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The Washington herald. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, July 28, 1919, Image 4

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THE WASHINGTON HERALD
CLINTON T. llltVIMHU Pre.ldr.t pd Edit
PUBLISHED EVERT MORNINO BT J
The Washington Herald Company
435-427-429 Eleventh Street t Phone Main 3300
L M. BELL Publisher
ft- G. B1TAHT Boilana Maaagfff
POREKiR REPRESENTATIVE?!
THE BECKWITH SPECIAL AGENCY
New Tork. World Bulldinc; Chicago, Tribune Building; St. Louis,
Post-Dispatch Building: Detrolv ford Building.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES BT CARRIER:
Daily and Sunday. 40 cents per month; $4.SO per year.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES BT MAIL;
Daily and Sunday. (0 cents per month; $6.50 per year. Dally only.
50 cents per month; 5.00 per year.
Entered at the rost office at Wash in ton. D. C.. as second-class mall
matter.
MONDAY, JULY 28. 1919.
"Days Gained Mean Lives Saved; Congress
Should Act Now.
A resolution to fight flu now is before Congress. It has been in
troduced in the House by Representative Simeon D. Fcss, of Ohio,
and in the Senate by Senator Warren G. Harding, of Ohio.
It calls for an appropriation of $5,000,000. This money is to be
used to investigate the sources of flu and its allied diseases and to
find a preventive or cure. The importance of this work cannot easily
be exaggerated.
In the pandemic which reached its height here last fall flu killed
many more persons than were killed in all the American battles with
Germany.
Even in nonepidemic years influenza, pneumonia and allied dis
eases caused one-tenth of all the deaths in the United States.
No preventive has been found which promises immunity.
Flu continues to menace every person in the United States.
American lives arc not alone at stake. ' The flu was as bad last
winter in South America as in the United States. It was as bad in
France as in England. It was yet worse in Central Europe. It en
circled the world. Discovery of a real flu preventive might be this
nation's best gift to humanity. . \
The economic loss through inflnenza and allied diseases has been
appalling. Dr. Otto P. Geier, of Cincinnati, secretary of the American
Medical Association, estimates America's loss through flu last, season
at $4,000,000,000.
Contrasted to this loss which grows year by year, the $5,000,000
a^ked to finance search for a preventive is small indeed.
The Herald has been pointing out repeatedly for mdnths the
necessity ^or Congress financing the investigation of flu by a suffi
cient appropriation.
The campaign has received wide and earnest support. The Ameri
can Medical Association backed it up by resolutions passed at a
recent convention at Atlantic City.
Need for the appropriation is great. Benefits which may result
are beyond estimate.
Congress should lose no time providing the money, and getting
the government investigation started. Every day gained means lives
save d.
If China should ever forsake her evil way and turn Christian,
where would the other Christian nations go to do their stealing?
The housewife gladly would put away some canned food for
winter if only she could catch up with the family's day-to-day appetite.
California and the Japanese.
Califorr.0 is anxious for the rest oi the country to understand
her Japanese problem. The constantly growing- seriousness of the
situation as it affects agricultural conditions in that State calls for
more than local treatment. The proud old Sfate has been wonder
fully courageous in attempting to save hersel. without troubling the
national government, but the time has come when the moral support
of all Americans must be given to those loyal citizens who have en
dured almost to the limit.
Senator lames D. Phelan has thrown all of his energy into an effort
to acquaint the people of the United States with the broad aspects of
111* mcnac-' his State iaces. He has taken particular pains to show up
the trickery oi the Japanese. The people now know, through the
Senator's expose, that the Japanese have found ways to circumvent
the California anti-alien land law by forming corporations officered by
dummy Americans; by leasing and buying land in the names of Japa
nese-American born children, and by taking advantage oi the "picture
bride" system to bring women into the United States for the rearing
of large numbers of children in whose names more land may be
acquired.
The Senator only recently gave out a brief statement of the fact
that 130 "picture brides" had arrived at Seattle. The press of the
country seemed quickly to scent the danger to the country in this
and gave space on the front pages to the story.
When the people thoroughly understand that the coming of Japa
nese to a farming community in California has the same effect as
rank weeds have in crowding out the growth of healthy grains they
will begin to feel a sympathy that will have its influence upon Con
gress.
Americans have been too patient with menacing problems in the
past; the price that has been paid has been in lives and human happi
ness
The Americanism of California calls to you.
Tomorrow's geographies may divide the world into the 'league
of nations and Mexico."
