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The Washington herald. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, November 11, 1919, Image 4

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THE WASHINGTON HERALD
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PUBUSHED EVERT MORNING BT
The Washington Herald Company
**i-**7-**9 Eleventh Street Phone Main 330e
I. M. BELL.?.
a. o. BRTAjr?
FOREIG?-? RE PRE ???? ATI VCIl
?niX BECXWITH 8PECIAJ. AGBNCT
N?w Tork. Worla Building; Chicago, Tribun? Building: St. Lenta
Poit-DUpatch Building: Detroit, Ford Building; Kan??? City. Mo., Bryant
Building. ?
SUBSCRIPTION RATES BT CARRIER :
_Pally auJ ?aaday. ? cants par month: jMj p?r'y?ar._
SUBSCRIPTION RATES BT KAIL:
Dally and Sunday, ?0 cants par month; 16.50 per year. Dally only.
10 cent? per month; $5.00 per year. e
?
Entered at the pott office at *Wa?blngtoa. O. C. aa second class mall
One Year of Peace?
One year ago this day the Germans signed the armistice terms
Marshal Foch dictated, ending a ?/ar they already 'had lost on the
battlefields of land and sea.
One year ago today a new era of peace began. A world was to
turn from making munitions to pursuits of peaceful industry, and mil
lions of men were to change from uniforms of destruction to overalls
of construction. Wonderful projects of readjustment were planned?
and planning is about as far as they went.
One year has gone by and what'plans of readjustment not piled
' on the junk heap are woefully in lack of repairs. We still are talking
about the peace treaty. We haven't done anything with the railroads.
Nor with the merchant marine. The peace cost of living is higher
than it was during the war, and we have done little but talk about it.
Industrial unrest, and this includes capital and labor, has been the
subject of no end of conversation, while production lag* and waste
continues.
One year has not brought the returned soldier nearer the farm he
wanted and which the government was going to make possible for
him to own.
But with all these things not accomplished, urgent matters left
undone, business unattended to, we?the nation and the people?are
better off today than when the last shot was fired.
Our vast armies have been demobilized. The boys have come
back home and gone back to their jobs. Their convention beginning
today in Minneapolis shows they realize the need for team work
work together?for their own and their country's welfare. It has
been this lack' of team work, the peace-time failure of co-operation,
which has slo**>ed up production in the United States within the past
twelve months, and which has stirred the the feeling of unrest natur
ally following war. _
Wc who may not have the honor of being members of the
Anerican Legion may take a tip from it. We can learn that co
operation in peace is as fruitful and as necessary as it was during the
war. Labor and capital must learn this lesson. So must the pro?
ducere and cons-imers. t
Our first year of peace would have been entirely different, im
mensely more pleasing to all of us, if the wartime spirit of co-opera
tion hadn't ebbed away with the signing of that armistice.
Let us bring it back into life, starting this the beginning of our
second year of peace!
Remember Your Joy a Year Ago Today?
Then Give to the Red Croaa.
The treasury of the American Red Cross is greatly in need of
funds.
The Red Cross is the greatest relief organization in the world.
Without exception our returning soldiers have sung its praises.
The District ot Columbia has been asked to contribute $100.000
to this final appeal for war relief work.
tn Washington $35,000 has thus far been raised, $63,000 is needed,
and needed badly. There are 30,000 wounded'or diseased American
soldiers now in hospitals, each one needing the watchfulness and as
sistance of the Red Cross; 3,000 of these sick and wounded heroes
|arc at the Walter Reed Hospital, at our very doorstep. That is enough
to justify an immediate response from the people of the Capital to the
appeal oi the Red Cross to assist in replenishing the treasury of this
Kreat humane agency t? the end that it may finish adequately the
task it began so noJ?'y. But in addition there are thousands of sol
diers' families needing assistance, and there are millions who will
starve in the lands of our allies if the Red CrossTs not able to assist
E this winter.
Washington doubled its quota in every Liberty loan. It never
Stalled to respond fully to every war relief call.
This is Armistice Day. A year ago the triumphant standard of
vci?,'?^ation was planted atop the hill of victory. It is not possible
t??at American citizens can so soon forget the greatest of all relief
organizations in the ia/ar. the horrors of which are still shuddering
ovea
\\e api?e?l to every man and woman in Washington today to
send a contribution to the Red Cross.
