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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, November 26, 1864, Image 1

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N2. 3.664
TRAVELERS' DIRECTORY.
O
FFIPE BALTIMOR1 A OHIO RR. CO.,
Washihuto*, November 12th 1364.
155 tag Ssgszg -
RkV 3tkkHf_W ^*2
On and *ft?T Sunday. November 13,1964. PW^B
ivr Trains between Washington and Baltimore
will De ran a* follow* :
TRAINS MOVING NORTH
No 1 ? BA LTI MORI. WAY STATION A HAR
R1SBUR(i TRAIN ?Leave Washington t?:JO A. M.
Arrive at Ba<timore S:-iO a. u.
So.i-SEW YORK A WESTERN EVPRE3S
Le?ve Wa-h'Dtfton 30 a. *. connecting at Relay
with Mail Trkin leafing Baltimore at 9:00 a. m.
for ttie West. Arrive at Baltimore 9:10 A. M ;
Philadelphia. 1:56 P. v . New York b:30 P M.
Ko 3 - N B W YORK MAILTR \ IN?Leave Wash
ington 1115 a. m. Arrive at Baltimore at l i: 4"k
p.m., Philadelphia 5 37 p.m., New York 10 00
P. N.
Wo 4? BALTIMORE TRAIN?Leave Washing
ton 3 00 y m. Arrive at Baltimore 4:50 P w
No. j?BALTIMORE. PHILADELPHIA AND
NEW YORK COMMUTATION TRAIN? Leave
Washington 4:30 p. y. Arrive at Baltimore 6:13
p. v.
??fiaS~Jn?T2I,| ALBANY A NEW YORK EX
PRESS TRAIN?Leave #a?hinetoD 6 00 p. m.
Arrive at New York .*> 00 a. m. Mail* and Passen
gers bv this train connect with all the early morn
ing trains leaving New York for the East, North
*nAv A'- l'll'lAJ?l?bia or Baltimore ticketi
?old by this tram
No. 7 ?BALTIMORE * HARRISBURG TRAIN
Leave Washington 7 00 P. M. #nd arrive at Balti
more ??: tO P M
No ??NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA AND
WESTERN TRAIN?Leave Washington at 8:30
p. m. ?*< pping at Rt^'ay House f?r Western p.i?s.-n
gers to take Express Train for Grafton, Wheeling
Parkersburg. and oil points in the Went
FOR ANN AP0LI8 the conn- ctions will be made
with the 1>:30 A. m and the 4:30 p. M. from Wash
ington. Notraina to or from Annapolis on Sua*
iay.
SUNDAY TRAINS.
THE ONLY TRAINS FliO.M WASHINGTON
'or passenger* on Sunday are the 7:30 A. m and
3 p. m. for Baltimore, and *:30 p. m. for Balti
more and Philadelphia, and the 6 p. m, for New
York ONLY.
SLEEPING CARS direct to New York on ? P. M.
and " 30 p. m train daily, except on Sunday. On
Sunday the Sleeping Cars on the "v.'i'J p. m. train
run to Philadelphia only.
tW~ Passengers leaving Washington at 7:30 A.
?*.. and t> and * 30 p. m., go through to New York
without changing cars.
For further information, tickets of every kind,
A r , apply to GEO S. KOONTZ, Agent at Wash
ington or at t>e Ticket Office
W P. SMITH. Mr.Rter of Transportation.
L. M. COLE. General l>cVet *rj?nt. nov 14
r 'BEAT PENNSYLVANIA B0UT1
l I 10 TEH
WORTHWEST AMI SOUTHWEST.
ON AND AFTER November lath trains will
leave Baltimore from North Calvert Station as
fellows : ___ . __
Fast Mail at- ~ A. M.
Harrisbnrg Accommodation .3.(J> F. M.
Lightning Express?. ?. .9.30 P. M,
f HE 6.30 A M.TRAInTfBOM WASHINGTON
connects with tbe9 2" a m train from Baltimore
for Pittsburg and tbe West, and for Elmira. Buf
falo. Rochester, Dunkirk, Canandaigua, and Ni
agara Jails, and for New York citv.
THE 7.30 P M TRAIN FROM WASHINGTON
connects with the 9 3"i p. m train from Balti
more for Elmira and the North and Pittsburg
and the West.
SLEEPING CARS ON NIGHT TRAINS.
POI.DI1K* TlCIITS AT GOVKRNMMT RATK3.
ONE THROUGH TRAIN ON SUNDAY.
LOW FARE AND"QUICK TIME.
?y For tickets and any Information apply at the
office of the Great Pennsylvania Route, eorner
Pa avenue and 6th stre -t. under National Hotel;
and Dep*t House, No. 463 0 st., near New Jersey
avenue, Washington. J. N. BUBARRY,
Superintendent N. C R R.
B J. WILKINS,
Pass and Ticket Agent, corner 6th st.
}e 9-tf and Penn. avenue.
PHILADELPHIA STEAMERS.
New Express Line, semi-weekly.between PHIL
ADELPHIA and ALEXANDRIA, jpw.
WASHINGTON and GEORGE- ft
TOWN.
Steamers Mayflower, Philadelphia and George
H. Stout.
Regular sailing days WEDNESDAYS and SAT
URDAYS, from No. 14 North Wharves, Philadel
phia. and No. 59 Water street, between Congress
and H'gh. Georgetown.
for freight apply to
JOHN B. DAVIDSON.
No. 59 Water street, Georgetown.
Agent in Philadelphia. WM. P. CLYDE. 14
North Wharves.
Agents in Alexandria, FLOWERS & BOWBN,
No. 1 King st. nov 8-tf
Tylers compound byrup of gum
ARABIC,
Well known as the
Most Pleasant. Safe, and Speedy Cure for
COUGHS, C9LD8.
HOARSENESS. CROUP, WHOOPING COUGH
ASD ALL
AFFECTIONS OF THE THROAT AND LUNG8.
Ite superior efficacy in arresting stubborn coughs
and tbe first stages of consumption, has long been
appreciated by most families and physicians, and
its success in giving immediate relief from a re
cent cough or cold, unprecedeuted.
For sale at the Drug Stores.
Price 26 and W> cents a bottle.
For conven'enre and portability the same com
bination msy he ha-! tn a mild lozenge form, well
adapted to relieve public speakers, singers, and
children, ard ^nowo as
??TYLER'S GUM ARABIC COUGH LOZENGES.'
nov 1 eo3m*
J^OIlflBS! HORSES! llORSES!
