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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, November 28, 1864, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1864-11-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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V2i. XXIV.
WASHINGTON. D. C . MONDAY. NOVEMBER 28. 1864.
N2. 3.665
TRAVELERS' DIBEGTOBY.
(IFFICE BALTIMORE t OHIO RB7cO~
' Washi?uto.i, November 12tk 19?4.
Ia?4 bu Ps
On and after Sunday, November 13.18K4. Passen
?? Trains between Washington and Baltimore
will De run an follows
TRAINS MOVING NORTII _
No t ? BA I.TIMOR*, WAY STATION k HAR.
RISBURG TRAIN?Leave W?shmgton 6 3? a. m.
Arrive at Baltimore S >10 A. M.
No.J-NKW YORK & WESTERN BXPRE38?
Leave Washington 7 30 a. m.. connecting at Relay
with Mail Train leaving Baltimore at 9:00 a. M.
for the Went. Arrive at Baltimore 9:10 A U ?
Philadelphia. 1 36 p. New York 6:30 P. m.
No.3-NEW YORK MAIL TRAIN?Leave Wash
mgton 11:13 a.m. Arrive at Baltimore at 1
p m ' 3:37 t. ii.. New York 10:00
No. 4?BALTIMORE TRAIN?T oave Washing
ton 3.00 p. m. Arrive at Bsltimore 4:50 p"
N*W 'VoRKLV'OMSHT1'?},\'SD*LpH1A AND
f?o?".oTA??,r.t 5sf&.iirs
VRE8"~TRaTnN? ALBAwY * NEW YORK IX
A?r>veat New\Crk?S-Oo7" jSta?dpl3;
fnTtbrIinh?"l??in c0"w"ith all the early morn*
ind Woit ^*7 y?rk for th* *Mt< North
Jo1d?rth??^in ,h'* ?r B?ltimor? ticket*
T?v*?7w.?hLTIS'0.JlB* nARRT8BURO TRAIN
a I|jto11 7 00 p *? ?n<1 arrive at Balti
more p. m.
.TGRK- PHILADELPHIA AND
WESTERN TRAIN?Leave Washington at 8:.'JO
p. *.;etrppiog at Re av House f?r Western passen
?rers to 'sk.- Express Train fi>r Grafton, Wheeling
Parkersburg, and *11 points in th^ West
FOR ANNAPOLIS the connections will be made
withtbe *5 30 a. m andthf I 30 p.m. frsm Wash
ington. No train to or from Annapolis on 8&n~
C-&T.
SUNDAY TRAINS.
TEE ONLY TRAINS FI10M WA8SINGT0N
for passengers on Sunday are the 7 SO a. m and
3 p m. for Italtimore. and *10 p. m. fnr Balti
mere an.l Philadelphia, and the 6 p. m. for New
Yerl oni.y.
SLEEPING CARS direct to New York on 6 p m.
and ** 30 p. m. train daily, except oil Sunday. On
Sunday the Sleeping Cars on the - 3a p. m. train
run to Philadelphia only.
?V Pa?s?nsers leaving Washington s"t 7:30 a.
and ?> and "?.30 p. m., go through to New York
without changing cars.
For farther information. tickets of every kind,
A c.. apply to GEO. 8. KOONTZ, Agent at Wash
ington. or at the Ticker Office.
W P. SMITH Master of Transportation.
L. M. COLE. General Ticket Agent. nov 14
? ' SCAT PENNSYLVANIA R0UT1
VI TO THS
NORTHWEST AND SOUTHWEST.
ON AND AFTER November 13th trains will
leave Baltimore from North Calvert Station as
felloes r
Fast Mail at 9 2rt A. M.
Harristurg Accommodation ?S.m?P, M.
Lightning Express?? .9.30 P. M,
PEE #;.30 A M TRAIN~FROM WASHINGTON
connects with tbe 9 2 1 a. m. train from Baltimore
for Pittsburg and the West, and for Elmira. Buf
falo, Rochester, Dunkirk, Canan iaigua, and Ni
agara Jails, and for New York citv.
THE 7 .t!0 P. M TRAIN FROM WASHINGTON
connects with the 9 30 p.m. train from Balti
more for Elmira and the North and Pittsburg
and tbe West.
SLEEPING CARS ON NIGHT TRAIN8.
80I.DKRP Tickrts at Governmkht Ratks.
ONE THROUGH TRAIN ON SUNDAY.
LOW PARE AND QUICK TIME.
t?T For tickets an<* any information apply at the
Office of the Great Pennsylvania Rxute, corner
Pa. avenue and 6th street, under National Hotel;
and Depot House, No. 463 C st.. near New Jersey
avenue, Washington. J N.BUBARRY,
Superintendent N. C. R. R.
E J. WILKIN8,
Pass and Ticket Agent, corner 6th st.
3* 9-tf and Penn. avenue.
J)HILADELPH1A STEAMERS.
> naT ??1JreiR ^ine, semi-weekly, between PHIL
ADELPH IA and ALEXANDRIA
WASH^GTON and GEORGE-'
n Pi i
H Stout" MaT8ower- Bhiladelpkia and George
wiling days WEDNESDAYS and SAT
URDAYS, from No. 14 North Wharves, Phlladel
*hi^n2 Ii?- 59 Water street, between Congress
and High, Georgetown.
For freight apply to
dPBN B- DAVIDSON,
No. 39 Water street, Georgetown.
Agent in Philadelphia. WM. P. CLYDE. 14
North Wharves.
Agents in Alexandria, FLOWERS <fc BOWBN,
No. 1 King st. nov8-tf
TYLERS COMPOUND SYRUP OF QUM
ARABIC.
Well known as the
Most Pleasant. Safe, and Speedy Cure for
COUGHS, COLDS,
HOARSENESS. CROUP, WHOOPING COUGH
AND ALL
AFFECTIONS OF THE THROAT AND LUNQS.
Its superior efficacy in arresting stubborn coughs
and tbe flm stages of consumption, has long been
appreciated by most families and physicians, and
its success in giving immediate relief from a re
cent cough or cold, unprecedented.
For sale at the Drug Stores.
Price 26 and 50 cents a bottle.
For convenience and portability the same com
bination may be ha4 in a mild lozenge form, well
adapted to relieve public speaker*, singers, and
ekildren, and known as
"TYLER 8 GUM ARABIC COUGH LOZENGES.'
nov l-eo3m*
j^ORSE
S! HORgEB! HORSES!
