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The Washington herald. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, November 08, 1918, Image 2

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SUPPORT FOR
FUND ASKED
Y. W. C. A. Official Pays
Tribute to Relief
Organizations.
iT'he seven organizations united
In this great war work oampaign.
wfco are asking for $170,500,000 with
nrtbich to continue their activities,
showing the most wonderful
development of service that has ex
isted in the world." declared Mrs.
J^mes S. Cushman, chairman of the
"War Work Council of the Y. W. C.
A., who is in Washington, accom
panied by Mme. Awril de Sainte
Cyrix of Paris, Miss Louise Holm
qal*t of the Y. W. C. A. Department
of) Method. and Miss Marie Butts of
Ixmdon.
?^"e have had allied nations, allied
armies and navies working in the
closest harmony and the latest to
oome in line are the outstanding
f4ltha of the country." * continued
Mrs. Cushman. "They are now al
lied in the service of the country
far the troops and for the women
d*tng the war work, the munitions
workers who are to be compared
wtth the soldiers in their service
td'. the nations. It is the greatest
aad highest expression of civilisa
tion.
*The Y. W. C. A., which I repre
sent. is the only one of the seven
organizationm working directly for
women and that our efforts for the
lYench women are appreciated is
?bown by the numerous ways in
which the French people honor us.
They were quick to sense the true
values of our association's efforts
to serve and be useful to the French
women and the honor bestowed upon
me, as a representative of the Y. W.
i JC. A., on Mothers' Day in France!
proved this. I was asked to be
present and speak as the representa
tive of the Y. W. C. A. and American
women at the great meeting in
Paris on that day. over which Gen.
Joffre presided. Gen. Joffre was
seated in the center with myself at
his right. Gen. Hagood, represent
ing the American army, sat next to
me. while on the left of Marshall
JofTre were seated Mme. Julie Sieg
fried. president of the National
French Council of Women, and M.
Henri Bergson. I was presented
with the most magnificent bouquet
I ever beheld, a great armful of
orchids, a gift to the American
women through me.**
Mrs. Cushman declared there
would be a vast amount of work to
be done by all organizations even
after peace was certain, and that
they would be called upon to con
tinue their labors and to expend
great sums of money in the work
of reconstruction, helping the men
- and women to readjust themselves
to new conditions.
MUST PROVIDE SAFETY
MARGIN IN COAL USE
So that "a margin of safety" may
protect the public this winter, the
United States Fuel Administration
called the attention of householders
yesterday to the continued need for
conservation of anthracite coal.
While the supply of coal in prospect
wtf] be sufficient fori the winter, pro
vided it js consumed with patriotic
economy, tbo recent epidemic or in
fluenza has reduced the production of
aifthracite from 5 to 15 p?r cent, a
loSs of about 500.000 tons.
To catch up with the required pro
duction to meet the estimated needs
wDl involve increased activity on the
P?*t of miners who have shown great
loyalty in returning to work as soon
a4 possible, although they are not al
ways so efficient as before illness.
Sftnilar co-oper&tion on the part of
the public is asked.
In a recent statement Fuel Admin
istrator Garfield called the attention
ofi the public ?0 the fact that con
servation is Bc^sary on the part
I of every hoomholder, as well aa
eTery industrwn plant, if the needs
?^winter are to be met.
IXficial figures on anthracite
sftowed that on October 1, of the al
lotment of 51.258.028 tons for do
mastic use, 26,388,151 tons had been
delivered.
EVEN CROSS, SICK
: CHILDREN LOVE
- SYRUP OF FIGS
If Feverish, Bilious, Constipated,
Give Fruit Laxative
At Once.
Don't scold your fretful, peevish
Chfld. See if tongue is coated; this
la a sure sign its little stomach, liver
and bowels are clogged with sour
waste.
When listless, pale, feverish, full
of cold, breath bad. throat sore,
doasn't eat. sleep or act naturally,
haa stomach-ache, indigestion, diar
rhoea, give a teaspoonful of "Cali
fornia Syrup of Figs," and in a few
hoars all the foul waste, the sour
bile and fermenting food passes out
of the bowels and you have a well
and playful child again. Children
love this harmless "fruit laxative." 1
and mothers can rest easy after
giving it. because it never fails to
their little "insides" clean and
sweet.
Keep it handy. Mother! A little 1
ffiven today saves a sick child to-!
morrow, but get the genuine. Ask
your druggist for a bottle of "Cali- j
forma 8yrup of Figs," which has di
rections for babies, children of all]
ag&s and for grown-ups plainly on 1
the bottle. Remember there are '
counterfeits sold here, so surely look
and see that yours is made by the
??California Fig Syrup Company."
