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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, June 14, 1882, Image 3

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TKIK TEXAS (OUIIOV.
A nrmbcr of the Craft Ham a Kindly
\V??rd fur lliin*
' Pony Bill." claiming to be an ex-cowboy,
bus been writing np the characteristic* of the
claw in the Macon ((la.) T'elryraph. He Bays
that the nam** cowboy originated in Texas, and
Is applied to those hired to herd and handle ;
cuttle raised wild on the prairies. The life being !
outdoor and tull of hardship and danger, require*
a healthy, wiry. active man to endure
It. Nearly all those following it for wages are j
yonng men, hence the name cowboys. Cattle !
man and stock man is the more dignified term
wed In referring to cattle owners and live stock
raisers. In old Mexico, California, Nevada and
Arizona, where Spaniards are largely employed
in the business, and where Spanish is more or
less spoken, the cowboy Is called aVaquero, i
tor kay ra. a cowherd. In Buenos Ayres aini j
the va^t pampas of South America.on account of
his nomadic life, he is called a tinacho. (jicaheft?,
a motherle ?. fatherless. homeless one. In
Australia he is called a stockrider. In Colorado,
Wyoming, and nearly all tiie Kooky mountain
grazing region, he goes by the ridiculous
name of cow puncher.
A full trail outfit consists of foreman, cook.
hor?*e-lierd?*r. t>vo pointtTs, two flankers, and
four drivers. With this force from 1.000 to |
1.SU0 of w stern cattle. and from 2.000 to 3.000
b?'^d if Colorado natives or Texans can he driven
over the trail at a*i average speed of eight or ten
miles j?er day and to a distance of 500 to 1,600
lulies. For shorter distances a speed of twelve
to twenty miles per day is often attained.
Whether on range or tra.l. the cowboy hassuffi- ;
cie.it always of d i jger and hardship to endure,
tut it is on the long "drives" over the trail,
often la-ting over six months, that all the grit
and sand in his nat ure are needed to enable him
to "stav with it ' till the drive Is done. Between
hard riding a!? day, sleeepJess hours on guard
around the herd at night, rain. hail, snow, frost,
blistering hot days on the treeless plains, blinding.
suffocating du>t. half blind bucking ponies,
stampede*. the possibility of losing his scalp,
sometime short rations, and almost daily stagnant
alkahne u;:te-. the trail man needs to be
made of nood leather to last well.
Whether on range or ttail. each cowboy has
"spotted" out to him. for his own exclusive :
riding, from three to six ponies. These, like !
the cattle, are raised wild and free on the range ,
till caught to be l>roken. They seldom become j
entirely gentle, but are always more or less :
wild and intractable. Whenever needed for use !
they have to lie Toped" (lassoed), und every
mother's son of them will buck whenever it
feels fresh and lively. This bucking is a vice
peculiar to the western horse. The writer has
never seen a horse bred east of the Mississippi
river buck. Bucking consists of bowing up the
back, lowering the hea t, and jumping stifTlegged.
just as a buck deer does when killing a
snake?hence the name. If an inexperienced
rider is subjected to a severe bucking, he is
apt to wish he never had l?een Imrn. The jar is
simply agony, and riders have sometimes suffered
concussion of the brain, bleeding of the
llin?r?4 !in(l iluul l?n/?L-?n?# *-"*tA * --
m u Mill* IX * U '/HI 1 " uv rv 111 ^ . r I 'Hi! ?A' I' > i -W? ) |
head of ponies. according to size, are sufficient I
for an outfit. They are final!, and it is simply i
astonishing how the diminutive little grass- fed
ponies will carry a ri?ler and riding rig*-about
200 to 350 pounds?all day long in a sweeping j
lope that covers easily from forty to sixty miles.
There are several breeds of them, prime favor- j
Ites anion? which are the mustang of California .
ami Texas, and tl.e Ind>.m pony of the northwest.
The method of raising and handling wild cattle
may U- briefly stated thus: In winter the
cattle, unherded and uncared for. run loose
wherever they please. In the spring the various
outfits iro out on a general round-np. Every
day all the cattle within a radius of ten miles or
more are driven together and rounded-up " at
?ne place. Each outfit "cuts out " and herds
separately its own brand of cattle. Tlve calves
and short yearlings are trimmed, branded, and
marked. If contracts have been made to drovers.
the required number ;ire gathered, classed,
tallied and turned over to them at the date
promised. Day by day the round-ups move on.
often working over a scope of country 200 miles
square 140.000 square miles), till the inclement
weather of fall begins. Then the round-up seaton
is done. Wherever the outfit moves it carries
its bedding, grub and cooking utensils in
wagons, where the country is smooth, and on
Kick animals where it is rough. At night the
>>s sleep, soldier fashion, on the earth in their
blankets, very seldom possessing the luxury of
a tent.
If the average cowboy have any love for the
beautiful at ail it is for his silver-mounted horserig.
his gundy sash and tassels, and for the
buxom prairie girls, of whom he sings songs
every night on herd around the cattle. Lo! the
Indian, is becoming rather suppressed and harmless,
but still in the far away regions of the
northwest and southwest, there is sometimes
Ju?t enough possibility of his raising hair to
keep cowboys interested and awake on guard.
