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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 22, 1882, Image 6

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fr-TCAL AND I>KAMATIC.
ATn*;fr?n\* yitXT wKr.K?flit.nrRT >vo srLi.iTiV
- ?;FKHA -JIORKVKW PLAYS? ZKLltA HKGU1X
? rt:? WII>OW?KTC.
? Mi**? Ada CJray. a melo-dramatlc and emotion-^
a fff--' appear* on Thursday night at the
National Her N*t piay i? "East Lynne" in a
Be* vrrMon.
? l it* Acme Opera Troupe besln the
week *r Knr.j's. Tiwy will give 'MHIvPtte," the
" Mswuftp," etc Miss Addie Kandall. who 1b
remembered In Washington, is the
>a*ly.
? The dramatic wawa Is gradually winding
up 1" the nort h, and ban been a pretty successful
on**, it rhr i nr.a7?Tw nre reported correctly. The
k;?y fulls f?<t;val in N. Y.. is the only remaining
;_rert PTfat to come off.
? A dntmatic paper published In Ch'caxo, reports
the marriage. on April 14, oi Mr. John E.
Ifc?'_-?.T t ? Mrw Minnie Palmer?who doses tonight
at P..r?lV -but Mr. Horera telerrapha the
X. Y. DfiiHKitic Tin#* that* there is no truth
In it whatever: hut he adds: "For myself I
ahou'O f?:- liappy ii it were true."
? The IJvi-Mter nights In Philadelphia, last
week. drew very largely. But the "off nitrhts,"
with K-.br;. were at borough failure. Shedidnot
draw all. It is the old story. Where there
a*e two r-t :;rs in a company, one has, to go to the
wail. Tiiey will do better In Washington.
? Tills week'.-* Dramatic Times says: Frail
Waterrm, the star of the N. Y. May Musical Festival.
luis not been given a good deal to do in Mr.
Tiioum*** p.-??^ram, but* the work assiimed her
Is L p.au. massive and solid. Mr. Fred Schwab,
who rd ts the Festival newspaper, speaks of her
grace ami beauty in one column ?n?l prints a
pi: Ture of i er in another, which, together, produces
a contusing effiect.
? John E. Ince went to see Anna Dlckluson's
J/mnleL Somebody asked him how he
was ples;ee?L '-She's all ritrht." paid he. "I
like h?-r weir enouub. but she's trot a bad play.
Len lirover ought fo fix it up for hea."
? Buffalo has been fixed apon as the city for
the national annual samgerfest of 1SS3. A
tmliditts will be put up for the occasion, the
wt-althy < Jermans of the city promising a handsome
guarantee fund.
? MKs Emma Nevada, the American singer
who ha.-- attracted considerable attention by
her success in opera in Italy, appears to fully
maintain (he brilliant promise of her debut.
Biie ha.- recently been highly successful at
Koine.
? The last idea in tlie comic opera line is to
Americanize "Pinafore*' by giving tt a new libretto.
and to treat "Claude Duval" In a similar
way.
? It is said that the Kiralfy brothers will produce.
during the mont.ti of May. a new opera,
by Big. lA-velli, entitled or, Settled at
Last." It will be produced with si>ectacular
etTert-?
? "The Widow" will open the summer season
it the New York Standard with the Hess company.
Mr. W. Cattle and Zelda Seguin will be
In th?? cast.
? M:s< Fanny Davenport will begin her fareaell
en retirement in New York on Mond;?y evening.
May & She will then disappear for three
r?ars.
?
? The engagement with Mr. Booth which
ftegan at Booth's theater last Monday night. w'rll
n* somen bat more interesting than usual for it
will l?e a sort of introduction to Mr. Booth's
leruus career in Europe. The encasement will
ast two weeks. and. outride of its special
airtcance. will have no novel or uncommon features.
? Erie Baylev intends to bring a comedy Company
over from London next season and play
tone of the Wyndam pieces. He has already
Bngaged dates in several cities that he has
flsited with the "Colonel."
? "The New York critics have churned davBght
out of Anna Dickinson's llamlet says a
Denver newspaper, "and the impression prevails
here that Anna can play King Lew and
dL-pease with the customary disguise."
? A. C. Gunter's play ''After the Opera,"
wh'th was brought out at the Boston Park at
the opening of the season, will follow "Divoreons"
at tl?e New York Park. Mr. Gunter has
lust finished a four-act comedy called Strictly
Business." the scenes of which are lasd In
Emrlmd and Russia. It will l?e ^ut on the road
ext season by a well-known manager.
? Will D. Eaton, now in Washington, and
author of "All the Kage," and W. W. Young,
author of "Pendragon," are at work cojointly
upon a melo-drama. Mr. Eaton also has in hand
Ihree other plays.which are nearing completion.
? The Emma Abbott English opera coiflpany
will begin a week's engagement at the Globe
Theater, Boston, on the 24th instant. The
Oomfianv has as its principal members. Miss Abbott
and Miss Julie Rosvwald. sopranos; Miss
Louise Annandale, contralto; Sig. Kabrini. and
Mr William Castle. tenors; Mr. Alonzo Stoddard,
baritone; and Mr. George Conly, basso.
? Mayor Grape, Judges Brady and Davis and
various other prominent people of New York
are arranging for a "souvenir"' performance of
"Forget Me N?>t" by Genevieve Ward, when it
shall have reached its fiGOth representationTblswill
be on tlie &>th. and the performance
will tiiltt n'in thn affornAr.n o* !Tr*5.-vT?
WW mmm ?*.??? * | V"\ HI l" 1 mn'U at VI it V-' 1IIVU
Square Theater. The support will be wholly
made cp of auiateurs from New York and
Brooklyn. ami the whole affair promises to be
one of considerable social importance.
? The New York Standard season will open
In Kept; mber with the new operette by Oilbert
4 Sullivan, founded on the "Princess," if it he
ready, of which there is Bome doubt. The
libretto is finished, and Mr. Sullivan is now
engased on the music of the second act. If
flrst played here the author and composer will
Come over to superintend its production. Tielatter
contingency is the probable one. as
'Patience" is still in the full flood In tondon.
