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The Washington herald. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, September 30, 1919, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045433/1919-09-30/ed-1/seq-3/

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HARVARD STARTS
DRIVE FOR FUND
$15,000,000 Endowment
Asked in Order to In
crease Salaries.
The general public, aa well aa
Harvard men. will be appealed to
for subscriptions tn th? local cai
paig-n for the raising of a 115.000.
000 endowment fund for the uni
versity, according to announce
ment by Walter R. Tuckerman.
chairman of the local executive
committee In charge of the drive.
The campaign will begin tomor
row and continue for a week. Each
of the (41 Harvard men reatding In
Washington will be paid a personal
visit by a member of one ot th?
group of canvassing team?. Cir
cular letter? explaining the pur
pose of the campaign and urging
liberal support have been aent to
all of the former Harvard students
so that they will be acquainted
with particulars of the campaign
when they are called upon by the
canvasser.
Subscribers to the fund may either
pay cash or arrange for payments
covering a period of five years. If
they choose they can make quarterly
payment? on their subscriptions.
Checks may be drawn payable to
Charles F. Adama, treasurer of Har
vard College, the legal name of Har
vard University. Checks should be
?ent to the headcraarter? of the local
campaign committee In the office of
Charlee Warren, room 716 Union Trust
Building.
The endowment fund wiTi be used to
increase the low ?alarle? of faculty
members, wipe out annual deficits, and
extend the work of the university.
GOVERNMENT
PRINTING
OFFICE
NEWS
Eight presses will be busy for two
months printing i;.00O,0O0 census
blanks. They are being run six-on
?nd will require 5.000.000 Impressiona
Joseph Gibson, monotype keyboard
operator, has started on a two weeks'
vacation to visit relatives near Del
aware Water Clap, and win later
take a trip through Lake George and
Lake Champlaln.
Mrs. Dora Jarrett ha? resigned
from the night pamphlet bindery and
will be married October 1.
Richard S. Peed is ?pending three
weeks on a fishing trip on Quiet
Creek
Pressman tn Chare? Frank A.
Dougherty is absent from the night
pressroom on leave.
Bookbinders George Hoffman and
Dan Casey, of the ruling and sew
ing ?action, are on leave.
Guy L. Partridge has returned to
the monotype section after a three
weeks' trip through the West.
Miss Edna Zura?, of the nirrht press
force, ia ?pending two weeks In At
lantic City.
Edward McCarthy, foreman of the
ea?emaking section. Is on leave. Ol
iver Thompson Is In charge during
his absence.
Mi?? Ola Mallory, monotype key
bosrd operator, la enoylng ? ewo
weeks' vacation to Richmond snd
PMlsdelphl?.
John L Scully left the Job room
yesterday to spend a vacation In
Boston.
Georg? L, Schoeneman of the
hand ?ectlon ha? been 111 several
day?.
Elmer E. Schott looked after press
revising while Valentine Ruff wa?
absent last week.
Bill Jone? returned to the lino
type section yesterday after a visit
to hi? home In Cleveland.
M. H Holmes has returned to the
carpenter shop after several weeks'
leave.
Jake Statler was absent ?eversi
day? from the ?tores division last
week.
Pressman Harry W. Cuppett of
tbe main press room is enjoying
several weeks* leave.
NEW ZONE SYSTEM PLAN
MAY COME UP TODAY
The Public Utilities Commission this
morning will resume hearing on the
application of the Washington Rail
way and Electric Company for an in
crease m revenue to prevent the com
'pany from suffering a deficit this year
in the boardroom of the District
William F. Ham. president of the
company. Is expected to lay before the
commission a new plan for a zone
system.
The Federation of Citisene" Asso
ciations, representing a number of sub
urban association?, will have repre
sentatives at the hearing to oppose
a ?one system.
Three Sailors Burned in
Explosion on U. S. Greene
Three sailors were severely burned
tn a boiler accident on board the de
stroyer Greene, thirty miles off Key
West. Sunday afternoon, the Navy
Department was advised yesterday.
The Greene Is disabled, and so far.
because of heavy seas, navy ships
have been unable to tow her.
Submarine chasers with doctors
aboard were sent to the scene, but
because of the heavy seas were badly
damaged when they tried to grv?
?salatene?. This morning a navy tug
was sent to the scene, but because
ot the rough seas Is not expected
to give help immediately,
i The TJ. 8. S. Sharon Intercept
ed a message from the Greene
shortly before noon yesterday, and
Is Eomg to aid the crippled de
?troyer.