PRINCE TO DECORATE
U. S. MEN WHILE HERE
Three American aviators, who dis
tinguished therneplv.-s in overseas
service, will b? decorated with the
British Distinguish??] ?'lying* Cross by
? he Prince of Wales while in Waah
?. Insrton.
F I.ieut. J. O. Creech, who lives at
a MI4 Hsrlan place. Takoma^Park. ?erv
r ed with the 148th American Air Squad
ron, and was cited for exceptional
valor.
('apt. V E. Kindle y was another
"ace" of the 14*tth, and nas twelve
German planea to bis credit. Capt.
Kindley is at present adjutant of the
Ha-Mlhurst Flying Plaid. Mine?la. L. I.
taieut. Cleo F. Pineau aerved .**?th
:- the "?loth"- Aerial Squadron of the
. British Flying Corps, and was In con
?- ttnuous active service daring the
E spring and summer of KM; ha was
G shot dsjwn behind the German lines
I In O toner, lilt, taken prisoner and
. released shortly after the armistice.
Cant. Harry Costello, former George
town football star, will be given the
British Military Cross by the Prince.
? Capt. Costello was citad by the
? French. British and American govern
' menta for exceptional bravery In the
Russian campaign
CAPTaMN ARRESTED,
FINED FOR SPEWING
_____ |
Clad In the uniform of captain of
engineers. Earl R. Lewis was charged
In the police court yesterday with
speeding at tha rate of from twenty?
five to thirty miles an hour at a cross
ing where several fatal accidents have
occurred; also with failing to exhibit
a permit to operate his motorcycle.
Capt. Lewis admitted that he may
have been going at the rate of twenty
miles sn hour aa shown by his speed
ometer.
"Twelve miles an hour Is the lawful
speed at crossings," Judge Hardlaon
said In Imposing a fine of So for apead?
I Ing and tl tor falling to have his per
I mit.
Ft Myer Soldier Injured
When Aato Is Overturned
An guto driven by Private Jerome
Leakey, Nineteenth Field Artillery.
Fort Myer. snd occupied by three
other soldiers, turned o\tr at the
entrance of Mt. Olivet Cemetery
yesterday. Leakey waa removed to
Emergency Hospital with alight In
juries. Tbe other occupants of the
car escapad Injury.
NEW YORK CITY
By 0. 0. Mc&iTCRE .
New Tork. Nov. 10.?Paris no longer
leads the world In st/lea for the ul
Ira-faahlonable Manhattaneae. Paris,
long tb? styl? capital. ot th?, world,
now hall? Michael, an American or,
to be more exploit, of New Tork'?
own Fifth avenu?. Michael la a dap
par w?ll-aet-op youtig man In hi*
thirties.
He ha? Jet-black, shilling hair, a
suave manner, a strictly American
?eeent and an nil-observing eye for
beauty, li? fairly ?sud?? energy. He
I? now regarded by fe-'.ion experts
ss th? style pace-maker for tb?
world. And. best of all, he has tem
perament.
He branched out for himself on
upper Fifth avenue In a salon of*
splendor severs! years ago. Then
II.? war came on. Paris forgot frills
and furbelows to don the seek-cloth.
After the war Michael, working quiet
ly In New Tork,, emerged on th?
fashion world as .th? style-maker.
not only for Paris, but for the whole
of Europe and* America, too.
May Blrkheail fashion editor of th?
Now Tork Herald in Pari?. In a ca
ble to her paper, says: "After see-,
Ing the tailored suits made by Mi
chael, I am Ineljneil to think Amer
ican tailors hare developed a style
of their own snd- hsve become real
creators In that particular line. I
can see no French Influence whatever
In the American tailored suit? of
Mie*?el. Hi? work Is strictly Amer
ican."
And so It Is that the humble lit
tle fitter of a few years ago has a***.
compliahed something ?very tailor in
America haa been trying to accom
plish for years?thst Is, to set styles
for ths world In 'New Tork, instead
of In Paris. All tao Paris suits ar?
now following the American styl??.
I dropped Into. Michael's Fifth ave
nu? shop the other day. It Is a cosy
place of dignified elegance. It la tn
black and whit?. There ar? sub
dued light?, great velvet eurialine,
and saleswomen who have resi draw
ing-room manners. And then there
are th? mannlklns?young and beau
tiful girls with perfect figures, who
display the latent suits that Ml?
chael's art I? tie fingers create.