? At a certain theater not long ago a gentleman
asked a lady friend In front of him if she
bad any objection to removing her Gainsborough.
She had not. and gladlv obliged him.
The piav proved to l>e a miserable hodge-podge,
and alter the first act the gentleman said: "I
thank you irreatly. but won't you please replace
your Gainsborough? I prefer the hat."
? A play based ou Mr. Thomas Hardy's powerful
aua pathetic novel of " Far from the Mad.
ling Crowd " was produced. Monday night, at I
the Onion Sipiare Theatre, N. Y., where it was
received w Ith interested attention by a nnmer.
on* audience the house, in fact, being crowded.
Miss Clara Morris personated the heroine, and
;hl* fact of course, gave importance to the pro<h
ction. In .! -elf. hoa ever, the attempt to utilize
for theatrical purposes, an extraordinary
v? k ?f literalur" had elements of attraction.
"Far From the Madding Crowd" has recently
been offered upon the I^ondon stage in two
forma
? Some id.-a ?-f the popularity of ' Patience"
m:?y he obtained t'rom the following statement
of D'Oyley < arte : " This opera has Ix'en played
under my management 801 times in London,
abont 205 times in the Kugiish provinces with
two companies. 1.V> times in New York and 'JO
times in other cities of the United States. Thus
nuut TV) authorial performances have been
j'i\i*n. which afforded employment and a living
to many hundreds of jiersons. 1 have not my
books at luuvl; but I am not over-estimating
when I sa\ that over TOO.OOU persons have jwiid
to witness. the perform*i.ees. and that $600,000
have been received for admission money."
(Mon are Propagated.
K C. Hit:'i t"or,l in J-cieuee Monthly for May.
According to this vie.v the odoriferous bodies,
or their molecules, have no more to do (in the
ense of physical impact) in producing the
ensaiioii of smell that a luminous body?a candle
or the sun?has to do (by impact) with the
sensation of light. There is corporeal Impact
?r touclrln neither case. Of course, with "each
molecule as a center of activity, the effect will
be motv pronounced at the immediate surface
(as with :?!' radiant energies) than at any distance.
And. undoubtedly, particles of disintegrating.
odorous matter are often brought in
Contact with the Schuciderian membrane; but
the sensation of that h-paet. If there be any,
would be of touch, not of smell, as sorely as
I .at. from that point of contact to the s?-nsoriusn,
the effeet or Influence is conveyed by a
oration?a wave-motion in the "fluid" of the
crve-dnet?as the undulations of the lumlnifer??us
ether are projaicati^d along the coarse of
the optic nerve to the seat of sensation, where
t!tey are translated Into Ihrht and color. Bat If.
for any portion of the distance between tlie internal
sense ami the fragrant body, the odor.
bl*.e light, Is but a motion. It Is safe to ovsuice
K for all. The analogy of this in:;.!-* of odors to
tuA pf light and sound Is goa^ihiHg ia its
Wai tins'.
Fran Oar ContitK-nt.
I can t believe 12 y wed.ling day was fifty years
apo!
This is t,hr second day of March! The clock is
licking alow;
The sua Minnas in across the room. Just seethe
folks K" byl
I cant remember hair of them who nod so pleasantly.
The llttln Enclir'U sparrows flit In the lilac bush
outbids,
I like to watch th^ busy th!ng3. There's one that
trie 1 and trl*-d
To break a striuir the children tied aroand a
branch on* day;
now >11M tie pulls it"with his beak! Now he has
llown away.
So it was fifty years agol It doesn't seem so
long.
ivl've frit iny aze more this last year, and yet Pra
pretty '-f.ronj,'.
! I dont?io mu?'!i i bout the house, but still I know
wh t"sd -nj:
I kn?w as well what's going on as Jane or any
i one.
Jane fn ts me dreadfully sometimes and yet she's
alw^yi kind.
She h' livsme when there's no need and has me on
her mind;
She ne^lnt t'llnk I'm past all use or that I'm like
to tali;
I've n-iver missed my footing yet, though I'm so
old ana aiL
But ti'.lnsrs don't seem to take my mind that
happen nowadays.
I like the roRts I used to know; I keep old-fashioned
ways;
I read tit** Ps ilitiN and Book of John and And them
always new;
And I can knit, but I can't sew same as I used to
da
The youn? fores think they understand just bow
to manage lite;
We old folks pity them; we've learn't Its change
and loss and strife.
Lite Is a fl?ht I tell you pl tin, It doesn't come to
hand
Just as you want to have It come or Just as you
have planned.
If you'd foretold me how It's been through all
these titty yars
I should have been discouraged and had no lack of
feirs,
And wished I ouid He doivn a ad die, but somehow
Pve.had "tren^Hi
That's c?m * t<> inn with every day all through my
whole life's length.
I started fair my wedding (lay, for my dear man
was kind
And alw tys pleasant spoken; we were mostly of
a mnd.
Ot course we had our fallings out hut nothing that
would last;
It always was my fault, for I was young and
spoke too last*
And John, you see, wag older by some ten years
than I.
At Qrst I wa3 afraid of him when we kept company.
He w.is a sort of man on whom you felt you could
depend,
But v.-ry quiet ?n his ways. Ills mother was a
Friend.
My hardest* line was when he died. It seemed to
me 'twos wmn?
The Lord should take him out of life and let me
drag aK>ng
As best 1 coal 1, with llttte means and all my
ehlldr.-n small,
Just when we .jeeined to soe oar way and get
ahead at ail.
But Got! snow* host. If it had b?en my life had
suited me;
If I had had an easy time, and not known poverty,
I*should have been a flighty thin? without a bit of
sen-^e.
I turne I ;ny hand to everything?to knit or bull l
a leace.
There weren't the folks to call on then that I
could g?n to- My,
For help was scare, the farm* were few, and l*d
no mean to pay.
I went to w ?ric with all my might and tried my
home t-i k-^eo,
But I can tell you many a night I've cried myself
to sleep.
I know the Lord h.13 prospered nn I've done the
best I could.
And I've stood in my lot and place as anybody
should.
The fann-l ind some folks would have sold I held,
bee rose I kn?w
Some day 'twould be good property, and all my
liopc3 com; true.