QFAKTBaMAiTKa GINRRAL'8 OPPICB, I
FlKPT DlVIBlOS, WA8HIMOTOH. Nov. 10, 1864.?
HORSES, suitable fbr Cavalry and Artillery ser
vice, will be purchased at Giesboro Depot, in open
market, till DECEMBER 1. W4.
Horses will be delivered to Captain L. Lowry
Moore, A. Q. M., and be subjected to the usual
Government inspection before being accepted.
Price ofCavalry Horses $175 each.
Price of Artillery Horses 318" each.
Payment will be made for six (6! and more,
JAMES A. EKIN,
Colonel in charge First Division,
nol21Ct Quartermaster General's Office,
Treasury department,
OrnoK op Oomptrollka op thb Currkhot
Washington, Ouobar 4,1864.
Whereas by satisfactory evidence presented to
the undersigned, it has been made to.appear that
Ifit Maiional Bank of the Metropolis, in the City of
Washmnten. in tbe county of Washington and Dis
triei qf Coinmb'11, has been duly organised under
aud according to the requirements of the act of
Congress entitled "An act to provide a National
Currency, secured by a pledge of United States
bonds, and provide for the-circulation and re
demption thereof." approved June a. 1864. and has
ecmplird with all the provisions of said act re
paired to be cobc plied with before commencing
the business of banking under said act:
Now,therefore, 1, Hugh McCellvck, Comptroller
of the Currency, da hereby certify that 7A? iVa
?wnal Bank of lie Metropolis, in the fV*y (J Wash
iprion. id the c?nnty of Washington ar d District of
Coiumtna. is authorized to commence the business
?t Backing under the act aforesaid.
In teftimony whereof, witness my hand and seal
of office this/i/ur?A day of October, 18K4.
fLP.l HUGH MoCULLOCK,
oeS-dfifit Oomptroller of the Currency.
IMPORTANT TO~~FEMALES?DR. CHEESE
MAN'S PILLS?Tbe comoination ef ingre
dients in these Pills is tbe result of a long and
extensive practice. They are mild in their opera
tion, and certain in correcting all irregularities,
painful menstruations, removing all obstructions,
whether from cold or other causes,headache, pain
in the side, palpitation of the heart, whites, all
nervous affections, hysterics, fatigue, pain in tbe
tack and limbs. Ac., disturbed sleep, which arise
from interraption of nature. Dr. Cheeseman's
Pills was the commencement of anew era <n the
treatment of these irregularities andobstructions,
hi. h have consigned so many to a premature
can enjoy good health unless
grave. No fema'.e _
she iti regular, and whenever an obstruction takes
place tbe general health begins to decline. Dr.
Cheeseman'? Pills are the most eSectual remedy
evt-r known tor all complaints peculiar to females.
To all elasseathey are invaluable, inducing, with
certainty, periodical regularity. They are known
to thousands who have nsed them at dlffereat pe
riods throughout the country, having the sanction
of some ef the most eminent physicians in Ameri
ca. Explicit directions, stating when they should
not be used, with each box; the price, one dollar
rsr box, containing frem 60 to 60 pills. Pills sent
y mail promptly, by remitting to the proprietors
gold by Druggist* generally. _
HCTCHINGB A HILLYER,Proprietors,
nov 2-DMtW9t *?1 Cedar street. New York.
M
THE BE8T AND CHEAPEST MANURE IN TU
UNITED 8TATBB.
The undersigned, having contracted fort fi
Manure at Giesboro Point, D. 0,, are nowpre
pared to put ?n board vessels free of expense to
Capta: o? at low rat*s.
YE8SBL8 WANTED.
Addreea No. 330 B street, Washington, or to
..Mj^roiM 4 oo
BE 0I.PMJJJ0T.U CO.?,,,!, ON TUB
Is eulareed to double its former capacity.
K EUROPBAN hotbl,
Comtr Pa. sc. and ll'A st., Washmiton, D, C.
This hotfl. the oldest sondncted on the European
plan In this city. fees been enlarged and A ?? A
Improved m every way necessary for they(7?|^
accommodation of the increasing auests.
Thaii*fus tor tbe patronage already received, tbe
proprietor hopes that by attention to business we
eont.nue to rtceive patronage as heretofore.
Guetts will only U charged with what they receive.
Charges are moderate.
oc 36 tf P. BMRICH. Proprietor.
iie?T8 AND 8H0ES ~
T? SUIT THB TlidM^^
We sisinw mannfaciaring ail hindsof BOOTS
and SHOES, and eonstanly reoeivlng a any- n
ply of Eastern-made work or every de?crip- Ml
tion. made exeressly to order, and will bef W|
?old at aoici lower price than has beon"
heretofore tharged in this city fer much lmferior
Article*.
Persons in want of BOOTS and 8H01S of Barter*
or Citv made work, will always find a good assort
ment la store aad at the lowest nrieee. Give u a
?nil.. .. ?BIFFIN A BROTHER,
api-tf 314 riaa.iTtaw.
T
AUCTION SALES.
FUTURE DAVS.
VALUABLE ROAD STOCK
AND
DURHAM CATTLE. , . .
I will offer for sale, ax w? lower Farm, adjoining
the town cf Upp?r Marlboro'. Prince George's
connty. Maryland, on TUESDAY. tbrf 29th day of
November. 1SJU, ir fair, if not, the next fair day,
the following list of
COLT? FILLIES. AND DURHAM CATTLE.
Most of these eolts are sired bya horse combining
the stock of the celebrated Messenger and Trustee,
from mares selected by myself with a view of
breeding them to him. His colts now in me bare
fully established his reputation. Those now offered
evidence the stock from whenco they are de
scended.
COLTS:
No. 1~?*T Filly, 4 years #ld, by Saratoga, dam,
Mergsn Mare Kate.
No. 2?Bay Colt, 3 yearn old,by Saratoga, Jr.. 'am,
Morgan Mare Kate.
No. 3-Bay Colt, 3 yearsold, by Saratoga, Jr., cam
by Rob Roy. (thorough bred.)
No. 4?Iron Gray Colt, 3 rears old, by Saratoga,
Jr.,dam, Kenticky Mare Fancy.
No. 6?Iron Gray Colt, 3 years old. by Saratoga,
Jr.. dam, Kentucky Mare F ash.