Chiropractic Physician.
The word Chiropractic is de
rived from the Greek and liter
ally means hand doing, or done
by hand. Appleton's Medical Dic
tionary defines a physician as a
practitioner of medicine. There
fore, the meaning of Chiropractic
Physician would be "a hand fix
ing practitioner of medicine.''
CThirn?ractie ia not aT-tiftn.. nor doe? It coo
??<ler itself . crjaspetitor of medicine any soars
than a dentist Is a ersavpstitor of tie fajraitr
piuacuui. Nor m a CUroptatset a ??-tt?-?-??.
?ad no nati Ct?roorsctot vaniti ?all baa??ab* ora?;
te te rmt a *Bss^SsaT?SJaa
a?ii^r-h.rirn that ts. a?rril of Cbiiotsactlc
ha? tempted atan? to tara a real tritili ? tato a
"-K-neii-qisc*" irlua?. ve -sta to assin u_
rea u> basasi the avasssk? hn?ln?si ra-cuon o?
ta. te"?-phoo* rvtrvctor? under the head of "sfai
essa of tb. ?tiiropractic Ataocia-ioo of ta. D_
tr?ct of Ojia?.???.'? Thaa? |?J?>f are
?raduata. of rasi school? ?ad hav. ?-rkod hard
M a-ars ts-cr iw.if?assilli Bach - alia |
laannlnlnl ?ad proveo his ahtlitr belar* beitat
admitted to membership. This for ?oar prouc
Chjjooractor ia
NOT s tssravdaa. a ss?a?oe or ?a ?a-avnalh.
" to at aaojUusc ?at . Cairo
ON TOP IN HUNGRY
Bucharest.?Take Jonescn Is form
ing- a new cabinet to succeed th?
fallen Brattano cabinet. Jonesca
was for Intervention on the side of
tbe allies In tb? days of Rumania's
neutrality.
THE TOWN CRIER.
n?nrs- at tbe Bin? Trlannlr Rec
reation Center, Twentieth and ?
streets northwest, tonight at 7:30
o'clock.
Band NaMsr-t ?< the pasa? hee?-lral.
Fort Myer. v?l. by the Third Cav
alry Band, this afternoon at 4
o'clock.
Knlrrt?l??if?l of ?he War Cam?
Community Service Club. 1314
Massachusetts avenu? northwest,
tonight at 8 o'clock.
Daorr andrr th? dlrrctKMi of the
War Camp Community Service at
the Trinity Parish Hall. Third and
C streets northwest, tonight at 8
o'clock.
Daaee ??der the aaasjlec? ?f the
K. of C. at th? g-ymnasium. Fort
My?r, Vs.. tonight at 8 o'clock.
Statr Mavrall?? ?f the Aasrrieaa
Legion. In the auditorium of tbe
War Camp Community Servie?
Club. 918 Tenth street northwest,
tonight at 7:10 o'clock.
Dauaee at ?he Th??????? Cm**
munity Center. Twelfth and L
streets northwest, tonight at 1:41
o'clock.
Dauaee aader the dli-ectlos ?f th?
Red Cross at the Walter Reed Hos
pital tonight at 8 o'clock.
Dawee ?n?w th? dli-rrtlo? ?f ?he
K. of C. at the Walter Reed Hos
pital tonight at 8 o'clock.
The Oelaaabo? Oeua-try Cl-sb ???
nounces a dinner dance for mem
bers and their guests on Thursday
evening at the clubhouse. Fort
Berry. Va. Mr. Guthrle Is In charge
of arrangements.
Iaeetare ?? ?Oar Pablle Utility
Emergency," by Stiles P. Jones at
the forum of the National School
of Research. Methodist Episcopal
Church, South. 90? Massachusetts
avenue northwest Wednesday even
ing at 8 o'clock.
CHARLES F. H?DER
TO BE BURIED TODAY
_-.
Funeral services for Charles F.
Helder. the Washington boy who
was drowned off Annapolis Light In
Chesapeake Bay a week ago Sun
day, will be held at ? o'clock this
afternoon at his home. 455 New
York avenue northwest. The boy ?
body was found Friday.
Helder, who was well known here,
was the ?on of William J. Helder. a
member of the firm of Heltmuller
and Helder, commission merchants.
He Is survived by his parents, two
brothers and three sisters.
He was born here, attended the
Washington public schools and Busi
ness High School, and was an au
ditor for the Southern Railway.