I've parted with It piece by piece?you see the
town has grown,
Just as John always said It would. If other folks
had known
And had the foresight that he hid! Instead of
that they told
How 1 should never get along unless the farm was
sold.
My boys grew fast and soon took hold, and then
my w .y was plain,
For all the money they had cost they soon brought
back atr&ln;
And like a busy hive of bees we were from morn
till nl?ht;
We had our health, the Lord be thanked! and that
mode work seem li$ht.
The children all have settled down In good homes
or their own,
Excepting Jane, and but for her I should be left
alone;
She had her chances too, but then she's not the
m irrylntr kind
I couldn't do without her now, I'm glad she stayed
behind.
Fm glad Tm mistress of my house; the children
often say
I must break up, and Jane and I were better off
to stay
With some of them, for I'm so old and Jane's not
over strong;
But I won't lit ten to their plans; I've made my
own too long.
My life seems like a book that's read and put up on
the shelf;
I used to be a hurrying round; I don't feel like
rav-elf;
Sometimes I'm tired of keeping still, I want to be
at work;
1 see so many things to do and I don't like to
shirk.
I used to have to toll and plan, and now I have to
Walt, ?
And I suppose I mustn't fret, but in a future
state*
I shall be sure to find my place and be some use
agiln.
For there we still shall serve the Lord?the Scripture
says It plain.
So it's my golden wedding day, though we've been
apart
; For forty ye<r*, and yet John knows that he has
kept my he irt.
And I know that he looks for me and waits for
me to come;
I've tried to do the best I could?and here or there
It's home!
Sarah O. Jewett.
?
Saturday Smiles.
? A man is known by his works. If you would
keep shady, dont work.
? Mother Eve i? responsible for a great deal of
man's sin and misery, but she never wore a big^,
j hat at the play.?Boston Transcript,
_ Tha lovu /?f mnnrtt! to fKn <*11 ??tl TA
t m Iiv ?v?v vi liivuvj to VJir ivmjv VI All VV1I. It
is always boat to pro to the root of things if you
would succeed in life.
? Candy pulls are In fashion again bnt they
are now called "glucosetenBlons.''? Philadelphia
News.
? " Some people," save Alphonse Karr, 44 are
always finding fault with nature for putting
thorns on roues; I always thank her for having
put roses on thorns."
? Miss Dora Apple of Chicago. Is suing Mr.
Stone of Wisconsin for breach of pi oniise, demanding
$30,000. And it serves him right. Mr.
Stone should have pared his Apple.? Louisville
Courier-Journal.
? Sarah Bernhardt Is married at last. Well,
every man has a skeleton in his closet.?Boston
Courier.
Always pay as you go," said an old man to
his nephew." "But, uncle,suppose I have nothing
| to pay with ?" "Then don't go."
? "I threw this off in ten minutes" softly said
| the poet, placing a manuscript on the editorial
i table. The editor said that when It came to
sj>eed no long-haired i>oc*t should distance him;
and he threw It off in less than ten seconds?off
the table Into the waste-basket.?Ex.
? The American palace hotel, to be built on
the Thames embankment. London, will be nine
stories high, accommodate 1,300 guests, ana will
be constructed strictly after the American fashion.
An expedition will soon start for Africa in search
of a suitable diamond for the clerk's breastpin.?
Lcnrell Courier.
? What to him was love or hope ? What to
him was Joy or care? He stepped on a plug of
Irish soap the girl had left on the topmost stair;
and his feet dew out like wild, fierce things, and
he struck each stair with a sound like a drum,
and the girl below with the scrubbing things
laughed like a fiend to'see him come.?E&.
? "Yes." said the Indiana legislator, "our
laws on divorce are rather easy, but we must encourage
immigration somehow, and It takes a
good deal to do that with fever and ague In the
air to buck against."?Boston PosL
-"How beautiful the dome of heaven this
evening!" said Angelica as she leaned heavily
ou hi ana. "The stars seem to look down upon
us." 4' O yes," said practical John, lt'? Impossible
for them to look up to us, you know. They
eawnt
? ?
A man was excused from serving as a juror
at Washington, Fa., lately, because be belonged
to tie Covenanter church, which holds the belief
that ours Is not ft Christian government, end
declared that he had oonseleufcioos aenplei
THE DEATH OF DAKWIX.
Ill* I.He and Works.
Charles R. Darwin, whose death was announced
yesterday, was born In Shrewsbury England.
February 12th, 1809, where he received the
el?n e its of his education at the local grammar
school. Mr. Darwin went iu 1S35 to the University
of Edinburgh, whence, afler two years of
study, he went to Christ's College. Cambridge.
At the latter place he took his degree In 1831,
and the same year volunteered as naturalist
aboard the Bea-le In its exploring expedition
nr<>und the world. The publication in
1839 of an account of his discoveries
in natural history and geology while on this
voyage was the beginning of a career
ol authorship extending through forty-three
years. A large number of books and papers
"from his pen on scientific subjects had appeared
when. in 1859. his fainons work on '-Origin of
Species by Means of Natural Selection" was
published. In it Mr. Darwin attempted to
account for the diverse forms of life on the
globe on a theory of continuous development
from simpler structures,without the intervention
of special creative flats at the origin of each
species. Large deductions were drawn by
others frmn the principles laid down, and
"Dfir.vini.sm" became the subject or hot
debate. A catalogue of the literature of
Darwinism contains 86 octave pasres of the
titles of books and 312 names of authors. In
1871 appeared ''The Descent of Man, and
Selection In Kelation to Sex*" a work complementary
to that on the origin of species. In 1
this work it was sought to prove that man is
descended from a lower order of animal?"from
a hairy quadru|>ed. furnished with a tail and
Krinted ears, probably arboreal in its habits."
r. Darwin is not, however, authority for the
doctrine that man is descended from the monkey.
so often credited to him. Nor can he be
considered the father of the doctrine of evolution,
though he was one of Its principal supporters.
Iu this, as in other fields, the Greeks
had anticipated modern thought. The first to
torin a distinct hypothesis of evolution in modern
times was Lamarck, a Frenchman, who In
1809 published his views, and Mr. Herbert
Spencer was the first to systematize it into a
philosophy of general application. Mr. Darwin
was famous for his habit of patient and careful
investigation, and with little turn for speculation,
confined himself to his studies iu natural
history and zoology.