Saratoga, Jr., was sired by Saratoga, dam. Lncy
Long. lie Is uow the property of a private gentle
man of Philadelphia, and considered one of the
fastest road Horses, though untrained.
No. 6?Bay Colt 3 years old, by Saratoga, dam, Vir
ginia Mare Gipsey.
No. 7?Gray Filly, 3 years old, by Kossuth, dam.
Lady, by Grey L'agle.
No. 8?Bay Filly, 3 years old, by Kossuth, dam. by
Register.
No. 9? Iron Gray Colt 3 years old, by Morse Gray,
dam, Lucy Long
No. 10? Iron Grt^ Colt, 2 years oH, by Morgan,
Virginian Jam. sorrel Mare Milly.
No. 11?Iron Gray Colt,2 years old, by Baratoga,
dam by Register.
No. 12?Bay Colt. 2 years old, by Saratoga, dam by
Kentucky Mare Fane*
No. IS?Pay Coit, 2 years old, by Saratoga, dam,
Kentucky Mare Flash.
No. 14?Sorrel Filly, one year old.
No. 15? Bay Filly, one year o'd .
No. 16?Bay Filly, one year old, by Saratoga,dam,
the Barch Mare.
No. 17?Bay Colt,one year old, by Saratoga, dam,
"Virginia Gipsy.
No. 18? B?y C?lt, one year old, by Saratoga, dam,
the Bell Mare. . ,
No. 19?Bay Colt, one year old, by Saratoga, dam.
Fancy. ,
No. 20?Black Colt,4 months old,by 8aratoga,dam,
Sorrel Milly.
No. 21?Bay Colt, 4 months eld, by Saratoga, dam,
Virginia Gipsy. . ^ ,
No. 22?Sorrel Colt, 6 months old, by Columbus,
dam. Lucy Long.
No. 23?Borrel Colt. 6 months old, by Columbus,
dam, Morgan Mare Kate.
For the selection of pairs an opportunity is now
presented that is rarely to be met with. The ped
igree of the horse is guarantied, and the dams will
be exhibited. _
CATTLE.
After the above sale. I will offdr
k0- 1.?Durham lleifer, "The Pride,'' red and
white,3years old, weighing 1.?*' lbs.?sired
by the Goldgborough Bull, dam, Ell-n. Ellen
was a successful competitor at the Marylaa!
and other Agricultural Societies for five
years, in every contest carrying off th^ first
prize, including the hard premium, wh?D, as
one of my herd, tbe palm was awarded over
an iiupcrted herd direct from England.
No. 2.?Durham Heifer, ''Virginia1'?roan, 3 years
old. weighing 1.492 lbs., by the Gcldsborough
Bull, dam, Virginia
No. 3.?"Kate." 2 years old. by Hiawatha, import
ed by W ells Lath'op. Esq., of Massachusetts
weight, 1,060 lbs.
No. 4?"Tilly,*' 2 years old, by Hiawatha, dam,
Rosett.
No. 5?" Alida," 2 years old, by Hiawatha, dam,
Pett.
No. 6?" Bade, ' 22 months old. by Hiawatha, dam,
Virginia?weighs 1,090 lbs.
No. 7?" Addie," 23 months old, by Don Carlos,
dam. Susan.
No. 8?"Tulip/' between 8 and 12 months old,
by Don Carlos, dam. Blossom?weighs SOo
pounds. .. ,. .
No. 9?" Fanny, ' between 6 and 12 months old, by
Don Carlos,dam Rose?weighs 81" pounds.
No. 10?" Clara," 6 months old. by Don Carlos,
dam. Cherry. ,, v _
No. 11?" Ellen," 6 months old, by Don Carlos,
dam, Virginia. . _ _ ,
No. 12?" Annie," aged 5 months, by Don Carlos,
dam,Ellen. . , ... _ ? _ ,.
No. 13?"Ned Hall,'' red and white Bull Calf,
IS months old, by Don Carlos, dam. Sweet
No. l^"r8eymnnr." red Bull Calf, 8 months ?Id,
by Don Carlos, dam, Ellen the third
No. 15?" Calvert." red and white Bull Calf, 10
menths old, by Don Carlos, dam, Rosest.
The resords of the Maryland and other Agricul
tural Societies will attest the success that has
always attended this herd. For purity of blood
and judicious combination, both of milk and beef
qualities, no herd in the country presents superior
advantages. , . . ,.
Terms of sale: Cash In all cases before delivery.
Animals purchased and not settled for will ^e re
sold at the risk of the first purchaser. Mr. Judson
V. Richards'.n, as Auctioneer, is authorized tocol
lect all monies at thesaie, and, as my agent, his
receipt will be good.
*^*Sale to commence at 11 o clock.a m.
nov 19td CLEMENT HILL.
QUARTEF.MA8TER GENERAL'S OFFICE,
First Division. Washington Citt,
November 8, H&4.
Wfll be sold at public auction, t<? the highest
bidder, at the time a: >t places named b?low, viz :
YORK, PENNSYLVANIA. THURSDAY, Novem
ber 17, 18tM,
LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA, FRIDAY, No
vember 25. l.*54,
EASTON, PENNSYLVANIA C \RSDAY, De
cember 1,18&4,
Two hundred Cavalry Horses at each place.
Ihese Horses have been cotdemncd as uMfit for
the cavalry service of the army.
For road and farming purposes many good bar
ga ns may be bad.
Horses sold singly.
Fales to commence at 10? clock a. m.
Terms: Cash in United States currency
J A M bo A, JBK I rl,
Colonel in charge First Division Q, M. G, 0.
nov 10-td
OLOTHINQ.
GOING !?GOING!?GOING !
DOWN THEY GO,
AT LIS3 THAN GOLD PRICES
J. H. SMITH an* SMITH BROS.,
THE GREAT
CLOTHING HOUSES OF WASHINGTON,
No. 460 and 464
81VENTH STREET, QPPoaiTg Post OryiGB.
ALL GOODS SPONGED.
Wher* you can "^V^T STYLES
JRXNC?l'
ENGLISH,
ASD
AMERICAN _
WALKING COATS.
LATEST BTYLES
PEG TOP ^^^bREASTED VEST8,
BUSINESS BUIT8,
PLAIN AND FANCY CASS1MERE.
Together with the
LARGEBT STOCK
of
BOYS
OLOTHINQ
THE CITY.
N. B.-We alBo have
THE
largest
STOCK
of
PIECE G00DB
CUSTOM "WORK.