And there Is Michael himself?
wearinar a perfectly fitted suit of Oc
tober brown and In his own private
den smoking a gold-tipped Russian
cigarette with easy nonchalance.
Outside at the eurb were manv li
mousines with liveried' chauffeurs.
This is typlrsl of the New York
beauty. And she wss beautiful. So
beautiful that folk stopped, looke?!
and listened, trvlng to remember
where sh? had been seen before. She
looked like a magazine-cover girl,
with her gold hair, the heaven-blue
eyes shining behind dark curved
lashes, the sweetly-smiling lip? sn?l
the ? fair complexion. No cosmetic.?
were needed to ??Id charm. She waa
the typ? so rare In these diys of
artificiality. And while I stood ad
miring her, ah? turned to her com
panion in ? voice like drippine honey,
"Say, ain't It funny Oiat them there
neighbors of ours don't belong to no
swell clubs or nothing!"
Tl?? pri?'? of novels wl?! ?oon mtl'.r.
The higher cost of fiction Is inevtfi
ble, whatever the ?"tite?me of the
printers' vacation, according to New
York publishers. If the present dif
ficulties were adjusted on the basis
of the offer of the master printer?,
novel? and juvenile? would be sold
be U.M0.
If the strikers win, the Drice will
be t2.t?0. If there Is a compromise
we shall probably have it.l novel.
Fiction-readers will grumble, but the/
will pay. New authors will find It
harder to break in when the price
goes up. for It is natural to suppose
that thevolume of sales will dimin
ish and the publisher? will be less
inclined than formerly to take a
cutanee with unknown writers.
As for the typographical problem,
it is freely predicted by some makers
of books that a. satisfactory process
will be Invented that will do away
with typesettlnc ultogether in book
manufacture.
Fire Damage to Church
$250, Bad Hue Blamed
A Are in the basement of the Flor
ida Avenue Baptist Church. Florida
avenue and Bohrer street about 8.30
yesterday morning, resulted in dam
age to the building, amounting to
t5o. A defective flue was the cause.
tn overheated exhaust pipe In the
omoblle of Edward Lawless,. 37
? street northwest, damaged the
machine to the amount' of J301.
about ? o'clock yesterday morning.
Engine cojppany No. 12 extin-ruished
the flrV.
Fire on the premises of 1128 Gi
rard street northwest about ?t??
yesterday morning* did about $500
damage? to furniture and bedding
stored In the garret. "The cause of
the fire Is unknown.
Mayor-Elect in Recall
Out for Congress Seat
Chsrlott*. H. C., Nov. I0.-Mayor
Frank R. McNinch, re-elected in re
cant recall eleetlon which followed
ear harn riots here, announe.l this
afternoon that he will enter the race
for Congr??? In .the Ninth district to
succeed Judge E." Yates Webb.
?ACROSS THE SALT SE.AS.
I
I San Sebastian?King Alfonso visits
his mother. Maria Teresa.
Lisbon?The King and 'Queen of
the Belgians land from th? George
Washington.
Madrid?Spanish priests ask mini
| mum annual wag? of tSOO.
I Stockholm- Swedish Red Croas will
relieve much suffering In eastern Eu
rope.
Paris?Armistice Day will not be
celebrated aa fete In Franco.
Paris?Meals st two franca (approxi
mately 21 rants) each will be served
at government restaurants to be built.
Rom??Cottage? will be built by Ital
ian government for middle-class
paopl?.
THE WASHINGTON HERALD ha- mad- an arrangement with the Shubert-Garrick
Theater whereby 50 per cent of all tickets purchased with coupon? from The
=Herald, up to and including thi* evening, will be converted into the Red Crow Fund.
Cro$s Fund.
??
Clip the coupon and present it at the box office of the theater and one-half of
the price of your tickets will be donated to the Red Cross.
In this way you may see the performance without extra charge and at the same
time enroll yourself in support of the
most worthy charity of all time.
This offer holds good until next
Tuesday and on ali tickets purchased
before that time for "When a Man's a
Man," next week's attraction at the
Shubert-Garrick Theater. Clip the coupon
to the left
Washington. r> c
Treasurer Shubert-Garrick Theater:
Kindly giva St par cant of purchase price oa
tickets bought by bearer to Red Creas Fund.
The Washington Herald.
"SCHOOL PAYS*
By DW1G
li did ?ttML""
r\w\m*??jT?^
tfcout -A? oet?n\
?iVi etAoA w?i>
t*Ut U ? I'*"?