WHAT DARWINISM IS.
Reducing the conception to the greatest possible
precision, Herbert Spencer defines evolu
tion as a change froin the homogeneous to the
heterogenec us, from the general to the special^
from the indefinite and simple to the definite
and complex. On this hypothesis, the universe
as it now exist is the result of an almost infinite
series of chances, "relat ed to and dej enient
upon each other, as successive steps, or rather
irrowths. constituting a progress analogous to
the unfolding or evolving of the parts of a
growing organism." This process of development
is considered to be "traceable in the formation
ut'tiie worlds in space, in the multiplication
of the types and species of plant3 and animals
on the globe, in the origination and diverity
of languages, literature, arts and sciences,
and in all the changes of human institutions
and society." In biology, as at present
employed, evolution is a general name tor "the
history of the steps by which any living being
has acquired the morphological and the physiological
characters which distinguish it. * *
No exception is* at this time, known to the
general law. established upon an immense multitude
of direct'observations, that every living
thing is evolved frotn a particle of matter in
which no trace of the distinctive characters of
the adult form of that living thing is dlseernable."
The doctriue of evolution, however, is
not identical with Darwinism, a term which
came iuto current use with the publication of
Mr. Darwin's "The Origin of Species" and
"The Descent of Man "
Darwinism Is one of the attempts to explain
the law or manner of evolution, finding the
cause of the differentiation of species to lie in
the struggle of the organism to adapt itself to
the constantly altering conditions of its environment.
These conditions of external life act
on plants and animals in their natural state
with an effect analogous to that by which artificial
cultivation or breeding by man can change
and improve the characteristics of the different
domestic plants and animals. This process of
the operation of natural circumstances, by
which those varieties or individuals best adapted
to their surroundings of climate, station, character
of soil, food-supply and the number and
kind of living being competing in the "struggle
for existence." are preserved ihe longest in life,
was called by Mr. Darwin "natural selection."
But he not only saw that the constant battle for
life going on among living creatures must be a
"winnowing and improving process, those least
adapted to the situation giving way before
those better adapted; * * * it was his merit to
discover that natural selection is capable of projntciiig
fitness between organisms and their circumstanccs.
and of discerning the importance
of the consequences that follow." Fromthe almost
general admission of naturalists that natural
selection was potent in the production of
varieties in species, Mr. Darwin went further,
aud held that one species sprang from anoth?r
"bv al one continued process of slow variation
and natural selection."
DARWIN'S THEORY OF EVOLUTION.
The article on "Evolution" in the Encyclopaedia
Brltannica, written by Professor Huxley and
James Sully, has the following regarding Mr.
Darwin:
The honor of working out this theory of evolution
on a substantial basis of fact belontrs to
England. Of the writers who have achieved this
result Mr. Darwin deserves the first notice.
Though modestly confining himself to the problem
of accounting for the evolution of the higher
organic forms out of the lower. Mr. Darwin has
done much to further the idea of a gradual evolution
of the physical world. The philosophical
significance of* the hypothesis of natural selection,
especially associated with Mr. Darwin, is
due. as Professor Uehnholtz points out, to the
fact that it Introduces a strictly mechanical conception
in order to accouut for those intricate
arrangements known as organic adaptations
which had before been conceived only in ateleological
manner..By viewing adaptations as conditions
of self-preservation Mr. Darwin is able to
explain how it is that the seemingly purposeful
abounds in organic nature. In so doing he has
done much to eliminate the teleological method
from biology. It is true that in his conception
of seemiugly spontaneous variations and of correlations
of growth he leaves room for the old
manner of viewing organic developments as controlled
by some internal organizing principle.
Yet his theory, as a whole, is clearly a heavy
blow to the teleological method.
Again. Mr. Darwin has trreatlv extended th?
scope of mechanical Interpretation by making
intelligible, apart firora the co-operation of intelligent
purpose, the genesis of the organic
world as a harmonious system ot distinct
groups, a unity in variety, having certain wellmarked
typical affinities. How greatly this arrangement
lias helped to support the idea ot an
ideal plan, we have had occasion to observe.
Mr. Darwin, in his doctrine of the organic world
as a survival, refers this appearance of systematic
plan to perfectly natural causes, and in so
doing he gives new meaning to the ancient
theory that the harmony of the world arises out
of discord. Once more," Mr. Darwin's hypothesis
is of wide philosophic interest, since it'helps to
support the idea of a perfect gradation in the
progress of things. The variations which he
postulates are alight, If not infinitesimal. and
only effect a sensible functional dr morphological
change after they have been frequently repeated
and accumulated by heredity.
Mr. Darwin's later work, in which he applies
his theory of the origin ot species to man, is a
valuable contribution to a naturalistic conception
of human development. The mind of man
in Its lowest stages of development is here
brought into close Juxtaposition to the animal
mind, and the upward progress of man is viewed
as effected by natural causes, chief among which
Is the action of natural selection. Mr. Darwin
does not inquire into the exact way in which
the mental and the bodily are connected. He
simply assumes tiiat, just as the bodily organism
is capable of varying in an indefinite number of
wavs. so may the mental faculties vary indei
finitely in correspondence with certain physical
changes. la this way he seeks to account for
all the higher mental powers, as the use of
language and reason, the sentiment of beauty
j and conscience.
Finally, Mr. Darwin seeks to give a practical
and ethical turn to his doctrine. He appears to
make the end of evolution the conscious end of
man's action, since he defines the general good
as "the rearing of the greatest number of Individuals
in lull health and vigor, and with all
their faculties perfect, under the conditions to
which they are subject." Further, In his view
of the future of the race, Mr. Darwin leans to
the idea that the natural process which has
effected man's first progress must continue to be
an Important factor in evolution, and that consequently,
it is not well to check the scope of
this process by undue restraints of population
and a charitable preservation of the incompetent.
TBI PHILOSOPHER AT HOME.
Trom Um London Truth.
