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Semi-weekly standard. [volume] (Raleigh, N.C.) 1853-18??, November 12, 1856, Image 3

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RALEIGH. WEDPTESUAr. NOV. 12, 1858.
Special Notice. . -
The Standard m conducted strictly upon the cash system.
Jll papers are discontinued at the expiration of the time
for which they have been paid. Subscriber uUl be notified,
jotiB weeks before their time it out, by a Caosa mark on
their papert ;and unless the subscription is renewed the pa
per icill be discontinued. This is a rule from which there
viU be no departure. Watch for the cross mark, and renew
your subscription. ' "...
Weeily Standard $2 per annum, in advance.
Semi-Weekly Standardly per annum, do.' - ' -
Ijg- Subscribers desiring their papers changed must
mention the Post Office from, as well as the one to, which
they desire the change to be made.
The Great Result.
We received a despatch fi om Washington City,
on Saturday, announcing that Illinois and Iowa had
gone for Buchanan ; and if this be correct, as we
have every reason to believe it is, Mr. Buchanan's
Electoral vote is 178 leaving 110 votes for Fremont,
and 8 for Fillmore.
Under the circumstances, this is a noble majority.
In the language of that sterling Democratic print,
the New York News
" The people hare spoken, and their voice must be obeved.
The excitement, the doubts, the fears have all vanished,
and the Democracy stand forth eras', proud and fearless,
full of joy and exultation at the noble triumph secured, full
of hope lor the future stability and perpetuity of our glori
ous and much loved institutions. .Never bare we been ob
liired to contend with so dangerous a foe. Never have such
Blighty consequences rested upon the works of a single day.
Sever were the terminations of a day's labor of a great 'peo
ple so rejoiced over by erery lover of liberty and independ
ence as 1 hat of the 4th of November, 1 8."8..
We feel as if a heavy load were lifted from us a dread of
gnat but vitinotcti dangers binsltfd away uutil the silent,
but all powerful ballot has pronounced us free and inde
pendent. The ballot ! Tis, in the hands of freemen, a weapon
: " that falls as still
As snow-Hakes on the silent sod,
Hut executes a freeman's will
As lightning does the will of God." .
To Pennsylvania we can now add Illinois witb her 6,000
ot T ,"!''; Indiana, which Gov. Wright telegraphs to cs,
WILL REACH NEAR TO 15,(XIU; TeXXESSSK, WITH HER 6,000;
and Kentcckt, with her 5,000. We need no more, but
more we should have been glad to hare seen on the side of
the Constitution and the laws. But let its thank God, for
IL iiii Sliced Lite JiepuUie."
All honor and gratitude to those who, in the free
States, have stood by us in this struggle, and aided
in the great work of arresting the floods of fanati
cism and sectional strife ! '
The New England States have voted against our
Constitutional rights ; but Pennsylvania, New Jer
sey, Indiana, and Illinois have stood by us, and thus
saved the Republic. Pennsylvania is entitled es
pecially to our thanks and gratitude. Nobly has
the re-established her character as the " Key-stone
of the federal arch." The prop osition to her own
people, to unite with traitors and abolitionists against
her own son, has been scouted and scorned j and
she has rolled up for him from thirty to forty thou
sand majority.
" Great but unknown dangers " have been passed,
and the Union, for the present at least, is safe. Our
only hope for the future, as in the past, is in the na
tional Democratic party. If it should be destroyed,
or even defeated in a contest with the hosts of dark
ness the black Republicans we may bid farewell
to peace, to safety, to the Constitution itself. " Let
cs thank God, for He has saved the Republic."
M-Mr FUbnore's Strength.
How is it ? Fusion or no Fusion t
The Raleigh Register of Wednesday last, publishes
a letter from Mr. Fillmore, dated in July last, advis
ing his supporters not to fuse with the Fremont
men ; and the Register adds repeating the lan
guage of the Fillmore Committee of Pennsylvania
that after reading this letter, if any of his friends
still persist in supporting the so-called Union ticket,
they are not sincere friends of the American candi
dates." We have before us the Philadelphia Times
of Thursday last, containing one of Mr. Rayner's
speeches in that city in favor of fusion ; and while
delivering this speech, Mr. Rayner read the follow
ing dispatch from Mr. Fillmore :
"Success would justify the union oar friends
must judge for themselves.!' Millard Fillmore.
How is this ? Can the Register inform us ? In
July Mr. Fillmore is against fusion, as the following
letter, above referred to, will show :
" Buefalo, July 29, 1856.
Henry F. Thomas, Esq.:
My Dear Sir Your favor of the 25th is this mo
ment received, and your course meets my hearty
approval. While I should be glad to receive the
support of all national Union men, by whatever
Dame they may be, or may have been called, I am
opposed to all bargaining, and especially with sec
tionalism, on any terms. Let us stand by the flag
of our Union, and if we go down, let.us go down
with it Dying at our masthead. I shall look oat for
no sectional plank on which to drift ashore. -I
am, in great haste, truly yours,
MILLARD FILLMORE."
In July, Mr. Fillmore is opposed to " all bargain
ing, especially with sectionalism" in. November,
he thinks "success would justify" an alliance with
the Black Republicans. In his Albany speech, in
June .last, Mr. Fillmore solemnly and emphatically
declared that the success of the Fremont Sectional
party would destroy the Union ; but in November,
according to Mr. Rayner, he is ready to " bargain ?'
nd unite with that party to defeat the Democrats.
Sow is it? Is the Register willing to be silent
while Mr. Fillmore is being injured and his reputa-
uon destroyed by the above dispatch read m Phila
delphia by Mr. Rayner? Let us have an ansvf er.
We may be some mistake about the matter ; and
Met the public know it " ; ' ':
Kestcckt. What becomes of the declaration of
tQe K. N. State Committee of Kentucky, that a list
f voters had been made, and that Kentucky was
for Fillmore by 10,000 . majority. That
State has gone just ten thousand the other way.
"as the Committee deceived? or did they intend
to deceive? or did 10,000 Know Nothings break
their oaths? In New York, toofcit was stated, on
"gh K. N. authority, that Mr. Fillmore's vote would
8 170,000 the noses were all counted, and the
Tote could not be less. Yet Mr. Fillmore's vote in
toat State will not reach 120,000. Ob,'", Sam!'; ; :
We reneat
. - -&--t
7nw who those Raleigh slaveholders are, who
T'sed Mr. Rayner to go to Philadelphia and advK
jte union between the Fillmore men ?and the
a,ack Republicans. J : , - : '
' ' - r v.
