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The Washington herald. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, January 25, 1920, Image 10

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FRENCH SPORT MAKES HIGH RID OF $700,000 FOR REMPSEY-CARFENTIER RATTLE'
Griffith and Bancroft
Pulling Barnum Stuff
Nationals' Pilot and Reds' Secretary Complete
Arrangements for Barnstorming Trip?
Eighteen Games Listed for Locals.
By GEORGE L. MORELAND.
L-A-D-I-E-S and G-E-N-T-L-E-M-E-N permit me to introduce
o you two men of world-wide reputation Messrs. Bancroft and Grif
ith. These gentlemen are known from one end of the country to
he other, the senior of this combination, Bancroft, is also known in
Tuba and Hawaii, where he has taken his show many times; intro-,
luced in both places his famous Doubleitis, a great affair.
The other part of the combination is also known from coast to
roast as a master of curveology.
Balance ?' TH>OFe.
-with these few remarks- L-A,
5-I-E-S and G-E-N-T-L-E-M-E-N,
tish to introduce for your admlra
ion the one great attraction of
?ight of the largest fJUM in the
'nited States - Babe Ruth, who
an Play one entire season to
he larsest crowds that ever attend
d purposely to see this wonder. |
'here are many other great per- (
ormers in this combination, but
emit me to first introduce the j
'see^valter JOHNSOS THE
-.keatest pitched of today
SEE FRANK BAKER. ALSO A J
il-rO WITH WAR CUJB.
SEE EDWARD ROUSH. THE!
^EADING BATTER OF THE NA
'skeA^AvVsaiJ.kk. the THIN
CST I JegTH AX PER TVi I RUNG
JSEEBA"rEABT" NBALL. THE ,
5REAT FOOTBALL COACH.
VND LAST. BL'T NOT LEAST.
SEE TUB KING OF ALL COM EDI
lN? NICK ALTROCK. THIS
-.ENTLEMAN PIT THE GREAT
*LOWN. MERCEDES. OLT Ot
sr SI NESS.
X-O-W. L-A-D-I-E-S and O-E-N
r-li-E-M-E-N, I assure you that this
* the original aggregation that will
>.? seen all season on both circuits.
will not fool you. but guarantee
.. give you an opportunity to see
?;.ch and every one of the men who
vill be seen during the baseball sea
on.
Play "Bin" Tewna.
We will during our encashment play
i the largest cities In Florida such
is Miami. Tampa. St. Petersburg,
irjando. and last but not lea*,
lacksonvllle. where on Jubilee Day.
'larch Will present something in
he way of an added attraction, a
twin bill" of baseball, that is com
-nonlv called a double-header.
This I wish to assure you will be,
?? flrst and only time in which.
club from both the American
,nd National league meet each I
ther on one and the same day |
? the same city. I "sure > ?u I
that this great show is billed ex j
ressly for the benefit of the cltixens
.f this city. Look at what we have
to offer you on this "Grand and
Slorious Jubilee Day." Babe Ruth and
"ari Ma>s. a pair that have
more talk than any other set of pla>
rrs. Then we have that nuaHet ?r
:reat managers. Messrs. MORA- .
ROBINSON. Hl'GGINS and GRIf-'
FITH. all under the same tent and
for one price of admission. The
spectacle of a man hunting a drtnK
in a fashionable cafe the c?m"g
summer won t be a better attraction
than what we are offering.
All S??r Attraction.
Interleague double-header between
tho?e four wonderful clubs, Cincinnati
Iteds. world .htmpions, vs. the New
fork Yankees, the first and only club
that ever paid $100,000 for a human
being.
Then we have that club that
Brooklyn and which controls the best
sational League grounds in that city.
This club will meet Walter'Johnson.
....?isted by several clever exponents
.f the great American game, base
l-'emember this date. Monday. March
1920. and you can tell your c""'
lien and grandchildren that you had
h?* pleasure of being the guest or
his wonderful pair of showmen at the
r*t and only twin bill in which two
?l ibs from rival leagues played a reg
j'.ar game, and with the assurance
it nil the promoters that the original
Mayer*. aa announced on the pro
21 am, will appear.
The Rnrnum Stoat.