A great peal of laughter fills the modest house
at Down. Not on* of these sharp metallic each" 1
tsnations which jar on the ear and set the teeth I
like the crackling of thorns under a pot, nor yet
the {ond laugh which speaks the Tacant mind,
but a rich Homeric langh, round and foil, musical
and jocund?a laugh to remember. The outburst
or merriment proceeds from the recluse of
Down, infinitely amused to hear that, while he
has been watching the tendrils of the vine and
examining the predatory habits of the sundew,
the microscope of The World has been focussed
upon the great observer himself; that, without
going through the preliminary process of pinntng
him to a cork like a cockchafer, he has been a
marked man for some time past; that when he
has imagined himseltmost secure atthe pleasant
bouse of his friend. Dr. Farr, discussing the light
and exhilarating subject of vital statistics, the
same penetrating orb was stilled fixed upon
him; that in the little garden where he
cultivated his plants for experiment,
"observation with extended view," was at his
elbow. "It is better so," says Mr. Darwin,
"than to be Interviewed and harassed with
questions which cannot be answered without
some appearance of vanity. Moreover it strikes
me as not proper that a man should communicate
anything to the author of a biographical
notice. He should behave as It already dead."
On any subject but himself he is the most free
and communicative of living philosophers.
Without an atom of scientific jealousy, he is
alwayB ready to expound his views, to narrate
the result of the delicate experiments on which
he is perpetually occupied and to asssist other
investigators from the stores of an experience
that has ranged over the whole field of natural
science and the conclusions of a mind trained to
reason closely on such facts as have been ascertained
by actual observation. No naturalist of
this or any other tim? has confined himself more
strictly to well-ascertained facts and devoted
more labor to original investigation. The
reason of this excessive care is to be
found in the keystone of the Darwinian
philosophy?La verite quand meme; the pursuit
of truth through all tlifflculties and without
regard to consequences. To this object be has
devoted his entire life, saving, of course, the
cheerful hours speut in his family circle?one of
the most united and affectionate in England?
and with his oldest friends. Sir Joseph Hooker
and Professor Huxley. Perhaps no merrier trio
of philosophers ever gathered together and enlivened
abstruse subjects with quaint quip and
crank, but neither of his two friends, genial
companions though they be, can approach Mr.
Darwin's pitch of hilarity. At a droll illustration
of Mr. Huxley's or a humorous doubt insinuated
in the musical tones of the president
of the Royal Society, the e3*es twinkle under
the massive overhanging brows, the Rocratic
head, as Professor Tyndall loves to call it, is
thrown back, and over the long white beard
rolls out sucti a laugh as we have attempted to
describe. Unfortunately there ar? moments
when Mr. Darwin can enjoy neither scientific
investigation nor friendly cjnverse; when sodden
fits of illness, to which he has been subject
since his manhood, lay him prostrate for days
together. Happily these attacks are only troublesome
while they last, and inflict no permanent
injury on his powerful frame. The long
wakeful periods of convalescence, too, are utilized
for observations which require almost constant
attention; so that the tables Inay be said
to be turned ou disease.
Mr. Darwin, like his friend Sir Joseph Hooker,
is an instance of hereditary transmission of peculiar
characteristics. He is the third of his
family in direct descent who have been fellows
of the Royal Society. He is the son of Dr. Robert,
Waring Darwin, F. R. S., and grandson of
Dr. Erasmus Darwin, author of "The Botanic
Garden," "Zoonomia, etc.,and by the mother's
side is grandson of Josiah Wedgwood. F, It. S.,
the celebrated manufacturer of pottery, and
founder of the works at Ktrur'a. In him. how
ever, the artistic element which dominated the
Wedswoods h&H beeu almost entirely overshadowed
by the scientific instinct which impels man
to fceek for knowledge for its own sake, without
the slightest admixture of interest or ambition.
For sculpture or pottery, or even for drawing,
except as an aid to botanical and zoological pursuits.
he cares very little, his collection of pictures
being confined to a portrait of old Dr. Darwin
and one of Joaiaii Wedgwood, hanging In
his dining room, and sketches of Sir Joseph
Hooker and Professor Huxley in the small study
whence have issued the "Origin of Species," the
"Descent of Man," and a large number of equally
valuable but less generally known works on
zoology, botauy aud geology. It is the fate of Mr.
Darwin, like that of many other celebrated men. .
to be best kuown by the works which he would
himself hardly assign the highest rank among his
many productions. The popular mind, smitten
with a taste for a smattering of science, naturally
pounces most eagerly upon those scientific
words which approach the borderland of speculation.
and has thus done him but scant justice;
the hurrying and blundering millions not
pausing to distinguish between those statements
which he puts forward as matters ot fact, ascertained.
beyfcnd all possibility of doubt, by experiment,
and the hypotheses which 'with
admirable caution he sometimes bases upon
them. This is grossly unfair to the most candid
of philosophers, who cares nothing for his theories,
and, as in the well-known case of the
bees in the' "Origin of Species,"
frankly admitted the difficulty of reconciling
the phenomena of nature with
his hypothesis of divergence. Thus it is
not uncommon to hear persons of supposed
sc.entilic taste, who chatter glibly enough about
protoplasm and the monad, compare Mr. Darwin's
most popular works with the "Vestiges of
Creation," a mere ^scientific romance, founded
on the daring speculations of Lamarck and the
nebular theory of Laplace, the famous astronomer,
who, when asked by Napoleon why he did
not attribute the structure of the universe to
one great architect, is said to have replied that
he "had no occasion to adopt that hypothesis."
Mr. Darwin's books are founded upon no hasty
generalization irom facts collected by others,
but on patient and independent observation.
Yet so persistent have been his labors that a
mere catalogue of them would fill a column In
this journal. Since his return from the memorable
voyage of the Beagle he has been constantly
present to the scientific world. It was a
happy thought of Captain Fitz lloy to offer, on
setting out in 1831. to give up part of his own
cabin to any naturalist who would accompany
the ship on"her now historic survey. Mr. Darwin
had Just taken his degree at Cambridge, his
preliminary studies having been made at
Shrewsbury school, under Dr. Butler (afterward
bishop 0( Litchfield), and then for two years at
the University of Edinburgh, when he devoted
some time to marine zoulogy. and read his first
papers before the Plinian society on the movement
of the ova of Flustra. On hearing of Captain
Fitz Roy's offer he at once volunteered his
services without salary, but on-condition that
he should have the entire disposal of bis collections,
all of which be deposited in the various
public institutions.