Raleigh and Gaston Road. We learn that at
the meeting of the Directors of this Road, held in
J"8 dty on Monday last, R. A. Hamilton, Esq., was
Elected President for the ensuing year.
Those patriotic old line Whigs whoent to Baltif
more to elect Mr.-Fillmore- and save the Republic"
told the country that Mr; Buchanan was a sectional.
and Mr. Fillmore a national candidate." - Let us see
how this statement has been met by the peopled ' .
: 'Mr. Fillmore has received jitat eight Electoral votes
out of 296 j and he has run behind the K. KBtrength
in all the Southern States. These eight rotes were
obtained not honestly, not fairly, not by the peace
ful exercise by freemen of the right of suffrage but
by threats, intimidation, and wholesale slaughter I
These eight votes are saturated with blood.- ' Seven
or eight murdered men and boys, and seventy-five
cnielly wounded in the City of Baltimore, will be
the record which will go down to posterity as a part
of the Know Nothing achievement which resulted in
these eight votes. Know Nothingism began in se
cret, and got strength, and exulted in it for a' season,"
by the strife which it engendered between races and
religions; and it has made its first showing of Elec
toral votes in blood the legitimate consequence of
its doctrines and practices. But it is weak now in
the free States, because . black Republicanism ab
sorbed it; and it was thus absorbed because its mem
bers there, bitterly as they hated the naturalized
citizen and the Catholic, hated the Southern slave
holder still more. Behold, then, the consequences
of Know Nothingism as thus far revealed feuds and
fightings between races of men and strife among the
followers of Christ I blood, riot, and murder at the
ballot-boxes in Baltimore, Louisville, and New Or
leans ! and black Republicanism and disunionism,
in all their hideousness, in the free States I " By
their fruits ye shall, know them."
This national candidate, Mr. Fillmore, has receiv
ed, for example, about 1,000 votes in Maine, about
800 in New Hampshire, about 300 in Vermont, about
8,000 in Connecticut, &c. This is his strength in
the free States, in that region of the Union where
conservatism and nationality are most needed.
Yet there are Fillmore men in the free States who
have exhibited in this contest a spirit of patriotism
and nationality, which puts to the blush many of the
Fillmore party in this section of the Union. We
refer to those who, in the City of Boston, voted for Col
Greene for Congress against the abolitionist Comins;
and to others, in the same city, who united with the
Democrats in the effort to defeat Burlingame. Look,
too, to that glorious gain for Buchanan in Philadel
phia of fifteen thousand totes, rendering it certain
that many Fillmore men, opposed to a fusion with
the abolitionists, must have voted wi th the Demo
crats. It was in vain that Mr. Rayner harangued,
and maligned the Democrats, the more he talked
for fusion the more firmly the honest and patriotic
portion of the Fillmore men were fixed in their pur
pose to vote for Buchanan. They saw no chance
for Mr. Fillmore they would not fuse with Fremont,
and so they cast their votes where they would tell
for the Constitution and the Union.
Let us be told no more, therefore, about Mr. Fill
more's popularity or the nationality of "Sam's"
party ; and whenever you hear a Know Nothing
boasting of the strength and the nationality of his
faction, just remind him of the vote of Maryland and
of Mr. Fillmore's 300 votes in Vermont
5?irThe New York Times, one of the leading or
gans of Fremont, takes the following view of the
Presidential Election :
"In Nev-England, New-York, Ohio, and the Western
States generally, with the exception of Indiana, Fremont
has run nobly. In this State his plurality will be over
40,000. 1 he wnole Kepublican state ticket is elected :
the Republicans hare at least 90 of the 12S members ot the
Assembly, which secures them the United States Senator
to succeed Hamilton- Fish: and they hare 21 of the 33
Members of Congress. Tbe Fremont majorities of the
western and central counties are enormous. The American
Party seems to hare been very geueraily betrayed and de
serted by its leaders, and thousands of its members voted
directly for Bochaxas. The Fillmore vote of the State
will probably not exceed 120,000, in an aggregate of over
half a million: they hare lost every Congressional Dis
trict, and tbe only consolation the leaders of this party
have left is in tbe reflection that they hare given Pennsyl
vania to Mr. Buchanan, a solace which the great body of
their followers will not share.
It is not often that a defeated party is left in so solid and
strong a position as that which the Republicans n the
Union now occupy. They hare coutested the ground with
rare vigor and energy, and, for a new party,, undisciplin
ed, inexperienced, almost unorganized, surrounded by dif
ficulties and entangled by hali-alliaDccs, which brought cer
tain weakness with only a faint promise of compensating
strength, they hare certainly achieved very extraordinary
results. They have almost consolidated the North, and
we are inclined to believe that their candidate will be found
to hareteceired a decided plurality of the popular vote of
the Union."
The Times is the same paper that so highly eulo
gized Mr. Rayner for his efforts to induce the Fill
more men of Pennsylvania to unite with Fremont
It is an abolition sheet In striking contrast with
the foregoing, wa clip the following from the Port
land (Maine) Argus. Bear in mind that Mr. Ray
ner, a Southern Know Nothing, went to Philadel
phia to advocate a union between the Fillmore and
Fremont men, to defeat such Democrats in the free
States as the Editor of the Portland Argus, who
" swears eternal enmity to Black Republicans," and
who has resolved " to work unceasingly to exter
minate the nest of poisonous serpents which it
batches." We would trust the Democrats of Maine,
who are thus working and who are thus spoken for
by the Argus, long, long before we would such Sou
thern men as Mr. Rayner and those who justify him :
" The vote of Maine against a statesman and patriot like
James Buchanan will hereafter, we venture to predict, be a
source of shame to her people. It will be pointed at as th
melancholy consequence of a wild fanaticism, and few will
be willing to acknowledge that they were parties to it.
- But Maine stands not alone. Her elder sister, Massa
chusetts, may well claim to be the ' Virago' State in this
senseless folly ; for Massachusetts gives to John C. Fremont
a majority of fifty-six thousand ! So says the Boston Trav
eller. We yield the honor, or rather the dishonor, to her.
Maine no longer ' leads' in infamy. She must give preced
ence to the State that violates the laws of the land, and in
cites to open rebellion against the constitutional authorities.