QUARTgaMAiTKa GISKRAL'8 OfPIO*, /
FIB8T DlVIBIOS, WA8HIHOTOH. Nov. 10, 18<j4.t
HORSES, suitable for Cavalry and Artillery ser
vice, will oe porchssed atGiesboro Depot, in open
market, till DECEMBER 1. 1*4.
Horses will be delivered to Captain L. Lowry
Moore, A. Q M., and be subjected to the nsoal
Government inspection before being accepted.
Price ofCavalry Horses $ 176 each.
Price of Artillery Horses 818") each.
Payment will be made for six (6) and more.
JAMES A. EKIN,
Colonel in charge First Division,
nol2-16t Ijuartermaster General't Office.
rpREASURY DEPARTMENT.
1 Orrioc or Comptroller vt thi Cuirhov
Washington, October 4,18t>4.
Whereaa by aatisfactory evidence presented to
the nnderaigned, it haa been made to appear that
Tht national bank of tke Metropolis, in the City of
Was\ingi"n. in the county of Washington and Dis
trtct of Columbia, has been duly organised under
and according to the requirements of the act of
Congress entitled "An act to provide a National
Currency, secured by a pledge of United States
bonds, and provide for the circulation and re
demption thereof," approved Jane 3. 1864, and haa
oomplied with all the provisions of aaid act re
wnired to be complied with before commencing
the business of banking nnder aaid act:
Now,therefore, I, Hugh MeCalleck,Comptroller
of the Currency, do hereby certify that Th* Na
tumai Bank of the Metropolis, in the City of WojA
twase*. in the ceanty of IFafAt?((oN and District of
Columbia, ia authorised to commence the business
of Banking nnder the act aforesaid.
la testimony whereof, witners my hand and seal
of offlee tkis/ovriAday of October, ISM.
Il.8.1 HUGH MoCULLOCK,
ogfl-aflf't Comptroller of the Currency.
IMPORTANT TO FEMALES-DR. CHEESE
MAN'S PILLS?The combination ef ingre
dients in these Pills is tbe result of a long and
extensive practice. They are mild in their opera
tion, and certain in correcting all irregularities,
painful menstruation*, removing all ob-trnctions,
whether from celd er other causes, headaehe, pain
in the aide, palpitation of the heart, whites, aU
nervous afTe:tions, hysterics, fatigue, pain in the
back and limbs, Ac., disturbed sleep, whieh'arise
from interruption of nature. Dr. Cheeseman'a
Pills Waa the commencement of anew era in the
treatment of these irregularities and obstructions,
which have consigned so many to a premature
wrave. No female can en)oy good health unless
ahe is regular, and whenever an obstruction takes
?lace the general health begins to decline. Dr.
Cheeseman 's Pills are the most effectual remedy
ever known for all complaints peeuliar to females.
To all classes they are invaluable, inducing, with
certainty, periodical regularity. They are known
to thouaanda who have used them at different pe
riods throughout the country, having the sanction
of some ef tne moat eminent yhyaiciana in Ameri
ca. Explicit directions, atating when they ahould
not be used, with each box; tbe priee, one dollar
rer box, containing frem 60 to 60 pills. Pills sent
y mail promptly, by remitting to tbe proprietors
8oU by Drug gists generally.
HUTCHINGSA HILLYER, Proprietors,
nov 2-Dl6tW9t *1 Cedar street. New York.
ENURE* I T
? A Ruti ? ? B ^
TE? BEST IN TB
The
M
Manur. ac^Cb '^'nt
8^1ins at lowT^1'
VEisoJfLB WANTED.
AddreM No. 330 E street, Washington. ?,
eiESBORO POINT MANURE WHAKfT t0
aa W-tf JOHN PETTIBOEE *0Q.
'lBt OLMeI,ToV.L4rp"LD10NC71D OS
I. cwc"''
Corner Pa. av, mnd IDA St., Wellington, D, C.
This hotel, the oldest eon lucted on the EnropMB
?Ian in this city, has been enlarged and I . ? A
improved in every way necessary for theVcSBV
accommodation of tie increasing guests.
Tbauktui for the patronage alreaay reoeived, tbe
proprietor hopss that by attention to business we
eontinue to receive patronage aa heretofore.
Quests will only he charged with what they reeeir*.
Chargvs are moderate.
? ? tf P. EMRICH, Proprietor.
B90TS AND SHOES
I> T? SUIT THI TI_
sutacturing all kinds of
We axe now
>4 SHOES, and eonstanly reoeivi'i
BOOT*
a" "fiwSBf rssiria;
as a
AUCTION SALES.
FUTURE DAYS.
THOS. DOWLIN?. Auctioneer;Georgetown.
? . CHANCERY 8ALB.
P J Yirt?e of * decree of the Supreme Conrt of the
District of Columbia, made in the cause of Myers,
and al.. vs. Parso-as. and a)., in eeuity, and dated
E2.o^8r ^ v&v1 win offer auction, on WED
/IP * "je.^oth of November, at 4 o'clock p. m
on the premises, the following Lota of ground in
Georgetown, yrz:
i ??r.t of Nor- 93 *nd in Beatty <fc Hawkins'
Addition to Georgetown, fronting about 155* feet
r"?H'gh atreet, near First street, improved by
two stofy Frame Building.
_ . . Immediately after the above?
Part of lot No. 9", in Threlkeld's Addition, at
v cprner of Second and Lingan streets, fronting
about ti6 feet on the former, and 60 feet on the lat
llouse PrOTe^ by * or ?tucco?d two-story
Term ofsAle : One third of the purchase money
to be paid in cash; and the residue in two equal
instalments at Band 12 months, with interest to be
??cured by approved notes with a reserved lien.
The terms of sale must be complied with in one
week after Fale. or the property maybe re-sold at
the risk and cost of the purchaser after one week's
notice.
Conveyancing and stamps at the purchaser
Cost. WALTER 8. COX. Trustee
nov3-8taw?w | Intel.) THOS, D JWLING. Auct
J. C. McGUIKJf A CO., Auctioneers
CJ!???5RY,8alk of~valuableSQUARE OF
G ROUND ON 7TH ST. WEST, BIT WEEN O
ST. AND RHODE ISLAND AV. '
On TIIURpDAY AFTRKNOON, December 1st, at
I 3 j o clock, on^ the premises, by virtue of a decree
i of the late Circuit Cuurt aad an amended de*ree
of the Supreme Conrt of the District of Columbia.
