaign under Gen.
Jackson. He was distinguished for
bravery at the battle of Chancellor.??.
vllle, where he was wounded in th*
arm, and being incapacitated from
further military service, he served as
hospital courier until the conclusion
ot the war.
He has been practicing medicine in
Washington for about ten years. He
was a member of the Kwell Camp.
Confederate Veterans, of Manassas.
Va.
He Is survived by a widow, Mrs.
Jennie Ashby Wolff, a daugHter, Sa
lina V.. and two sons. Dr. J. T. and
S Ashby Wolff.
WILSON HEARS RUSSELL.
Social Democratic League to Aid
Allied Countries.
Charles Edward Russell and a
delegation of the newly organized
? Social Democratic League, called on
; President Wilson to explain tfte
? scope and purposes of the work of
the organitation. Offices will prob
ably be established In both Paris
and Milan, Mr. Russell said, and an
international commission, whose
members will be approved by the
State Department, will operate In
the work of bringing an under
standing between the labor element
of both America and Us allies.
Every Woman Needs
IRON at Times
If
, , r would only take
*/t 5ex*,e^ ?G?? wnen they .-# ?
. .? ' ?eel we.*k. rtm-down, bred \?
? 'out-when th^ .ire pale, ner- A
?? vo?iis ?nd haggard-there are thoa-v * '.
*and* who might readily build up * ? *.
their red corpuscles, become rosy- * ? "
caeeked, strong and healthy and *
be much more attractive in every
way. When the iron goes from the
blood of women, thr healthy glow
o? youth leaves their skin and ?heir
charm and vivacity depart. A two
weeks coarse of Nuxated Iron *
_\ S works wonders m many cases. /*
. \ ? Satisfaction guaranteed or /* ?
' ..Kt*\\Y.*__\
, \ money refunded. _
good drjggits.
Nuxated Iron
Combine Business With Charity.
GEORGE STONE SEEING CITY
THIS WEEK IN OWN AUTO
The cut above shows 'George
Stone and Etta Pillard with the So
cial Maids, playing at the Gayety
this week, ln their new Stuts car.
Mr. Stone is a real auto bug. . Last
year he made the entire circuit of
the Columbia Amusement Company
by auto. The picture above was
taken in Kansas City, Mo., just
after he had his ??? washed, after
completing his trip from Omaha,
Nebr. Mr. Stone has in hie garage
at home now a Fiat, Stutz runabout,
Marion "Bear Cat" and the one ih
the picture, a Stutx touring car.
Not bad for the actor, who years
?go was considered anything but a
business man.
Mr. Stone ia a very close friend of
Ralph de Palma and Barney Old
Held, and has ridden with them both
in several cities in their morning
workouts. He has carefully laid
out a route for himself and Miso
Pillard, who. by the way. Is Mrs.
Stone in private life, for next sum
mer as soon as the company closes
its season, he, accompanied by the
charming Etta, will embark from
New York to California and return,
in the interest of tne Red Cross.
A real true and interesting story
Is told by Mr. Stone about his first
automobile. He paid the lar?e
M'ADOO HEARS VIEWS
OF RAILWAY WORKERS
Did Not Know of Order Barring
Outside Business.
It developed at a two-and-a-half- '
hours* conference between Director
General McAdoo and the heads of
the four railroad brotherhoods yes-J
terday that the Railroad Adminis- '
tration was not responsible for the!
"no outside business" order which
constituted one of the main griev
ances of the employes.
Mr. McAdoo did not issue the
order and did not know of its ex
istence until he read the written
protest of the brotherhood chiefs.
It appears that some of the In
dividual roads have had in effect
for several years a prohibition
against employes engaging in any
tine of business or commercial en
terprises on the lineg of the roads.
Since the matter has been speci
fically called to the Director Gen
eral's attention, it will receive con
sideration along with the other
questions presented yesterday for
adjustment.
The principal subject discussed at
the conference was McAdoo's "No
politics" order, for which he assum
ed full responsibility. The brother
hood chiefs are Insistent that the
new regulation goes far beyond any
legitimate restrictions which may
?be necessary to eliminate "politics"
from the administration of the rail
roads.