Massachusetts has been the breeding hot-bed of nearly all
of tbe crazy vagaries that have disturbed the peaee of so
ciety, and led this country to the verge of disunion. It is
most fitting that she should stand out the foremost sup
porter of the sixteen-starred faction.
There is hope of Maine yet We have a noble army of
true-hearted patriots, forty thousand strong, who will here
after rest with their swords in their hands and their armor,
on. The battle is not ended : this army is not 'annihilated, '
as was proudly asserted by Neal Dow. The battle never
will end until the State shall be restored to the ranks of the
national democracy, and elevated up out of her deep deg
radation. This army never will be. ' annihilated' so long as
treason stalks abroad, and the integrity of our glorious re
public is endangered. Of this our opponents may be well
assured. . From this day let every friend of the Union in
Maine swear eternal enmity to black republicanism, and
resolve to work unceasingly to exterminate the nest of
poisonous serpents it hatches. Down with it, from Kitte
ry to Aroostook 1 and no jo a bter!" . . , -.
. j .i r
' The New York Congressional Delegation. Ac- '
cording to the Herald, the dslegation from New
York in the next Congress will stand 14 Dem ocrats
to 19 opposition j as follows :
L ET Wood, opp . 18. Nat" J Rossiter, dem
J S F Stranaban, op ' 19. J J Gregory, . , "
Dan'l E Sickles, dem 20. . Wm C Johnson, ; "
John Kelly, : .'- 21. Henry Bennett,-.opp
Wm B Maclay, : " 22. wm Alien, .oem
" 3iS.. Unas u Hoard, opp
opp 24. A F liranger,
dem . 25." E B Morgan,
; r 26.' E B Pottle,
odd 27.. S Q Hathawayy dem
2.
8.
4,
5
? (J. John Cochrane,
" 7. George - Briggs,
i.8.,HF Clarke, v
. v. oao d nasKiu,
10. -AS Murray, f
11. John rTream.
u
u
-r' The iarns.received Wtetegraph yesterday, says
- the iWashington ; Union rNpf Saturday j:TasV only J
' Strengthen the confident belief expressed by us in
oar last ."issue," that Mr.: Buchanan will receive at
le"t 170 probably 174, y"ot electoral col
lege. We stated yesterday that the report originat
ing with Mr.lWentworth, of the Chicago Democrat,
that the black Republicans had carried IHinos,'was
too ab: u d to merit - a contradiction. Our faith in
the invincibility of the - Democracy 'of Illinois was
founded, not upon information of a contradictory
character for so far as we were concerned the tele-V
graph was provokingly silent but upon a lively're-,
collection of a long and unbroken series of triumphs
which they had achieved. We were not surprised,
then, when, at a late hour yesterday afternoon, the
, following despatch from Judge Douglas, addressed
to a gentleman in una city, was placed at our dis
posal: "Chicago, Nov. 7. Illinois gives Buchanan about
eight thousand majority over Fremont. Five demo
crats elected to Congress against four abolitionists.
Both branches of the legislature democratic by de
cisive majorities. The State ticket rendered doubt
ful by the Fillmore mcnoing with the abolitionists.
- S. A. DOUGLAS.
MISSOURI.
Partial returns from Missouri show democratic
gains compared with the last governor's election.
KENTUCKY AND TENNESSEE.
The democratic majorities in Kentucky and Ten
nessee promise to be much larger than were first re
ported. WISCONSIN.
The probabilities are that in Wisconsin three black
republicans and one democrat have been elected to
Congress. The State has gone for Fremont
IOWA.
A despatch from Senator Jones, dated at Dubuque,
November 6, says: "You may add Iowa to the
glorious Buchanan democratic pyramid." It is said
that a despatch containing the same gratifying in
formation has been received in this city from Judge
Mason, who is now in Iowa.
NEW YORK. .
We have by telegraph incomplete returns from all
the counties in New York but seven. They show
that Fremont has received 203,009 votes ; Buchan
an, 155,000; and Fillmore, 101,000. The official
vote will, of course, vary these figures.
OHIO.
In regard to the probable result in Ohio, Col. Me
dary, of the Statesman, pleasantly remarks:
" Strange as it may seem, we have very few relia
ble returns from Ohio. Such as we have we pub
lish, but thy are not of a sufficient character to
justify any calculation as to the probable footings
up of the whole State. The most we can say is,
that we are continually reducing the majority aga
inst us on the 14th of October.
INDIANA.
All the returns from Indiana show democratic
gains over Willard's vote. Buchanan's majority in
the State will be very large.
PENNSYLVANIA.
We are as yet without complete returns from Penn
sylvania. The Pennsylvanian of yesterday morn
ing says :
" The reported majorities from the counties heard
from, with a liberal estimate for the counties yet to
be heard from, would indicate a plurality for Mr.
Buchanan of 30,000 majority ; over both, of from
8,000 to 12,000."
MICHIGAN.
Detroit, Nov. 7. Thirty-three counties heard
from, which give Fremont 18,589 majority. His ma
jority, in the State will probably reach 20,000.
FLORIDA.
Augusta. (Ga.,) Nov. 7. Partial returns from
Florida show democratic gains over the vote of last
month.
CONNECTICUT.
The vote in Connecticut four towns to her from
is as follows : Fremont 42,071, Buchanan 34,457,
Fillmore 2,490.
NEW JERSEY.
Mr. Buchanan has carried the State by a large
majority, and the Democrats have gained two mem
bers of Congress.
NEW HAMPSHIRE.
Concord, Nov. 5. Returns from thirty towns give
a gain for the Republicans.
Concord Midnight Ninety-five towns give the
following results : Fremont 24,661 ; Buchanan 16,
729 ; Fillmore 292. One hundred and two towns
show a net Fremont gain of 3,143 over Metcalf's.
VERMONT.
Montpelier, Nov. 5, A. M. The Republicans have
carried the State by 23,000 to 30,000 majority.
MASSACHUSETTS.
Massachusetts has gone for Fremont by 60,000
majority over Buchanan, and 75,000 over Fillmore.
All the members of Congress are black Republi
cans. "Bully" Burlingame is re-elected by 70
majority.
ILLINOIS.