All of which we offer at
UNUSUAL LOW PRICES.
GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHING GOODS,
HATS, CAPS, SHIRTS, TIES, SUSPENDERS,
ic,? 4,6.
J. H. SMITH, No. 460,
And
SMITH BROS., No. 464,
Clothiers and Mehchant Tailors,
Seventh street, opp. Post Office,
oc 25-5m Washington.
NEW BOOT AND SHOE STORE!
rln CHAS. B. BAYLY Sc. CO.,
* VM 27* P?!?!?8TLVA5!A AVBNDB,
Bet. nth and 12th sts., near the Kirkwood House
Would respectfully inform their Friends and the
Public, that they will open
On MONDAY, October 17,1064,
A fine and new assortment of
LADIES, GENTLEMEN, MISSE8, BOYS, AND
CIIILDRIN'8 BOOTS AND SHOES,
made up in the Latest and most Fashionable style.
We will sell at reasonable prices, and hope, by
strict attention and integrity, to merit a fair share
of the Public patronage.
Particular attention has been paid to th? Ladies*
Department of tke business, and we can safely
boast of on? of the finest assortment ?f
LADIES' BOOTS AND SHOES
in the eity.
CHAS. B. BATLY A CO..
oc 14-tf No. 878 Penn. >T.t bet. 11th and Uth sts.
FOR SALE-A good BAGATELLE TABLE. In
quire at ft 7 4 7tl? ftreet. Island. nov!7 3t*
AMUSEMENTS.
CANTERBURY HALL.
MU8I0 J CANTERBURY HALL,I AND
HAL L10ANTERBUBY HALL.I THBATBB
L0C1SIA?A AV?*U1,
Mtar Comer tj Sixth street, Rear of National mnd
Metropolitan Hotels.
Gsemon hwA Proprietor
Josh Hart ?? Btage Manage?
Locis Seollobt Ballet Master
J*bm Abpdta?_ Musical Director
EVERYTHING NEW,
EVERYTHING NEW,
EVERYTHING NEW.
NEW COMPANY OF STARS,
NEW COMPANY OP STARS,
NEW COMPANY 0F STARS!
NSW STAGE EFFECTS.
NEW SCENERY.
AND A
NEW BURLESQUE,
First appearances the great Australian Rider,
MR. JAMES MELVILLE.
MR. JAMES MELVILLE.
MR. J AM KB MELVILLE,
MR. JAMES MELVILLE,
MR. JAMES MELVILLE,
AND HIS TALENTED FAMILY,
AND HIS TALENTED FAMILY.
AND HIS TALBNTED FAMILY,
AND HI* TALENTED FAMILY,
SAMUEL, FRANCIS AND GEORGE.
SAMI EL, FRANCIS AND GEORGE,
SAMUEL, FRANCIS AND GKOIlliE,
SAMUEL, FRaNCIS AND GEORGE.
The above-named artists hare h*en engaged by
Mr. Lea at the enormous outlay of
ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS PER NIGHT.
ONE HUNDRED DOLLAR* PER NIGHT.
ONI HUNDRED DOLLARS PER NIGHT)
THESE WONDERFUL GYMNASTIC PER
FORMERS h?v? won laurels in both hemispheres.
The name and fame of Melville, the wild rider of
Australia, are patent throughout the world, as also
that of his famous white mare. MAY FAIRY, who
has traveled round the world with him from Aug
tralia to America, Europe, the Indies, China and
Japan. To dilate on the surpassing merits ef
THE GREAT MELVILLE
and his talented sons would be enperSoua.
First appearance of the beautiful Dansense,
M'LLE DE8IREE,
M'LLE DB8IREE,
M'LLE DESIREE.
Also, first appearance of the celebrated Panto
mimist and Dancer,
late ef the
M. MATHIEU,
M. MATHIEU.
M. MATHIEU,
MARTINETTI TROUPE.
martinktti troupe!
MARTINETTI TROUPE
MARTINETTI TROUPE.
Reappear&nee of the Prince of Ethiopian Com
tdians,
JOHN MULLIGAN.
JOHN MI7LLIGAN,
JOHN MULLIGAN,
in new acts, assisted by
LEAVITT AND PIERCE,
LEAVITT AND LIERCE,
LEAVITT AND PIERCE)
The three. Mulligan, Leavitt and Pierce, form
the greatest trio of
ETHIOPIAN COMEDIANS IN THE WORLD
ETHIOPIAM COMEDIANS IN THE WORLD.'
First nifc'bt of the Equestrian Burlesque of
MA7.EPPA ;
MAZEPPA;
MAZEPPA;
MAZEPPA;
MAZEPPA;
OR
THE WILD nORSE OF SWAM POODLE
THE WILD HOESE OF HWAMPOODLE.
THE WILD HORSE OF 8WAMPOODLE.
JOHN MULLIGAN A8 MAZ1PPA.
In which he will perform his daring feats of
Horsemanship. Mr. Mulligan will not ride the
celebrated
FLORA TEMPLE,
FLORA TEMPLE.
buttheborse Flipmngilder,made express?? for him.
THE NEW SCENERY
THE NEW 8CKNERY
THE NEW BOENERY
THE NEW SCENERY
has been got up regardless of coat.
READ THE CAST OF CHARACTERS.
LIBERTY POLES AND POLE CATS:
Castilian of Lourenski.a Long Pole. .Andy Leavitt
Count Premiscus, a Slippery Pole ..Johnny Pierce
Olinska.a Liberty Pole Miss Laura Le Clare
Other Poles and I'ole Cats by an augmented corps
of actors.
CREAM OF TARTARS:
Vance Mazeppa i
Fisher I
Seven Ma*eppas< Kaymond " > John Mulligan
I Memen " |
1 Oceana " J
Abder Chan, King of Tartars Dick Collins
Thamer, a Sweet Tartar . Josh Hart
Radac. a Sour Tartar Ella Wesner
Zembaja Tartar Emetic.?......... John Redden
Rofccar, a Tartaric Tartar Pete Williams
E'ders, Shepherds, kc.
SATURDAY AFTERNOON,
8ATUBDAY AFTERNOON,
LADIBB' MATINEE.
LADIES' MATINEE.
A CARD FROM MELVILLE. THE AUSTRALIAN
RIDER AND u YMN A&T.