I sitting as a Court of Equity,the latter decree da
ted i;6th of April, 1S64. and rendered in a cause, No.
738, wherein Elizabeth Brent is complainant, and
charles E. Brent and others defendants, the un
dersigned will sell the whole of Square No. 420,
except two lots heretofore sold, subdivided Into
twenty-five desirable Building Lots, fronting re
spectively on 7th and 8th streets west, between U
street and Rhode Island avenue.
Terms ; One-third cash; the remainder in 6 and
12 months, with interest,secured to the satisfac
tion of the trustee, or all cash, at the option of the
purchaser.
All conveyances and stamps at the expense of
purchaser.
J. CARROLL BRENT. Trustee.
nov lleod J. C McGUIRE & CO., Aucts.
J-JY JA8. C. McGUIRE A CO., Auctioneers.
TRUBTIE'S 8ALEOF VACANT LOT NEAR THE
? CAPITOL
On TUESDAY AFTERNOON, December 31th, at
4 o clock, on the premise*. by virtue of a deed of
trust, dated August 12th, iWi, and duly recorded
among the Land Records for Washington county,
D. C., I shall sell, part of Lot No. 4, in 8quare No.
(m!4, fronting on Delaware avenue, between C and
D streets north. Beginning for the said part of
said original Lot(4,) on the northwest corner of
Delaware avenue, and running at ri srht angles with
said avenue, eastwardly 16!? feet, thence south 2>i
feet 10 inches, thence west 2^ feet, thence parallel
with the north line of said Lot westwardly to Del
aware avenue 152 feet 9 inches, thence northward
'K. ?n Delaware avenue 27 feet 4}? inches to the place
ot beginning, containing 4,600 feet more or less.
Terms cash. ? ,
? . , . 3 FTEER. Trustee
nov lt>-2nwA'is J. C. McGUIRE A CO., Am-ts.
JJY J, C. McGUIRE A CO., Auctioneers.
CATALOGUE SALE ~OF VALUABLE MILI
B00K8 NT1FIC AND MISCELLANEOUS
On TUESDAY AFTERNOON, December eth.
coromencing at 7 o'clock, at the Auction Rooms
of James C. McGuire A Co., Washington, D. C.,
1 shall sell the Library of the late Gen. J. G. Tot
ten, t Chief Epgineer. U# 8. A.,) comprising ov?*r
one thousand volumes. Military. Scientific, and
Miscellaneous Works, most of them rare and
valuable.
Terms cash.
Catalogues may be obtained from the Auctioneer
prior to the sale.
CAPT W. G. TEMPLE, U. 8. N? Executor.
nov 19-eoAds J. C. MeGUIRK fc CO.. Aucts.
QUARTERMASTER GENERAL'S OFFICE,
First Division, Washington Citt,
Noyember 8,1364.
WtB be sold at public auction, to the highest
bidder, at the tieie and places named below, viz :
YORK, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, Novem
ber 17, 1864,
LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA, FRIDAY, No
vember 25,lo64,
EASTON, PENNSYLVANIA.C VRgDVY, De
cember 1,1861,
Two hundred Cavalry Horses at each place.
These Horses h^ye been condemned as unfit for
the cavalry service of the army.
Wot road and farming purposes many good bar
gains may be had.
Horses sold singly.
Pales to commence at lOe'clock a. m.
Terms: Cash in United States currency.
JAMES A. SKIN,
Colonel in charge First Division Q, M. G. 0.
nov 10- td
CLOTHING.
GOING !?GOING !?GOING !
DOWN THEY GO,
AT LESS THAN GOLD PRICES
J. H. SMITH and SMITH BROS.,
THE GREAT
CLOTHING nOUBES OF WASHINGTON,
No. 460 and 464
81VENTH BTBEET, opposite Post OrriO*.
ALL GOODS SPONGED,
Where you can find all the
LATEST 8TYLE8
FRENCH,
ENGLISH,
AND
AMERICAN
WALKING OOATS.
LATEST BTYLE8
PEG TOP PANT8,
DOUBLE BREASTED VESTS,
AND
BUSINESS SUITS,
PLAIN AND FANCY CA88IMBBE.
Together with the __
LARGEST 8T0CK
or
BOY8
CLOTHING
the'oity.
N. B.?We also have
THE
largest
STOCK
or
PIECE GOODS
FOB
. u- V c?8TOM work.
AU of which we offer at
UNUSUAL LOW PBICES.
GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHING GOODS,
BATS, CAP#, SHIRTS, TIES, SUSPENDERS,
^?C,, Ac.
J. H. SMITH, No. 460,
And
SMITH BROS., No. 464,
Clothisrs and Merchant Tailora,
Seventh street, opp. Post Office.
oc 8g-Sm Washington.
Horses wanted. ? i want to purchase
number of ponr-conditi?ne4 YOUNG?\__
HORSES *nd MARES, for parties North to
winter. None wanted with marks ob ef<
any description.
I am also purchasing Horses raitable for Goy
ernment use, or putting in Horses to Government
for a commission. Persons having Horses to sell
will, I think, find it to their advantage to call.
dnABLE8 A. MURPHYT Agent,
National Hotel Stables, 6th street, and Wiliard's
Hotel 8tables, 14th strep aov 16-lm\
HEW BOOT AND SHOE STORE.'
CHAP. B. BAYLY A CO., fll
97b Pennsylvania atinub, * Hh
Bet. 11th and 12th sts., near the Kirkwood House
Would respectfully inform their Friends and the
Public, that they will open
On MONDAY, October 17,1364,
A fine and new assortment of
LADIES. GENTLEMEN, MIS8BS, BOYS. AND
CHILDRBN'8 BOOTS AND 8H0E8,
made up In the Latest and most Fashionable style.
We will sell at reasonable prices, and hope, by
strict attention and integrity, to merit a fair share
of the Publle patronage.
Particular attention has been paid to the Ladies'
Department of the business, and we can safe] y
boast of ono of the finest assortment of
LADIES' BOOTS AMD SHOES
in the eitr.
? ?3HAS. B. BAYLT A CO..
ocH-tf Mo.>T8>ib?. ar., bet. Uth and 12th sts.
?0C0A MATTING AT PRIVATE SALE.
Prhrat^Salo"81 r*c*iT#* from the Importers for
250 rolls 2-3 4 eaarter Ooeoa Mtttia* whioh wS
Will sell to th? Trade at low prffir **
..W.L, WALLJtCO.,
Aaction and Commission Merchants
South comer Pennsrlyaaia avenue aid
pot 21-<t lOhron.] ?th street.