However, he is never sorry when the drive and
Its terrible hardships are over. The ponies are
either sold or sent back to the range on hoof in
care of some of the most trusty boys. The cattle
are either sold outright or shipped by rail to the j
great cattle markets of St. Louis. Kansas City,
and Chicago. Most Texas and southwestern cattle
get to the two former, all northwestern and many
Texan go to Chicago. One cowboy to every
live carloads is required to go along with the
cattle to keep them ''punched up"' from lying
down in the cars and being trampled to death
by the other cattle. This is how the "cow- j
puncher" obtained his Colorado name. Every
twenty hours the cattle in the transit are unloaded
at immense stock yards, where they are
permitted to rest.feed and water for four hours.
lh*? is done both as a humane act and to ore
vent shrinkage and loss of flesh. Arrived at
market the cattle are unloaded finally at the
stock yards and pass into the hands of the stock
commission men, who sell them. Some are resiiipped
to iw.ints farther eastward; some go to j
Kuroj?e alive, some to packing-houses and beef
Canneries, some to wholesale butchers, some to
Illinois and Iowa farms to be corn-fattened.some
to distilleries to be slopped, a few are sold for
work oxen, and if it be cold weather many are
slaughtered and shipped abroad in refrigerators.
After "doing the town** for a few days, the
cow puncher, being provided with return passes,
rolls out for his old range. maybe 2.000 miles
away. Most of the southwestern roads run a
rough kind of emigrant sleeper free, especially
for him.
In a region whore competing railroads are
hugely dependent on their live stock traffic,
cowboys and stockmen are careful 1) fostered by
them.
Arrived back on his old stamping grounds, he j
seeks some kind of work for support during the j
winter, and generally swears never to "punch I
up" another bovine quadruped while he lives,
but in t lie spring he is <ure to hire out as a cow boy
.it the very first op|M>rtunity. and joyously
gives hint self up to the free, reckless lite of the
ra:< re r endures airain the hardships and romantic
incidents of the trail*.
Having -?hown who the cowboys are. we will
now end u..r to describe what they are. Helng ;
nxule up of suc h mixed material the task is dif- i
ficutt. One writer has said they are half angel, |
with heart - compassionate and tenderly liberal
with comrades in distress, and half devil, indifferent
to the sufferings of a wounded enemy,
cruel in the use of girt ii and spurt; their ponies,
and totally unmindful of the agoii/.ing bawls of
cattle enduring the bloody edge of the knife and
ttie red hot torture of the branding iron. Another
writer, mindful of some gallant cowboys
w ho have stamped their name?- indelibly on border
history , has said that the now unwrltten-up
hero of the coming novelist will be a cowboy. !
Many cowboys, and they are the best, are bred
to the business from childhood, but the majority
are simply wild young fellows from all callings
and grades of society, brim full of romance
and energetic force and a thirst for adventure
on the plains. With present facilities for reaching
the border by rail, thousands such are pouring
there daily. Some ten or twelve years ago
the co*l(ov was an Ignorant, brutish lout from
Texas, but to-day the man who tackles the average
cowboy in conversation will find him
quite up to the modernisms of the age. The
Cowboys are made up of just such adventurous
elements as armies are recruited from in time
of foreign war.
Classically educated young men cut loose a
little too early from the galling restraint* of
college life, young mechanic*, embryo medicos,
tooth butchers, young railroaders, youths with
souls above office work and counter hopping,
very many young men from the south who were
never taught any way to be self-sustaining?all
these and many others arrive out west, find no
room for non-producers in that land of rush and
rustle, and gladly turn to the free and romantic,
but terribly hard lite of a cowboy.
When'round-ups and trail work Is over rangemen
ana trailmen congregate In the towns of
live stock regions, to have, as they express It,
"a little time of their own."
It Is then that occur those bloody tragedies
which, glaringly sub-headed, blazon the columns
of sensational sheets. The cowboy, as a rule,
possesses abundance of phy sical courage. A few
days' work with broncho ponies and wild cattle |
thin out all those who scare easily. When the
cowboy fights, he fights desperately, and generally
having a forty-four caliber pistol at his hip,
he uses it too often rather freely and effectively
on the impul^ of the moment. " When he shoots
he shoots to kill, but seldom slioots at all unless
wrongfully dealt with. We do not defend 4?lra
In this, nor la his shameful orgies nor reckless
as.
waste of his hard-earned money. We simply
wish it known that it is the few and not the
majority who do this. Very many cowboys r.de
the range all summer and return "east ana south
to spend the winter in quiet enjoyment with
frieudd and relative*. Very many cowboys are
from the south proper, especially Tennessee,
Kentucky and Georgia.
In the suppression of Indian outbreaks and
swift annihilation of border outlaws, the cowboy
has proven always a most reliable and effective
instrument. The Texas Rangers are nearly
all cowboys, and cowboys of grit and leather at
that. The writer has a very dear friend a cowboy,
who was last heard from as a government
scout near the White river (Ute) agency, In Colorado,
pay $150 per month', and a royal good
time during |>eace.