My attention having been called to the fact that
a person Is, or ha* been performing in Philadelphia
with a juvenile gymntstic troupe which he styles
"Ihe Australian Family," I t*ke his meanB of
protecting my own interests and of informing the
public that my family is the only Australian ana
that has ever nppeared in the United State*, as I
am also the on'y Australian equestrian. Justice
alike te the public and myself demands this intru
sion on their notice JA8. MELVILLE
UirroTH*atroh, New York, N?y. 11, ladl.
Mr. James Melville is now engaged at the
CANTERBCRY,
Washington.
PRICES OF ADMI8SION.
Parquette, Balcony, and Gallery u cents
Orchestra chairs. . - - so sects
Reserved Orchestra seats _ 75 CeBta
Lower Private Boxes, holding six persons S6 00
Upper Balcony ????? $5 0
Single seats in Balcony Bex.?
Private Boxes and Reserved Beats can be seen red
from 10 in the merniag till S p. m.
A GRAND CHRIBTMAS PANTOMIME
Is inactive preparation, which will be produced
with gie t splendor during the Holifdaya.
AMUSEMENTS.
FORD'S NEW THEATER.
Tenth ttrett, above Pennsylvania avenue.
Last Light of
mr. j. i. Mcdonough isd miss lotta,
who will appear this
SATURDAY EVENING. Nov. 16,1864,
In a
GRAND DOUBLK ENTERTAINMENT,
consisting of the tirst two acts of the
8IVKN SISTERS,
and JehB Brougham's great Burlesque of
PO CA HON TA8.
?I E McDonough. .as Mrs, Plato and Powhatan.
Miss Lotta as Tartarine and Pocahontas.
With new Songs, Dances, and Banjo Solos.
MONDAY?First night of the engagementof
MRS. H. WATKINS.
(LATE MKS O HOWARD,)
and MR H. WATKINS.
* ho will arpear in the great Irish Drama of
KATHLEEN MAVOURNEEN.
GIIOYKK'S THEATER.
Pennsylvania Avenue, sear Willard's Hotel,
LAST NIUH'F POSITIVELY
of the eminent American Actor, MR. J. W. WAL
LACK, who will on this occasion appear in bis
great character of JOHN MII.DMAY, in the beau
tiful heart touching play of
STILL WATERS RDN DEEP.
The Manager takes pleasure in announcing th%t
MlfS 8C8AN DEN IN will this evening appear as
Mrs. SUrnhold . in this beautiful play, and a* Sal
ly Scrapes in SKETCHES IN INDIA.
BATUKDAY EVEN I NG, November 2j,
la?t time of STILL WATERS RUN DEEP.
The Performance will conclude with
SKETCHES IN INDIA.
GROVER'S NEW THEATER.
Pennsylvania avenue, near Willards'Hotel.
GROVER'S GRAND GERMAN OPERA
will commence
A SHORT SEASON,
limited to
FOUR NIGHTS,
by existing engagements, at
GROVER'S THEATER,
on
MONDAY, DECEMBER
The entire
GRAND COMPANY,
GRAND CHORDS,
AND
GRAND ORCHESTRA
will assist, precisely as from the
ACADEMIES OF MUSIC,
NEW YORK,
BOSTON.
AMD
PHILADELPHIA.
Full pareiculars advertised in papers of Sunday
and Monday. nor 26
SANDERSON'S MINSTKELS.
Corner D and Ninth Streets.
BRILLIANT SUCCESS.
TWO NIGHTS MORE.
ENTIRE CHANGE OF PROGRAMME.
NOVELTY OUR MOTTO.
First night of the HAUNTED HOTEL. New
Songs and Dances te night.
Admission, 3U Cents. Colored Gallery, 30 Cents,
Doors open at 7, commence at ft.
Remember, corner D and 9th street*, nov 25 2t"
THE OXFORD HALL OF MUSIC AND
FINACOTHECA,
Ninth street, fronting on Pennsylvania avenue
GRAND INAUGURATION WEEK.
OPEN EVERY KVENING.
THE MOST C08TLY UTTBD OI? >1USIO HALL
IN THE CITY.
CAPABLE OF SEATING 3.000 PERSONS.
THE GREAT STANDARD PLACE OF AMUSE
MENT.
Advance is our motto.
Our banner's unfurled;
For pluck and enterprise
The tirst in the world.
The pride of the citv.
This great Music Hall,
The foremost anl proudest,
The grandest of all.
READ THE MONSTER MUSTER ROLL.
Mme. Marzetti, Premier Danseuse, late of the
Bavel Troupe and Niblo's Garden.
Mons Antonio, and his great Pallet Troupe,
(Twelve Beautiful Young Ladies.)
Johannes Senia, the extraordinary performer on
the Wood and IStraw Piano.
Robert Butler, Pantomimist.
The Australian Brothers, Gymnast*.
George Derlous and J. C. Franklin, Gymnasts.
Signer Harrington, Contortionist.
M'lle Estelle Forrest, Vocalist.
Miss Julia Christine, Popular Danseuse.
William Chambers, Ethiopian Comedian.
Miss Amelia Wells, Vocahstand Actress.
Mr. Hughey Dougherty, the Great Stump Orator.
Miss R?sa Voiante. Serio-Comic Vocalist.
J. Clarke Wells and Son, Happy Contrabands.
Miss Kate Harrison, Popular Danseuse.
MiBS Maggie Henry, from the Bowery, N. Y,
Bliss Lingard, " "
Miss Ida Devere. Popular Danseuse.
Miss Frances Gardner, Popular Danseuse.
And Twenty Eight other Performers, whose
united efforts combined will constitute the
Urtal ChalUnte Evenings EntfTtaxnmtnt,
FOX, CURRAN A NORRIS,
Proprietors and Managers.
VT XXTRA NOTICE-THURSDAY AFTER
NOON (Thanksgiving Day) there will be a grand
Afternoon Performance. "Ladies," bear this iu
mind. nov 21 6t
WASHINGTON THEATER.
llto st., a few doors south of Penn'a avenue.
EXTRAORDINARY NOVELTY.
BAUM'S GREAT DIORAMA OFTHE PRESENT
WAR,
WILL OPEN TO-NIGHT,
and continue for a few nights only.
The great success that ha* attended this Diorama
and the large and appreciative audiences that have
witnessed it, is a gratifying assurance that it is the
GREATEST EXHIBITION
of the kind ever before the public.
The MechanicaleOecta, the movement of troops
the blowing up of steamers, the prancing of
horses. Ac., work and move as things of life.