The above in the way B. T. Barnum
K'ould have announced the great dou
->le-header to be played at Jackson
ville. March 2?. which Griffith has
?cen at work on for over a month.
Now that President Griffith has this
>ft his mind, he announces that the
Nationals and Cincinnati Reds will
?>!ay eighteen games against each
^ther in the cities named, while four
lames will take place between the
Washington and Cuban teams at
Tampa, where the Nationals are to
train. These games should arouse
he greatest interest, for the thousands
>f Cubans in that city remember that
?t was Griffith that gave many of their j
Shanks to Stay Here
President Clarlc Griffith denied
last ?ight that there was any
truth of Howard Shanks being
shipped to Minneapolis.
"You can say for me that Shanks
will be my utility man all during
the summer of 1920," said the Old
Fox.
friend* of Cuba an opportunity to1
play with the Washington club. These
games, one in particular, March 17
? can you guess what nationality cele
brates that day?) will be a rouser In
that city.
Then games will be played with
Indianapolis at both Tampa and St.
Petersburg. When these are com
pleted the long series between the
Reds and Nationals will open at
Tampa for two games; then a game
will be played at Orlando enroute
to Miami, where, on March 26 and 27,
two games will take place. Atfer these
are finished, both teams will travel
to Jacksonville to *spend the 28th
as guests of Jacksonville, where
the visitors will be shown the city
by the Chamber of Commerce, under
whose direction the games will take
place.
The balance of the schedule is j
shown:
Washington vs. OppOnrnt*.
Clubs Cities Dates
Indianapolis Tampa March 1.". 1ft
1'ubans Tampa Mar 17 18 19 20 j
(White Team)
Indianapolis St. Petersburg March 22
Cincinnati Tampa March 23 24
Cincinnati Orlando March 2-"?
Cincinnati Miami March 2ft 27
Sun. Jack'vllle (sighSeeing) March 28
(Cincinnati v*. New York)
Part of Double-header.
Rrookljn Jacksonville March 29
Cincinnati Charleston March 30
Cincinnati Columbia March 31
i Cincinnati Greenville April 1
Cincinnati Raleigh April 2
! Cincinnati Washington April 3 4
(Saturday and Sunday)
< Cincinnati Richmond April 5
| Cincinnati Portsmouth April ft
Cincinnati Danville April 7
1 Cincinnati Roanoke April H
Cincinnati Clarksburg April !>
Cincinnati Cincinnati April 10 11
(Saturday and 8unday)
The schedule ef the Cincinnati 1
Reds at Miami prior to their play- |
ing the Washington team follows:'
At Miami?Cubans. March 11, 12.1
13: New York A. 1*. March 15, 16: |
Indianapolis. March 19. 20.
Abftoad?Indianapolis, March 22.
at St. Petersburg. Then they start
in with the Washington on the 23
at Tampa.
After Washington visits Cincin
nati, the Reds will go to Columbus
to play the American Association
team of that city on Monday,
April 12.
INDIANS MADE OFFER
FOR HARRY HARPER
Cleveland. Jan. 24.?Th? Cleveland!
Club is still gasping about the deal i
which sent Pitcher Harper to Boston j
in the trade that sent Roth and Shan
non to Washington. Menoskey and
Foster were also Washington contri
butions.
The need of obtaining a good left- |
handed pitcher had been impressed
on President Dunn by Manager Tris
Speaker, and the Cleveland scouts
immediately reported that Washing
ton was ready to trade Harper In
any deal that would bolster the club.
Dunn set about to obtain the Sena
tors' southpaw. The first offer of
Pitcher Uhle and shortstop Lunte,
together with some cash, did not im
press Griffith. Then the Red Sox
came along with their proposition and
before Dunn could enter the field
again, the deal had been closed.
I
Frank Moran Off for Enfland.
New York. Jan. 24.?Frank Moran,
according to Willie Lewis, now is on
the ocean headed for Merry England.
Moran seeks a bout with Beckett, but
doubtless will meet some of the other
heavies in England?Goddard, Coghill,
Smith, et al.
Moran should prevail over any of
the present crop of heavies in Eng
land. as his experience and hitting
would give him a decided advantage.