As population increases, and the grazing
regions are settled up. there will come a time
when the raining of wild cattle on government
lands, as at present, will be impossible. Then
the cowboy, like OtlwUo, "his occupation
gone," will have to seek his living in some
other industry. Natural inclinations will lead j
him to outdoor camp life, and as long as he can
secure such work lie will prefer freighting and j
packing to the drudgery of hiring out as a j
ranch hand. Stripped of his rig, than which
there is none more becoming or picturesque in j
the world, all his marked peculiarities of man- 1
ner and language ground off smooth, he will '
be reduced to the common level of common- j
place people. Possibly the change may better j
his happiness and usefulness, for it is a truth
that mounted men. leading a nomadic life, are
bad when bothered?witness Arabs, Bashi 1
Bazouks. Tartars, our own horseback Indians. |
and va-as, our cowboys. Too often the most '
daring criminals are from horseback people, j
Possibly it were better to unhorse the cowboy,
tut you can never get him to part his hair in
the middle, wear plug silk hats, and rig himself ;
out in dog-eared collars, bald-faced shirts, and
other toggery affected by our vast horde of useless
cityfled non-producers. He is made of
other stuff.
The Code Fully Explained*
From tho Brooklyn Ea;<'e.
i. "?r i ?? ? ? -
-- ,??y dear, sam .Mrs. spoopendyke. examining
the baby's feet critically, to pee if they were
both alike, " my dear, I pee that one of the
strikers, or capital, has been hurt; do you know
the facts aliont it?"
"How hurt? what did it fay?" asked Mr.
Spoopendyke, turning from the glass and strapping
his razor.
' I don't remember exactly, but he went down
to a slaughter-house to get something for his
family, and somebody shot him in the legs."
' That's the way it happened, was it ?" demanded
Mr. Spoopendyke, grinning through his
lather. ' He didn't go to his family for a pair
of leirs and somebody shot him in the slaughterhouse,
did he? Nor he didn't go down to his
legs for a slaughter-house, and somebody shot
him in the family ! That wasn't the way it read,
was it ?"
" No-o-o, I think not." replied Mrs. Spoopendyke,
dubiously, " I'm suje it was something
about a slaughter-house and legs. Do you know
how it happened ?"
"Yes, 1 know how it happened!" mocked Mr.
Spoopendyke. pegging away at his visage with
the razor. " If I hadn't found out away from
home I'd always been nuzzled about it, though.
Two gentlemen fou-rht a duel, and one got shot.
That's all there is in it."
" I knew there'd he some trouble as soon as I
read about those strikes," confidently continued
Mrs. Spoopendyke.
What's the strike to do with It?" vociferated
Mr. Spoopendyke. "Think he struck for another
shot? (iot a notion he struck for more
leirs. haven't ye? It would have been a bad
idea, that?" soliloquized Mr. Spoopendyke.
rather impressed with the combined originality
and utility of that class of strike.
"Did he get shot in both legs?" queried Mrs.
Spoopendyke. "It must have been a cannon
ball, or else he held his legs in front of each
other."
"That's the way he did it." moaned Mr.Spoopendyke.
"They always do that. When they
are tight inir a duel they sit down like a tailor or
a Turk. What d'ye think they tight with, forts?
(Jot some kind of a vague idea that they tight
with line of battle ships? Who said anything
aliout cannon balls? Pistols. I tell ye! They
fought with pistols, and one of them hit the
other! Roll that information around in your
ten acre intelligence!"
"Certainly," faltered Mrs. Spoopendyke. "But
tell me, dear, why sh(>nld one man shoot another
for goinir to the slaughter house?"
Holy herring!" ejaculated Mr. SiHjooendyke.
"He went there to get shot. It was agreed
upon. The man who shot him had reflected on
his honor and he went thereto satisfy it."
"And did it satisfy his honor to shoot him in
the leirs?" asked Mrs. Spoopendyke.
"That was as near as he could get to it. I
tell you that when a man fights a duel he wipes
out an insult, whether he gets shot in the legs
or the ear. It makes no difference."
"I should think it would," murmured Mrs.
Spoopendyke. "It would to me. So bis honor
is ail right now, is it?"
"Of course it is," replied Mr. Spoopendyke,
wiping his face. "Suppose you can reason on
the subject without any further information from
me?"
"I guess so," ruminated Mrs. Spoopendyke.
"As I understand it, if a man's honor is hurt all
he's got to do is get shot in the legs, thouirh I
don't see why he didn't shoot hlmseli, unless it
was that he couldn't reach around.'*
"That's just the reason!" roared Mr. Spoopendyke.
"He shot at himself in the looking glasH
ail the morning, and couldn't make it work, so
he hired a man to do it for him! It took your
shot tower intellect to see into it! What you
want now Is a squint in one eye and some dod
gasted friends to interfere to be a revised edition
of the measly code! If you only had somebody
to chalk off six paces on you and a squad
of police with a beuch warrant, you'd be a regular
Bladensburg! I'm going out to tight a
duel and get shot! Think you'd understand it
then? If I had a bullet through both legs,
would you want any more information?'*
"No, dear," sighed Mrs. Spoopendyke. and as
her husband tossed his shaving brush into the
baby's crib and slammed out the door, she
beiran to think that a man shouldn't keep his
honor in his legs if they couldn't take better
care of it.