]Haad back with contempt any other
fig syrup.?Adv.
All States Club
Meetings changed to
Friday night
Beginning Friday,
Nov. 8,1918.
CHURCH OF THE
COVENANT
18th and N Sts. N. W.
WALK TO YOUR WORK TO KEEP
WELL, SAYS CAPT. GOODACRE
If the ?0,000 or more young war
workers here would take old Cap'n
GoO<?acre'a advice he promise that
they, tpo. will become near-century
plants like himself and two of his
comrades, blooming with health as
they approach their 100th birthday.
Walk to work
That is his solution for the transpor
tation problem at the present time
and the secret of longevity.
"Two friends of mine who live up
on the hill with me near Fourteenth
street and Park road walk to work
at the Treasury every morning, win
ter and summer. Comrade Hustln is
87 years old and Maj. Saxon is 91. and
both of them have ruddy cheeks and
every indication of good health."
Capt. D. M. Goodacre is a court
crier in the District Supreme Court,
and he claims also that he walks to
work from his residence, 2616 Univer
sity place northwest.
"I think the end of this war will
see a change in the rising generation,
which was becoming very la*y on ac
count of all the modern means of
transportation.
"The boys coming back from over
seas will not be afraid of long hikes.
I have three sons in France now and
if they return to their lasy ways
when they return I will cut them off
without a nickel.
"Girls who walk to work will make
better wives, with rosy cheeks, and
boys will make better husbands and
have sweeter dispositions."
The old captain expostulated on this
subject at great length, the gist of
his discourse b?ing that walking to
work was the panacea for almost
every ill, physical and mental.
"I have no desire to aid the car
companies at this time by relieving
congestion," he added, "as I have
not got a bit of stock in either of
them. I merely want to help the
young people themselves."
WASHINGTON'S "COPETTE"
ATTRACTS THE CURIOUS
Ten deep the curious of Washing
ton crowd the curbstones of Seventh
and K streets every day to gaze in
silent wonder at the first traffic
I policewoman, Mrs. Leola King.
Since the little lady first appeared
at her post she has marshalled the
traffic of the crowded crossing un
der the close scrutiny of several
hundred persons. Friendly, but in
terested, the crowd watched each
wave of her white gloved hand as
I she motions Baltimore and Wash
ington street cars to move on down
the street.
"Look at thet gal." a bewhiskered
old gentleman whispered to his
timid little wife, "not as old as our
Mary Anne and standing there just
as pert as a regular cop.".
Despite their absorbed interest
few of the members of the crowd
seemed to be able to pluck up
enough courage to try to engage the
"lady cop" in conversation, and
those who do make the attempt are
thoroughly quelled by one direct
glance from the copette's blue
eyes.
CARE OF EMPLOYES
IS GRAVE PROBLEM
i Army Officer Tells How Govern- j
ment Is Solving It.
A plea for a "broad humanitarian
attitude toward our fellow man, es
pecially the war worker" in view
j of reconstruction days, was made
[yesterday by Capt. Julius I. Peyser,
chief of the Housing and Health
Division of the War Department to
the Twentieth Century Club at All
Souls' Universalist Church, Four
teenth and L streets northwest.
"We must start with the war j
workers," said Capt. Peyser. "as 1
their problem is the most pressing.
The problem to be solved divides ,
into four parts: they must be i
housed, properly fed, given places
with proper sanitation and recrea
tion. j
"The housing problem is probably |
the most acute.
"Over 100,000 people have come to
Washington in the last fourteen
months. War found Washington
unprepared and ouj; housekeepers
could not face the problem. People
who kept boarding houses did not
adapt themselves easily to condi
tions. ;
"The authorities concluded that
the government itself must erect
dormitories for the war workers and
accommodations for nearly 8,000
men and women will be ready in the
near future in Washington."
PAINTING CHIMNEY,
FALLS OFF AND DIES
.
j John Crogan Is Victim of Accident.
Other Fatalities.
John Crogan. 57 years of age, a
j resident of Second and H streets
| northwest, died yesterday afternoon
1 at the Casualty Hospital from in
j juries received earlier in the day
when he fell from the roof of a house
at 411 South Capitol street.
Crogan was painting a chimney
| and lost his balance and fell to the
j ground, receiving internal injuries
which resulted in his death a fe^i
hours later. An inquest will be held
this afternoon.