The Rev. J. Fredrick WencheU
pastor of the Christ English Evan
gelical Church, will officiate at Ol?
funeral services._^^
Portland, Ore., Police
Official Guest Here
Capt aUbert J. Headier, command
ing the trafile rjollce, had as his guest
vesterday Lieut H. A. Lewis, chief
of the police traffic department of
Portland, ?"rregon. The latter official
has been on a tour of Inspection of
the traffic departments of the larger
cities.
He says the arrangements here for
the regulation of traffic and the en
forcement of rules and regulations are
the best he has found avnywhore.
Matszine Editor Speaker.
Deibert Essex Davenport editor of
Photo-Play Journal and American
Ambition, will deliver a lecture en
titled "Lift Up Thy Heads and Broth
era" In the Pubic Library Lecture Hall
on Wednesday evening, October 1, 1919,
at 8 o'clock.
SHOES ON SALE
AT ARMY STORE
Price Will Range From $2
To $3.50; Food Stocks
Sell Rapidly.
Sever?! carload?? of redairoed army
shoes will ba placed on sale at ths
army retail store In the Liberty Hut,
opposite Union Station, next Satur
day. Pries? win rang? from 81 to
13.50, and all pairs are guaranteed
to be in excellent condition.
Ten carloads of food commodities
were placed on aale at the store y?
terday, and Washington was afforded
tbe first real opportunity to purchase
army food In unlimited quantities.
Th? sslessof shoes was not Included
In the original plan of th? store.
but the present high prices caused
tbe War r>epr.rtrnent to offer than
to the public
"The purpose of the army retail
stores Is to reduce the cost of liv
ing." the War Department announced
yesterday, "and because of the high
cost of footwear we have offered
Shoes for public sale."
The sale of gas mask?, helmet?
and other war souvenirs was de
layed because of th? urgent demand
for food and merchandise, but with
in ten days Washington will be able
to purchase all sorts of war relics at
the retail store.
It was said yesterday that the
present supplies at the Liberty Hut
store were sufficient to last for six
months. This Is a vivid contrast to
the opening week of the store when
the supplies were practically ex
hausted after the first day's aale.
BUREAU OF EN
GRAVING AND
PRINTING
NEWS
The Bureau Bowling League opened
Its season last night at Recreation
Alleys with eight clubs. Albert N.
Dewey, custodian of presses, ?
elected president for the ensuing ye
with David Kulp as vie? president
O. P. Anderson, custodian of presses,
will act as secretary and treasurer,
while H H Stevenson, electrician In
the numbering division, has been des
ignated as the official scorer. Tb?
schedule of games for tbe coming
season Is as follows:
BUREAU BOWlalKO l.EACCX.
BJK-RIUTION AUaaCTS.
???? WEEK.
?aaiiliwlin -*s-RelS ?a wildest?
JS-KJatta n. Surf a<*. Octotx?- l-Roaa?ssr.
Osa-odian? OcXshrr *r-ll>r*ian? va. NnmOortn?,
SECOND WEEK.
Oct/*?r S-Sarfaoe rs Nirmberlrx Octotsar
T?Machina ?a ?liai ta. Oatsbrr 8? Roamrra ra.
1 Bid?. Otober ?-t^Uatodiana ??. Wildcats.
THIRD WEEK
?-Mbwsw B-Wildcats ra Surface. Oetstaa? 1?
'? awBawaUS w. atachlne Ootobar 15-Red? ?a
Custodian? Octobsr M?MiafHa ra NnaatartZaT.
TOCBTH WEEK.
Matar a*-R?ds is. aawafaSSa Octastssr ?
? Seamtta ra Misdta October B-8orf??s, ?a.
. Ol?*ndl?n? *?******? g-WOdcsU ?a Hxaobrtr*
???? WEEK.
Ootobw a-Nnmhaarins t? Gp??????1?? Ooo>
ibw ? ?wate ?a MttSta Octotsjr ? w?w-S-aSS
vs. Ser?a.? ?Drlasbrr ?>?Wild<-?ta ?a ?main?
SIXTH WEEK.
1 sioswnbw J-W!tocata Ta MiaBta ?grab? 4
-stachls? ?a **?aSSawaw? ?.al.i I Risaaawr?
SEVEfmi WEEK.
K?wsa-*tw t? ?inwir? ?a Wlldoata H j ? ins a
11?Beds ra Numbarlnc. Nossxohw lS-Miaflta
?a, t>-?t?ldi?na NulljaLaa U?Surtas? t?.
afadhiae.
Reds, Wudi-at? and B? ara plat?
pdnt*aw
Mrs. Julia Barry, chief of the stamp
perforating division, retaxned to her
desk yesterday, after an abesnee of
several days with a severe cold.