There are no strikes in the plant where the Old Man calls the
employes Dick and Bill and asks about the baby's new teeth.
x
S. Claus, Salesman.
Consider the ca^c of Santa Claus.
Old Santa is one of the things with the label "Made in Germany."
He represents the spirit of brotherhood and of good cheer. Also
he wns a pretty good salesman for German-made goods.
The National City Bank of New York has just issued a list show
ing the character and \aluc of what we imported from Germany in
the year ending July 30. 1914?before the war.
In this list of fifty-three items, the principal one is muriate of
potash, 236,218 tons valued at $7,855,000.
Next in importance come dolls and toys with a total value of
|;,7Kj,ooo.
For five Christmases, Santa Claus has been unable to sell us any
trade-in-Germany toys. Meantime the trade couldn't wait; it has gone
flsewhere. Santa Claus had to see that millions of small stockings
were filled. Good cheer and the spirit of Christmas meant more to
him than Germany and when Germany's heart went bad the old saint
:anceled his contract and went to selling goods for somebody else.
So Santa Claus has "come clean" as they say. Some day, maybe,
iell be working again for Germany but it will be a changed Ger
Tianv?a .Germany that understands and appreciates and tries to live
31 the Spirit of Christmas, so that a nice, old, respectable gentleman
*ith white whiskers and a twinkle in his eye will have no reason to
X ashamed of the connection.
Were you speaking of sky pilots? The Rev. A. W. W. Little
jses an aerial runabout getting to and from his Liverpool, England,
ihtircli.
Mr. Taft and His Views.
Mr. Taft says his letter proposing changes in the league of
lations covenant was not intended for publication and that it was
pven out without his consent.
Are the people to understand from this that the former President
tas one set of views for expression in his newspaper articles and
ilatform addresses and another set for the edification oi the chairman
- the National Republican Committee?
New York. July 27.?A page from
the diary of a. modern Samuel Pepys:
Up betimea and with F. Casey. of
Collier's, to Bowling Green in a ben
sin? buggy, and at St. Paul's we
saw old men and haggard arising
from sleep In the cemetery, some
?leaping on the marble slabs. At
the Battery we saw Lord Andrew's
barque, and Karl Kitchen, the scrlv
enar. was on deck In white panta
loons and cap. very noble.
Hack through the town afoot, stop
ping at Whitehall for a great (art*
a neat's tongue and some anchovies
and the best beaker of cold milk ever
I tasted; but Lord! the prices?cost
ing me\a half-pound. The news this
day is that all the cabaret places
are shutting down, for which Provi
dence be thanked.
On Park Row I met an old enemy,
but he spoke pleasantly and took a
very civil leave of me; yet I dis
trust his manner. Too, I met a Jour- j
nalist on an evening journal and he'
wore a silk topper and a bouquet and'
a silken waistcoat and I hear he Is
a moat likable fellow withal, which
seems strange.
Near City Hall I saw Lord Mayor i
Hy lap, In a great petrol buggy and,
he *|is guarded about with consta
ble^ and I stood upon the steps and
j matde observance to Cutting as he
l^went along. v ^ I
At Brooklyn Bridge we took the
/Underground tram and a fellow foxed
with drink was causing a great up
roar by pulling the beard of an an
cient Hebraic gentleman, and a young
lady of great cotirage basted the
rogue soundly amid hand-clapping
| Home and to see Will Cressy in his
new role In "LightninV and found
him most engaging, but the play in
ept. And so home and to bed.
Odd things attract crowds In New
York. Start looking for a penny in
Lonsracre Square and it means a
i hurry call for the police reserves,
j Sidewalk traffic is always blocked in
front of a Childg Restaurant when!
the skilled worker in immaculate
white is giving a hair-raisin* exhi-j
jbition of the hazardous art of seeing!
' that buttercakos get a square deal on !
I both sides. When tho buttereako
I Juggler's companion In heroism, the
blond young woman dressed as a
j trained nurse, happens to bo on the
: Job turning pancakes or preparing
I buttered toast, it proves a double
? attraction. They press about the big
windows in droves I often wonder
j if the crowds are held perhaps by
j no other spell than that produced by
i curiosity ss to why the white coat
. of the buttercake man always lias
j an egg-stain over the heart
( The bar^-lecxred Idea is spreading
rapidly. It was quite natural that
i serious drinkers?pardon?thinkers In
! Greenwich Village would take up tho
! idea with a ban?, but that it would
; spread uptown wag never entertained
for an Instant. But almost any Fifth
i avenue bus has one or two bare
I letrged girls. Over on Eroadwav It
I has ceased to be a reason for stop
ping and turning about shame-faced
?y. One restaurant has a sign in its
; marble entrance: "Barc-les^ed la
, die* are not permitted to dine hero
i with or without escorts." There are
i a lot of men who have been going in
j for thte idea for several decades.