Admission.25 cents. Orchestra Chairs 50 cents
Doors open at 7 o'clock; Diorama moves at 8 o'elk
precisely. no 19-lw*
URADY S GYMNASIUM,
D 93, S4, amo Ptt LOUISIANA AVENUE,
NEAR NINTH 8TREET,
NOW OPEN,
The most complete Gymnasium in the country for
Physical Exercises and Amusements. Hot and Cold
Baths, Reading find Chess Rooms, Lookers. Ac.,
for the free use of the members Regular classes
for Gentlemen and Boys. Special arrangements
made with Schools or Colleges. Circulars can be
had at the gymnasium.
nov 14 Ut? ABNER 8. BRADT.
S EATON HALL,
CORNER OF NINTH AND D 8TS.
This largo and handsome HALL is now for rent
for BALLS, CONCERTS, Ac. It is finely frescoed
and finished in the most substantial manner, with
large and convenient dressing rooms and gallery
at the south end for spectators.
The Hall is the best ventilated room in tho city,
with twenty windows on tho south and east and
west side, with a large ventilator in the center of
the Hall, It is admirably adapted for Concerts,
being built with special attention to that object;
and for Balls the greatest care has been taken to
have the best floor that could be procured,
?VTbe Hall w:ll be rented for Balls, Concerts,
Minstrels, Fairs. A c.
Inquire of 0. 8HECKLES, on D street, 3d door
from the HaM. nov in 3in
BOOTS AND SHOES.
OLD PRICKS AGAIN ! fWl
BOOTS AND SHOES AT REDUCED RATBB.
Having a large stock of all the various hinds of
Boots nnd Shoes on hand, and wishing to reduce
the same. we have therefore reduced the prices,
and are now selling Ladies Heeled Congress Gai
ters at ft .#?, worth Si 60; Ladies Sewed Morocco
Men's Heavy Walking Boots, $3.25, w?rth $>i;
Men's Shoes, High-cut Balmorals. $2, worth $3.SO;
and all kiuds of other Goods, at prices to corres
fsUNKS. VALISES AND CARPET BAGS, AT
. , COST.
Butlers and dealers supplied with Calf and Grain
CAVALRY BOOTS,
at New \ork prices, at
HKLLKR A CO S, 492 7th street,
nov 17-6t* 4 doors abeve Odd Fellows' Hall.
LILLIK S SAFES, the coleb atod CHILLED
AND WROUGHT IRON FIRE AND BUR
OLAB PROOFS, with COMBINATION LOCKS.
Also, BANK LOCKS, VAULT DOORS AND
FRAMES.
General Bouthern ageniy #T west Lombard at.,
Baltimore, Md.
?ov8-3m A. PR0SED9, General Agent.
SHERMAN.
THE PA.1IC I* GEORGIA.
The Rebel Paper* Admit that Shcrmau
?'."?lay Do Much D?m?s?"-Thf Georgia
legislature Adjourns **with Some Degree
of Precipitation'' ? Governor Brawn's
House Burued ?The Krb. Don't Know
Ktactly W hether Kherman i* going ta
"* Sarannah, or Maron, or Augusta
his ?-Objectire Pol nt"-They W i?h they
did Know?They t7rge Ench Other to
Ji','r,n and be Patriotic and not
Skedaddle.
We take the following from late Southern
papers:
The Savannah News of Nov. 21 says :
W eare still without reliable information of
tne precise movements of Sherman's army
I he reports which we publish from various
sources leave no room to doubt that the inva
ding army is advancing through tbe centre of
the State, with & view tp reach tfce coast, but
us yet we have no certalb information of the
route which he will lake. Our latest and most
reliable advices are that the enemy was in force
In the vicinity of Monroe and Jones counties
and that a considerable body had crossed the
Ocmulgee river, at Planters' Factory, 7 mil*-s
west ol Indian Spring, taking a direction which
would indicate his purpose to take Augusta in
his route to the seaboard.
The enemy may, and no donbt will, inflict
much damage; but if the people ol eur noble
State nerve themselves as one man to the im
portance ot the emergency, and, forgetting self,
direct their incessant, united efforts against
the foe, as advised by General Beauregard
and our patriotic representatives in Congress
the great Yankee army of Tennessee, and
their brutal and insolent leader, will be anni
hilated.
Movements of the Enemy.
jFrom the Savannah Republican, Nov. 21 J
The telegraph brings ns no information ol the
whereabouts and intentions of the enemy, who
are said to have left Atlanta in force some days
ago, and reports brought by passengers and
private letters are so vague and contradictory
that there is no such thing as founding an in
telligent opinion upon them.
Passengers who arrived from Macon and the
points on the line of the road this morning,
say the enemy's cavalry force encamped last
night within seven miles of Griswoldville, the
llrst station south of Macon, and that the main
body of Sherman's army was at a point some
twenty-three miles distant from Milledgeville
It is also reported that the latter place was
being evacuated by the citizens. The Legisla
ture adjourned Friday night, and the members
lelt with some degree of precipi'ation. Some of
them arrived here last night and some this
morning.
How true these reports from the enemy may
be, we have no means of knowing, and we
candidly state to our readers that we place
but little faith in any of them. This much, at
least, is reliable: The enemy, with all arms,
but in numbers not ascertained, but perhaps
from twenty to thirtv thousand, have set
out on their grand tour through Georgia to the
seabord. The best military authority is of the
opinion that the move in the direction of Ma
con is a feint to cover a march of their main
body on Augusta, the real object of their des
tination. Milledgeville will probably be
visited by the right wing of their array, and.
If unsuccessfully defended, the capitol of our
State laid in ashes.
It does not become ns to speak of our pre
parations for this formidable invasion. Suf
fice it to say. that if the people of Georgia will
only co-operate with the army It will be met
and successfully resisted. Wehave only to
be true to ourselves now to save the State
and utterly destroy tne invaders.
And what are our Carolina lriends doing in
this great emergency 1 Certainly they will
not be lookers on when their liberty, as well as
onrs, ia at stake. Will they not pour forth
across the Savannah by tens of thousands, and
aiming with their brethren of Georgia, give a
finish blow to this ruthless attempt to reduce
ns to slavery ? -Now's the day, and now's the
hour! Let Carolina editors and statesmen
quit their wrangles over constitutional ab
stractions, and use their logic and eloquence
to summon their countrymen to arms.