LILLIB'8 8AFE8. the celeb ated CHILLED
AED WROUOHT IRON PIRE AND BTTR
?LAB PROOFS, with OOMBINATIOV LOOKS
Also, BANK LOOKS. VAULT DOORSAND
General Soa thorn aconey S7 west Loss hard st.,
Baltimore, Md.
?0TS-to A. PBOSEUS, General Agent. *
AMUSEMENTS.
CANTERBURY HALL.
MUSIC {CANTERBURY HALL, I AND
HAL L{CANTERBURY HALL.f THEATER
Loufgimi. Aviaus,
Jftar Otrntr tf Sixth street, Rear of National emet
Metropolitan Hotels.
Gaetfja Lai . ?? .??Proprietor
JOsf Hart ? ?.?. _ Stage Manager
Louis Bzollos*? ? Ballet Master
Jhhw *8puta? ? Musical Director
ANOTHER SPLENDID BILL.
ANOI "IKK SPLEN l)ID BILL.
ANUTHKR SPLENDID BILL.
WHO CAN DKNY THR CANTERBURV HALL
WHO CAN DENY I H E CANTF.RBUHY HALL
WHO CAN DENY THE CANTERBURY HALL
gives the best performance ever otfer-d in this city.
We have better Sinr>>rs, better Dancers, better
Ethiopian Peiformeis, better Actors, better Gym
nasts, and
MORE OF THEM
MORE OF THEM
than any p!ace in the world.
Second week of
MR. JAMES MELVILLE,
MR, JAMES MELVILLE.
MK. JAMES MELVILLE.
MR. JaMES MELVILLE,
THE WILD RIDER OF AU8TRALIA,
THE WILD RIDER OF AUSTRALIA!
THE WILD RIDER OF AUSTRALIA.
AND IIIS THREE SONS.
J AMES MELVILLE wag born in Svdney, Aus
tralia, on the 15th oi October. 1837?his father hav
ing emigrated from Scotland to that rich country
about thirty years ag<>, where he purchased a large
tractot land and turned his attention te farming
and stock raising. At the time of the birth of Mr
Melville, his father owned a large number of fine
horses, and as Boon as his son's perceptions were
sufficiently formed to enable him to distinguish
objects, he manifested an inherent love and ad
miration for the noblest of animals?the horse.
As he grew in years this passion increased, and as
he had ample opportunity te gratify it, he soon be
came an expert in driving and riding horses?those
of the most untameable and wild nature being his
favorites.
In addition to Mr. Melville's superb horseman
ship, he stands unrivalled in athletic and gym
nastic exercises. Wiih his accomplished son*
who inherit the talent and daring of their
father, he gives a beautiful illustration of classic
groupings, graceful poses, and splendid tableaux
Ilis success in this as in other branches of his spe
cialty is beyond comparison, and defies rivalry or
imitation.
No other artiste ever acquired such a proficiency
in these characteristic displays. With a certain
innate grace rarely seen in man, he enriches them
with all the attributes of elegance and skill, and
adorns them with an enthusiasm of action and pic
turesque power truly fascinating,
Second week of the beautiful Danseuse,
M LLH DK8IREE,
M'LLE DESIREE.
M'LLE DESIREE.
SeeoDd week of the celebrated Pantomimist
and Dancer,
M. MATHIBD,
M. MATHUSU,
M. MA rillEU,
late of the
MARTINETTI TROUPE,
in new acts.
MULLIGAN,
MULLIOAN,
MULLIGAN,
First appfaranceof
CHARLES 00V1LLI.
CHaRLES OOVELLI.
the Great American Pantomimist.
R.-appearance of
DICR COLLINS.
DICK COLLINS.
DICK COLLINS.
Eanjo Player.
First appearance of
SYLVAN CLARK.
' 8YLVAN CLARK,
SYLVAN CLARK,
VERSATILE ACTOR.
OVER FIFTY PBRFORMKRS,
OVER FIFTY PERFORMERS,
OVER FIFTY PERFORMERS,
OVER FIFTY PERFORMERS.
First week #f tie Beautiful Ballet Pantomime,
entitled the V1VANDERB,
VIVANDERE,
VIVANDERE,
VIVANDERE,
VIVANDERE,
?IVANDERE,
in which M'lle Desiree and Mons. Matbieu win an.
pear, assisted by the Corps de Ballet of
TWENTY YOUNG LADIES.
Second week of the Equestrian Burlesque of
MAZEPPA.
MAZBPPA.
MAZEPPA.
Pirst week of the New Farce, entitled
NAN AND HER TWO FATHERS.
NAN AND HER TWO FATHERS.
Dir^rNw ? ? Miss Laura Le Claire
Tom Dribbles? ? Josh Hart
NEW SONGS.
N1W BALLETS,
NEW ACTS,
NEW PIECES.
A GRAND MATINEE
A GRAND MATINEE
A GRAND MATINEE
A GRAND MATINEE
FOR FAMILIES, EVERY
BATURDAY APTERNOON,
8ATUBDAY APTERNOON,
BATURDAY AFTERNOON,
8ATURDAY AFTERNOON,
SATURDAY AFTERNOON,
SATURDAY APTERNOON.
gpeci&l attention is called to the fact that we da
NO CURTAILMENT OF PROGRAMME
at the Matinees, the Performance bsing identical
with that of the evening.
IMPORTANT NOTICE J
Will shortly appear, the greatest Humorist of
the day, TONY PASTOR,
TONY PASTOR,
TONY PASTOR.
TONY PASTOR.
TONY PASTOR,
TO?T PASTOR.
from 444 Broadway, New York.
MR. TONY PASTOR,'
AS A COMIC VOCALIST.
is far snyerior to the lata
SAM. COWELL,
and his Witticisms excel those of
THE GREAT ARTEMUS WARD.
Mr. Lea has engaged Mr. Paster at a very large
Salary, he beiag determined that the
CANTERBURY
?hall always rank highest for
MIRTH AND TALENT.
PRICES OP ADMISSION.
Paraoette, Baleony, and Gallery ? M oents
"reheattachairs. ? ? ? ? ?- *>Mats
~ -
tlfl nnxalag Uli > y. a>. ?**
AMUSEMENTS,
6llOVKH'? THEATER.
Pennsylvania Arena*, near Willard's Hotel.