, Eut they live down in the Bowery
lodging houses.
Many fashionable eating houses are
| advertising the soft-shell lobster. A*
| a rule only about two or three are
1 found a season. But this year at
Raritan Bay they are caught by the
j dozen. They are very perishable and
! are sold prepared for $20 each.
THE PARAGRAPHER'S
NEWS VIEWS.
The Belgians can't be blamed for
protesting against the adoption of
their national colors by Germany,
i That looks like a studied affront.?
Buffalo Express.
j A dog which belongs to one of
? the members of Marshall's band
does not howl when the band 4s
playing real music, but when the
band starts a jazz tune the dog
bursts forth loudly and dolorously,
which is a distinct addition to any
Jazz selection.?Topeka Capital.
The Turkish government has con
demned Enver Pasha to death, hut
the news would be more reassuring
if anybody knew the present
wherabouts of Enver Pasha?Cleve
land Plain Dealer.
In New York a movement i.? on
foot to found a home for aged phy
sicians. Common experience., how
ever. finds that when the doctor is
through it's the patient who needs
eleemosynary assistance. ? Balti
more American.
Germany during the war was tol
erably successful in providing sub
stitutes for all sorts of articles of
use and convenience, but the Ver
sailles council has no idea of ac
cepting one for tho Jtrial of the for
mer kaiser.?Providence Journal.
"What has become of the old
time picnic?" asks an exchange.
Under the present conditions of the
high cost of living, it is a good
deal cheaper to take the family to
a restaurant or hotel.?Rochester
Post-Ex pre ss.
"SCHOOL DAYS"
1 kt<t * .
c>u?I-IooK?nj awfttK ix tW*
hovVI ?ni ill 1
ia i? Si***- ?*
%*t 1u -wjllo tk* clatV
ltttt a. littl* *??*
aT co*?-?? I xwWWt
?? ?*?
1 a? ? S?*
sf~W W, 1 *.??
tfc IA* ?< ????*? ? s^ek
By DW1G
XnT^Tiwl
-???SB? jt> ?j ^
tht?*(tt> Jieieo?
ytiih Cnto* oil
1 ten 1"?
WouMut t*
?unfcSS *?? *"J
sick- J*? ,
3**
"Siticlm ?
<ip?iller3 of t?u .beans
7-X6
Who's Who
in
Our City
A. G. BISHOP. 1
Arthur G. Bishop's first po ltion
called for a good ri^ht hand and
plenty of ink and paper. He started
his career as a business man twenty
five years ago ? copying manuscript
for the Lawyers' Title Company. He
now holds the office of vice president
of the District and Washington Title
Insurance Company, and also finds
time to carry on a general practice
of law and real estate brokerage on
the side.
Mr. Bishop was born in Wash ng ton
in 1S75. He was educated In the 1 cal
public schools and Central Hich
School, from which he graduated in
11890. He then took up the study of
i law at Georgetown T'n Te-sity
I received the degree of LL.M. in 1S99.
j Like a trie citizen of the District.
Mr. Bishop favors representation in
; Congress for Washington. He is
| possessed of a large reserve of that
I quality essential to good citizenship?
I civic pride. He is active on the Doard
J of Trade.
I Mr. Bishop is assistant treasurer of
; tho local Young Men's Christian Asso
ciation and also is on the board of di
rectors of the association. He is a
director of the Perpetual Building
Association. As a member of B. B.
French Lodg*. No. 15. he is promi
nently identified in Masonic circles.
Ho is president of the board of offi
cers for the Ninth Street Christian
Church.
Mr. Bishop is married and he has
two daughters. Doris and Mildred
His home is at 323 Tenth street north
oast.
Theaters Free in China.
No charge for admission Is maa?
in many of the Chinese theaters,
which depend entirely on the profits
from the sale of drinks and food
nroducts.