G.W.U. STUDENTS
WANT FOOTBALL
,?,
Law School Freshmen Peti
tion Trustees Urging
Gridiron Sport.
i
George Washington University Is
likely to have a football team next
fall. A movement having such an
object In view and launched Just
before Christmas is growing in
sise. and an effort now is being
malle to have every student organ
ization at the institution join in a
petition to the faculty for a charter
for a team.
The movement was originated by
the first-year class at the Law
School. Resolutions were adopted
and gent to the board of trustees
urging the immediate issuance of a
charter for a team next fall.
Before adopting the resolutions
the law class made a canvass of the
student body and ascertained defi
nitely that there was ample mater
ial for the organization of a strong
team. Many of the students have
starred in football at various high
schools, colleges and universities.
The recent adoption of the volun
tary student activities ? tax plan
virtually assures the financial suc
cess of a team, it is pointed out.
The Hatchet, weekly student pub
lication, favors a team next year,
and has called upon all student or
ganizations to help push the project.
So enthusiastic have some of the law
students become that on their own
responsibility they have written to
a number of prominent colleges and
universities urging that dates be
kept open for possible games with
George Washington next fall in the
event that a team is organized.
University authorities have not
yet passed an opinion upon the pro
posal, but It is certain that they
will give their sanction if the stu
dent body can in some definite fash
ion guarantee the financial success
of a team.
PREP ATHLETES IN
VIRGINIA DIVIDED
Charlottesville, Va., Jan. 24.?Fol
lowing a conference of representa
tives of the foremost preparatory
schools of the State, held at the Uni
versity of Virginia, the Virginia High
School Literary and Athletic league
divided the State into five districts,
as follows:
Eastern;* which embraces Petersburg
and the territory to the east.
Northern. including Winchester, i
Front Royal and Alexandria.
Southern, which takes in Bristol1
and the schools in that section.
First Western, embracing Staunton, (
Charlottesville, Lexington and Har- j
risonburg.
Second Western, which includes
Roancke, Lynchburg, Danville and
Blacksburg.
Schedules will be made between |
schools in each district and semi-1
finals will be played betwen the sec- |
tion winners. The final championship
contest will be staged at the Univer
sity of Virginia. This new plan will
go into effect next fall, the league
having taken over football in its ath
letio activities.
BATTERSBY MAY BE
VIRGINIA POLY COACH
Rumors are /lying thick and fast in
the athletic circle here that Coach
Battersby of Business High School
will cast his lots with the Virginia
Polytechnical Institute, of Blacks
burgh. Va., after his term with the
Stenographers.
It is claimed that Battersby will
! resign Ms position at the Rhode Js
I land avenue Institution this sumrper
and take up his duties as football
i coach Immediately. *
SUBSTITUTE MADE
FOR BASKETBALL GAME
_________ i
The basket-ball game scheduled
with Loans & Currency team of
the Treasury Department, against
the McKinley Tech has been can
celled and in their place, the Loans
& Currency will meet the Army
Medical School, at Epiphany Chapel.
January 3ft. 1920, at 7:30 p. m. The
Ix>ans & Currency team is looking
[ for games, and such teams as Peck
Stars. Aloysious. Ingram Memorial
are desired. For games address
Mr. Woldenberg, Room 69. Treasury
building.
J
Hockey Game a Tie.
West Point. N. Y., Jan. 24.?The
Army hockey seven and University
of Pennsylvania went to a 1-to-l
tie game here today in an interest
ing game on Stuart rink. Both
teams scored when the game was in
its last stages. Two extra periods
of five minutes each were played
without a decision.
OUR MID-WINTER CLEARANCE
The Best Buy in Washington
In the first place, all our woolens were purchased be
fore the big increase in price, which is an item to be con
sidered. They are guaranteed to be all-wool and fast color.
Then, too, the clothes are made up in our own daylight
workrooms, which means a big saving of which YOU get
4he benefit. Add to all these advantages the fact that just
at present we are offering any suit or overcoat in
stock at
our
l/3 OFF
?and you'll realize that the BEST BUY in Washington
today on men's clothing is right here at Wilnfer's. You
get a suit or overcoat of the very finest material and
lining at one-third off a price that already was remark
ably low. Better hurry, so that you can have a good
choice.