__4 ? s-**0* s***r
Wmxmmm^amlM
??t?
??.???
IT HAPPENED
ON THE HILL
>rt on the Esch bill con
Plumb ptan as "radical"
Tbs House Interstate Commerce
Committee >esterday favorably re
ported the Esch railroad bill, re
turning the roads to private hands.
The majority report of the Senate
Interstate Commerce Committee on
the Cummins bill alao waa laid be
fore the upper legislative body.
The report
demns the Plumb p\
and "Impossible.* The report aisy
rejects the provision of tbe Cum
mins bill recommending a transpor
tation board.
The line-up in the House, when
ij. W. Herrold. representing the
I Fifth 'Oklahoma district, takes his
: place, will be 240 Republicans snd
188 Democrats. The fact that Her
] rold was elected on a platform
? which included support of the Lode?
peace treaty reservations has little
(bearing on the treaty fight, a? tbe
[House does not participate in it.
Petitions from the American Le
Igion post, Seattle, urging with
drawal of the A. E. F. from .Sitferla,
were presented to the Senate yester
day by Senator Jones, Washington.
The Senate yesterday adopted a
resolution by Jones. Washington,
{asking the Shipping Board how
'many Norwegian ships were requisi
tioned by this country after April 6.
1917. and what settlements have
been made.
Melvin W. Maynard, the flying
parson, yesterday was give? sn ova
?tlon when he appeared in the gal
?lery of the House of Representa
tives, s
Maynard Is In Washington to tes
tify before the House Aviation Sub
committee, on the advisability of an
iadequate aviation program in peace
?time.
A resolution, asking the Attorney
?General whether It has ever been
?the Intention of the Department of
?Justice not to use the conspiracy
; section of the Lever act against
j labor unions was offered in the Sen
ate today by Senator Thomas, Colo.
Thomas questioned the A. F. of L.
.statement that Congress passed the
law with the distinct understanding
that it would not apply to labor.
Secretary of the Navy Daniels, ap
pearing yesterday before the House
Naval--. Affairs- Committee, recom
mended an increase in pay of the
entire personnel in the navy.
' A LINE O' CHEER
EACH DAY 0' THE YEAR
By John Krndrlrk Baag-s.
THE LOWLANDS.
(s*opyrisht, 1319. hy The McClur? \cwei-ap-T
Syndic?.!?.)
"My heart is in the Highlands!"
So sang a Poet rare.
But Bine is in the Lowlands, down
in the vales of care;
Down where the Man of Burdens Is
staggering on the road. .
His shoulders bent and breaking be
neath his heavy load.
My heart Is in the shambles, my
heart is in the alum.*
My heart dwells with the Voiceless,
the Toilers dull and dumb.
Who need the Hand of Solaee to
guide them through the night,
And lead them from the darkness
up to the Hills of Light.
OPHELIA'S SLATE.
N?fT To
?? Ktwi"?T
pf| I?
L^fflR.
L
la.
?"??*$G
POLITICS
?^^?^^-^?^??^
Some of the best political gossip
ever written >? being sent out of
Washington by Louis Ludlow. James
P. Hornaily. Maurice Judd. Charlee
Hart, Sevellon Drown, G us J.
Kai-Set. J. Fred Eassery. Hugh
Balille, Morton Milford. Theodore
Tiller. Arthur M. Evans ?nd other
correspondents. Washington seldom
has the opportunity of reading their
scintillating article?. They are printed
in the "back home" paper?, few copie?
reaching the capital. But these cot
respondents are moulding public
opinion as tu presidential possibili
ties.
Arthur M. Evans, correspondent of
the Chicago Tribune, sent his paper
the following resume of the situation.
Presidential politics began to sim
mer today, caloric energy being im
parted by Tuesday's elections. Re
publican national headquarter? eaa*
.sldered calling the national commute?
here tale in December or early In Jan
uary for th? regular preconvention
pow-wow. The Democrat? ?ot leady
a call for their committee to meet
Jan 7 and 8 at the Shoreham Hotel.
Kansas City, St. Louis, the tw-n
cities and San Francisco are biddini
strongly against Chicago for one of
| the conventions, and Krexl W. Upham.