The CauacM and Care of Old Age.
From the Gentltman'a Magazine.
L. Langer has recently been engaged In the
comparative analysis of human fat at different
ages. He finds that infant fat is harder than
that of adults or old men, that there are oil
globules in our fat but none in that of babies;
the microscoi>e shows one or two oil globules in
every fat cell of the adult, while very few have
tat crystals. The fat cells of the infant contain
no oil glcibules, and nearly every cell contains
fat crystals. "Infant fat forms a homogeneous,
white, solid, tallow-like mass, and melts at 45
deg. C.," while adult fat standing in a warm
riM.?m separates into two layers; the lighter and
larger is a transparent yellow liquid which
solidifies below the freezing point of water, the
lower layer is a granular orystaline mass melting
at 35 deg. C. Infant fat* contains 67-75 per
cent <?t oleic acid, adu.t fat 89.80. Infant fat
contains 28.97 |>er cent of palmitic acid, against
8.16 iu the adult, and 3.38 of stearic acid against
2.04. Tties?e latter, the palmitic and stearic
acids, are the harder and less fusible, while the
oleic acid is the softer aud more fusible constituent
of fats.
No attempt is made to explain the reason of
these differences, or to suggest any means by
which we may reharden or repalmitize our fat,
and thus regain our infant chubblness.
Old age is evidently due to changes of this
kind, not only of the fat. but also ot the other
materials ot the body. The first step toward
the discovery of the elixir of life, the "aurum
potabile," of the alchemist, is to determine the
nature of they changes, the next to ascertain
their causes, and then to remove them. If, as
we are so often told, there can be no effect
without a cause, there must be causes for the
organic changes constituting decay and old
age. Remove these, and we live forever. The
theory Is beautifully simple.
A Michigan Liar.
"Let's see, they raise some wheat In Michigan,
don't they?" asked a Schoharie granger of a Mlchlgander.
"Raise wheat! Who raises wheat? No, sir;
decidedly no, sir. It raises Itself. Why, If we
undertook to cultivate wheat In that state It
! would run us out. There wouldn't be any place
to put our house."
"But I've been told that grasshoppers take a
good deal of it."
"Of course they do. If they didn't I dont
know what we would do. The cussed stuff
would run all over the state and drive us out
?choke us up. These grasshoppers are a Godsend,
only there ain't half enough of them."
"Is that wheat nice and plump?"
"Plump! Why I don't know what you call
plump wheat, but there are seventeen in our
family, including ten servants, and when we
want'bread we just go out and fetch In a kernel
of wheat and bake It."
'Do you ever soak It in water first?"
"Oh. no; that wouldn't do. It would swell a
little, and then we couldnt get it in our range
oven."
? ???????
Affair* In Ireland, an Noted by an
American Toarist.
The following extract from a private letter,
written by a well-known Boston gentleman,
will be accepted, the Advertiser thinks, u a
trustworthy presentation of one phase of the
existing state of affairs In Ireland:
I wmm sitting in the reading room of the Shelburne
hotel, Dnblin, Thursday evening, when a
quiet man* evidently an English or Irish gentleman,
moved up and began talking about the
social stagnation of Dublin. This did not
awaken my especial interest, but when he said
he had just returned from the west of Ireland,
I asked about the feeling and prospects there.
In the course of an hour's talk he told me, as
follows:
That he owned four estates in Ireland which
he had not visited for twenty-nine years, having
left their management entirely to agents. Recently
no rents whatever had been collected;
and as his income from the estates was encumbered
by annuities, etc., to relations, which had
to be punctually paid, whether he got his rents
or not. he found himself somewhat embarrassed.
His principal agent fell seriously ill, and seizing
the opportunity thus offered (for a visit while
the agent was iii health might have looked like
distrust or interference, a thing which, he
thought, landlords were too punctiliious about,)
he came over from Mentone, where he was living.
to examine into affairs personally. He came
with the belief that his rents were low enough,
and that the tenants were unreasonable, and
perhaps dishonest. He convened his tenants,
and then spent some time in going about among
them. The result was that he confessed himself
"thoroughly converted." Although his rents
were not so high as on some other estates in
the neighborhood, he was convinced that they
had been forced up too high. He made a reduction
to the poor law valuation ('"Griffith's")
?a reduction amounting to six snillings and
sixpence to the pound (a virtual confession that
the rents were nfty per cent too high), and gave
fifteen year leases "on that basis. The result, he
said, affected him extremely, for the tenants not
only borrowed money of the banks to pay all
arrears, but flocked to him with the voluble
and earnest blessings the Irish peasant, can invoke,
and begged him to let them remit directly
to him. without the intervention of agents.
He said that although there was a great difference
among estates, ami between localities, he
thought that there were many cases where rents
were fixed at two or three times the proper
sum, and that it seemed to him. after his visit,
that the "no rent" program, in many districts,
was a virtual protest and struggle against starvation,
rather than a political agitation. In
other districts, of course, it was complicated
with "home rule" and other Issues, but In his
neighborhood it was simply a stand of the
tenant farmers for subsistence and existence.