From Macon and the Georgia Front
[From Savannah News, Nov. 19.1
The i ankee news which we publish to-day
in connection with information otherwise ob
tained, seems to be conclusive that Sherman is
making a bold movement on Macon, with a
large army, having lelt Thomas in Tennessee
to check any movements which Hood may
make on Sherman's rear. What progress he is
making with his movement we know not at
this hour.
Wehave authentic information that the en
emy has appeared before Macon: and that an
other raiding party has come down-probably
from Covington?on the track of the Stoueman
raid, and had reached the little town of Wal
Tvifn l?n Jo.nes co^n^,y' a few m,les north of the
Milledgeville and Gordon railroad, last night
or Parly this morning. It is reported that this
party has burned Monticello. the county seat
of Jasper county, and the little town of Hills
boro', in the south of that conntv. No doubt
they ars aiming to strike the railroad at Gor
don, and thus stop the passage of the cars over
either the Central or the Milledgeville roads
and perhaps proceed on to Camp Lawton to
release tbe Federal prisoners, or do general
damage in that direction.
We have also reports, apparently authentic,
that the enemy yesterday made an attack upon
rorsytn, in Monroe county, on the Macon and
Western railroad, and were signally repulsed.
We learn that a good deal of excitement exists
in Macon, and that a number of women and
children are leaving.
It is evident, from the appearance of the en
emy at all these points, that it is only a cav
alry raid, aiming to strike and destroy all the
railroad communications to Macon before the
main army approaches, and perhaps to ven
ture farther in the direction of this city or Au
gusta, and do as much mischief as possible.
It is believed that the lorce at Macon and Mil
ledgeville Is ample to protect those places for
the present. Whether the main army of Sher
man will ever get that far down is a matter
which we cannot venture an opinion npon
P. S.?Since writing the foregoing, we have
received a private despatch from Macon, show
ing that up to this writing (half-past 1 p. m.)
the enemy had not struck the road. The des
patch states tnat no trains would leave Macon
to-day for this place.
P. S.,:) p m.?The telegraph is still work
ing to Macon, frem which we conclude the
enemy ha\e not struck the Central road at any
point.
Address of B. H. Hill to the People of Gear.
gia.
Riohmonp, Nov. 16.? To the People of Georgia ?
You have now the best opportunity ever pre!
sented to destroy the enemy. Put everything
at the disposal of our generals. Remove all
provisions from the path of the enemy, and put
all obstacles in his path. Every citizen with
his gun, and every negro with his spade and
axe, can do the work. Good soldier, you can
destroy the enemy by retarding his march.
Georgians, be Arm. Act promptly and fear
DOt . H Hill.
I most cordially approve the above.
Jamcs A. Sbddon, Sec. of War.
Reliable News from up the River.
[!? rom the Augusta Sentinel of the lttih.J
A gentleman who arrived on Thursday eve
ning from Stone Mountain reports that the
lankee column moving down the Georgia
Railroad divided at Decatur, one-half going
down the Covington road and the other the
Rockbridge road. At Stone Mountain they
burned all the unoccupied houses, comprising
some two-thirds of the town, and were laying
waste the country as they progressed. They
march in hollow squares, their trains in the
center. They united at Baker's Mill, near |
Covington, and It was nut known whether they
would strike for Eaton ton or iithens. i
This gentleman says that the view from the
summit of Stone Mountain of the conflagration
of Atlanta was awful beyond description. The
Gate City was "an ocean of flame," as the fiery
waves rose and fell throughout its whole ex
tent.
P.-issengers on the Georgia Railroad last
night reported that about one hundred Federal
cavalry made their appearance at Social Cir
cle on Thursday and burned the railroad plat
form. It is not believed that they have come
down any farther than the Circle.
Their iniantry encamped at or near Old
Shefflelds on Wednesday night. It is also re
Sorted that they have burned Monticello and
lillsboro', which, if true, indicates clearlv
that thev design tapping the Central Railroad
at Gordon or some other point.
The passenger train on the Georgia road ves.
terday, only came from Union Point.
Macon.
The Macon Telegraph of Friday states that
that city on that day was considerably excited,
owing to various reports of the enemy, who are
known to be positively marching on the city.
U6nir&l Co do has iA&oed id order oillini out
every man capable of bsarinc arms. and all
who do not respond be baa ordered to be arrest
ed The Telegraph farther says:
There Is no doubt that the military authori
ties will do everything in their power to star
the ad vane;'of the enemy, and we trust they
will receive the cordial support of the entire
community. For obvious reason* wa refrain
irom giving any information concerning the
movements or namhar of onr farce*.
Frsn the Oesrgfa Frsat.
The Macon T? !egraph speaks thus of matter*
at the front:
We have reltabia information to tfet effect
that the Yankees ara advancing from Atlanta
in this direction, in two columns, on* on the
McDonough road and th? other by Joneeboro'.
Oar forces are at Griffin. More than this wa
deem it imprudent at present to atate.
A gentleman who latt Forsyth Thoraday at
three o'clock, informs us that a courier arrived
at that place about half an bour before ha left,
and reported that there was some Yankee cav
alry eight miles north of the town. All the
bridges on the road from Forsyth to Indian
Springs were burned by our forces.
The Intelligencer publishes the annexed
new e about affairs:
lat*#tratable intelligence from the front
l_v have received from a gentleman
who left Qrtmn Wednesday night at 10 o'clock.
General Wheeler fought the enemy, who waa
advancing with a force estimated at from twen
ty-five to thirty thousand, in two columns,
one on the McDouough and the other on the
Jonesboro' road at Bear Creek, ten miles aoov*
Griffin, until late In theeventng, when he fell
back to Griffin, and was passing through that
city on Its right when our informant lett.
Our infantry forces were failing back io Barnes -
ville.
It is probable, at the time we write, that
Sherman occupies Griffin and will rapidly
demonstrate upon Macon, and perhaps Mil
le Cgeville.
It .e reported that Sherman has applied the
torch to a large portion of Atlanta, and has
burned Jonesboro', also McDonough. It is
also reported that he has destroyed the rail
road lrom Atlanta to the Cbattaliooi hie, and
burned the bridge at the river on that road.