Washington, Nov. 9th, 3 P. M. Illinois is stiil in
doubt, though the Democrats claim it.on the strength
of a Springtied despatch from Juege Douglas, sta
ting that the State had gone for Buchanan by 8,000
majority.
The Democrats have elected five members to Con
gress in this State.
Richardson is beaten.
telegraphed for the standard.
Washington, Nov. 10, 1S56.
Illinois has gone for Buchananan by at least three
thousand majority.
TENNESSEE.
You need have no doubt about Tennessee having
gone for Buchanan, notwithstanding a dispatch from
Wytheville reporting gains for Fillmore in East Ten
nessee. '
The following States, we think, may with entire
safety be put down in the democratic column :
CERTAIN STATES FOR BUCHANAN.
Pennsylvania, 27
New Jersey, 7
Indiana, 13
Illinois, 11
Fourteen southern States, 112
170
Or twenty-one votes more than is necessary for an
election. It will be seen that California and Wiscon
sin are not included in this count, although the pro
babilities are strongly in favor of Mr. Buchanan
carrying one, if not both, of these two States. As
suming, however, that the black republicans have
carried Wisconsin, the vote in the electoral college
with stand as follows :
Buchanan, ' 174
Fremont, 114
Fillmore, , 8
16. Q W Palmer,: ' ; 83. F S Edwards
17. F E Spinner. ,: ; " " v-
In the' present Congress the delegation stands 80
opposition to 3 Democrats. " ' v v'-"- .'ifvf
Total,
Necessary to a choice,
296
149
28.' Win W Kels'ey,; opp
12. Jno Thompson, r1 V 29. ,S G Andrews v ,
13. A B Olm, ' - J r 30. D Richmond, : .'dem"
1A ! Coming :-.'.t 'AoWftT v S"R-f!hrnlfc;KV' tHf :
15. Edward Dodd. .opp 82. S G Haven, 8.' i SURRECTION NY-NIGHT IN ;:JH15. YEAR,i
V 8H- K S KdWSrdflv-i .i.".'' I JH HIOBOBS WOBLD ABJ!S TO ttlVE TBS A UUW X
Precious Morsels from Kenneth Rayner abont
Southern Democrats, his own fellow-citizens.
" Why, it has got to be a very common thing here
in the South for the most true and reliable men
among us to be denounced as ' unsound on the sla
very question' as tinctured with abolitionism' by
these contemptible party hucksters, THAT COULD
BE BOUGHT BY ANY ABOLITIONIST AT THE
NORTH. ANY DAY IN THE YEAR, FOR MUCH
LESS THAN THE PRICE OF AN ORDINARY
NEGRO." K. Baynefs Letter.
" He was not one of those who believed that the
Locofocos, at least those whom helnew at home, were
any special lovers of our glorious national Union.-r
Their course proved only too clearly that they were
willing to jeopard it all to carry their, own BASE
PURPOSES; and to secure to themselves the seven
ty millions of spoils for another four years." Ken-.
. neth Rayner's speech in Philadelphia. -? .: V : -'"Mr.
Rayner then went on with his excoriation
; of the Buchanan party. - He denounced them, and
SHOWED THAT THEY WERE THE SLAVES OF SLAVERY AND
. FOREiGNEHS.V-:-Jlf. 'Rayner's- Philadelphia, speech,
'-'reported in the-Sun." vi.V '-- ' Nv 'i-.
.."And these' men. who -make that charge are all
Democrats yes, I have been charged with abolition
ism by men who WOULD JOIN UN A NJfiUKU LB-
V . r. .
; fStf-viffff
w FOR SALT RIVER!! i.:.
Direct Through Without Landing,
; THE FAST SUNNING VESSEL, " .
r . ' DIS - U MM O If Y
COLONEL JOHN C. FREMONT, Master, '
Will leave for Salt-River Direct, from Pier 8" North
River, on WEDNESDAY, November 6th, 1856, .
At 6 o'clock, p. if., V "V J - ' '. r
;' ' . -LIST OF OFFICERS. . '.'
William L. Dayton. ,
v OFriCE WHEN THEY SHOULD 'GET INTO POWER." Ken
neth Rayner speech &' Philadelphia, reported, tn
thou Times." '" : " . - . -. V '
First Mate,
Second, V ' ::
Steward,
Clerk,
Engineer,'
Cook,
Barkeeper,
Assistant do,
Spiritual Adviser,
: Physician, -
Chambermaid,
Barber,
Charles Sumner, -
Horace Greeley. ' y
Fred Douglas. 7
, Gen. Watson Webb.
Gen. Nye. '
Myron H. Clark.
Henry L. Raymond. '
. Henry Ward Beecher.
Thurlow Weed.
Lucy Stone. .
' N. P. Banks.
For passage and further particulars, apply to
JAS. GORDON BENNETT, N. Y. Herald.
George Law, General Ticket Agent
The upper deck rooms are engaged by "Jessie"
for herself and the "Jessie Clubs," and tbe Fremont
clergy. No ticket will be delivered to any clergy
man who does not acknowledge an " anti-slavery
God," and own copies of the " anti-slavery Bible "
and "anti-slavery Constitution." Pocket editions
may be procured at the office of the New York
Tribune. New York Bay Booh.
FOR StMMeT RWER!
Right Through, the Slow-sailing vessel,
MILLARD FILLMORE, Master,
Will leave the shores of North-Carolina this morn
ing, the 12th for the headwaters of Salt River.
LIST OF OFFICERS.
Andy Donelson,
First Mate,
Second Mate,
Steward,
Clerk,
Engineer,
Cook,
Barkeeper, -Assistant
do.,
Spiritual Adviser,
Pilot,
Physician,
Barber,
General Ticket Agent,
John M. Morehead.
Gen. J. M. Leach.
T. Burr, Jr.
Gen. Alfred Dockcry.
John H. Haughton.
John W. Cameron,
L. B. Carmichael.
Kenneth Rayner.
John A. Gilmer.
C. N. R Evans.
Nathaniel Boyden.
John D. Hyman. '
For passage, or further particulars, apply to
R. C. PURYEAR, of Yadkin.
A colony is to be established at the head of Salt
River, where the most " intense American national
ity " and a pure " American religion " will at once
prevail. A large number of " Plug Uglies " have
already engaged passage, and there will be many
on board of a new party, formed on the "ruins" of
the K. N. party, called the Plug Outs. No " furrin
er " will be allowed to approach the shore of the
river within gunshot of the Sam Lantern ; and all
" furriners " found at the head of the river will be
at once shot or stabbed. The " Plug Uglies " and a
select crowd from Louisville, Ky., headed by Pren
tice, w ill take pleasure in performing this duty. It
has been determined that " Americans shall rule
America " at the head of Salt River.