Miss Nellie Connolly. Mrs. Story aad
Miss C. Walmsley. of the wetting di
vision, are on the sick list
Miss Hattie Wilson, of th? surface
division, has been granted two we*ks'
leave.
J. J. McDonald. Albert Ledger, Rich
ard Clabourn, and Herbert Leach, en
the engraving division, day force,
have been transferred to the night
shift
Mrs. Margaret Loffler and Mies
Katie Strobel, of section B, have been
absent for the past week on account
of the Illness of their mother.
I. B. Cohen, Edward Doe and Rob
ert Little, plate finishers, tuai ?.
ehankle and W. Posey, skilled help
ers, all In the engraving division, night
shift have been transferred to day
work.
T. Coburn. R Jama, J. Shannon and
J. Mclntyre, of section 5, are on the
sick lut
Miss Annie Friesen, Miss Josephine
Mancuso, and Misa Mary O'Sulllvan,
of the stamp perforating division, are
on the sick list
George Jacobs, Prank Smith, George
Land and Henry Schnede. of section s,
motored to Solomon's Island Saturday
evening to do some fishing. Jacobs
won the honors for the day, having
landed a couple of extra large trout
O'Connor School Moveu.
The O'Connor School of Expression
has moved from Studio Hall, on Con
necticut avenue, to a more spacious
suite in the Mills Building, Seven
teenth snd Pennsylvania avenue. Mr.
O'Connor opened his school on Con
necticut avenue four years ago.
EDMONTON'S ?Home of
the Original FOOT FORM
Boots and Oxfords for Men,
Women and Children.
Statu OPEN Every Day, Saterday lacrodetl, T31 6 P. M.
Wear "Foot Form" Boots for Health's Sake.
Do your shoes do this to
your toes? Why will you
wear them, then?
Why won't you get a
pair of shoes so made that
every toe has room to
"breathe???
Don't fret about style?
we have looked after that
We are ADVISERS on
Footwear.
EDMONSTON & CO.,
<I.<-or-.r?te_>.
ANDREW BETZ, Manager
1334 F Street ?*^?"&?t?? ?
. ?
; ? ..?.??
-
A. D. 1889.
?
-
?
?
--
Thirty Years Ago
The Washington Loan and Trust Company
opened for business in the office pictured above, located at 1001 F Street Nortfrwest. Twice
since then it has been necessary to build or rebuild on a large scale to accommodate the *ver-in
creasing business. In response to popular demand, the company opened a branch office in 1917
on Seventeenth Street opposite the State, War and Navy. Last winter a fully-equipped savings ?de
partment paying 3 per cent on deposits was established and met with immediate success as indi
cated by 4,000 depositors and nearly $1,000,000 deposits in eight months' time. Now a foreign
department with agencies in London and Paris and with connections throughout the world sup
plies the needs of our customers.
30 Years of Continuous, Conscientious Service!
30 Years of Courteous Consideration of Customers!
30 Years of Conservative and Successful Management!
30 Years of Experience in the Handling of Trusts!
30 Years of Satisfactory Settlement of Estates!
30 Years Under Practically the Same Management!
These are the factors that have built the business of the company and caused the 1,000 de
positors of 1889 to increase to 40,000 in 1919, and swelled the deposits from $100,000 to $10,000,
000 in the same time.
THE DEPARTMENTS
Rentlainf Seti Sati-rfictory Serrice Are
BANKING
3% Paid ?ra Saving?
1% fiai m Cieca Aaa?_nt,
Lae-OSa Made 8* CtXtTtmt
pr
TRUST
FOREIGN
Draft! Bonghi and SoW
Cable Transfer?
Post Rermttance?
Tnrelen' Cheqoes
Letter? of Credit
Foreign Cain Pnrclruue?J
Convenient Locations
Ada far Irftiluafc and Corpora
tions ai
Ti-tjj-te*
G?????? ?
RaJXClTCI
fLaTsji-atrar
Trans? er Afent, r te.
Acts for Estates as?
A frein??traior
avavMavaW
Tnutre, etc.
Suitable Office Hours
?. 1010
RE/VL ESTATE
Sales Ef ette.
Rents Oillectet.
Repairs Made
Insurance Placed
Ajreacy Accepted
SAFE DEPOSIT
BOXES RENTED
Storace for Balky Valuables
Bond? Safeguarded
Liberal Policy
Lobby ef Banking Department?Main Office, 900 F Street

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