^EDMUND
VAT^ CE
:ooke
It, was-' a woroar) weeping,
Wfiile all th? world was sleeping,
WitV) wflite lipr* hid behind Ibe KighL to p?*a^;
. 1 thought liim sieol and gVarrle;
O, God ! that 1 fou rhouldst >lan it
To make rriX turn to common ^?y'"
It was a woman sin^in^
Her tones with courage ringing,
AnA lifting op a brave flee to th? Day'
] Hank. God ' 1 (too didjk not planyt
IS make V)jm. steel ani granite ?
jlfldnk GoJ! 1 may r?-md<l his Crv'mVW cl^!"
A LINE 0- CHEER
EACH DAY 0" THE YEAR
By Joba Kendrick Bane*.
A SACKED FLOWER.
(Oopyrlgbt, 1?I9, by the McCiure New?papei
Syndicate.)
O the Poppy?'t?? a flower sacred unto
me,
For it whispers tales of valor In the
lands across the sea
As it veils in smiling color scenes
where sons of ours have trod
Mid the agonies of battle upon the
Hills of God.
Year by year with all Its beauty on
the hillside and the plain
It will deck the graves of heroes who
have died for Freedom's gain.
And will stand a guard of Honor,
garbed in regal majesty.
To our gallent sons now sleeping in
those fields across the sea.
WELL! AIN'T NATURE
WONDERFUL!
Well, y'know customers. I was a
I victim to a picnic last Sunday, and
maybe It was the hard boiled eggs.
or pickles, or ice cream or sumpiQ'
that acted in a way to bring back
memories of my childhood days in
a big city when I used to go wading
; in back of a sprinkling wagon. There
? was an infant river there, and it's
there yet if somebody didn't throw a
! sponge or blotter in it It had the
| babble that moves poets to rhyme,
i but it moved me to unhook myself
from shoes and socks for a lil foot
i swim. With an idle branch for sup
j port I waded down the center of the
stream with a De Soto expression ot
| discovering the Mississippi on my dial,
j and when I splashed in focus of the
bunch they exclaimed I was a "bug."
I 1 didn't deny it. I was a creeket. 1
; made such rapid progress with my
j wading, I decided for the future to
: go in still deeper and buy a swimming
vest and pants. But the only draw
back was, my pedals absorbed so
much of the river I couldn't get my
foot satchels on to Join the rest of
the gang in the various picnic pas
times. So I had to ^sit under a tree
and amuse the mosquitoes until the
.tide ran out of my hoofs.
British Horses Sell High.
| The good treatment of their horses
by the British army has left the ani
mals in such excellent condition that
they have been sold for very high
prices, and altogether have realized
$42,300,000.
OPHELIA'S SLATL
Famous Honolulu Joker
Here?Watch Your Step!
Hailing from Honolulu, he has come
to this country armed with five years*
accumulation of hoaxes, deep-laid
traps for the unwary and subject mat
ter for a thousand laughs at the ex
pense of his victims.
Chester Aloysius Doyle, lawyer, lin
guist, poet, detective, bon vivant and
"prince of the house of Nikko," is the
man for whom you should keep your
eyes open.
j Recently there was a native wed
ding in Honoiuiu to which Doyle and
several friends thought they should
have been invited?but weren't. The
night of the ceremony Doyle secured
; the use of a hearse for an hour.
The "Jester" arrayed himself in fu
neral black, donned a false mustache
; and drove the hearse into the court
yard of the residence. When the as
semblage?largely composed of Ha*
i waiians, who are intensely supersti
tious?saw the "dead wagon." there
were wild shrieks and a mad tumble
for exits. The wedding was postponed
until Invitations could be issued for
Doyle and his friends.
: Some years ago. to help a Honolulu
| crony who had established a zoological
garden. Doyle purchased a small don
key, had its coat clipped, and then
painted It with stripes of nitrate of
silver. It was dubbed a '?zebrolfl,"
. and crowds came from all over the
i mid-Pacific to gaze upon thf animal.
These are only samples of Doyle s
capers, which Include an entry into
the lobby of the St. Francis Hotel. San
j Francisco, dragging a 700-pound sea
;turtle on a leading string: introducing
a girl who wanted to meet "one of
lyour wealth planters" to his fr.end
ithe undertaker, etc.
i The island Joker is universally popu
lar-in Honolulu, where he has lived for
I the past thirty years and where he
maintains a beautiful home called
| "Nikko," which has been the scene of
i some of the most famous banquets and
! receptions in the history of Hawai..
'He has come to this country to consult
jwith the authorities on the subject of
Hawaiian independence.
Wed on Tune Here.