At the conclusion of the confer
ence it was announced a further \
session would be held within a week \
and that no formal statement would I
be made by either the railroad men
or the Director General until there]
had been full and final considera- ?
tlon of the questions raised.
amount of $200 for on?, and his first
trip was from Sow York to Ohicigo,
which he made in three days and a
half. As proud as ? peacock was the
daring George on his arrival in th?
Windy City, where he was met by
Ed Lee Wroth, who was playing at
the Columbia Theater, Chicago, that
summer. Rehearsal is called and
George start g back to New York.
Well, it took him ten days to make
the return trip. "If I live to be *
hundred years old 1 will never for
get his arrival in the big city," says
Manager Maurice Cain. "I WAS
.?landing in front of Hurtig and
Soartion*? new the-ater on 125 th
street where we were rehearsing,
when along came the lost, strayed
or stolen Stone in his car. The tires
were stuffed with straw. For head
lights he h-id two red lamps from a
railroad train. Best he could do,
as he sold everything on the car for
gaa to operate the ?ame, as he ran
out of funds and had no way of
getting any. He resembled the fa
mous character he played years ago
in one of the 'Wirard of Ox* compa
nies, the part of the Scarecrow, as
he was pronounced at that time
equal to famous Fred himself in the
part. It took him fully a month to
get the oil and grease from his
countenance."
SUBMITS PROOF OF
PACKERS' INFLUENCE
Clover Shows Senators* Bond with
U. S. Chamber o? Commerce.
Chairman William B. Colver, of
tho Federal Trade Commission?
submitted documentary evidence
to the Senate Committee on Agri
culture yesterday to establish the
sympathetic bond between the
packing Interests and the Chamber
of Commerce of the I'nited States.
The report of the Fedcrs*l Trade
Commission committee of the
Chamber of Commerce of the Unit
ed States on the Andini;? and re
commendations of the commission
on the packing industry was a bit
ter attack upon the commission?
so much so that the Senate Com
mittee on Agriculture is conduct
ing an investigation to find wheth
er It was justified or inspired by
the close relations between big
btuifettM, the packers and the
Chamber of Commerce.
Mr. Colver is scheduled to ap
pear before the committee again
at an early date, and it was re
ported about the Capitol late yes
terday that he will have some
highly intcre.nins facts to lay be
fore the committee, and th-tt hie
testimony was but the gronudwork
for what is to come.
LOCAL MENTION.
Cuspowdrr tea. 69ei Perfect Ml? nd
tea, ?9c; Blue Label coffee, S?e; !
lard, 32c; compound, 26c; 2 cans to- |
matoes, 25c; tuna, 10c and 15c; flsh
roe, 15c and 20c; Cal, sardines. 14c;
red kidney beans, 12Uc; Log Cabin
eyrup. 20c; navy beans, 12Hc;
hominy, 5c; safety matches, 10c.
1338 M St. N. W. and all the J. T. D.
Pyles stores.
I AM DEPENDING ON YOU
(From Wt?blngton Tim?*)
MAKE THE COMING
4th LIBERTY LOAN
AN IMMEDIATE SUCCESS
BE READY!
L?ba?CR?BE HERE THE FIRST DAY
The Washington Loan & Trust Co
90S-902 F Street
61?S-?S20 174 Street
JOHN B. LARNj/
Preudent. |
300 D.C. PUPILS
TOSTUDYHARD,
Will Take Intensive Train
ing to Become Free for
War Work.
Three hundred high ?chool pupil?
have signified their Intention of
? takln?? the Intensive course provid
' ed in th? high ?chool. The?? young
people will have longer ?chool hour?
to complete the year'? work ahead
of time tn order that they may
sooner become fit for military ?erv
ice.
Boy? and girl? both will take
these courses. The boy? who are
within the new draft age will finish
their courses ?ooner so that they
may enter the army. The girl? who
finish the courses will either be
come teachers or war -worker? of
some ?ort.