Kenneth. Rayner denounced by honest Fill
more men in Philadelphia.
The Philadelphia News an old and reliable Fill
more journal asserts that Mr. Rayner went to Phil
adelphia to advocate fusion, at the request of black
Republican traitors ; and that paper dwells at some
length and with much bitterness on the discord cre
ated by Mr. Rayner in the Fillmore ranks. Indeed,,
so aroused and enraged gwere the honest Fillmore
men by his conduct, that it seems Mr. Rayner at one
time apprehended personal violence at their hands ;
and in proof of this we copy the following from the
Philadelphia Sun of the 4th instant :
" Mr. Rayner's speech was so earnest and truthful that it
carried hope and conviction with its eloquent sentences.
Three cheers were given for Rayner and three for the Union
Ticket, as he closed and left to address another meeting,
saying as he left the room that he believed that if he mat at
t acted to-night in the streets he would have twenty good and
true Americana around him in, five minutes to defend him.
(Enthusiastic applause.)
.The Philadelphia News of 3d November, says :
"Mr. Rayner is either ignorant of the effect of tbe action
he recommends, or he is willing to risk the hazard of the
die. We remember well wheu Kenneth Rayner was re
garded as the most ultra of the antagonists of abolitionism,
and the fanaticism of the Giddings and Garrison school.
He denounced these disorganizing doctrines in Congress, in
the most violent language, and in terms not strictly within
the rules of parliamentary decorum. Now, he is advocat
ing an electoral ticket composed entirely of the friends of
Giddings & Co., and the greater part of which will enure
to the benefit of the champion of Northern sectionalism,
Is Mr. Rayner blinded by ambition? Let him explain
these matters to his constituents, for he will be called to a
stern account by them. Mr. Rayner overrates his influence,
if he supposes that he can induce the Americans of Penn
sylvania to follow hirn in the tortuous path he has chosen
to walk in."
The News was right Mr. Rayner did " overrate
his iuflueDce," as is shown by the fact that thous
ands of the Fillmore men there voted for Buchanan.
The Philadelphia News on the 4th says :
"Mr. Rayner was brought here 'at the instance of the
black Republicans, and even this Mr. Millward and his
traitorous coadjutor, Mr. Cooper, dare not now deny.
If these gentlemen were the instruments in the hands of
that party which seeks the blood of the American organiza
tion, so much the worse for them. If, after receiving the
honors of the party which elevated Mr. Millward to the dig
nity of a Congressman, he choose to play second fiddle to
tbe Northern section of locofocoism, this is his matter, not
ours, at least, until a more fitting occasion.
But why not let Mr. Rayner speak for himself? He as
pires to be a leader in the American party, yet on the ere of
the most important Presidential election witnessed in the
country for years, he abandons the canvass in his own State,
and comes here, to do what?, to assist that party to which
he claims to belong ? No 1 To aid it in elevating Mr. Fill
more, its nominee, to the Presidency ? No ; but to ask it to
prostitute itself before and beneath the fom of an sectional
organization, and to ask its members to note for an electoral
ticket which hat none other on it but friends of John O. Fre
mont. If Mr. Rayner can reconcile this conduct with his
duty to the American party, let him do it : but we say to
him, now and henceforth, that no matter what were his in
tentions, he came here and cast a firebrand among men who.
were contending for principles which must live or die with this '
contest. ,
If Mr. Rayner is no better politician than to be guilty of
such conduct as has characterized his present visit, we con
fess that he would make but a poor leader. Let him, be
fore coming here to instruct the people of Pennsylvania, look
to his own deserted State, and let htm go back to the State of
North Carolina, if he dare, and tell the people there that
the object of his mission into Pennsylvania was to advise
the American party to a cohabitation with Black Republi
canism and Northern Sectionalism, whose crusade aims the
ASSASSIN'S KNIFE AT THE HEART OF NORTH CAR
OLINA, as of every other State south, of Mason audDixon'a
line." - -. .-. ."" c' . -. :
; . Half a Million of DoUawr - r
r' A more stupendous corruption end bribery "fund .
(says tiie Pennsylvanian) was never raised than the
one which the free,-negro Fremonters have expended
in attempting to corrupt the yeomanry 'of Pennsyl
vuuia. j.k ur wu iu iub vciuuer ciecuou cost..
Ihemjialf 1 million: o .dollars f All just as- good
as thrown away.' How much the Presidential elecV
tion acosr;no '(correctr- estimate can:be iade,'v.tt
quite safe to say that like. the.o6UauVgw,"jt cosi
VOTE OF NORTH-CAROLINA-
t
COUNTIES.
1 ' .
'WJ&eimU Uroeere, Forwarding Oommimxm MtrctoU
iiAyi-i?i'-x Vi .J o-. JToarouu Hey 6, -Wkte
! ' . JJtADStTIFFfi Floor W eomla? in ta too small qites
; titiea to invito atteatian frets shippers, and the marSet to
KtW itali c Wa nnota FamttT X8V68i JtXtraaJiUl
EAv. S. are wanted af $1 : 408H ? Ito Clay ir t ;
Alamance,4
Alexander, v;.
Anson --f
Ashe,- V :'
Burke, v V
Buncombe. ,
Bladen, . -Bertie,
: . .
hBeanfort, . :
Brunswick, ;-v
Cabarrus,
Catawba,
Craven, - , V
Cumberland,
Chowan,
Columbus, -
Camden,
Carteret, : -
Cherokee, u
Caswell,
Chatham,
Caldwell,
Currituck,
Cleaveland,
Davidson,
Davie,
Duplin,
Edgecombe, ,
Forsythe,
Franklin , .
Gaston,
Granville,
Guilford ,
Greene,
Gates
Haywood,
Halifax,
Hertford,
Hyde,
Henderson,
Iredell
Jackson,
Jones, '
Johnston,
Lenoir,
Lincoln,
Madison,
Martin,
McDowell, -
Moore,
Montgomery,
Macon,
Mecklenburg,
Nash
New Hanover,
Northampton,
Onslow,
Orange,
Pasquotank,
Perquimans,
Pitt,
Person,
Robeson,
Rockingham,
Rowan,
Ruthcrfordj
Randolph,
Richmond,
Sampson,
Surry,
Stokes,
Stanly,
Tyrrel,
Union,
Wake
Warren,
Washington,
Watauga,
Wayne,
Wilkes,
Yadkin ,
Yancey, .