SignN of IVIodern Decadence*
From the Dbndon Evening Standard.
Mr. J. II. Mapleson has published the terms
which Mme. Fattihas accepted for another trip
to the United States. Regarding this matter
philosophically, without imputing a shadow of
blame either to payer or payee, or even to the
public, who virtually endorse this extravagant
sum, one must admit that the effect is demoralizing.
Working persons who have a hard struggle
to make both ends meet will be shocked and
disgusted, unreasonably, no doubt, but sincerely.
Weak souls among them will be further
urged upon a course of discontent too common
already. The selfish luxury of the rich is the
most telling argument of the agitator, and he
has a grand example here. For Mr. Mapleson
expects to recoup his outlay with interest.
and prices must be raised proportionately.
The speculation may prove unfortunate, hut
it is based upon experience and comparison.
no doubt. Fabulous sums paid for a brief
and sensuous pleasure are a sign of decadence
In her last days of freedom, Rome possessed an
actor, the most famous of all time. When he
had made the fortune which lie thought sufficient.
Roscius declined to play for money. He
gave his services gratis for the amusement and
instruction cf the people. It would be interesting
to know what terms the irreat comedian was
in the habit of receiving, and what fortune he
thought equal to his dignity on retirement. If
we may jud<rewith any decree of truth the salaries
of actors, free men like Roscitis. by what is
recorded or the sums paid to philosophers and
lecturers in ancient times, they would almost
bear comparison with Mme. Patti's rates. The
rigorous Aristides accepted .?4,000 !rom Damianus
for a single lecture: Herod, the younger,
crave something like ?80.000 for three discourses
to an orator who pleased him; and to another,
for a single discourse, ten horses, ten porters,
ten secretaries, and two beautiful young slaves,
with nearly ?40.000 in money. We have not yet
reached such madness, but we seem to be traveling
that way.
Dc Lam' a Strayin'.
[Exhortation it a colored camp m^etinsr. The dialect
is that of a Mississippi plantation.]
Look out, backslider, whar you walking
Make a misstep, sho's you bo'n.
I fr-11 you what, It's no use talkin',
Ef you slip up, chile, you jrone!
Dn road Is full er stumps and stubble,
Ruts an' sink holes ebcrywhar",
I sp-^c' dey'll gib you heap er trouble,
'F you don't stop yo' tool In' dar.
It's dark ez pitch an' mighty cloudy,
Spec' de debbtl's walkln' roun',
Fus' thing you know he'll tell you " howdy " ?
L1I' his hoof an' stomp de groun',
Man, can't you see a sto'm's a brewlnt
Hear de a^ful thunder peal!
Look! Illazen' Ught'nln' threat'nln' ruin?
Oh, backslider, how you feel?
Drap on yo' knees an' go to prayin',
Ax de Lawd to he'p you out*
Chile, tell him you's a lam' a strayln'?
Done got los' an' stum'lln' 'bout,
An' den you'll see de stars a gleamln'?
'Lumlnatln" all de way.
Yea, 'bout ten thousan' twlnklln', beamln'?
Smack untwell de break er day,
But et you fall, debbll git you.
Fetch you slap! right in yo' eye.
You'll feel mof like ergrape shot hit you,
Drapp'd t'om hall way to de sky!
Robert McGke.
The Man Who Boxed.
From the Detroit Free Press.
There are scores of respectable and reputable
heads of families In this city who take regular
lessons in the manly art of self-defence, and
who spend an hour every evening In swinging
clubs and otherwise developing and hardening
the muscle. One of the most enthusiastic of the
lot had finished his boxing lesson the other
night, when the trainer said:
"lam sorry to lose your money and your company,
but I feel It my duty to say that I can
learn you nothing further. You have got the
science and muscle to clean out a crowd, and
heaven help the man who stands before you!"
The citizen went home with a consciousness
that only cowards carry revolvers, and he wondered
how a man would look after he had (riven
him a sock dologer straight from the shoulder.
The next morning as he was leaving his house
along came a strawberry man who was yelling
his wares at the top of his voice.
"Do you sell any more berries for yelling In
that manner ?" asked the citizen, as the peddler
drew rein.
"Oh. take in your nose?" was the reply.
"Some one will take your whole body in some
day!"
"But it won't be a man with a wart on his
chin!"
"No Impudence, sir!"
"And none from you, either!"
"You deserve a good thrashing!"
"And perhaps you can give it to me!"
There was a goldeu opportunity. The one had
science?the other impudence. The one had
received thirty-eight lesssons in boxing?the
.pther fairly ached to be pounded.
"Dont talk that way to me or *111 knock you
down," said the finished pupil as he gentlv
threw himself in position to mash a brick wall.
"Oh, you will, eh? Then let's see yOu do 1!"
Even the graduate could not tell exactly
what took place. He remembered of being
kicked on the shins, struck on the chin and
twisted over a horse block after he fell, but
when consciousness returned his wife and
children were crying over him and the peddler
was two blocks down the street shouting:
"Straw-bu-ries?great big ones?red as
blood?perfect daisies?only two shillings tor a
heaping big quart without any thumb in it."