We learn from a reliable source that Gov
ernor Brown's residence in Canton, Cherokee
county, unbracing his commodious dwelling
bouse, kitchen, out-house*. , together with
his oflice ^nlldicg, were all burntto the ground
by the vandal fos a few days ago. The officer
in command ot the vandals who were sent to
Hi cute the work they so ruthlessly arid suc
cessfully performed, allowed the family, who
were living on the premises at the time, only
fifteen minutes to remove their furniture from
the boui-e, and all that was not removed within
that time was devoured by the flamea. The
same party burnt the courthouse, jail, acad
em}-, both the hotel*, and about two-thirds of
the"best dwelling aud business houses in (Jan
ton. A force of some three or four thcusand of
the vandals were within a mile or two of the
town, while some seventy of the band were
Eent into the town under an officer, with orders
to burn the house of Governor Brown, the
public buildiugs, and the housea of all who
have been prominent Southern men.
An Interesting and Instructive Railroad
Speech.
The address of John W. Garrett, Esq , at
Baltimore, on Monday last, when he waa unan
imously re-elected president of the Baltimore
and Ohio railroad, abounds with interesting
and instructive information. Mr. Garrett has
held that office for the last six years, aud it
might well be regarded as a high compliment
(to executive ability, skill, integrity and suc
cess) by any man, that, alter such a period of
protracted and extraordinary peril and diffi
culty as this struggle with a gigantic rebellion
has caused, the onerous duties and responsi
bilities of the presidency ot this great road
should have been so discharged as to elicit this
signal mark of approval. Mr Garrett's review
shows that the various roads under his man
agement traverse hundred ami fourteen miles
of territory, mainly upon the border, and con
stantly subject to the vicissitudes and embar
rassments connected with great military ope
rations. The Central Ohio Is now fixed as a
line identified with tbe Baltimore and Ohio,
connecting Baltimore with Columbus, Ohio, a
point whence connections radiate in all direc
tions, to the lakes, to the west, and to the south
west
In tbe midst ot the destruction of its equip
ment and property. and the loss of train after
train of passenger cars, the company has
steadily maintained its strength, and toe im
mense increase of passenger business has been
conducted with a smaller proportion of acci
dents than has occurred on any road in the
country.
In this connection Mr. Garrett says.
The leading and most important interest, re
quiring the greatest energy and effort on tbe
part of the company, in view of the pp^uliar
condition of the country, has been the perfec
tion and completion of tbe road betwixt Bal
timore and Washington. At the commence
ment of tbe war tbe main traek of the Wash
ington Branch Boad was in au?h condition
only as suited the relatively light business of
that period. The track was sot of sufficient
strength for the heavy traffic which the changed
condition of the country threw npon It, neither
was its iron sufficiently heavy, nor its organ
ization and arrangements such as met the re
quirements of the crisis. Under these elrcuin
stances, and amid creat difficulties under the
adopted policy of the Board, the officers of the
company first devoted their energies to the re
construction of the main track for the Wash
ington Branch Road, and that light and infe
rior track was converted, during the contin
uance of a heavy business, into a first-class*
excellent track, placed upon heavy cross-ties
and relaid with new Iron.
I have tbe pleasure of stating that, within
ten days from this period, the additional second
tr ack will be compu ted, and by the fifth day of
the opening of Congress on the 5th of Decem
ber next, the entire lin* will be perfected and in
ute between Baltimore, and Washington.
It will be perfected, too, as a strictly first
elase double-track road?a road to which there
will be none superior in the country?a double
track, iron bridges of the most costly and per
manent character, placed upon the most solid
masonry, have been constructed over Paint
Branch, and over tbe Savage, Patnxent and
Potomac rivers. All other requisite and de
sirable improvements have been made of the
most superior character.
At a period when accidents are common
throughout the country, in many cises in con
sequence of the condition of the railroad, the
Baltimore and Ohio Company, in the midst of
all its difficulties, presents to the public prac
tically a ww double track road for tbe business
of the country. It presents this road, too, un
der circumstances of the mo6t extraordinary
difficulty At four different periods the Com
pany had placed upon that track the cross-ties,
which bad been transported 400 miles from the
western divisions of the road, and the iron and
other material necessary for its construction,
but in consequence of the destruction of nu
merous sections upon its mainline by the rebel
armies, this material became essential for the
repair and reconstruction of the road west ot
Harper's Ferry, and was removed for thac
object Under these circumstances, our people
will appreciate the energy and determination
that has enabled the Company to accomplish
the construction of this necessary improve
ment.
In that connection the Board has determined
upon the construction and completion of a
double track betwixt Baltimore and Cumber
land, and when the double track upon the
Washington Braneh is finished tbe large force
of laborers now employed thereon will be
placed at tbe dispotal of the Company, and
even in this difficult period the double track
on the Main Stem will be prosecuted with vigor
so that the policy determined on by tLe Board
shall be carried Into the earliest practicable ef
lert.
The surveys of the road, in which the Board
decided to take an Interest, to connect the Main
Stem ot tbe Baltimore and Ohio Road with
Hagerstown, have progressed satisfactorily.
The engineers report that an admirable line of
about 23 miles is being located via Antietam
Creek to Hagerstown, and It will doubtless be
the policy of this Company, if there should
prove to be some failure in regard to private
subscription, that the people of Washington
county and the people of Baltimore shall,
within a reasonable period, have the advan
tages ot that line.
A Child Killed by a Ram ?A horrible
accident occured on Columbia bridge, in this
countvon Tuesday last. Herman Schmeidien
and wife were digging potatoes in a field near
their house,and had left a child athomeasleep.
Two other children, one live years old, and
the other, Maria, a bright little girl, aged:)
years, weie sent to the house to watch the
child. On their way they met a viclooa ram,
which attacked Maria, and though tied bead
and foot literally crushed in her ribs ana
killed her upon tbe spot. The other child gave
the alarm at once, but when the father reached
tbe scene of the horrible event, it waa too late
to do more than knock the brains out of the
vile brute.?Lansing (Iowa) Journal.
Statk 8t7I?ki?nt?wi>wt or.^PFSAnlo1t7~
Governor Bradford haa appointed the Rev. L..
Van Bohkelin, State Suj^jrtntendent of F ublic
Instruction, under the new constitution. Mr.
Van BeklteHn has for a number of years con
ducted St Timothy Hall boarding school, at
tlatonsville, wi'h distinguished success, and
has also been School Cemmiasioner ot the 1st
district for some time.
IJnder the new constitution the Governor,
lieutenant Governor, Speaker ot the Houae of
i/elegates and the State Superintendent ahall
compose a State Board of Education.? Balti
more County Advocate.
Somebody advertlaes in the Richmond
Dispatch?under tbe bead of ??Lest"?"a pair
of aboee, somewhat worn, belonging to a ser
vant girl."

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