$16
466
: 884 v
- 784 ;
623
969
608
470 r
. 639
404'
426 ;
968
'784..
1575
291 .
589 -107
-493
:
632.
1120
1166
,438
656
1109
823
853
1113
1563
1060
744
759
1225
571,
432
459
537
736
335
882
665
851
570
261
1036
447
.706
536
733
211
867
1024
1107
1522
605
771
1119
830
304
775
678
773
1168
885
1070
561
246
990
877
769
166
124
835
1693
819
261
257
1332
609
633
810
645
411
772
708
459
786 481 '
545 -
i 833
468
665
158
,585'
928
230 .
: 806
474
' 602
574
211
1062
425
146
138
1199
586
155
189
926
834
133
994
2059
289
392
254
.584
501
647
1349
112
180
817
263
222
847
840
395
677
725
396
623
93
570
428
108
1045
502
348
716
384
669
439
905
781
1281
55G
497
579
498
797
309
273
1124
101
877
392
274
1264
888
820
717 ,
.811
000.
-878i
- 778
000
458
626 :
864
: 865 ;
:645
.695
1257
255
-463
000
917
760
000
. 000
' 796
634
279
1173
1581
1043
793
697
1061
413
875
888
000
683
801
000
000
802
000
211
958
424
514
000
.725
000
440
000
000
1031
10G8
1472
621
683
909
299
000
787
543
673
1001
-777
676
000
176
927
706
658
000
000
655
1472
841
236
000
1,172
380
' 483
616
462 C
V 822 V
728 ;781
000 .
'Ml-'
796',
884 y
694
: 167
' 475 ;-
767
212 1
. 207
000 .
: 889 -
OOO;
212
,788
000 :
000
71
964
477
117
151 '
772
. 255
53
756
1515
218 .
805
000 -
509 '
; 875
000
000
1241
000,
157
619
264
226
000
811
000
489
0U0
000
573
61
577
466
145
747
533
000
577
279
566
359
863
412
000
500
858
862 .
831
000
000
. 236
789
77
64
000
208
992
694
208
Red
and
'PEAJt-B.
Black in nuutetr .'.
i1
niTTOV u Wkward la arririnir and the stock oa mar
ket does not exceed 700100 balesu Bnyera ai offering
U&iiU, but we hear of na sales tor some dayas4?-!
PROVISIONS . C hojfronDd 1818ts.J HUM
a; Western Sides lOVffllOM truoniaeT
eta. Mess Pork $a222W- Goshen UutUr 86S
laetft;
Cbees e 11K1 centa.
NAVAL STO
mand at 04l, cents ;
easu.
irita f TOTpenttM win Kjrhf ia-
monttosia f tpw ; rraue ao.
are in demandat $88a$7a tor prime, ;
$8Wf ; Tar dull at Claf W. -
m i a v ios nm am in oam
$80 for Culls. Other descriptions very dull: W. . nno.
$45; Culls $20; B. O, bhd. t81a33; CulU 8laX5 ; :
Heading$58! Culls $18. : .-V - rvvr5.
. DRIED FRUIT is in demand.: . Prime bright Peaches ,
- $5a$5Xi Apples $l,40a$l,6j Unpeeled Fruit itvery dull;
ale: Flaxseed is wanted at $1: Beeswax 85 eta. v.
' LIME is scarce-r-We quote Tbomaatoa $1.16a$L80 W. '
C. $l.40a$l0. . . . V- s- v
GUANO. Pernviaa $58 for H25 Tons Mexican $2Sa$S0.
' ' JROCERIES-Sugars show a still further advance.
Standard LoaflSV; Crushed and Pulverised 14)ial5 ota ;
A. B. and C. Coffee Crashed UValS); Molasses very
scarce No N. Ov in market ; Cuba 68a55 eta ; Rio Coffee
. llalS cts; LanguayralSalScU; JavaieaiTCts; noma
Candles 17 cts ; Adamantine S8a30 cts; Sperm 48a56 cts. .
--:X i"1-. - .WILMINGTON MARKCT,
- ' -- :- . - r.WnJirilOHW, November 8,1856.
TURPENTINE. No chance in jirtees. ; Bales yesterday
- of If 5 bbls., and this morning 255 do. at $2 60 for virgin -and
yellow dip, and $1 50 for hard, tier 880 lbs. - v
. SPIRITS TURPENTINE. Sales yesterday of 800 bbls.
at 89 cents per gallon. Nothing done this morning. '
ROSIN. Sato yesterday of 250 bbls.., common . at $1 for
small bbls. - . " , ' ' ' ' ' -
TAR 100 bbls. sold tits morning at $1 50 per bbl. ' :
COTTON. Sales yesterday of 878 bales at U a 18
cents per lb;, as in quality.'. Cv - -'-. v - ; -.
' CORN. Two cargoes received yesterday, (8,800 bushels,)
' 1,800 bushels of Whieh sold this mornig at S4 cents per
bushel. '' - .- ' ..'.' . '
; FLOUR. Market firm, and stock smalL - Sale vesterdar
of 58 bbls. Wilmington inspection at $7. 50 per bbl. for su-
perfine. . , --... :;. ' . .. ' r Journal,
. - FAiTTlTviLLE MARKET? C
Fatsttivillb, November 8,3 866. .
BACON dull and heavy at 15centa. COTTON-Rather ,
better feeling, but sot sufficient to justify a change of prices
selling at 10 to 10 V. FLOUR Receipts light ..and prices
full up to $8 25 to $7 25.. TURPENTINE Virgin and
yellow dip $2 0a ; Scrape $1 ; Spirits 85. v y. '. .. i
; - ' '-'.MARRIED.' ;.?:r A ..