? .?? . .1
A Fa?aw Railway Recently Opened*
The mountains of Switzerland have been reechoing
the rejoicings of three nation*?the
Italians, Swiss and Germans?who gave themi
selves a rendezvous to oelebrate the opening to
the public of the Ootthard railway. The following
are the enormous dimensions of the
great tunnel through the St. Ootthard mountain:?The
highest point of the tunnel reaches
3,500 feet above the sea lovel, is 42.000 feet long,
required the removal of 800,000 cubic yards of
rock, and has been completed In eight years.
The entire tunnel is finished with masonry.
Besides this large tunnel, the line has fifty
smaller ones?all together 78,000 feet long?and
famous among these are the so-called "spiral
tunnels," which have very contracted radii. The
line is one of great importance, as It makes a
direct connection between the northwest and
southeast of Europe.
Wm. L. Johnson was arraigned before U. a Commissioner
Hallett, In Brooklyn, last week on the
charge of fraudulentiy obtaining a pension. He
was held in |3,ooo ball for trial In the district
court
married or Single 1
From the 19. T. Graphic.
The question has assumed considerable importance?"
Shall married women, no matter
how well qualified as teachers for the young, be
turned out of the public s chools to give place to
unmarried teachers ? "
Or shall the woman fortunate enough to find
a husband be debarred the exercise of a calling
where she is doing good because the husband is
able to make for her the burden of life easier?
Or must the public schools give unmarried
women employment in preference to married
women ?
Why should the penalty of marriage for the
woman be exclusion from a work for which nature
may have peculiarly fitted her ?
Why should the benefit of her services be lost
to the community because she is a wife and a
mother ?
Is teaching a merely mechanical function, not
requiring special talent or ability ?
The agitation of this question has involved
for the married man the charge of "lack of manhood"
if he accept* support from the woman. Suppose
nature better qualifies the woman in some
calling to earn money than the man? Suppose
that, in sympathy, companionship, congeniality
and similarity of taste these two find In each
other their ideal of companionship? Suppose
that the man's sympathy is a necessity and a
rest to the woman? Is he to be charged with
"lack of manhood" for accepting the position he
fills? Suppose such a woman is in charge of an
educational Institution and possessed of business
and executive capacity, and after years of
waiting finds the man possessed of neither, yet
which bring qualities which aid her in her work
and she marries him, shall he be taunted with
"lack of manhood" because he has found the
place, the calling and the partner where he may
best develop and exercise his peculiar talent?
What is the motive lor following teaching
as a profession on the part of the women who
argue that the married teachers should be discharged?
Is that motive a pure love of their
calling? Is their art paramount to everything
else? Is It of such importance in their eyes
that for it they are willing to forsake houses
and lands and father and mother, and if necessary
even a prospective husband, who will support
them on condition that they forsake the
work to which nature has called them?
And if such young women should plainly see
that the married woman they would supplant is
fitted for her profession, that she has that innate
capacity Cur imparting knowledge and suggesting
ideas which no mere training can give;
if they see that she is united to a man who sympathizes
with her in her pursuit, that they are
partners and are able to afford each other help
in their calling, will this young woman demand
the withdrawal of the married woman from the
place, where she is doing good, because she
needs the pay appertaining to that place?
If "lack of manhood" is charged on the man
for accepting support from the qualified woman,
may not a countercharge of lack of "womanhood"
have some weight when there is taken
into consideration the woman who accepts expensive
support from the man simply because he
is her husband?who marries him for his money,
who regards him merely as the treasury on
which to draw for shoes, dresses and jewelry?
A rn f hrtt'n ounVi nrnninn0
The exigencies? and situations peculiar to the
feminine organization are also urged against the
retention of married women as teachers. But all
this enters into the economy of human existence.
If maternity was phenomenal, illegal and
under all circumstances improper, there might
be lorce in their objection. Good taste will dictate
what is proper in this matter. But if the
married woman is to be entirely banished from
the school room and the whole bias and Influence
of education left to the unmarried, then
there will be eliminated an important element
and influence in the public school.
The teacher who is a mother and who knows
the responsibilities of motherhood is possibly
better fitted to convey certain influences for
good upon the young than can any unmarried
woman. Banish the mother element from the
public school and there is banished a means and
influence ?.?<st important for such children.
Arithmetic, grammar and geography do not constitute
all of education. Something of duty, of
morality, of delicacy, of a higher refinement, of
a true sense of purity needs also to be inculcated.
and for this the womanly mother and
teacher is especially fitted.
However, the best teacher h* one who has
given up all else for the work of teaching. She
will be neither a married woman nor a woman
who wishes to be married. But such teachers
are not to be found in the ordinary public school.
?+?
Self-V nterent.
W. H. Mallock in The Contemporary Review.
No action is possible unless prompted by some
form of self-interest; indeed, aelf-interest is but
another name for motive. Motives, however,
are various, therefore self-interest is of various
kinds. The commoner form is the desire for
fame, power or riches, and, except In a few
special cases, this desire is essential to the production
of any public beneficence. When the
beneficence is confined to a smaller circle, other
causes come into play. We have to deal with
the affection, with good nature, with family
pride and with class feeling; and self-interest by
each of these 1b conditioned in a certain way.