Thomas Wagner, the St. Louis
lawyer who wa.s struck by a street
' car Tuesday night on Pennsylvania
avenue northwest, died yesterday
morning at the Emergency Hospital.
The crew of the car that struck Mr.
Wagner. Motorman Christopher Sor
rell and Conductor'' f.' O. Bannon.
were exonerated of all blame at the
inquest. Dr. W. E. Titus, acting
coroner, issued a certificate placing
the blame for the tragedy on the
carelessness of the deceased.
Alfred Mullin. 54 years of age, of
149 Adams street northwest, commit
| ted suicide yesterday afternoon by
I inhaling illuminating gas. The man's
body was discovered about 4 o'clock
I in his room with the gas turned on.
I The police say that Munlin left no
I note and they are at a loss to find
I a reason for his act. The acting
coroner will hold an inquest this
j afternoon. t
SECOND WAR SAVINGS
STAMP SERIES COMING
I Secretary of the Treasury McAdoo
yesterday announced that a new se
j ries of war saving stamps to be
known as the series of 1919 will be
placed on sale early next year. The
1 new series will be issued on the same
terms and in the same manner as
the present. the chief difference
being in the maturity date, which
: will be January 1, 1924. The new $5
stamp will be blue and bear the head
of Benjamin Franklin, apostle of sav
ing and a former Postmaster Gen
eraL
No Price Fixing on
Cotton Recommended
President Wilson last night was
given a report based on a survey of
the cotton situation by Dr. Thomas
W. Page, chairman of the cotton com
mittee of the War Industries Board.
The report recommended that no
basic price be fixed on cotton by the
government, setting forth that there
is no cotton shortage.
At one time President Wilson fa
vored the fixing of a cotton price, but
later agreed that such action should
be postponed until an official and
thorough survey of the situation
could be made.
CASTOR IA
For Infant* and Children
in use For over 30 Years
AlwvibMn -
l.'""0*, d?..you '"?? being ? Police
i*k?cl inrt ?h* c"r,ous B^ntleman
????? n hurriedly added,
c.ould0 you tell me how to
get to Union Station T'
,?^rfke 'he car across the street
IlhlntW Y'. the offlcer replied and
?ilently pointed to a large yellow
? Beabnrf 55 :L?m th? umbrella!
read. ??'''? ,th," Ie*'nd on the disc
PoMce ??v"TM conversations."
t once authorities say that ?n th
ihwo
K^3hdF,L7ur,?-"
wordd~"C 'nd ,h^ w^hout'a0
that ^thln ?
worn off, and th* no^elty will have
directing the tram" ?f a womin
<"g in tte c,ty awoU,V ,'Verjr
BUnHnSS 70 CONFER
ON RECONSTRUCTION
U- S'? Chamber of Commerce Plans
M?ehng at Atlantic City
Prel,m,nary plans for the War
rZTZ w.dr iZDMtTUrCUOn Con
to b? heiH . Ice. Committees.
' VanS* A,lantic Clty ^cember
ber"f Co arC ann?Unccd ">' ">? Cham
p ?l Commerce of the United State*
| "construction will be given a
itTrnr. Pla"' ,he ?
taken ! d """ SUbJe0t mu? be
1 tHak.enthUe?e^abyU*be'pl^W" ^
be on behalf ,, ^arr,ed on may
' industries anri nnnl business. War
I concerned eouaii &r 'n^Us^r,es are
tion of reconstruct/" determina
? R?rowa^~?VJ?" rrob,cm3. A?
I der way with already are un
The Itl^,t n,0nStrU5tl0n
I for which was ce' a ca"
I by the war "rvie. """ werk
I mittee of com
jof the United of Con"nerce
I general JZUSf^k * L include four
and eomm' t^p ^ouP
final session will bl hi ? nt0 ,he
??*n all ?Te p^c^if'
meetings. Proceedings of the
Participated' In" bv" alfTh^rf "e,sion?
On December J .k delegates,
morning and afte?? W'" be botl?
on the 5th and fith ?e*?ions. and
The chamberl. mo?lng sesslona.
taininr the best nOW ln ob"
to discuss amono- s avai,able
ing suggestions n*,!"? follow
dustrial relations 8truction- ln"
?d their ?0| narT rnaterlals
economic legislation r"oe control.
L1E[U-!J- COMEGYS
missing IN AIR RAID
AtW kfrom Washlngfon WaS in
B?mb,ng night in Lorraine.
^;:LE7rTh^c?