Ernest L. Thur?ton. ?uperlntend
ent of schools, made it clear that
the Idea wa? not to rush young'
people out Into the world, and
would not mean a reduction of sub
jects.
The Intensive course 1? already in
operation In McKinley High School
where many student? ar? reporting
at 8 o'clock insttad of 9 o'clock, a?
formerly. In the other school? It
will be started within a few day?.
Central High School I? greatly
crowded. Every application for ad
mission to Central ha? been thor
oughly studied, and the applicant
referred to one of the other school?
where possible.
The night school? will open about
the middle of October. A greatly
Increased enrollment over last year
I? expected. Many war worker?
who wish to brush up on ?ome old
?ubjoits will attend ln order to ob
tain promotion?.
Lumber Prices Hold.
The maximum price? on Southern
or yellow pine lumber, f. o. b. mill,
a? established June 14 last, are to
be maintained until midnight of De
cember 23, isn**. it wa? announ? e?1
yesterday by th? price-flxlng com
mittee of the War Industrie? Board.
MISS HELEN GERRER
DOUBLE WAR WORKER
Pretty Oklahoma ?ri Play, for
Boys ,-at Camps.
Working for Vncle Sam in the day
time, and playing for hit boya al
night. Miaa Helen Gerrer of Okla
homa la doing her 'bit" toward win
???? the war.
Mis? Oerrer la a vlollnlat of eatab- ?
lished reputation In New York, where
ahe haa been playing at concerta for
several year?. Born ln El Reno.
Oklahoma, in 1898. the young musician
.li-- HELEN ..,???? n
took up the ?tudy at the age of flv?
and gave her flrat concert two years
later.
At the declaration of war by the
I'nited Statea, the ?iolinlat waa con
sidering a poaltion as aoiolst with a
well known New York orchestra.
Realiaing the need of her country for
war workera, ehe relinquished the
brilliant future offered her and came
to Washington to accept a position
in the distribution branch of the *????|
Risk Insurance Bureau, where she
is still employed.
After her work In the day. Mlssj
Gerrer spends her evenines playing a
at the various campa around the c.ty.j
After a recent performance at one
AMUSEMENTS. AMUSEMENTS.
Al.l.
sS'.'sfrkxcTi.?? ??at. ?%t.
ANH?UVICEMFNT
A. H. WOOD!*
Desires to announce that o?, ine to
the emphatic Mt registered by th?
Supreme Comedy,
"BUSINESS
BEFORE
PLEASURE"
With B?rney Bernard. Alexander
Carr ?nd the '?rtglaal New V?.rk
Cast, the engagement ha? l.e-en <\
tended for the Meek mt *>???. .?.?a.
1'es.l 11 ? e-ly Ike I.??l ? e-e-L
of the nearby base hospitals, where
the wounded men had baten unusually
appreciative of her work. Miss Gerrer
declared that ahe waa never ao happy
as when she was plsylng for the men
In khakL
The young muaiclan expect? to con
tinue her patriotic work until the
American men have been victorious
She then expects to return to tlie con
cert stage.
MARSHALL AT PRESS CLUB.
Vice President with G?raldine Fer
rar Will Give Loan Drive Send-off.
Vice President Marshall, assistant by
G?raldine Farrar. will head the bill
at the National Preae Club enter
tainment In the Central HigTi School
auditorium tonight
The meeting has beam arranged by
tbe club as a send-off for the liberty
loan drive scheduled to begin tomor
row. Pictures made apecially for the
drive by such atars aa Mary Plrkford,
Marguerite Clark and William S. Par
nom will be shown for the first time
tonight
Members of the club have been
asked to wear their buaineaa clotheja.
"Can the dress suit until we can
Kaiser Bill" la the request of the
chairman of the entertainment com
mittee. Labert Bt Clair.
HIRSH'S SHOE STORES, 1026-28 7TH ST. N. W.