; G- O. P. treasurer, is up and doing
i for the old home town,
j __
Meanwhile the political shark.? took
a survey of the various booms?. The
I following conclusions were generally
| voiced :
The industrial situation will ?be the
? key to the campaign on both sides.
j Gen. Leonard Wood hat? made
1 marked gains during the last week
| due to the manner in which he is han
? tiling the military end of the labor
! troubles.
Gov. Frank O. Lowden, of Illinol.?.
! is making headway in the east.
| Ixiwden and Wood continue lo be
' Ladini? possibilities on the Repub
I lican list
Attorney General A. Mitchell Pal
mer, who for week* has been re
garded a.? the administration pick, is
now the prise puss!? to thr Demo
crats, who are wondering whether the
cosi strike Injunction suit will hampei
his candidacy.
The ?? hopping plurality rolled "up by
Gov C'oolldg? In Massachusetts ha?
resulted in his being trotted out.for
| inspection as a White House possi
j hillty. The Coolldge boom Is evoking
' inore noisa in Boston than in Wash
ington. Senator Lodge favors Co??l?
Tidge for vice president.
Similarly, ?ome friends of J. liarnp
{ton Moore, who piled up a pluralit?*
of nearly 200,000 for mayor of Phila
delphia, are nominating him for
President.
Senator W. E. Edge, of New Jersey.
| had the, edge taken off his vice pres
I idential boom by the election of Ed
wards, Democrat, for governor. Uov.
I Elect Morrow, of Kentucky, is being
talked of by the Republicans as a
possible candidate for vie? president
In the hope of carving into the
Southern States.
From all indications next sum
mer's national conventions will see
more "favorite son" delegations than
ever before. At Republican head
quarters seventeen ar? in th? talk.
?The Democrats list sixteen.
Some fourteen States will hold
I Presidential primaries, and there
.will be great effort? to pick up vest
I pocket delegations, which can be
? used for trading purposes.
The booms placed on exhibition
| today include all sorts. Some are
flourishing, some are flat, some are
foolish, some are ? ready, for the
Smithsonian, Institution. /
?Here's the' list?It contains names
so far seriously considered, many of
them, of course, being vice presiden
tial booms, disguised according to
custom as bids for tbe Presidency.
REPUBLICANS. ,
?Gov. F. O. Lowden (111.).
Gen Leonard Wood (?. H.).
Gov. W. C. Sprout (Pa.).
Senator W. G. Harding (O.).
Senator H. W. Johnson (Cal.).
Senator MHea Poindexter (Wash.).
Senator F. B. Kellogg ?Minn.?
By the
Occasional Prophet
Senator J. E. Watson (Ind.).
Gov. J. P. Goodrich lind.?.
Senator W. E. Borah (Id). /
Oov. Calvin Coolidge 'Mas*.1.
Mayor J. H. Moore (Pa.).
Senator I. L. ? .? moot lWis.).
Senator W. E Edge (N. J.).
Gov. E. P. M.rrow (Ky.).
W. H. Taft .ilo.).
Charles E. Hugh?! OS. Y
DBMOCRATF
A M. Palra?r; (Pa,).
Gov. James Cox (Ohio?
W. G. McAdoo (? Y.t.
Secretary Josephua Daniels iN. C).
Senator A. Pomerene ?Olilo).
Secretary tt. f>. Baker (Ohio).
ChamffClark (Mo_l.
Vice President T. R. Marshall (Ind >
Senator G. M. Hitchcock (Neb.).
Gov. ?. E Smith (N. Y.).
Senator Oscar Underwood (Ah*, v.
j Senator ?. E Chamberlain (Ore.*.
1 Gov. J. J. Com well (W. Va.).
Ambassador John W. Davis (W.
Va.).
, Senator R. L, Owem (OklaV
W. J. Bryan (Neb.).
j Hei ' ert Hoover, loo. would have
been added but for one reason, the
; Republicans were not certain he Is a
Republican: the Democrats are not
positive he is a Democrat.
The strategy of the next battle. It
appears, will be alteeted by Tuesday's
results. New Jersey. New England.
Ohio, and Minnesota, in addition to
1 the States farther west, will be
picked for drive points hy the Demo
crats. Both sides will devot.? especial
attention to Ohio.
As to the formulation of the issues,
both sides are little short of bewil
dered at present It is recognised
that the industrial program framed
by each convention and its attitude
not only against radi'-au.-m. but
towards conservative labor, will he
the critical part of the plat form?.
Hut at present both sides are waiting
for the fog to lift a bit.