JOS. A WILNER & CO.
Custom Tailors
Corner 8th & G Streets N. W.
Prince Mural Makes Bid
. Of $700,000 for Big Fight
Paris, Jan. 24.?The record breaking purse of $700,000 will be
offered for the Dempsey-Carpentier fight by a syndicate of French
sporting men anxious to have the bout held in France. If accepted,
this huge amount will be divided $400,000 for Dempsey and $joo,ooo
for Carpentier. The French syndicate is headed by Prince Murat.
In the meantime, other promoters are still campaigning to land
the fight for America.
Prince Murat, who is heading the French syndicate, declares he
is confident that the patriotism of French sportsmen will make the
raising of the proposed $700,000 purse an easy matter and that it will
j be possible to post satisfactory forfeits as soon as Carpentier is re
leased from his contract with Cochran.
I Griffith a Pitching Star
Among the Montana Gunmen
This is the fourth installment of President
Griffith's storj as written bj George L.
! Moreland, The Herald's baseball statistician.
I Soon after the team was located at
; Missoula there sprang up a great
rivalry between that city and Butte.
: Mont. Tony Mullane. the old Cincin
| nati pitcher back in the '80's, was one
j of the pitchers in the Butte aggrega
, lion. Then they had a pitcher named
McGlnnis, who was the idol cf the
fans out that way.
I A series of three games was ar
j ranged between the two clubs, all to
j be played at Butte, as that city had a
much larger grandstand, and besides,
the miners of that city would bet
line, sinker, an' everything. When the
day for the trip arrived over 500 fans
, accompanied their team to the other's
| den. They did not forget to take
i along enough money to make any i
) size bet that the Butte fans wanted.
| One of the staunchest supporters of
| Griffith and his team was Lou Hlg
| gins, of Missoula. This gentleman.
J who was a millionaire, would pust as
| leave bet $1,609,690 as he would a ci- ,
i gar and let it no without a whimper,
as though it was the smoke from his I
! cigar.
| The Butte team had two pitchers,
I McGlnnis and Mullane. and either
j was looked upon as a sure winner,
j When the first game arrived Griffith i
1 was slated to pitch and Cross was
! '
pitted against him. The betting was
terrific with the Butte team a fa
vorite at 10 to 7. The ground was
crowded to its limit and the fans
were crazy over the game. This
J proved one-aided aa Griffith prevented
' his rivals from taking any liberty
with his curves and won easy. The
fnns lost over $50,000 on this game
alone.
Th following day the betting was
heavier, with the money at even, for
they found out that the Missoula
! club was some bunch. They were
unable to make up their minds
whether Mullane or McGinnis would
pitch and as Griffith was out of the
way they felt sure that their club
would win. but they would give noth
ing better than even money on tho
contest. McGinni* *a3 selected to do
the twirling for the home team, and
mainly through his excellent work,
his team won the second game by a
score of 9 to 1.
With each team a winner the third,
and final game, was to l?e a big one.
i With the eamanner that McGinnis
i trimmed his exponents and a day of
j rest between the games.
The managers of the two teams de
cided that a? Sunday was the big day
out that way. and that every one
could get a chance to be at the game.
[ it was decided that a day's rest
i would not hurt.
1 (CONTINUED.)
GRIFF'S TRIBE HAVE PLAYERS WHO
CLEARED BAGS WITH LONG CLOUTS
Robert Frank (Bobby) Roth holds
the record of being the only batter
j In the American League laj-t season
I to clear the base* twice with triples.
The first time he found the banes
choked was June 10 when he faced
Davenport at St. Tx>uis and cracked
out a three-bagger; his hit won the
game. His second triple with the
bases filled was here in Washington
when he hit a three-bagger off Gill
on September 28.
Then Frank Harris Ellerbe also has
a very nice little record of batting
in four rum* in a single contest, but
the Nationals youngster did that
twice. On September IS. in a game
against St. Louis in a double-header,
ire hit in four runs in each gamo.
When Roth made his triple against
Gill he batted in five runs in that
game, two besides the three that were
on when he cracked out the three
bagger.