Mrs. E o c?? SOn ?f Mr ?d
northwest hash " ** Q 8tr<*'
.?z' srss.s?..~" ?- .??
Aero Bombing Squadron ? S,a:'-s
ed missing after a r.u report
troops in the LormV ?V6r Gernian
cording to , ac
Kion. newspaper from that re
P>^\?rasu^,'sqfufdrrai3 ^
tons of bombs had hi .? which two
the OermarT troon mnu dropped ov"
return the Ameri^l ents ?n the
ten enemy machlnes"anii ^Uddron met
battle. "acnines and engaged in
to?wile.Mdme?ndeW",b0rn ln Ca
education there Sev^f d his early
family mavrt to w"yhear* th'
I-ieut. Comegvs a.te^hin?ton- and
,eHeTt'hCehnn,C*,t H'?h1C MCKJn
"cs of the "brl? :?eCoC?PyriKht ?f"
remained until nsresa> where
H.b^r^ "' "h? waren,latment at
I from the "ume'he"1' N'ation?l Guard
trlct and ??nt h? ',ame, the Dis
d6r aS a ?*rgeant b?r
Fraudulent Practi^eT
License for Firm
taR'oi.Lh^e a?t Ct?hm|Panr Aug'M"
mlnistration license k! ??d Ad*
ulent business nr.ef? ause of fraud" i1
ministration aiinoune!!* thc Food Ad"
An lnvestig^i"?UnhC?ed.,r"t*rday. 1
ministration shn*/^ Food Ad
tcan Rice Mlllin that thp Amer
?ale through R o ,?"]Z,any madf- a
P?-n>. acting u, v Lundy and Com
the consignee faiiJi f?' and that
shipment. The a! . ac??Pt the
ing ComDanv * . n Rice M"'
and Company tn ?t* K" Lundy
name. Instead nt h I1*8 tbe r'ce in Its
dy .toSfS rlce n'h'.""' Mr' Lun"
began to sell it J ?Wn nam?.
full settlement. h" not mad*
^^^^ns^rded.
Sv? STWE5U
manufacturerr^ to twenty-three
countr^ hv ,1 ln varlou? Parts of th.
tion of the Ciotehither clothln* ?*?"
Division. Thesi wni5n,*nJiME?u,pe?e
nii^i *_ ?, Be Jerkins will be sup
SmbJ tI* *?Varnm?nt during 5i
^n^iia?Uary and February and
Marr^T ml. rwJU,re?!nta ?P ?
I ALEXANDRIA f
?
THE HEBALD BUREAU,
JL S. Doniphan,
TSJ Kina H tract.
Alexandria. Va., Nov. 7.?The report
Germany had surrendered was re
ceived in Alexandria early this after
noon. and the city Went wild with Joy.
The big siren whistle at the plant
of the Virginia Shipbuilding Corpora
tion, Southern Railway Co.'s whist'e
and the bells turned loose, and the
racket was kept up for half an hour.
There was great rejoicing throughout
the city and especially among those
having members of their families
overseas. There are several thousand
Alexandrians in the service.
The chamber of commerce requests
that all patriotic citizens tomorrow
display flags from their places of busi
ness and also their homes if the re
port is confirmed.
Following the receipt of the news
that Germany had agreed to the ar
mistice the 1.600 employes at the plant
of the Virginia Shipbuilding Corpora
tion were given a holiday for the re
mainder of the day, and many of
thorfe living out of the city departed
for their homes to spend the brief
holiday.
A survey of the housing facilities
in Alexandria was completed today by
the Navy Department. If necessary,
it is stated, the Navy Department
will requisition every spare room in
the city for employes of the torpedo
assembling plant. Within the next
sixty days 3,000 men will come to
this city to work at this plant, it is
stated. When in operation the plant
will give employment to about 2,000
skilled mechanics.
The Alexandria fire department has
Just received the new city service
truck ordered several months ago
from the American La France Com
pany. Elmira, N. Y. It is a 14-4 cyl
inder type and is motor driven, and
contains eight ladders, the longest of
which is fifty-five feet and the short
est twelve feet. In addition it is
equipped with all of the-necessary
adjuncts for fire fighting, including
extinguishers. It cost $6,0$0. It ar
rived at midnight last night and was
brought to the house of the Relief
Hook and Ladder Company under the
direction of W H Wood. Jr., drover
of the motor engine, and Bert Ray
mond, engineer of the American La
France Company.
Mrs. Arthur Warfield, this city, has
been informed that her brother, S^rgt.