His various work covers an immense area of
thought, extending over zoology, botauy and
geology, in each of which he has made the 'mark
of an original and powerful mind enricheu by
long research. The bulk of work of this kind
conveys but the dimmest idea of the toil involved
In the collection of material, and spent
In experiment and observation. In actual writing
Mr. Darwin works on a plan of his own. in very
short spells?never exceeding a couple of hours
nnrl nAVAr until Hio mnrlnnon lioa
? ? I *. WVM.M.v.tvv MUWIt Vliv VIIMVUW I IUK1
been carefully collected, arranged and duly
pondered over.
In ono respect, despite his vexatious attacks
of Illness, Mr. Darwin must be considered a fortunate
man. Durinsr the whole of his life he
has been in easy circumstances; above the toil
of earning an income. Unlike many philosophers,
he has not had the mortification of spending
his best hours In the drudgery of official
routine or the hardly less wearisome task of
teaching. He has been enabled to devote his
entire time to his favorite pursuits, and since
his marriage with his cousin. Miss Emma Wedgewood,
has resided at Down, amid the rich and
vailed scenery of one of the prettiest parts of
Kent. As his numerous family has grown up
around him he has been relieved of all the cares
which distract the scientific worker In the heat
and turmoil of active life. He leads a truly
calm and philosophic existence, unvexed by the
contemplation of weekly bills and the signing
of checks. In bis wife and family he is especially
happy, being spared the pain of degenerate
offspring. His eldest son, William Darwin,
is a banker # Southampton; the second. George,
took high honors at Cambridge, and Is now a
Fellow of Trinity; the third, Frank, who has
inherited his father's ill-health, acts as his secretary;
the fourth. Leonard, is an officer in the
artillery, and distinguished himself as one of
the sc entific corns sent to observe the transit
of Venus; the fifth, Horace, is an excellent
mathematician. One married and one unmarried
daughter complete a family whose constant
care is to relieve its head of all possible trouble
or anxiety.
Thus, free from the disturbing influences of
the world, he can well afford to treat with admirable
good humor the attacks of scientific
opponents, and the jokes of ignorant folk incapable
of understanding either bis books or
himself. When young he pursued field sports
with combined interest of the hunter and the
naturalist; but of late years he has found bis
chief relaxation in reading the popular novels of
the day, feeling Hke AUguste Comte, that the
scientific bow requires frequent unbending. In
the treatment of books and specimens be resembles
Mr. Carlyie?caring nothing for them
when read or thoroughly investigated. His
books and plants are always at the service of his
friends and neighbors, among whom one of the
nearest la Sir John Lubbock. Finally, let It be
of absolute truth at all hazards, he abhors tampering
with or shaping facts to suit preconceived
theories. It is. perhaps, hardly too much to say
that no man has exercised a more powerful influence
on the study of natural history since
Aristotle himself.
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LOUISIANA STATE LOTTERY.
PARTICULAR NOTICES.
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A SPLENDID OPPORTUNITY TO WIN A FORTUNE.
FIFTH GRAND DISTRIBUTION. CLASS E.
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144th MONTHLY DRAWING.
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Incorporated in 1868 for twenty-five yean by the Legislature
for Educational and Charitable purpose*? wiui
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By an overwhelming popular vote Its franchise was
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ITS GRAND SINGLE NUMBER DRAWINGS WILL
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IT NEVER SCALES OR POSTPONES
Look at the following distribution;
CAPITAL PRIZE $30,000.
100,000 TICKETS AT TWO DOLLARS EACH.
HALF TICKETS. ONE DOLLAR.
-LIST OF PRIZES.
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2 Prizes of $2, MX) 6,000
6 Prizes of! 1,000 6,000
20 Prizes of 1500 10,000
100 Prizes of 1100 10,000
200 Prizes of SO 10,000
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APPROXIMATION PRIZES.
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9 " * 200 1,800
9 " " 100 900
1867 Prizes, amounting to $110,400
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For further information, write clearly, giving full address.
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"yOYAGTO EU ROPR
J. W. BOTELER * HON
Are the A#*nt* far the sale of Tickets In thi* Di?trlet<rf
Um
I KM AN PTKAMKHIP OO.
rirtlw |Topo?iiif to vtnt Europe o*u obtain iD la*
nnauou by at*ilyinc to
ml7-*m J. w. BOTELER ft HOW.
pOTOMAC TRANSPORTATION LINK.
Ob and after MARCH 1Mb the RTEAMER Rt'T, Ouv.
tain W. C. GE^XiHFAiAN. *i l W>ave HTV1 HKNHOV8
WHARF, foot of 7tb atreet. EVEKY SUNDAY. at four
'clock p.m.. for Baltimore and Riear l*udiu?ceAil
Klw Freight mint be Prepaid.
fieturumr, amve in Winhimrtoo every Saturday nl?M?
STEPHENSON ft BRO.. Asum,
mlft-ftai 7th *tr*f< Wharf and Cor. 14th and Pa. a*%
jjoncati
FOR POTOMAC RIVER LANDTNO*.
On and after NOVEMBER 8t>. 1M1. the ateanw*
ARKOWSMITH will leave bar wftarf, foot of 7th atreat.
at 7 a. m. every MONDAY. THURSDAY and KATURDAY
for an river lan&nv*. On MONDAY m far aa
Nonuni Ferry. On THl'RSDAf. Mnouai. CurrioHian.
Li<i'i>aniU'*u and feu den n v H?v -uv-a'* Wharf,
Co? ronV and Howard'*. On SATURDAY. Cumonan
and Laoaardtown.
UK JOHN E. WoOD. A*??L.
J?AMBURG LINE.
WEEKLY LINEOF STEAMERS
LEAVING NEW TORE EVERY THURSDAY
AT 2 P. M.
FOR ENGLAND, FRANCE AND GERMANY.