In the Argentine Republic if a man
engaged to marry hesitates beyond
a reasonable time in leading his
fiancee to the altar he is heavily
fined.
Farther by Sea.
The distance from Eastport to
Kittery, Me., is 226 miles, but the
1 State has really about 2.500 miles of
! sea coast on account of the many
I Indentations.
$3.50
?TUKTIC CITY
AND RETURN
(Including War Tax)
SUNDAY
AUG. 3
BALTIMORE & OHIO
Lv. Washington,
Union Station 6:00 A.M.
Ar. Atlantic City 11:10 A-M.
RETURNING:
Leave Atlantio City 7 P.M.
Philadelphia 9 P.M. Same Day
Tickets on Sale Friday and
Saturday Preceding
Excursion.
See Flyers. Consult Ticket Acta.
'Round the Town
With capt.
J WALTER
MITCHELL
Cheer up, the best it yet to come,
The stormy days are over;
With no more riots, war or rum
We ought to live in clover.
Important Change of Management.
CHARLES C. FOSTER, temporarily in charge of three District
penal institutions?the jail, reformatory and workhouse at Occoquan?
will more than likely be made permanent superintendent of all and
given an assistant to have immediate charge of prisoners "down the
river." Mr. Foster is an ideal warden and prior to coming to Wash
ington he gained great commendation because of his management
of the city jail of Louisville, Ky., which was made a model institution
while he was in charge.
I am informed the District Commissioner* have practically
decided upon the consolidation of positions, and that Mr. Foster
is the only candidate in sight?and he haa not sought the office.
If he is appointed it will be another case of the job seeking
"the man.
Paradise of Faddists and Theorists.
Washington has become the stamping ground of acute faddists
and theorists from every place under the sun. Just as the glare of
the electric light attracts the ephemeral Mayflies, so the dazzle of
the Capital attracts those who have vague ideas, fantastic proposi
tions and day dreams. If they would come and go again, provided
they escaped the psychopathic ward of Washington Asylum Hospital
no harm would be done. But every mother's son and daughter of
'hem insists upon trying out his faas and fancies upon the patient
| Washington public. ?
! This condition has come to the attention of Congressmen and
I they have discussed it and laughed over some of the experiments
that have been inflicted upon the people, such as the scheme to
"teach the children to play scientifically."
. Qlf ?f those who have taken the "matter seriouslv is Representa
|tive STL ART FliLIX REED, of West Virginia, a good and true
? friend of the folks here. This is what Mr. Reed said to me on the
subject: x
"The City of Washington, instead of being a place to try out ex
I Per'me",$ different States are afraid to try out, ought to be a
| model for the entire country. Washington ought to set a pace for the
, nation. And the people ought, too, to be permitted to have a voice
? in their own government, with Representatives in Congress in nro
portion to the population."
Municipality As "Mine Host."
My old friend DAN O'LEARY, who recently returned from
r ranee, says the municipality of Brest, in combating the high
cost of living, has opened a municipal restaurant, designed oar
'ticularly for the patronafee of returned soldiers and workinsr
people who can not pay the prohibitive prices for food charred
by privately owned cafes. k "
For the modest sum of 43 cents, Mr. O'Leary savs. the citv
fathers of Brest served a meal composed of soup or a liirSt
stew, meat, fish or eggs one vegetable, dessert, and a quarter
|of.a. ht;r ot *.'.n.e hilf ? l't" of beer. Other di?hes are pro
vided for additional small amounts. Eig placards announce
j that tipping is positively prohibited. More than a thousand
I pcopl* a day arc served at this city caff.
Protect Wall Paper.
Buffers have been invented to M
clamped to bed posts to protect wa'I
paper, woodwork and furniture as
beds are moved.
"The Beauty of the Lord"
By THE REV. CHARLES JTELILE,
Staff Writer on Religious Topics. J
"I>t the beauty of the Lord our
i God be upon us"?
In former days men sought merely
to make things useful; today they
also seek to make them beautiful.
If hi? house was dry. that's all
| the savage cared about. But now
we hire architects to plan our homes'
, on lines that appeal to the eye.
The workman today builda ma
I chines that not only "go" but look
i well?so well, indeed, that they vie
j with "woif.? of art" in show win- ,
1 dows on stylish avenues.
Once, a man was satisfied if his
I coat was warm: tcday it must alsd
be harmonious in color and correct
] in form. Because people are giving
more and more attention to their
personal appearances?even the so
called common people. They are
learning that while a clean shirt
may not cover a clean skin, a dirty
J shirt never does.