OHIO DRYS 45 AHEAD
IN UNOFFICIAL COUNT
Columbus, Ohio, Nov. 10?Drys thia
afternoon were leading by a majority
of forty-five votes on the States rat
ification of national prohibition in an
unofficial count of the entire Siate. I:
was announced from the odi e of the
Secretary of State.
The votes from every county, with
the exception of Hamilton, wet
stronghold, have been afletally count
ed. Drys said the official count from
Hamilton will uphold their claim to
victory.
?*-- Stop Sa_ar Outputs.
Buenos Aires, Nov. S ? To stabi
lise domestic prices'* President Iri
goyen today issued a decree pro
hibiting exportation qf sugar
CREAM FOR CATARRH
OPENS UP NOSTRILS?
? Tells How to Get Quitk Relief j
from Head-Colds. It's Splendid!?
_?
In one minute your clog-red nos
trils will open,'the air passages
of your head will clear and you
can breathe freely. No more hawk
ing, snuffling, blowing, headache,
? dryncss. NO struggling for breath
at night, your cold or catarrh will
be gone.
Get a small bottle of Ely's
Cream Balm from your druggist
now.-? Apply a little? of this fra
grant, antiseptic, healing cream in
your nostrils. It penetrates
through every air passage of the
head, soothes the inflamed or
swollen mucous membrane and re
lief\*j?mes instantly.
It'?i^ust fine. Don't stay stuffed
'Up with a cold or nasty catarrh?
Relief comes quickly.?Adv.
BE PREP.ARED
For Your Vacation Nerxl Summer
It Is Not Too Late*to Join Oar
VACATION CLUB
Three Gaue?
50c, $1.00 and ?RM a Week
' CLUB EXTENDED TO NOV. 15, 1919
CENTRAL SAVINGS BANK
7th **t Eye Street? N> W.
'Round the
I'd give th? be?* af vanilla
Tha? th? elty can ?tYnrd.
To ?lake my tthlrst at th? old
spring. ?
And drink from a eaMintry gourd
-at. ?. ?
?Jeaare |? War ?V?caser?.
The government owe? a distinct
duty tv the girl war worker, who
so patriotically responded to the call
for assistance in the burly-burly of
?The re?r?Bnt great conflict. The service
rendered by these young women aan
t?ot be mlnlmhwd. The/ performed
their duty a? nobly as dkl the boys
wbo crossed the ocean to battle un
der the flag.
The reconstruction period having
been reech?*d. It Is reliably reported
that soon there will be whole??-?
discharge? of the girl war workers.?
Su-ne of these Kir's who came fiom
the farm or ?mall town have be
come obsessed by the bright lights
of the National Capital They are
loath to return to Their homes and
tranquil surrounding?, and many of
them, no doubt will decide to rema???
here. Borne of them dep*iivr-d of
their present grrve-nraent earning?.
and unable to fin??? honest ??tnp*?'?'
ment will drift Into evil pathways.
A few already haVe
The duty'of the amvernmerit 1? to
adopt some measure to Insure the
return of these young woi-ne-n to fam
ily ?nd home promptly after the??
defr-trtmentsl service 1? er?de?1 and not
?us? p?y them their last ?alary
and ess. them adrift to shift on fhelr
own Initiative. ?A e?.e pointing to
the almos* ir.evta*?le came before the
Police Court Thurtadsv Two pretty
girla handaomely attired ?nd wear
ing the countenances of well-bred
persons, were eberged with severs!
oases of larceny. They were oe
rupants of ?ut.imoblle? into wrbleh
men were lured and then robbed. Th??
secret record? of the police der-art
inent contain . the n?me? o** other?
who have encaged In s'nful pese
tir?? '
There I? a reeve re?r?on?'v>''ity rest
ing upo-r* the r-ovcrnment that eslied
Ihe Power of it? young womsnhood
to Washington for war service.
Adven? ?f Old ?aw??? rtaaa.
Several big men with ruddy faces
sad a smile thst will not fade away
may find employment for h week at
least takinc tlie part of Santa Claus
In the toy department? of several of
the big stores, according to ZEFF
I SCHL08BI-:na. of ?Oil Pennsylvania
' ?venue ntnrthwcst. Mr. Schlosberg waa
' for many years the property mia. or
( "props." at the old Nstion*tl Theater
, ?nd Is ?killed in the "rn-ike-up" busi
ness He procure? the amateur Santas
for the merchants and ?rr?nr.?<*s their
j costume?, paying paniculsr -attention
: to the ?nowy beard and stub pipe.