Eddie Gharrity also had a little bat
ting practice, batting on June 23 when
he hit in four runs against Boston.
Jim Shaw had an equal number to his
credit on May 5 against Athletics.
Rice, on June 30 off Rogers of the
Athletics and Shanks off Dauss on
July 10, made triples with the bas?s
filled.
ST. JOHN'S EASY
FOR G. U. QUINT
/ , %
Brookknders Swamp An
napolis Cadets in An
nual Battle.
The Catholic Uniireralty baseball
tossers. defeated the St Joha's quint
from Annapolis, Md.. last nirht in the
Brookland Gym, by *4 to 18, In a
cleanly played same which caused
much interest in the Anal half as the
visitors made a game attempt to pull
the contest out of the Are.
Catholic University secured a lead
in the first half, which was too much
of a handicap for the Cadets to over
come in the final session. St. John's
was held to one basket during the
opening half. The line-up and sum
mary:
Catholic U. Positions. 8L John's.
Lyon* K. P BinftMd
MrNamara L. P flpeelmaa
l>unn Outer Klngbton
Glaseott K. G Ridgley
Kutledge L. G Batty
Hubgtitations?llopke for Butledge. Goals
from floor?Lyons (5). MrNamara (2), Dunn
(8), Glaseott (4), Hpeelman (8), Klngbton
(2). Hopke. Goals from foals?Dunn, 1 oat
of 1; Glaseott. 8 oat of 7; Banfleld. none oat
of 3; Hpeelman. 8 out of 7; Batty, ft oat of
10. Referee?Mr. Hughes. I'mpire?Mr.
Hchlosser (Q. U.) Time?Twenty minute
halves.
MAJOR LEAGUES TO
START ON APRIL 14
New York, Jan. 24.?Eight National
league teams will get away for the
1920 pennant race on April 14 and will
traverse 154 laps up to October 3.
John Heydler, president of the Na
tional League, made this announce
ment here tonight following his re
turn from a Southern hunting trip
with Den Johnson. American l>eagu*?
chief.
Scenes of the four inaugural battle*
were not announced, a* the details
are to be considered at a league
meeting February 10, in Ctiicago.
GEORGESCARPENTIER
TO SAIL MARCH 15
Paris, Jan. 24.?Georges Oarpentier.
heavy-weight champion of Europe, is
to sail for New York on March 15,
accompanied by Francois Descamps.
on his way to L,o? Angeles to fulfill
a motion picture contract. It is ex
pected that the Frenchman will Kive
a few boxing exhibitions while he is
in the United Stales.
ISSUE INJUNCTION
AGAINST BECKETT
I?ndon, Jan. 24.?Joe Beckett, blast
ed hope of Great Britain for the
heavy-weight championship, will not
fight any more until the court looks
into his case. Bernard Mortimer, his
manager, secured an injunction re
straining him from signing any more
contracts pending a breach of con
tract suit for 3,900 pounds.
Griffs to Travel South I
Over Deep, Briny Seas
President Griffith hat about decided to take the National player*
to the training camp by boat. He will send Mike Martin, Nick
Altrock and a groundkeeper in advance, as this vanguard leaves
Wednesday, February 17, while on the following Wednesday about
twenty players including the battery men and a few extras will
embark for the South.
It takes four days from Baltimore to make the trip to Jackson
ville, and then a night's ride by train to Tampa. This will get the
players at the camp on Sunday, 39, ready to begin work on the
first of March. The other players will be ordered to report direct
to Tampa so that all will be in shape for the opening game between
the Nationals and Indianapolis clubs on the fifteenth of March. g
MOST INNINGS PLAYED RECORD IN
CONSECUTIVE GAMES GOES TO GRIFF1
President Griffith's club holds
a major league record not generally
known, that of extra Inning gamed,
in which his boys played 101 consec
utive innings in nine garnet*, which
required eleven and two-thirds in
nings for each contest per average.
The games were played in 1*15.
and started off with a contest
against Chicago on August 24 and
wound, up in a game in New York
on September last, in which nine
games were played.