For Paaaac* apply to
C. B. RICHARD ft 00General
Pa<wen?rer /Umta.
x crotavv, ion.
Or to PERCY G. SMITH.
1361 and 619 Pennsylvania iTftin*. apl
J^ORFOLK~AND MEW KOM BTEAMER8.
THE STEAMFR LADY OF THE LAKE
Win taw h? wh*ri, foot or 61h street, every ta)XDHf,
WEDNESDAY aud FRIDAY, at 6 o'clock p.m.,
trr at PineyPtanuPoiut i??>ko*it and Fortress Mooro^
CONNECTING AT NORFOLK Willi I HK B?*TON
AND PhOVlOENCE STEAMERS.
First-claaa Fare to Fortran Man me aud Norfolk ..Bit
Sccond-class Fare to Fortress Monroeand Nnrt >lk.(l M
F.rst-claaa Fin to Piney Point and Point Lookout.. l.M
Second-claae Fan to Pine? point and Punt L?>k<mt. 79
Brtununc. taw Norfolk TUESDAY8, THURSDAYS
and SATURDAY K. at four o'clock p.m.
THE NEW YORK 8TEAMKR8
JOHN GIBSON and E. C. KNIGHT -ill r?'im* tMr
tr.??. nv n? Pier 41, Eaat River, Now York, rrarj
SATURDAY? at four o'clock p.m., and Geoiwntowa
every FRIDAY, at T oviu* a.in. For iiarncutara
aiiily to arent. 63 Water street. iteogpetown.
Ttcketc and staterooms - can he secured at panaH
Office. 613 16th street National Metropolitan Rank
Building; B. & u 'J irket oft,.*, l.-61 k iim-j i\?iua ?veBi.i't
t?t. Man; Hotel, and at b > t.
oc28 ALFRED WOOD. Hecivtarj.
J^EW YORK ROTTERDAM.
The flnrt-claa* Steamers of thla T/*?a.
"AMSTERDAM, " "RdTTKIlDAM,"
**HCH1EDAM.* "W. A. SCIIOLTEN,"
T. CALAND," aud "MAAfL*
Carrying the U. S. Mails to the Netherlands. Vvive Wakfc.n
Stares, Brooklyn. regularly, on V EDNESDAY.
lirsttWnn, 960-* . 1^0. Steerium. (M.
H. CAZAUX, General A pent, j, South w l.i.im Ki"?t
New York. For i<aat>aire apply to W. G. MKT/EROTT
'4 CO.. 9*25 Pennsylvania avenue, Wachunt.>n,. or K.
H. JOHNSON. Afrcnt, National Safe Depoirfi HuiRhnr,
comer New York a\euue aud 16th street north u?*t. JalT
QUNARD LINE.
NOTICE!
LANK ROUT*.
TBF CUNARD STEAMSHIP COMPANT MMI IXDL
BETWEEN NEW YORK AND LIVERPOOL
CALLING AT CORK HARBOR.
FROM PlElt 40. N. R.. NEW VORK
. W (I., _?j Aj'.. ia Ued 31 May.
Catalonia.. Mel.. 3 May. b. tti ia.... We ...?l way.
G- ma t* '<..10 May. Cit-kiid .. We .. IJunsb
Scrvia Wed., 17 M-*-. ? -n>c fced.. 1i -'nue.
AND EVER, ?. H? ES AY HMii Nlm iOUK?
.. iitk or rinua".
"""nlWOii ..r i .ij; ; , . cinw "*"t' *<o->a.
Steerape at very km ratea. Steer?r* tickets from U*
crpool and Oueenatowu and aU other pertsu/ Europe at
lowest rate*.
Ihrnmrh bill* of laaen frtven for Belfast. niaaaiiML
Bavre, Antweri> aud other portoan the Continent aal
for Mediterranean porta.
For freight and paeeare apply at the Company's ofloa
No. 4 Bowiimr Green. or both steerage and oabtn to
OTIS B1GLLOW * 00.. 60i 7th street. Waahincto^
C VERNON H. BROWN k CO.. New forkj
Crto Mam. O'llH BIG FLOW k CO..
Jai 12 (06 <th afreet. Waahiutfcea.
VTORTH GERMAN LLOYD?
X* Steamship Link betwun Nrw Tot*, HaVU
London, Southampton and Bksmkn.
The steamers of this company will saii EVERY SATURDAY
from Bremen Pier, foot of td streak Hobnkem
Ratea of passage-.?From New York to Ham Loudon.
Southampton and Bremen, first cabin, f 100, second
Pcabin. 960; steerage, $30; prejisio steerage cerunoate^
7. For freight or passage apply to OELR1CHS A ?X)..
Boa Hup Green, NewYork. W. G. METZEROTT &
CO.. 92b Pennaylvania avenue north weak Acwuts far
WaemnKtoc Jan 13
RAILROADST '
rpHE GREAT
1 PENNSYLVANIA ROUT*
TO THE NORTH. WF.*T AND SOUTHWEST.
DOUBLE TRACK- SPLENDID SCENERY.
STEEL RAILS. MAGNIFICENT EQUIPMENT.
IN EFFCT JANUARY 22o. 18ft.
TKiJVS LeAVB WAaBlMOTON, FROM STATION, CoKiraa
or 6th aj?d B Htkekts, as Followh:
tor Pttttbunr and t'?e West, Chicago Limited Expreaa
of Pullman Hotel and sleeping Cars at 9 :3" a. m.,
daily; Fast Line, 9 30 a. m. daily, witU Ntaepinjr
Care from Hsrriabniw to Cincinnati. Western
Esiirees. 7 SO p. m. nailjr, with I'alaoe Cars to
Pitt*burfr and Cincinnati. Mail Exprea^ 60 p.
m. daily for Pittubur* and the West.
I BALlIMORE AND IHOiOMAC RAIEROAD.
ForCanandatirua, Rocheeter, Buffalo, Niatrara. IMa
m. daily, exoept Saturday, w;th PaUoe Oars to
i'anandaunia.
For Wiliiamsport. Iy?ck Haven and Etak^ at t;M >
bi. dai y. except Suurtay.
For New YorV and the Itat, ? 00 a.m., 10;S0 a.MU..