In consequence of the univerially expressed feel
ing of disappointment at the unexpected termina
tion in the higbt of a most brilliant success. of the
late engagement of Washington's favorite Com
edian,
MR. D. 8ETCHELL,
The Manager hos effected another engagement
with that inimitable irresistible artist, to com
menee Nov. 28. 1>W4, for positively six nights only.
MONDAY NIGHT. 8ET0HELL IN THREE OP
HIS UE8T Gil ARACTER8.
Only time of the delightful Comedietta entitled
ICI ON PARLE FRANCAIS.
Mr. gprigginn _>.Mr. Setchell
FORD'S NEW THEATER.
Tenth ttreit, above Permtyivanin avenue.
Engagement for a few nights only with the emi
ent Vocnlist and Comedienne.
MRS H. WATKINS.
(LATE MRS C HOWARD.)
and the popular and versatile actor,
MR. U. WATKINS. *
Commencing
MONDAY EVENINO. Not.J8.19S4.
when will be presented ttie thrilling Irish drama of
KATHLEEN MAVOURNEEN;
UNDEK THE SPELL.
Kathleen Mavourneen Mrs 11. Watkins
With the beautiful ballads. "Raty's Letter,"
" Kathleen Mavonrneen," and "I'm Leaving 1'nee
with Sorrow, Terence."
Terence O'Moore, a Young Irish Peasant,
Mr. II. Watkins
To conclude with the mnsical farce of
A LOAN Of A LOVER.
Gertrude, with songs Mrs. II. Watkins
Prices, Ac,, aw usual.
SANDERSON'S MINSTRELS.
Corner D and Ninth Streets.
GRAND GALA WEEK.
NEW SONGS.
NEW DANCES.
NEW BURLESQUES,
First week of the celebrated
TROUBADOURS.
Visitors and strangers wishing to pass a pleas
ant evening and emoy a hearty laugh should go to
the new hall, corner D and yth sts. Admission 3J
cents. nov 23 3t*
GROYER'S THEATER.
COMMENCING MONDAY, DEC 5. A SEASON
OK FOUR NIUHT8 OF
GROVER'S (.RAND GERMAN OPERA
LEONARD (5ROVER DIRECTOR
CARL AN8CHUTZ CONDUCTOR
Tn announcing this very brief season, the Direc
tor begs to express His regret that engagements of
many months' existence positively preclude a long
er stay" On Friday, Dec. 9, the Grand Gorman
OperaCompany starts for the Great West.
In returning to the seen" of the earlier triumvhs
of GRAND GERMAN OPERA, the Director is
proud to be able to present the
LARGEST AND MOST EFFICIENT
GRAND GERMAN OPERA COMPANY IN THE
ENTIKE WORLD.
M'LLE MARIE FREDERICI,
Prima Donna.
MADAME JOHANNA ROTTER,
Prima Donna,
MADAME BERTHA J0I1ANNSEN.
Prima DJnna.
M'LLE SOPHIE D'/IUKA,
Prima Sobrette, from Imperial Opera House,
Vienna.
M'LLE PAULINE CANI8SA.
Prima Sjubrette.
MAD. MARGARET ZIMMERMAN,
Second* Denna.
MADAME PAULINE BERGER.
8econda Donna.
M. FRANZ HIMMER,
Tenor Robusto.
M. THEODORE HABELMAN,
SIG. GIUSirPE TAMARO. Teoor Lyric.
KARL PORMT|I?: L"ie' EOT" Mi"?
The Renowned Basso.
JOSEPn HERMANS.
? Th? Celebrated Basso Profundo.
M. ISODORE LEHMANN,
, rimo Baritone. Royal Opera, Berlin, first season
in America.
M. 11 UN RICH 8TEINECKE.
M. ANTON GRAFF, Prima Baritone
Basto Buffo.
M. Martin Zinabeim, M. Alphonse Urchs,
M Edonard Laimer, M. Otto Lehman,
MIfiS THERESA WOOD,
Premier Danseuse.
Especial attention has been given to selecting
the members of the
GRAND CHORUS,
which has been very largely augmented. Several
acknowledged principals will be recognized in the
list:
first soprani. Mr. Charles Welsgarber,
Miss Maria Marehand, bkcosd tkskri.
Misi Meta Ilerwagen, Mr. Soseph Zinsheim,
Miss Emilie Weinhold. Mr. Joseph Klebs,
Mme. Gert'de Dornbach, Mr. John BunBman,
Mme. Prederika Boche, Mr. Henry Millor,
Miss Emily Fritsche, fibs* uassi.
Miss Julia Bocks, Mr. Otto Lehman,
Miss Anna Miller, Mr. Edward Haimer,
second sopra*i. Mr. Edouard Gross,
Mme. Martha Berger, Mr. George Albrecht,
Mme. Anna Meyer. Mr Herman Smith,
Mme. Pauline Dehlon, .-econd hassi.
Mme. Anna Taubot. Mr. Frederick Urchs,
Miss Wilhelinina Kohn, Mr, Ludwig Kerrel,
Master Henry Kohn, Mr. Philip Fleck,
firs tbnori. Mr. Charles Lehman,
Mr. Phillip Schlosser, Mr. Philip Eohn,
Mr. Emil Zott, Mr. Charles Berendorff,
Mr. tmt Reidel, Mr. Otto 8mith.
Mr. Charles Vierec.k,
This is the strongest, in numbers and talent, of
any chorus hitherto organized in America.
THE GRAND ORCHESTRA,
ERNEST GRII.L LEADER
Comprises the fallowing Instrumental Virtuoson :
Julius Bernstein. Herman Weinhold, Philip Kar
her, Gn.stau Bahls, Adolph Nenendorff, Gustav
Brannes, Frederick Allner. Adolph Bartels. Lud
wig Bott, Emil Wiese, Joseph Eller. William
Leiboldt. Gustav Iieinecke, Gustav Bernstein,
Louis Hofman, Leuis Bumpier, Gustov Billhardt,
Frederic Ludwig.
To these for the season in Washington will be
added the very LARGE AND EXCEEDINGLY
TALENTED ORCHESTRA OF GROVJR'S THE
ATRR, which recently received from two celebra
ted New York critics, (one Mr. Williams, music?l
critic of the Evening Pest and Ilerald, the compli
ment of being one of the very tlnest Orchestras
extant. ?
The combined Orchestra will constitute the
largest and most talented
ORCHESTRA
Ufedatany Academy or Theater in Grand Opera
this season.