He has performed thi? service for a
long lime as he Is ?n expert In get
ting the right men ?nd make-up.
When Zeff begins hia search for men
to take the p?rt of the venerable
patron ?lint of the hoy? and girl?, it
is a ?tire sign thst "Christmas Is
coming " The Santas will "be on the ?
! Job" in a few days.
Kot Afraid ? ? Ola) H C. 1.
There waa a philosopher in the
? c?ge? of the Police Court who does
I not care a whit about the high cost
; of living or the threatened ehortaee
of coal. Supt. GEORGE IT MAR
MAM10?2
?-** ?a?*? ? ?..
SUM*, ???rmr*m%,9*.. ..?"?
???'?-JK'IH II I I IS.il S?, Hi?? SI
PRINTING
RUSH WORK A SPECIALTY
SMALL AND LARGE JOBS
HAYWORTH
Composition and Trade Work
627-629 G Street Northwest
if
U? I
? WH* CAPT.
own laiss?
SHALL, who haa charge of the ooui
hnilding. ov erti ss t a co? verse tion b?
tween the philosopher atei ataetmm
piisOMT.
"I wish the Judge bad gl-ea roe ?
sentence that would have can-teg m.
over th? winter." he aald. It's gt?
Ing to be pretty toogh outside frets
December to March "
"You must like besag Jugged." th?
other tellow remarked "Tau talk at
It you had been aiutascced to Pal?
Beach."
"Why ahoulgn't I tike Itr* the phi
oaopher cam? baak. "Ill gat loe-*?,.
and three square meals a gay. Tha r
more the? I get outside. I won't hav?
to arorry about my wardrobe?es
pecially an over-coat?with the Met
price of s?rmenu The coal ahorla-.
won't mean anything to me nor th?
hla-h cost of I is*Ing Sugar may 1-4
short hut I'll lake any coffee piala ,
should w**-***i-j*.** ?
The A-B-C of fi
nance? "AL
WAYS BE CARE
FUL" with your
money.
That means to
Spend it carefully,
to Save it carefully,
and to Secure it
carefully.
"The Friendly
Bank" is the place
to put the money
that you save and
make it secure.
3% on Savings
C??hi Acconti
Solicite..
Monthly Statement* If Yon
Delire Tbens
SECURITY
Savings and Commercial
BANK
NINTH AT G
Hows: 8:30 to 3
Satm-di-, 5 to 8 P. M.
Eat Beef, Lamb and Veal This Week.
QUALITY FINE. PRICES LOW.
"FRANK KJDWEL'S~
stores MARKETS stores
??ora____e_-__-__? -_-_-_-?-?___?--?
MEATS PRICED RIGHT-NOT ONE DAY, EVERY DAY
I have on sale an abundance of Beef, Lamb and Veal
and ask yon to buy some at killing prices. The qnabty
will suit yon, I know. Help pay your coal bills with ave?
ings on KidweB's Meat?.
SPECIAL NOTICE?New market on Fourteenth street,
just below U street, opens Saturday, November 15.
Round, Sirloin and Porterhouse Steak.25c h.
Chuck Roast, 18c. Plate Beef, 12c. Hamburg Steak, 20c
Top Rib, Prime Rib, Bouillon, Shoulder Clod, choice, 22c h.
This Beef is of fine quality and will please yon.
Gemme Spring Lamb. Strictly Fresh. Quality ine.
Leg Lamb, 25c. Shoulder Lamb, 20c. Breast Lamb, ISc
Loin and Rib Chops, 30c. Shoulder Chops, 23c.
?_Don't Pay More!_
Veal Cutlets, 38c Veal Chop*. 20c and,3tk
Roast Veal, 15c to 25c_
Smoked Hams, 27c lb. Smoked Shoulder?, 22c -..
Compound lard, 27c Pure Hog Lard, 33c h.
Loin Pork Chops, 40c lb. Machine Sliced Bacon, 40c h.
3272 M Street
Georgetown
1341 Wisconsin Ato.
Geo r g e town
1920 Nichols Ave.
Anacostia
Eastern Market, New Serti?.
7tb and C SU. Sootheast
_Memi. Paly_
Northeast Market ? Twelfth and H Streets Northeast

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