Thus, in the case of family pride, it is merely a
case of extended egotism?of an egotism which
is capable of being extended thus to a certain
degree, but to a certain degree only. All this
the inquirer will have to note; but for the
present it will be enough if we consider public
beneficence oj^ly. Now, it will be found that
there are three classes of action which are of
good to the world at large, and which are apparent
exceptions to the doctrine of
self-interest. I refer to artistic production,
to the search for knowledge,
and to the inculcation of religious
or moral goodness. And these are not apparent
exceptions only; to some extent they are real
ones. The question is. to what extent ? The
religious motive it will take too long to discuss,
so we will let that pass. We will only touch
upon the artistic and the scientific motives.
Now, no one will for a moment deny that there
is a delight to the artist in the very fact of production,
and that there is a delight to the man
of science in the very fact of discovery. Indeed,
when the one is painting a great picture, or the
other discovering a new planet, there is nothing,
probably, of self-interest present to the
consciousness of either. This, however, goes
for littJe. Let us try an experiment. Let another
artist claim the picture, let another astron
uuier uiuiiu me uiscovery 01 me pianet, ana the
indignation of the injured parties will afford a
singular revelation to us. It will Bhow us that
in each case, although at the time it was unsuspected,
there was self-interest working and giving
life to the other motives. The artist feels
not only that a great picture Is being painted,
but he feels, "It is I that am painting it;" and
the astronomer feels similarly, "It is I that am
discovering this planet." Thus, some form of
self-interest is essential to all great deeds, and
the deeds are great in proportion to its character
and vitality.
We shall And that, whereas the self-interest,
proper to art, science, or philosophy, is concerned
merely with prestige, all other forms ot
self-interest are "concerned with political power,
with riches and with material elevation; and we
shall find a corresponding difference in the social
results produced by these two classes of motive.
We shall And that the more abstract, or, as we
may call it the purer form, never produces results
that are of direct popular benefit. It produces
discoveries, but it does not produce Inventions;
it may lead to the understanding of
economic laws, but it will never lead to the
establishment of any special trade or manufacture;
it may produce a great architect, but it
will never produce a builder; it may lead men to
lorm theories of government, but it will never
produce an active and successful statesman.
Bran Beds for the Babies*
From the London Globe.
A French doctor has invented a new bed for
babies which holds them safe la Its custody and
prevents them from ever giving any trouble at
night to their attendants. This gentleman has
subiected his system to the meet trying of all
tests, for he has applied it to all his own children,
Mid considers that the fife of one of them
to entirely owing to Its uAe: The Idea is to fill
the greater part of the cradle with bran and
immerse the legs and put of the body of the
child in this nest, covering them over in the
usual way, but fastenlng down the counterpane
tight so as to keep him firm in his place. Why
this change of tactics should have the effect of
taking away from the infant hte usual desire to
howl during a part of every night is a question
which we will leave nurses to explain for themselves
after they have tried the system. In the
meantime, until that trial has been made it is
only civil to believe the testimony 01 Drs. Bourgeois
and Vlgoureux, who in two French papers
of some authority declare that such is the invariable
resait. This Is not, however, the only
advantage to be exported from the system. The
bran is supposed to have a warming and stimulating
influence superior to any sort of cotton
or cloth, and to allow children of the more
sickly kind to develop more quickly and to be
sooner able to use their limbs. The inventor of
the system declares that they delight in their
bran beds, and always "quit them with regret,"
when removed at the age of two-toon* of a
,
Natural History.
From the Detroit Free Pre*.
"What sort of ft bird is this?"
"This is an English sparrow. He cannot carry
off a lamb, like the eagle, nor la he provided
with teeth and claws like the tiger, but he
leaves his mark all the same."
"How did he get here?**
"A philanthropist brought him over from England."
"What ia a philanthropist?**
"He is a cross between a lunatic and an
idiot**
"What did he want to bring the sparrow to
America for?"
"Because he hated the country and wanted revenue.
It wasn't enough for him that we have
smallpox, yellow fever,cholera, droughts,floods,
cyclones, and forest fires and grasshopper
plagues."
"What are the chief merits of the sparrow?"
"His beautiful voice and lovable nature. His
song Is so much sweeter than a file rasping
over cast-iron that people have died after hearing
it."
"How does he employ his time?'*
"In screaming, fighting and voting early and
often,"
"Where does he build his nest?"
"In the cornices of houses. If he could have
the use of 1,000 trees rent free he would turn
up his nose at the offer. He couldn't damage a
tree any, but he can make it necessary to paint
a house every month."
"Of what is his nest composed?"
"Of everything he can handle, except old
oyster cans and empty beer bottles."
"Does the hard hearted citizen ever destroy
those nests?"
"He does. When his family clothes line, or
crow bar, or long handled shovel is missing he
pulls down a nest and recovers the lost article."
"What does the poor sparrow do then?"
"He rebuilds."