THE C RAND REPERTOIRE
Selected for presentation ?mbraces the
FOUR MOST MAGNIFICENT AND GRAND
OPERATIC SUCCESSES
Known to the entire Lyric Stage.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1864,
First time in Washington of the Great Master
Opera.
ROBERT LB DIABLE, (by Meyerbeer )
Formes, Himaer, Habelman Haimer. Madames
Rotter. Johannsen and Theresa Wood.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER, 6, 1864 , '
Only time of
FAUST, (by Gounod.J
Hermanns, Tamaro.Steinecke, Lehnun,Frederick
Dzuiba, Zimmerman.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER, 7,1864.
Only time ef
MARTHA (by Flotow,)
Formes, Habelman, Graff, C. Lehman, Madame
Rotter and Di&iuba.
THURSDAY, DE01MBER, 8.1864,
LAST NIGHT OF THE GRAND OPERA,
First time in Washington of the very celebrated
Grand Opera^ JKWEgg (by HftlevyJ
Hermanns, Himmer, Madames Rotter and Jo
hannsen.
It ia worthy of remark that the above grand Re
pertoire can only be presented in the entire world,
in the same number of consecutive nights.
BY THIS COMPANY.
The aale of secured aeata for fke season only, will
commence at the Box Office of Grover 'B Theater
TUESDAY, Nov. 29,
at nine o'clook a. m. precisely. No seats will be
?old, nor in any way retained, before thathonr.
Pruts for the season? Drees Circle and Parquet,
$8; Orchestra Chairs, 9)0,
No boxes aold before Thursday, Dec. 1. Mo seats
for single Operas before Saturday, Dee. 3.
Especial attention is directed to the season Bale,
in the earnest hope that thoae who propose ptron
lzing tbe season will attend promptly in person or
by messenger, so as to prevent subsequent specu
lation in seats.
From the very large expense attending Op?ra
this season, the Free List will necessarily be very
much restricted. No existing complimentary pass
fro in the theater admits to opera. nov 23
EATON HALL,
OORNER OfNINTH AND P STS.
Thif large and handsome HALL is now fer rent
for BALLS, CONCERTS, Ac. 14 is finely frescoed
and tniahed in the moat substantial manner, with
large and convenient dTeasing rooms and gallery
at the aouth end for Bpectatora.
The Hall is the best ventilated room in the eity.
with twenty windows on the south and east and
west side, with a large ventilator in the center of
the Hall. It is admirably adapted for Concerts,
being built with special attention to that object;
and for Balls the greatest care has been taken to
have the best floor that could be procured.
fcTThe Hall w'll be rented fer Balls, Concerts,
Minstrels, fairs, Ac.
Inquire of 0. 8HECKLE8, on D street. Si door
from the Hall. noT lO-3m
IVTOOBE'S WS8T END DRUG STORE.
ItI 113 Penna. avenue, aouth aide.
On hand a Uneropply of Perfumery. Powder M
Soaps, Ae., Toilet Articles, Ac.. Fare and geauTae
Medicine*. 4?. ??v ? *w ?
TELEGRAPHIC NEWS.
SHERMAN.
THE WAR IN GEORGIA.
Capture of Milledgeville and Gordon?The
State House, Governor's Mansion, Ice.,
Burned?Proclamation of Gov. Brown
He Orders a Levy en masse?All from 16
to 55 to take tbe field?Reported Occupa
tion of Macon ? Presumed Rescue of
L'nion Prisoners?South Carolina Hp.
serve Militia Under Orders.
Fortress Monroe, Nov.'26?The steamer
Heiman Livingstone arrived at 6 r. m. with
753 exchanged prisoners. Two were lost on
the passage; the restare reported doing well
and Improving very fast.
Tbe Savannah Daily Morning News of the
'j:id has the following telegraphic news:
"Acgcrta, Nov.'22.?The central train from
Davisboro reports that Milledgeville aud Gor
don were captured yesterday. The State
house, Governor's mansion, and penitentiary
were burned. General Wayne holds the
Oconee Bridge. Nothing from Macon.
? Passengers from Georgia, road report that
the train went to Greensboro to-day. The en
emy appears to have all gone in the direction
of Milledgeville and Macon, but nothing cer
tain is known.
"The Augusta Constitutional ol Monday
evening says the passengers by the Georgia
road train last evening, report the Oconee
Bridge, five miles above Gordon, was burned
abotat noon, yesterday, by a small party of the
enemy's cavalry, who retired after burning
the bridge to their cainn on the north side of
the river. The terce ffcthe enemy on the line
of this road is estimated at 15,000, advancing
slowly and cautiously.
"The Governor of South Carolina has or
dered the reserve militia of that State to as
semble at Hamburg.
"Governor Brown has issued a proclamation,
making a levy rn masse ot all citizens between
trie ages of sixteen and filty-five, to 6erve for
forty days.
"Captain Baker of the li. Livingstone, says
it was reported before he left 'hat Sherman
occupied Macon; that there were J,500 Union
prisoners at Macon, on the way to Savannah,
to be exchanged, but the road being interrupted
they could not be brought through, otherwise
the exchange was going on well."
Probable Rescue of Union Prisoners by
Sherman.
Baltimore, Nov. VT.?The Annapolis cor
respondent of the Baltimore American tele
graphs this evening as follows:
The steamer Hiram Livingstone and Wey
bosset have arrived with twelve hundred
and forty-si.\ paroled prisoners from Savan
nah.
The captain of the Hiram Livingstone re
ports that when he sailed on the 25th, the ex
change ot prisoners ceased. Sherman having
cut off the railroad leading to Savannah, and
had, it was thought, reached all the remainder
of our men, as he was only about six hours
march from the stockades when tbe men who
arrived at the Hiram Livingstone left there,
though an effort was being made by the rebels
to send our men to Florida.
THE WAR IK TENNESSEE.
Massing of Troops in Hood's Front?Retro
grade Movement by the Enemy Antici
pated?Deaths by Violence nt Nashville.
Nashville, Nov. 26.?Hood's army, num
bering, prebably, forty thousand men, have
been lor several days fast concentrating south
of Columbia, Tennessee. Our forces, mean
time, have evacuated Pulaeki, Huntaville, and
Decatur, which places are in rebel hands.
In Hood's front, near and about Columbia,
are the Federal forces commanded by General
Thomas.