Thomas Beale Sale, is now in a base
hospital overseas. suffering from
wounds received in action.
The local draft board today com
pleted the work of sending out clas
sification cards to men in the recent
draft between the ages of l'J and 36
years. The board is now engaged in
sending out questionnaires to the men
between the ages of 36 and 46 years
and to those 18 years old.
Orders today were received by the
local board to send twenty colored
men to Camp Lee November 19.
Additional contributions recatvcd by
the influenza committee are a.i fol
lows: Corby Baking Company, S'OO;
Miss Charlotte Watson. $3; Mrs. Al
fred H. Roberts, Miss Eleanor
Radcliffe, $1.
The name of Claude B. Vaughn. <.f
Alexandria, Va., appears in th? cas
ualty list of yesterday as being killed
in action overseas.
FOOD ADMINISTRATION
SCOPE BROADENED
Licensing Covert the Manufacture,
Storage and Distribution of Foods.
Through a proclamation recently
signed by President Wilson (Novem
ber 2) the licensing machinery of the
United States Food Administration
has been extended to cover the manu
facture, storage and distribution of
various foods, which heretofore have
not been in the licensed class.
All concerns engaged in the busi
ness of operating warehouses or other
places in which any food or feed
commodities are stored for hire will
be placed under license.
Another provision of the proclama
tion is designed to give more control
over the glycerin extraction of ani
mal and vegetable fats and oils.
Under the proclamation all millers
of com, oats, barley or rice will now
be licensed.
Importers, manufacturers or dis
tributors of sausage casings, if not
already so, are placed under license.
These sausage casings are imported
from China principally, and the ac
tion was taken for the purpose of
stabilizing the market.
Those engaged in importing, manu
facturing or distributing oat Hour,
raw corn flakes, buckwheat or buck
wheat products are also placed under
license through the presidential proc
lamation. Buckwheat and buckwheat
products concerns handling these com
modities for food purposes have not
been under icense heretofore, while
those handling oatmeal and rolled
oats have been.
POLICE CAPTAIN HURT
IN FALL FROM ROOF
James A. Duvall, acting police cap
tain, who has been in charge of the
police school for the instruction of
rookies, fell from a ladder yesterday
morning at his home, 2200 Fourteenth
street northwest, and probably fatally
injured himself.
Capt. Duvall was painting the roof
of his housa at the time. Only re
cently he recovered from an attack
of influenza, and it is thought that
in his weakened condition he lost his
balance at a time when ordinarily he
would have been able to maintain it
and fell a distance of nearly 35 feet.
The injured man was removed to the
Casualty Hospital in a passing auto
mobile. Capt. Duvall has been on the
police force since May 5. 1892.
Food Administration
Urges Turkey Saving
In order to discourage the waste
ful practice of ?elling young turkeys
before they mature, and to Increase
the amount of poultry flesh, the Food
Administration has placed time lim
itations on the purchase of turkeys
of certain weights by all licensed
dealers.
It is requested that all licensees
refrain from buying hen turkeys
weighing less than eight pound/?, and
toms weighing less than twelve
pounds, live weight until December 7;
not to dress turkeys in a temperature
above 40 decrees; not to purchase
turkeys intended for Tranks^ivins
markets at points east of Pittsburgh
and Buffalo after November 16.
To Prevent firln i?n#1 Infln~nrn
LAXATIVE PROMO QUININE Tab
lets taken in time will Prevent Crip
land Influenza E. W. GROVE'S sig
' nature on box. 30c.?Adv.
fruited
Oats
A luscious
combination
of Fruit and
Cercalbascd
on a. scientif
ic recipe for9
an IcleeJJbod
An Instant Hit
ALL
CUOCKU9
Hrmbrr Federal Rnwrf ?r>lm.
Successful Savings!
Were s f/ie /Cry
JUST as saving is the key to success, so is a bank
account the key to successful saving.
* Deposit your money regularly with this Bank
spend only for essentials?and as your available
funds increase your financial future will loom broader
and brighter.
?Checking and Savings Accounts.
?Interest Paid on Deposits.
ContikentalTrust Co.
^Nathan B.Scott, President
? Caurieenih^t H Sira*i:
U. S. Fooc A drairuatrati on
No.
Annniinrpmpnf Our new market at First and
announcement?rhomas Street8 Northwest
be open for business on next Saturday, November 9, at 7 a. m.