But the beauty of the Lord must
be not only "upon uV but ?'within
h us."
A clear skin Is the sign of clean
l| blood. And no amount of cosmetics
li can hide the character that's back,
of a jaded eye?because the eye is ,
the window of the soul.
"Create in me a clean heart. O;
God." should be the prsyer of every
man who desires to be clothed in
| "the beauty of the Lord."
li For neither coat, nor car. nor cot
B'jtage?however fine and beautiful?
can cover any man's character.
Hailstones Freeze Cream.
Hailatonea that fell on the Peter At
farm, near Deft*noe. Ohio. %ere 10
large that they were scooped up by
campera and used to fr?exe ice cream
By simplifying the ryitem of
tickets rlvtn to IxqiIoti'i oniiibyi
passengers a having of 100 tJn.
of paper pulp a year was eltected.
(r
TAILOR
McConville
Woodward
Building.
15th and
H Street*.
Room
210.
Tw l - iked for ymrt fl
for t Lfcuar vto eouid,
supply much apiaodrt
fitucf CrniMri u the*
TOi'w m*4e, Tailor
McCarrCle."?Ard tbrr
fkilac McObcriU# woe
are
if other
lookic* tor such trrwiae:
Uon. He wiU d?
ai weU :or ywt
RESORTS.
' -
HILUHOUU, >. J.
WILDWOOD-BY-THE-SEA
For tout summer ?arauoc. B?*jfe>
Courtn?ht Smith. Sac'j Board of Trait. Wi.d
wood. N. J. j^-nso t 9
Centra*;? located r,?*r
bract: white ?*mee.
! cap St. arch?ua; Ult. J ALBEBT BAl:*>.
JelS-w itJt
EDGETON INN
When tou come to
New York do not run
I the risk of marring
V^pyour visit by accept
ing less than the Hotel
Astor offers.
Many patrons say that
they have been unable to
duplicate Astor service.
To stay at the Astor is
to haye New York's beat
in comfort and ostler,
tainment.
Times Square
\ At Broadway 44th to 45th Streets
?the center of New York's social
and business activities. In close
proximity to all raiiwsy terminals.
WILDWOOD MANOR
| Capacity. 400. whole bio k: ocean Iroct. tra*
I acu salt water is hatha rumunc water. hoc ati
j cold, is bedrooms, electric ele*atar?: team*
j ccurta. etc.: ope&a Juce 2T Wild wood's larr?:
'ard au?*t hotel, lira. VTM B LLSTTH M|r
ORKNEY ftPRIXCfT VA.
ORKNEY SPRINGS, VA.
ORKNEY SPRINGS HOTEL
I Orca rcw. Beautiful mc.Tiaiai. slw^et
i coal. aale. LeelUiy. zastfai. pleaaast. hern*
like, free amuacaoecu. bent environment; food
1 table; waters equal Carlatad for rheumavsr.
k-.di.er* EerTouaoeas; capacity, we brv*>L
j B C. Caner. Prm Jul *
ATLAKTK CITY"
trmhcm
IV3R1DS (KATEST H
2. ATLANIX u i f
LiK^GRFATESTKmsucqss
HOTEL IROQUOIS
6outh Carolina Avenue adjacent to beach. {
Cap. SuO. Reflned patron a*e. muaic, dta' "4 '
itncUy modern, tabla and aarriee escelieok j
large aolariam. Booklet. ?. FBANCkLL I
Hotel Bothwell
Virrinia Ave., second house from
Boardwalk and Steel Pier. Every
appointment. Highest standard
In cuisine and service. Booklet
LAKE LOUISE
For Strenuous Pleasures, Gay
Social Life, Rest or Relaxation
This lovely lake alone is worth the trip, but then there i*
CHATEAU LAKE LOUISE
?a metropolitan hotel in appointments and service?
wonderfully situated on the lake's edge and facing the
mighty Victoria Glacier. Something to do and see
ana enjoy every moment of the aay, with Boating,
Motoring, Climbing with Swiss and Canadian Guides,
romantic walks ana drives on Alpine trails.
Get Better Acquainted with Canada
lik or write for information or Beaort Toor Ma 112
Canadian Pacific Railway
r, E. PkelfMfc, City Pa*?fn*rr Aftat. 1419 New York
Ave.. Washington?F. R. Perry, Graeral
PaM?B|rr JL>ept? 1231 Broadway. New York City

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