Fall Styles in Great Variety
HIRSH'S English
Walking and Dress Boots J
For Women and Growing Girls
At the Very Low Price of
These are the
shoes that Washing
ion women have
lound so highly sat
isfactory. Newcom
ers should learn,
too, how good
HIRSH'S new fall
Shoes arc. Comfort,
style and economy
are combined in
these fall boots at
KM
THE
PAIR
Cholee <vf cloth
lop combination?
and solid color?
tn the following
leathers:
Gray. Hassaaa
rasa? a? Blaerk Kl*.
?? ??.?.?? r ? ?? a a
? a si Battle-.htp
'?ray Calf.
HIRSH'S Economy Prices
For School Shoes That Are Reliable
Stylish and attractive footwear for the young school
girls and also for thofe who are going away to college. We
ran surely fit the growing feet.
We suggest that you avail yourself of the expert fit
ting service, splendid assortments and excellent values for
?vhich HIRSH'S is famous.
Misses' and Children's Shoe Department.
Extremely popular school and college models in all the prevailing lasts ?nd
en.
Misses' and Children'? Gun Metal or Patent Colt High-cot Bort?n and Lace
Shoes; English and Orthopedic lasts.
Sizes 5 to 8.$1.45 to $2.45
Size, 8-/2 to 11.$1.75. $2.25, $2.45, $2.95
Sizei 11 Vi to 2.'./ .$1.95. $2.45, $2.95
Misses' and Children's Mahogany Tan Lace
and Button Shoe?, with or without cloth tops;
English and Orthopedic lasts:
Sixei 5 to 8.$2.45 to $3.45
Siiei 8Vz to 11.$2:85 to $3.95
Size? llVz to 2...,./$2.95 and $3.95
7
Viisti' ind Children's Gun Metal English
Late Shoes; also in Orthoptic last, ?evith or
without cloth tops:
Sizei 5 to 8.$1.95 to $2.95
Sizes 8-2 to 11.$2.45 to $3.45
Sizes ll1 2 to 2.$2.85 to $4.00
/
Boys' Shoe Department.
Boys' Gus Metal English Lace Shoes in the
new ?College last ; Goodyear welt ; size? 1 to
5-/2, $3.50 to $5.00.
??*?' Mahogany Tan English Lace Shoes in
the ?,ew College last, with blind eyelets; sixes
lib S?/4; $3.00 to $5.00.
"Little Boys'" Mahogany Tan English Lace
tehees, in natural shape: sizes 9 to 13V??
$2.95 and $3.45.
Boys' Gun Metal Blu
cher Shoes, with me
dium-broad toes,
$1.95 to $3.00.
"Little Boys' "
Gnn Metal English Lace Shoes: sizes 9 te
13V?; $2.00, $2.50 and $3.00
Boys' Gun Metal English Lace Shoes in Col
lege last; sizes 1 to d1'??, $2.*45 to $4.00.
Csalldrea'? Tna aad Blark
-??kaffera?*? Natural ?hape ;
plenty of room
for the toes;
wide extension
?ole? and
beel?.
8lae? S ta ft.
BS-&4SI UH
?? 2. ?*3.?eA.
Special Attention Giren Phone (Main 4471)
and Mail Orders.
IRSH'S
SHOE STORES
1026-28 7th St. N.W.
Helaaeen ? aad 1. ??<?. V ?v.
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Out of the
High-Rent
District. Once
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Pnces Ar*
Sure to Please
Yon.
Shubert-Belasco
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ToasiaTbt. SOc?. Mat. bau Sr? SI
BERTHA KALICH
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srithout aweaos Kalacti.
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"LOOK WHO'S HEUE"
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GAYETY
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JOE III ?TU. OPFERS
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THE PALACE OF 1
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The Peansn!
CASINO ^metJmmma.
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LOEW'S COLUMBIA
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VALESKA BRATT
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WILLIAM RUSSELL
"HCBBS III A KBRRT"
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What's The Answer?
Set Them at American
League Park?Starti
Today at 8 P. M.
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RESORTS.
aVTLASTIC CIT?. H. J.
TRSPMOR1.atunttctt
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HERALD CLASSIFIED ADS \U
I WAYS BRING RESULTS.

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