Week-End Specials
MEAT DEPARTMENT
BEEF
PORTERHOUSE STEAK,
BOTTOM ROUND STEAK,
HAMBURG STEAK,
RIB ROAST,
CHUCK ROAST,
BOILING BEEF,
Pound, 48c
Pound, 40c
Pound, 30c
Pounj, 35c
Pound, 30c
Pound, 25c
PORK
FRESH HAMS,
LOIN ROAST (center)
LOIN ROAST (blade end)
PORK CHOPS (select),
PORK CHOPS (lean),
PORK LOINS (whole),
Pound, 40c
Pound, 48c
Pound, 42c
Pound, 50c
Pound, 43c
Pound. 40c
STEER BEEF LIVER ^ lb., 18c
r\ 1 T *-) F7 I A D r* Op?11 Kettle Rendered,
f (J Kt? L AKU At the Special Price,
lb., 30c
Bacon M"b "
50c
Sliced, lb.
Pudding ,T' 22c
Sausage
Bologna. lb. ?
30c
Salt Butts u. 25c
BUTTER
FANCY FRESH CREAMERY r%
WE GUARANTEE EVERY POUND hhr
OUR DERRYDALE BRAND, LB
GROCERY DEPARTMENT
CAMPBELL'S SOUPS ?rnorted. . . 10c
AUNT JEMIMA 5SM5T 15c
RICE, Imported, 2 lbs. for . . . 25c
BEANS
Navy Beans ST"- 15c
Lima Beans _ 35c
Pea Beans ?,i,orn* 10c
Soya Beams l? Them' _... 5c
Wagner's Baked 15c
Van Cane's Baked caV 11c
Van Camp's Baked c.?n2. 19c
TOMATOES
No. 1
No. * Can,
2 for
High Grade
High Grade
Standard ^.?n 2
Standard
D Fane* Early Junes,
i eaS , Special, i cans ...
. Sweet Meadow.
V^OTO Maine Style, can
9c
25c
15c
20c
50c
18c
PALMOLIVE SOAP, 3 Cakes for 25c
Two
Pounds. .
Hominy ?B??d,
Hominy Grits
Goblin Soap?
iVIixed Vegetables
Safety Matches
akes
can
Dozen
Matches rH.\v Box-.
15c
17c
25c
10c
10c
6c
Mackerel
Cut Herring Do^n ..
Labrador Herring
C_ __ "Pride of
OOap Kitchen," cake
Peanut Butter
Brooms
Each..
Doren
No. *
4-String. each
30c
38c
38c
_ lc
w 22c
63c
TEAS
Lipton's Well Known
Varietie*
!4 lb., 20c; lb., 40c
Snider's
Bottle ...
Ketchup
Salt "C
r> Continental
JUirtll Brand, paci^afe.
15c
9c
corn atarcn gr7nd7i^k-te 9c
Egg Plums 22c
Ginger Ale _.10c
Challenge Milk c.n ? 16c
Van Liir*
Assorted. Jar
Strained.
<ilass ....
Jams
Honey
jeiio rzz*
Candles Thr~
for ... _
Clothespins
Eagle Milk
Two
Dozen..
Can.
25c
19c
28c
5c
5c
22c
Sugar Substitutes
There is no better substitute than old-fash
oned molasses or syrups.
Brer Rabbit c.Tn L*^ _ 10c
Brer Rabbit 25c
Old Style Southern ^. 25c
K.aro Syrup, 1] Size I 2 fc0"rn*
Golden Crown Syrup I 27c
Flour Substitutes
New regulations require sale of one pound of
*ubstitote with each four pounds of wheat flour
Corn Meal *?%} Peck 55c
Corn Meal 13c
Corn Flour, Lb 7c
Corn Meal, Old Va. Style
2 lbs. for 15c; 5 lbs. for 37c
^"V r* 1"^ T"^" Special Santos, Rich in C\
Li)r r rL, K navorandAroma lb.,/ /r
Why rtay ? higher price? ? mm ^
FRESH FISH" DEPARTMENT
Butter*, a nice pan fish, lb., 22c
T'out, medium size. lb. . . .22c
Rock, very choice, lb 35c
Oysters, dry pack, qt 60c
Tile, sliced,
Salmon, sliced,
Halibut, sliced,
Labrador Herring, ^
Lb., 28c
Lb., 38c
Lb., 38c
10c
VEGETABLE DEPARTMENT
Potatoes andei 43c | Onions ie^Qtoke' 17c
Apples ggn. 25c 1 Apples 38c
SAVE PAPER?BUY A MARKET BASKET
And Carry Your Merchandise Home Unwrapped '
MARKET BASKETS, Each, 10c
I

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