On the 21th instant some severe skirmishing
occurred, resulting in a loss to tbe Federals of
forty-four killed and wounded. The rebel lo?9
is estimated at two hundred and sixty-four;
among the killed was one colonel.
Large bodies of troops are being massed in
Hood's front. Some heavy fighting may be
expecte din a few days.
Communication by telegraph to Columbia
has been interrupted since yesterday. Rumors
were circulated ol fighting yesterday, but no
official advices of an engagement have been
received. Hood's demonstration on Tennessee
has thus far been fruitless. A retrograde
movement is confidently predicted by those
who are well informed in army matters.
Nashville is filled with thieves and murder
ers. About twenty deaths by violence have
occurred within the last few days. A steady
rain has been falling all day. The river is
twelve leet, and rising.
THE ST. ALBANS RAIDERS.
Important Proceedings?What has lately
Transpired.
Torokto, C. W., Nov. 26.?The application
ol the St. AlbanB raiders to the Canadian Gov
ernment, to dispatch a messenger to Rich
mond to obtain evidence alleged to be material
( to their defence, has been rejected. It is un
1 derstood the Government considered the raid
ers to be undergoingexamination upon eharges
making them amenable to the extradition trea
ty, and that evidence procured at Richmond,
wnile it might be very material if rebels were
before the United States courts, is of little con
sequence at this stage of the proceedings.
It has transpired that cannon and war ma
terial have been transhipped from Sarnia on r
tug boat bound for Lexington, in the State of
Michigan. It is thought probable that the
Georgian took cannon on board when proceed
ing in the direction of Collingwood.
FROM THE SOUTHWEST.
Movements of Hood's Army?Sharp Skir
mishing with our Forces.
New York, Nov. 28.?A special dispatch to
tbe Herald says:
"Nabhvillb, Tenn., Nov. 27, 10.20 p. m.?
There has been smart skirmishing between
Pulaski and Columbia for some days. We
have fallen back behind Duck river.
"Part of Forrest's forces have also crossed
the river on our right flank, and are aiming to
strike the road in our rear.
"Hood's main army is supposed to be moving
on the pike road towards Shelby yille and War
trace."
The War in Kentucky and Tennessee.
Louisvileb, Nov. '25.?About thirty of
Jessie's men were at Shelbyville last night,
robbing stores, &.c. Jessie was at Eminence
at the same time,plundering the peopl#. Fed
eral forces'were sent out from Frankfort to
day to look for him.
General Bnrbrldge with his command, has
arrived at Cumberland Gap.
Rumors prevail here, which, If verified,
wonld be contraband that Hood's army was
marchingon Wednesday against Pulaski. His
force is said to consist of 30,000 men, one-third
cavalry; and ten batteries of artillery, includ
ing reinforcements from Forrest and Dick
Taylor. Hood will either fight at Columbia,
or leaving Columbia to the left, march into
East Tennesse and join Breckinridge. It |ts
possible a battle will be fought at Colombia
to-day.
A Rebel Colonel was killed in a skirmish
yesterday. A detachment of our cavalry
were driven in within three miles of Columbia,
when the Rebels were repulsed by our Infan
try. On Wednesday our forces withdrew
from Pulaski, and are supposed to be concen
trated at Columbia. No damage to Palaski
for the prsent.
From tbe Southwest.
CAIRO, Nov. 26.?The Rebel General HIll
man, with his staff and body-guard crossed the
Mississippi at Catfish Point, some days ago,
en route to Arkansas. He had a heavy box of
specie with him.
Riohts of pedbstriahs.?The United States
Circuit Court, New York, has given a verdict,
of ?4,000 to a person for damages sustained,
while crossing the street, from a stage. The
law is that pedestrians have the first right to
the crossing; and that drivers of vehicles must
consult the safety and convenience of the per
son crossing the street on loot. A few ver?
diets of this kind would have a good effect in
Was kin g ton.
?GTEgcs are twelve dollars per dozen in
Richmond, and "baecy" four dollars per
pound.
wr A Mystic, Ct, lady gave birth to trlpletts
last week?one girl and two boys.
Daniel Webster's old house, in Ports,
month, N. H., is now an oyster saloon.
Widows who pay taxes in Moravia are
entitled to vote.
?EW A twenty-pound wild cat was killed in
Connecticut last week.
?OTThe Denver City New* reports tremen
dous snow storms on the plains.
FROM THE SOUTH.
RICHMOND DATES OP 9RI0AT LABT.
Speculations about 8hema._R*b<), p
on hi?:Wev?e?t?--Tbey pr-let, t# be J
Hopetul-R amorala Rlchm.?d ?f Good
Sherman t0 be Speeditv
lied Ip-Hu Aadacity I'njarallelodJ
Rumirfd Repulse ?( the Lnloa Arm*
Bat it Still Goes Marching Oa-Araiai
Southern Slave*? Lee la Favor ?( ,h5
Project.
We have Richmond papers of Friday last,
from whicb the following abstract of sews is
taken:
From Georgia.
[From the Richmond Whig, Not. 25.1
Georgia is now tile Interesting military field
of theConfederacy, Sherman having discarded
caution, and boldly advanced into the Interior.
yonld *b*t, without giving information to
<!f?.\ankees' who now dependent npoa
?nv,"n sources for information as to his
he u ai* could tell enr readers where
i? ihow he >8 faring.
nothing1mU?. 8ay' h?weTer, that there is
hone fill lOD 10 c*U8e lea*'.
????!? i ?10 fear tbat the campaign,
now taken in that quarter, will not resoi*"
most advantageoneiy to our cau^ lnstMd of
applying the torch to certain coveted cutes In
the empire State of the South, we indu.ge n
the confident hope that Sherman will soon
have to exhaust both bis solitary skill and
unquestioned energy in making good the re
treat of the remnant of his defeated army.
Latest from Georgia.
Just before going to press we learned that;
the War Department had received information
from Georgia of an eminently encouraging
character. We refrain from making a mors
definite statement of the new* a* it has reached
us, but we are warranted in assuring onr read
ers tkat the official advices from Georgia are
as favorable as we could expect.
Georgia.