- On the SOth'October, by N. M. Hubbard, Esq., Dr. James '
ArDougass to Miss Matilda Jane Lisenbe,, daughter of 1
Holden W. Lisenbe, Esq., all of Atuon. ' . -.,v "'
Age copy. ' ' " v' : . . '-
On the 28th alt., by the Rev. John Pickard, ilr. .
liam T. Parish to Miss Mary Ar daughter .of John C. Tot
ton, Esq., all of Caswell county. '. . j i" -
LIST OF LETTERS, '
REMAINING IN THE POST OFFICE, AT RAX-
MM' i-lUU. for tne montn endinir 1st Movemner, 1S5S :.
Vs.
-. i.t''S.
1
AS
v.l
(.
.''1
3
; id
,1
57,555 44,961
44,961 .
000000 0C000
000000
Bragg'smaj. 12,594
Counties officially heard from.
000000
CORPORATION PROCEEDINGS.
Raleigh, Nov. 7, 1856. ;
Regular meeting of the Board of Commissioners
of the City of Raleigh, held this evening. Present,
Wm. D. Haywood, Esq., Mayor, Messrs. Ed. Yar
brough, A. M. Gorman, Alex. Adams, H. D. Turner,
E. Smith, and O. B. Root,' Commissioners. : .
On motion, the Board proceeded to the election of
first Constable, when Mr. E. E. Harris was duly
elected for the balance of the year.
The Board then proceeded to elect Assistant Con
stable, when Mr. Wm. N. Andrews was elected.
On motion, the present Guard, Messrs. Overby
and Crawley, were re-appointed for the balance of
the year as night watch.
On motion, Mr. Dean has permission to establish
a Soap' Factory on Mrs. Hollister's lot in the City of
Raleigh. . J
On motion of Mr. Gorman, the Mayor was re
quested to call on Mr. B. F. Moore, the City Attor
ney, and request him to bring suit against J. C.
Moore for selling goods at auction in the City of Ra
leigh without having Auctioneer's license from the
Board.
An account of S. Burns & Co., for $10 76 was
presented and allowed.
An account of H.D.Turner for $11 05. Allowed.
An account of Messrs. Holden & Wilson for $52
25 for printing was, on motion, allowed.
An account of Wm. N. Andrews for $78 40, for
corn, fodder, &c, was allowed.
Mr. N. Creech resigned as Weigh Master.
On motion, Mr. Joseph Betts was appointed Weigh
Master.
Mr. A. S. Lougee petitioned the Board to be re
commended to the County Court for license to retail
spiritous liquors by the small measure Recom
mended by Messrs. Wm. H. Harrison, W. W. Hol
den, W. H. H. Tucker and J. F. Hutchins. Rejected.
Messrs. Cooke & Hood also petitioned for same
Recommended by W. F." Askew, R. B. Haywood,
W. H. Harrison, W, H. H. Tucker, C. W. D. Hutch
ins and C. E. Johnson. Rejected. - .
Mr. Terrell Gill also petitioned for same. Recom
mended by N. L. St'th, S. H. Rogers, Willis Scott,
N. Kramer, and was rejected.
On motion, the Board adjourned.
J. J.-CHRISTOPHERS, Clerk.
Mornina; Star Lode. ;
Whereas, It has pleased Almighty . God to re
move from among the fraternity our much beloved
and respected brethren, Tbos. W. Wright, Col. Asael
Yick, Rev. J. W. Perry, and . A. P. Bowden, all of
the County of Nash; - r.:'-'-C v-.- -
Resolved, That the community has lost soma of
its most worthy members, the Lodge some of its
brightest jewels, and the families of the dee'd their
best friends. . - J- ;.: . . -
Resolved, That we commit , them to the care and '
keeping of oaf great Grand Master, who is mighty
to save to the utmost ; ' . "1 ;. r ? .
Resolved, That the awful dispensation of divine'
Providence, in so suddenly taking from us so many
worthy members of our order '; and of society, we
fully recognize that the ways of the Almighty are
mysterious and strange, and are past finding out." :
Resolved, That while', we mourn the1 loss of. oar;
worthy brethren whose places cannot be filled, we
tender our warmest" sympathies to the (Widows, or
phans, and fkmilies of the deceased.': r ? ;- yy,
'Resolved, That we wear the usaal badge of mdturn.
ing-fbr the space of thiidaysC.:v;v ?
VXvm.-vv'.-'Wlt
.JESSE' BE AL, ;'f f y
T JOHN J. DRAKE: f "wuttee.-
.j;'j.AYLOB.j.?;;
r'' Sampsoit C!oWt FAnt-The -next annual exhi
bition of the Sampson County , Agricultural Society
will comtnence at the Fair grounds,. ear.Clinton,
onthe first Thandayia.December next.. . .
J "' . ' f -Clintfr . Independent.
i n t?
Artis, Isaac
Bell, Miss Ellin
Bryant, Frank
Burnet, Charles '':
Biss, D R v
Burgwyn,HE ' .
Barlew, CS -Bristen,
Patrick '
Buffalo, QM. '
Connolly, Wm
Crandall, P M
Campbell, Charles 1
Copeland, Wm
Clark; Miss Marina J ! '
Capps, Thomas '". S
' r- '
Dickson, Rev AF
Davidson, J M:
Dunston, Jesse , '
Echols, J W . 'Vv". -
Foggs, Viss Ellen -
Francis, Jr, James . ' "
Fitts, Caswell G .- ". ' y
Fennell, Owen - -, '
. FenneU 4 Sale, ,; ,
Green, Miss Martha L ; u
Griffis, Paschal
Griffis, Mrs Rebecca : . - - -.
Gary, Mrs Patsey
Garnett, Theodore S
Hedrick, BS - ' :'
HaU, T L ;. ' - -
Hutchens, Wm B . -Henry,
David ;
Hall, Frank
House, Miss Penelope
Hardenburgh, C H .
Huddlerston, Wm C S
Hough, Mrs Sarah ; .V,
Howe, John W " -T
- Harwell, J A .. .
Hunter, Alsey
Hail, T L .
. Harrison, Charles H .
Hanks, Miss Elizabeth C
Hinton, Joshua ' . ,
Hillier, Thomas A .v ' -Horton;
H S
Hughes, Hanson.T ; '
Hused,MissHA '
Ivey, Jno H ' ..y
Johnson, MrsfMary J ;
Johnson, Lucius J - .
Johnson, J -
Johnson, E A
Jones, Miss Elvira T S
Johnson A Jordan, ' "
Jones, ttV - -Johnson,
WD
Jones A Co, G B ..