1:30. ?:M) aud 10:20 p.m. On Sunday. 1:30. ? M
and 10:'A?j>.m. Limited Fxprees of Pullman Parlor
Cars, 9:30 a. m. dally, except Sunday.
For Brooklyn. N. Y., aU tlirougb trains connect at JerwitJK
hAfita n# Unonklim A
41wK transfer to Fulton street, Avgidimr i rnlrU
UuTivre acroes New York City.
For Ph ladelnhia. 8:00 a.m.. 10 30 a.m.. 1:30. 6 40.
9 50 and 10:20 p.m. ?>D Sunday. 1 30. ft 40. ? M
and 10:V0 |>.m. Limited l iin? 30 t,m.
_ daily, cxoert Sunday.
For Baltimore, 6 40. 8 00. 9 30. 10:90 a.m.. and 1 .Ml
4:20, 4:40. 5:40. 7 30. 0:60 and 10:l0 I .m. On
Sunday. 8.00. V30 a.m., 1:80, * 40. i so. I K
and 10:20 n.m.
For Pope's Creek line 6:40 a.m. snd 4:40 p.m.. daily.
except Sunday.
For Amia^olia, 6..0 a.m and 4:40 p.m., daily, ennui!
ALEXANDRIA. AND FRF.DERICKBBURO KAILWAY.
AND ALEXANDRIA AND WASHINGTOM
RAILROAD.
For Alexandria, 6 30, 7.20, 8:20, 11:00 and 11-26 a.m.|
4:20, 6.-00, 6:30. 8:00 and 11:? p.m. On Sunday.
at6 30. 9:20. 11:00 and 11:26 a.m., and k 00 p.m.
For Richmond and the South. 6:90 and 11.26 a.m.?
_ daily, and 6:00p.m., daily, except Sundav.
Trains leave Alexandria (or v<aeUimrton, 6:00, 8:0A
8:53 and 10:00 a.in.; 12:407 3 0(1. 6 00, 7:00and
9:20 p.m., and 12:00 midnicht. On Sunday, at
8:05, 8:63 and 10:00 a.m.; 7:00 and ? 20 p.m.
Ticket* and information at tbe ofltoe northeast oomer
of 13th street and Pennsylvania avenue, and at the atetion,
where orders can be left for the cL<<otrlng' of tat>
K*g* to destination from hotels and residences.
. J- R- WOOD,
General Paaannrnw Agent.
FRANK THOMPSON, General MauaSerT J28
JJALTIMORE A OHIO RAILROAD.
THE MODEL FAST, AND THE ONLY LINE
TBE EAST AND THE WEST. VIA WASHING TOIL
DOUBLE TRACK! JANNEY COUPLER! STEEL
RALLS!
SCHEDULE TO TAKE EFFECT MONDAY, JAMM
_ UARY 2:ii> 1HH ?.
A. * LEAVE WASHINGTON.
t3:36-CBICAGO, CINCINNATI AND ST. LOTTIE
jrAbl EXPREbb. b<eepinir Cant to Crounuatt.
Si i>>uu and ('tiirasrt.
6:00?Baltimore, Elttoott City, and Way Stations.
6:60?Baltimore, Annapoha. and Way (Piedmont
Straabonc. WincheaterTHatrantown. and Way. via
Kenfcjr.)
f7:4ft?BALTIMORE EXPREaa.
8:10?Point of bocks and Way Statlona.
8:15?PHILADELPHIA. NEW YORE AND BOSTON
? EXPRES8. Parlor Car* to New York.
8:40?i/I ALNTON AND VALLEY EXPRE88 (connects
for Hsvcrstown and at Point at Rocks for
Frederick.)
tf:00?Baltimore, Hyattrville and Laurel Ex proa
SU<|? at BeltaMiie, Annapolis Junction* Jcesupa
and Urn'# On Hunoais stona at ail rtauoraa.
10:00?BALTIMORE EXPRESS (stops at Hyattsrllla
L'-iitv.)
tlO:40?PITT8BUBG, CHICAGa CINCINNATI AMD
ST. LOUIS Patlor ana hswyian
Can.
P.M
12.10?BaltiiEore, ERJcott City, Annapolis and Way
htaooDs.
ftn^,2 ^HU-"'ELPBI4 iKD *** .
8:40- -Baltimore ana Way Stations, (Winchester, Frederick,
Matftrstown and W ay, via Relay.)
4:30?BALTIMORE, HVATTSYII.LEAKD LAUREL
EXl'RLStt, (Frederick, via Relay, stops at lnn^
olis Junction.)
t4:40?Baltimore, Annaoolix and War Stations.
t4:4??i'oini at Kocka, Frederick, Hinrerstown. Wtochesier
and Way Stations. (On Sunday to Pointef
^ocks and Way Stations only.i ?
t6:46?BALI 1 MORE EGRESS. (Martinsbui* ?4
. ^Way, via Relay, Slops at HyettavUlaend 1 ?dj
8:06?point ot Rooks andWsy SUOoua.
t7.00?Baltimore and Way- (iUttnoa. _
n :40?BALTlMOItK, HYATTSViLLE AND LAURBL
xi* JL* e%
t8.10?pi l"i> B URG. CLEVELAND and DETROIT
EXPELS*. Sieejnnir Urn. 4
tf :S5?PHILADELl IliA, NEW YORK and BOS TOE
EXPRESS. Sleeping Cars to Nov York. Stgp at
B j attsviiie and Laurel.
ft:47?<.HIOAOvJ, CINCINNATI and 8T. LOUI8 EXPRESS.
sleeping Can to \ nif-man ana CM*
C KO. _
tSundAf only. Other tntns dai^r, auspi
All sins trcm Ws -4dnston stop at Belay Btotkm.
Lor further information appiy at the BattuucvsMf
Cbiolicket Ottoe , Waahin^ton tonbon. ?1? and m
Pennrj ivanU avenoe, jcrnor i4tb strost. whrse artpm
?iUbatakenfor bacaaato be ?hn*ed anA iirtwi
ny point m mectt?-.
THE TEiLDES.
jpYCKTT^
By^TKERtt, ^ ^ ?

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