Jlrcm thn Richmond Sentinel, Nov. 2.">.J
T he intelligence trom Georgia yesterday was
very agreeable, ano hcr>e grew more buoyant
that Sherman will suiter severely ror bis au
dacity. A portion of his forces is understood
to have been very heavily repulsed In attempt
ing to cross the stream We forbear particu
lars of names and localities. Let our troops
opposed to Sherman adopt sleepless activity
for their motto. Let them harrass him with
attacks and with alarms. Harrass him by day
and harrass him by night. Let them destroy
supplies before him, and let them block his
roads, ai:d resist hi6 march at every practica
ble point. All this m:ty be done independent
of heavier operations which we shall doubtless
be able to direct against him. Break in upon
his array, and there will soon be a grand hunt,
tree for everybody, and in which we hope
everybody will join. There is no confirma
tion of the report ol the burning of Milledee
viile.
From Georgia.
i From the Richmond Dispatch, Nov. >j.J
We are still without any official information
concerning Sherman's movements in Georgia;
but we are not entirely without some authen
tic advices on the subject. Sherman was yes
terday still west of the Uconee river, one of the
tributaries of the Altamaha, which runs south
through the eastern centre of the State of Geor
gia. Milledgeville is situated on the east bank:
uf this stream. It is believed that the enemy
has been to Milledgeville, though we are pretty
well assured that no official information of the
fact has been received at the War Department.
In the only brush we hear of our troops hav
ing with the enemy, they have been entirely
successful.
This affair occurred near Jonesboro, where
the Central Georgia Railroad, running from.
Macon to Savannah, crosses the Oconee river.
A considerable body of the enemy's cavalry
attempted to cross t? the east bank of the
Oconee on Wednesday morning, but were me:
by our troops and driven back. The situation
in Georgia is regarded in official circles as de
cidedly encouraging There is one fact in the
campaign which we think should give much
ground for hope; that is the 6low progress
made by Sherman. He is now in his fifteenth
day from Atlanta, and has yet marched only
about 75 miles, and has not reached one point
of strategic importance. Perhaps he does not
now, as when he started out on the expedition,
feel himself positively master of the situation.
We shall hear more from him in the next day
or two.
The Richmond Enquirer doses a review of
an editorial in the New York Tribune on Sher
man's movement, wherein a hopeful view was
taken of the situation in Georgia with the fol
lowing sentence:?"Confidentially, and not to
go beyond Mr. Greeley's ear, we will tell him.
that Sherman is cot in Macon nor Augusta.
The Exchange of Prisoners.
The exchange of prisoners goes on well;3,200
Confederates have been delivered, and Cap:
Hatch is now engaged in the delivery of Yan
kees in return.
Arrangements have been made to exchange &
large number of prisoners at Mobile, and it is
probable that the exchange will soon be re
sumed on the James river, as the arrangements
made at Savannah and Mobile were only at the
suggestion of Commissioner Ould, in order to
obviate the necessity of much overland
travel on the part of the Yankee prisoners.
From East Tennessee.
fFrom the Richmond Sentinel, Nov. ".5 ]
We had a very pleasing rumor <says the
Bristol Register of the Wd) from below last
night, that Breckinridge and Vaugban again
have the "i ankees surrounded at Strawberry
Plains. There was an engagement on Friday
last, in which the negro regiments are said to
have suffered severely, three nundred being
reported killed. We have not been able to
learn authentically the particulars, and are
inclined to think the report only the lancy of a.
'?reliable gentleman." The latest information
irom Knoxville ia that Glllem has his head
quarters at the Fair Grounds, and that there Is
no prospect of bis receiving immediate rein
forcements.
Lee's Advice Desired on Arming Slaves.
[From the Richmond Dispatcn (Editorial)
Nov. 25.]
The President, in his message, has already
broached certain military propositions, which
he considers of great importance. Now there
is no donbt that General Lee agrees with the
President on these subjects. Now if General
Lee sliould be celled in, being the man who is
to execute what the President advises, there
is no doubt his advice would carry immense
weight with it. Tbe great military question
now before Congress, is the recommendation
of the President to employ forty thousand,
slaves in certain capacities as laborers in our
armies, thereby releasing nearly the aami
number of fighting men. This we consider to
be absolutely necessary in the present state of
affairs. If Congress feel any doubt, let them
call in General Lee and abide by what he says,
and let it be done at once.
Pertion* of Magruder's Army Reinfercing
Hood.
[From Augusta Chronicle and Sentinel, No v.9.J
Hood's army is at-Columbia, lenn., with
Sherman's force 98 miles in his rear, greatly
demoralized
General Walker, of Majrruder's army, Is en
route to join Hcod at Columbia or Nashville,
Tenn. Gen. Beauregard declares he will win
ter his army in Tennessee.
Corinth is our point of concentration, to
which place all the hospitals have been or
dered to go immediately from Macon.
The Rebel Prospect in Middle Tennessee
net Leaking Flattering.
[From Montgomery Mail, Nov. ?.]
We are kept so much in the dark in regard
to army movements that we know nothing of
them until It Is too late to be called news. I
hardly know what to think of tbe prospect of
going to Middle Tennessee. Sometimes it looks
quite flattering, and then again becomes very
gloomy.
Large quantities of hard tack and bacon are
being brought to Tuscumbia, the transporta
tion, already quite limited, being again re
duced?the usual precursor to a move.
Sherman (Thomae f) was on yesterday report
ed, with his forces, lying between Decatur and
Huntsville. To-day I was told that he was
moving in tbe direction of Pulaski.
Well, let him move. We can move him back:
through Middle Tennessee as we did out of
Georgia.
The Rebels Kept in the Dark as te Heed's
Operations.
[From thA Montgomery Appeal.]
Civilians are not permitted to travel on the
Mobile and Ohio Railroad north of Meridian,
which is the railroad ronte to the vicinity of
tbe army, when its location was last reported.
Thus far General Hood has succeeded in mys
tifying both friend and foe; and as he can very
easily direct the conduct of his military super
intendent of telegraph so as to prevent the
transmission of Intelligence, we may expect to
remain befogged until such time ss he desires
the public to become posted. We must exer
cise patience.
Thb Kvittivo Machutb?The knitting
ly amazing. , . .
erated It can turn out
woolen soeks is a day. It can take 200 stitches
iiu^ sr? ondfeac hperfect as those by the
hand It ta not confined to socks or stocking*,
b?tiakis a ??^iet70f *rt,clM> ?ch'S
afglJni blaSets, shawls, undersleeves, com
forts, etc.
vTec million dollars' worth of petroleum.
hm been lost in transporting or carelessly
wasted during the last year.
gy Twenty thousand dollars were oflfertd
rod refused for two merino bucks last week la
Vermont.
tar A machine capable of turning ten twenty-'
nch shot in one hour is now on exhibition at
he Boston Exchange.

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