. Jones, Alstern
Jestice, Miss Mary
Mederis, Dennis G
Matcher, Robert ,'
' ; Mangum, Hon Willie P
Moore, W H H
Morgan, J C
, Mangum, Joseph
McOullers, Jno S T -
. McCaffartay, Owen' ?'
McDonall, Wm v ,' Y
' V Kuckles, v' ;.'.: '
Nelson, George -'
Newby, W H 'r
Owens, Stephen '-- .! .' .s )
1 Prince, Mrs Carrie '-i-'
Pullen, Messrs ;
Prigleden, John 'v- ' " . -.
" Pool, John or Bufus Tempje
, Pearsall. Mrs Sarah 8
Pool, James - '
V-;Partin, JC ;-VV
Platner A Smith, '.V,';
Port, Mrs Elizabeth . :K
? Pate,SW i .:
"', Parish, William , J V: ,
; Pullen, Turner ;''.- ;' v
': Patten, Zachary : ,v';V
' ;'Ray, Pinckey: ? V;.'
' Rosa,WR ' - ' j
Robertson, L W ; .'V
Raby, Hilory .y-'-1 . "'.-" .
itusseii, .
.. Richards, Allen
, Rosemond, John C-
Rose.WS - ..--':
. Reid. Edward
Rogers, Mrs Tilletl H
' Smith. TB
Smith. Dilsev
1 : Strudwick. Wm S
. SecyManteo
o:- t 1
oipes. 4Uuo v .
Stedman, Joseph
: SimcrelL Professor
.Small wood, Jane Y
Biter, j a
Smith, H
' - Sanders, Linn B '
! Stallings, Isaae W
. Times, Editor --
. Tray wick,
Thompson,
'1 nomas,
' - Thomas,
Thompson,
. Terry, WmH
Upchnrch, Lewis
.Wiggini
, 4, ;-
- - -7.rs
, .'
-' M'iL
,' -W'
a
i
rf
ruS - 'w
Lodge, No 8r ,;
Woodward, Christopher j.;
Wray, Mrs An.'&-r r ;
Womble, John T - : : .
Williamson, Miss P A Z
Wellons. Rev W B i
Wilson, EM A . ' r
wren, Wm ' .
Waldbaur, DaVid ':
Wethers, C H f 5 H ' , r ? ii
WilUams, Morgan o '-fU
Winchester, EX3 - y. r - V
ti ; if; r r ii i , . ... , i . . '. .
say they are advertised.. ; r - WM., WHITE. P. M. rtfif-i
King, Miss Bettie II
King, Warren
Kennedy, Mrs N - -
Lewis, Geo C - ;.
Lutner, H D -Lams,
Wm H v .
Leeds, Joseph fJ . . :
Loper, Mrs Margaret
Lowry, James 7,
Lewis, AS ... V
r. . ..... - ......
U-.-::.yr..':-.r?7iJ i v
:.'' - : ?7J I ii
Jlenry . x-.---..' ; .f';l l-f.-
John W . : : . I
. Mra Louisa. v. :..-.ZV:i I.M
"'''-V'.-i
cb
iss Anna :
Wiggins, Miss Pennmah i;
WelcUer, David K
v iDcnesier, x. j -
Woodard. Atjflrustoa
Whittington, Miss Kale ;
FLOUR I FLOUR I 1 WARRANTED FAMILY . 5
Flour ocDosite the Masonic Lodsre: - . - . -'
November 9, 1856.
WEa
w. w; WOODELij; ' -'
. loa-tf. .'
ARE AUTHORIZED TO ANNODNCK J. O ' ' - i-.
M ULLINS as a candidate for the office at Ami. s v
session of the Legislature. . . : v.--.. . . -:.j
November 9, 1856.
lOO-tmL
"WKTE ARE REQUESTED TO ANNOUNCE HUGH JV. I:
; WW I
GASTON, of Raleieh. as a candidaU for th offi r .'
Beading Clerk to the next House of Commons. . -4,.;-"
November 10, 1850. , - .; 10J--4mL-'- : "'-
.. ' Sr.
AMES PAGE,' OF
uemocrat,; wisaea
OF-RANDOLPH vCOUNTE, (As ' ', ,
to inform the members elect tothe
Senate of the enftuinor Leeiftlattire. that he will acralh ha .
caodidateJbr re-eluciion . to tha rffi of iPrinmMl Hnnr. ' '
October 25, 1856. - 'V
I'
ll fi
0
8-r-Wt
':X
10 THE SENATE OF NORTH CAROLIlf A".
i - WE ARE AUTHORIZED TO ANNOUNCE, WM.: A
, E, ALLEY, of Raleigh, as a candidate for Assistant Dootw
keeperin tbe Senate of th ensuing Legislature. -'- ' ; -;
.Oct 25,1856. ' -;' .. ',.4?,- r , . -VIA& -: - ,
'; ElfGROSSIIfG ERK. : -i
WWT E ARE . REQUESTED) . TO ANNOUNCE V'
. W W - William H.'H. Conner. rDemnnMt. of Rmiulr)n ; ..
. as a candidate for Engrossing Clerk, to the next Legisla- - - -t: i-
tare. -- - - ,y. i:.-.v ' ---V ; i-?.-'' .
i-Oct. 13,' 1856.. .jV.-rv-v-.?'.-. . vf V, "v- i 9l.-mtli.-i-.-
:.vV vv.-2i4''iHoajej f 9oamBiv-1 . ,
THE SUBSCRIBER TAKES THIS METHOD OF .
informing the members elect to the House of CodV v
mon s, that be will baa candidate before them for the office -.
.of Chief Clerk, r ' - ' H.DON WILSON,
IWr-iE ARE REQUESTED TO ANNOUNCE MR.
ERASMUS PARISH, of W as a candidate for
principal Doorkeeper of the House of Commons, at the en
suing session of the Legislature. ' v
V- Nov. 4, 1856; - - , V ..'l00--d. ':
v"JOTICE. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT
1M application will be made to tbe next Legislative to
grant a charter for Miniag and Transporting Coal withia
the State, entitled "Th North Carolina Gas, Coal and
Transportation Company." . y -
October 21J1856. ! 96 lmw
"ATOTICE THE TRUSTEED OF HOLLY SPRINGS
i.M High School, in Wake county, will apply to tbe next
LegiBlature for an act of incorporation. v , ,
October 8, 1866. . r Mr-lm,
'7
. ''

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