Three of the games went the regu
lation number, nine, while one wan
eleven, one twelve, two of thirteen,
and one of fourteen innings. Dur
ing the nine games the Nationals
captured five and lost four. His
club won the longest game.
j fourteen taaiags. and split even
, on the two thlrteen-inning af
fairs. He lost the twelve, but won
the eleven, and lost two out of
three of the regulation game*.
Here are the results:
MOST INNINGS IN CON88CCTITE GAMES
WASHINGTON. 181S, 102.
A of. 24?Washington 5 Chicago.. 6 11 lam.
An*. 25?Washington 7 Chicago . 4 14 ian#
Aug. 28?Washington 2 Chicago.. 1 IS taaa.
Aug. 27?Washington S St. Louis. 1 W inn*
Aug 28?Washington 1 St. Louis. 2 12 laaa.
Aug. 29?Washington 1 St. Louis. 2 t Inn*
Aag. 31?Washington 4 New York 1 * inn*
?lat gsm"i
Aug. SI?Washington S New York 2 11 iaa?
'2d gab'
Sept. 1?Washington 2 New York 1 12 int .
Totals?9 games 28
3U 102 tar
THREE CHAMPIONS OF GREEN CLOTh1
GAME TO PLAY AT ROYAL ACADEMY'
Local billiard enthusiasts will have
an opportunity to watch the three
J title holders of the green cloth game
in action this week at the Royal Bil
liard Academy. During the entire
week there will be r .atches in which
the champs in the three styles?
pocket-billiard. three-cushion and
balk-line?will display their wares.
Robert Cannefax. three-cushion
king, will start the ivories rolling
Monday evening, meeting Charles Mo
Court. the runner-up for the crown
in the recent three-cushion tourna
NicWalls Yale Coach.
New Haven. Conn.. Jan. 24?Capt.
Churchill Peters of the Yale 'varsity
crew has received word from Guy
Nickalls. former rowing co^ch at
Yale, that he has accepted the ofT*-r
of the Y'ale athletic board of control
and Is sailing from Encland Februarv
n to asume charge of aquatics here
March 1.
Those enthusiast* who prefer t* J
ment. This pair will entertain aga*
in afternoon and evening sessions i
Thursday.
pocket style of frame * ill ?.??? offer* I
four matche?. K Ral|?ii <;re^nl-atl
who went thmuph the nai nal titula j
event in Philadelphia last mont'
without the loss of a Mnglo can
will oppos** Jerome Keotrh ??n Tue
day and Wednesday in afternoon an?"
evening contests. Keoch hap held th
j national championship on five diffwr
lent occasion? and should prove a
| worthy opponent for the young Wil
j minsrton wizard.
Willie Hopp*, kinc of 'em all. will
apepar here on Friday and Saturda'
meeting Charles Peterson, the St.
l?uis veteran halk-line and fancy _
shot artist. They will entertain st
afternoon and evening matches.
Boston Plays Here.
' Botson College baseball club will
play six pames here in April. Hop
kins. Catholic University. George
town. Mar>land State. Baltimore In
iternatlonals and Navy are listed.
BOXING, With Ju-Jitsu
?rsursr officially npprowd by
flie I fitted ?to? rrsmrst
? ad kite hi? Ia4?rse4 by Jack
DeH^sry and proatlaeal net.
WHIPP'S SCHOOL
Scientific Boxing
Physical Cohort
?2?l t*? At.. VW . I'h.ar I' ?>*l
FOLLOW THE CROWDS. MEN
CLEAN-UP SALE!
Suits &0'coats
From $35 to $45 Fabrics
1
4
te
>
ill
Look in the Windows of Ready-made Clothiers
Look at the Prices of Other Tailoring Shops ?
COMPARE THIS OFFER?AND THEN JUDGE
Every garment designed, cut and tailored by master
craftsmen?and backed by my 30 years' business repu
tation in Washington.
Tkk it a bona fide clean-up of all ay Fall and Winter fabric*. Nothing re
ferred?pick from icores of $35 to $45 pattern*.
Measure
For . . .
Trousers to Order for Only $8.50
Cove in and get (ample*?Make comparison*?give the* fabric* tbe acid
te*t.
HORN
THE
TAILOR

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