"Can he be discouraged?"
"If his nest was pulled down 15.000 or
20,000 times he might commence to feel down
hearted, but those who have routed him out 500
or GOO times have not seen him even chauge
countenance."
"What other birds does he agree with?"
"The buzzard and the polecat. He is too
proud to take up with every stranger who
comes along. He has driven away our robins
and bluebirds and larks, and chickadees, and
even the hens are looking for another opening."
"Would it be wicked to kill one of these sparrows
?"
"Awfully wicked. The philanthropists would
raise such'a howl that the killer would have to
skip the country. Beside, you can't shoot 'em.
they won't be poisoned, and no one ever yet
trapped one. A man down in Ohio thinks a
blow with a barn door might fetch 'em, but it is
as yet an untried experiment."
"That is all for this time. Let us now lay
away our books and sit on the steps and listen
to the ravishing melody of the sparrow's evening
song."
Church Bells In England.
From the London Times, May 23.
London to-day acquires a new distinction. Its
Aafhailrol will K/\.??-?4- 4V?/\ *>!/*/?/*? ?
asked if the plan of the assassination in the
Pbcenix Park resembled, in respect of the arrangements
of the murderers to reach their victims
and then effect their escape, the plan
adopted in New York by that daring and proverbially
successful class known as "butchercart
thieves." Well, applying the "butchercirt"
theory, 1 should call it an American,
or, perhaps, a New York "job." We call
these robberies "butcher-cart" robberies, but
many that have happened here have been
done with four-whe^l vehicles. Take the
Ruppert robbery; that was done with a
covered wagon, in which half a dozen men
could have been concealed. I cannot remember
to have read or heard of "butcher-cart" robberies
in Europe, and believe that few have occurred
outside of New York and Its environs. This
style of robbery started many years ago In a
petty way. Herds of swine ran at large in the
streets of New York, and thieves would hire a
horse, generally a good one, and a wagon; they
would then drive to where there was a herd of
swine, capture one of them, throw it in the
wagon and drive off. They were seldom caught.
The hog-stealing business was improved upon
in time. It merged into the business of driving
up to a store, seizing a case or package of
goods, throwing it into a wagon and getting
away in a flash. Then came the business of
"standing up" men in the street. This began
about twenty years ago. I remember its start.
There were several petty cases, and then a bank
messenger was robbed of a large amount, on paper,
in the vicinity of Wall street, by a gang who
operated with a sleigh and a fast horse. The
scheme was in time perfected, and such cases
are the most annoying that fall to our lot. The
gang first look after the horse. It must be a
good one and well trained. Old hands would
not employ a driver not in sympathy with them.
If the Phoenix park assassins hired a vehicle
and a driver, detection should be all the more
easy. Now, the Goody gang, for instance, have
always owned a first-class horse, and the Phoenix
park murderers may have owned one and
trained it tor months. For a "butcher-cart"
scheme a horse must be trained. It must start
smartly, be nervy and not startled by a conimo..
tlon or a pistol shot, and get off at foil speed the
moment the job Is done and the robbers are
clambering into the vehicle.
From the N. Y. Bun*
"The fashionable flower for the past season
was the rose," said the veteran seedsman, Peter
Henderson, "and I never knew such prices to
be paid for roses. The older sorts, such as the
Safr&no, the Douglas, and the Isabella Sprung
are yet grown, but they are giving way to what
are popularly called fancy rosea, such as the
-Perie des Jardins. But those for which the
highest prices have recently been paid are the
hybrid perpetual roses, particularly the variety
known as Magna Charta. Last year everybody
was frantic to get General"Jacquemlnots, which
are of the same class as the Magna Charta. But
the costliest rose this year has been the Baroness
Rothschild. It has no fragrance, bot to a beautiful
flower. Buds of this rose I have sold to :
retailers for fl each, and the retailers made a
handsome profit. They were scarce, for as yet
they are rarely forced to flower early. For sin- <
gle corsage bouquets for an evening party last
winter as much as $20 and $25 was paid. These
hybrid perpetuate will, I think, soon be supplanted
In popular flivor by a newer class, known
as hybrid tea roses, of which the Duchess of
Edinburgh (bright crimson), La Fra&ce (light
pink), the Duke of Connaught (scarlet), the
Duchess of Connaught (deep carmine), and the
Coquette det Alpee (white), are at preaeat
tjpefc"
vumcuiai Vltuivu Will uuan 1/ VIXC UCll lli
the kingdom, and one of the dozen biggest in
the world. Guide-books will give the fact due
prominence, and tourists will pause,as the hours
come round, to distinguish the solemn note in a
babel of sounds. It cannot be said that till a
quarter of a century ago Londoners missed the
privilege, or wished the hours and royal deaths
to be announced In louder thunder. They were
generally under the impression that their own
bell was a very big one, and a very fine one.
Few of them, however, had heard the bourdons
that do every duty abroad, and that, we know
not why, beat our own largest bells in the solemnity
of their tones. They were also unacquainted
with the history of St. Paul's bell,
which is, we believe, only a recast of that over
the old gateway to Westminster. In this country,
too, the taste for bells has gone Into an entirely
different direction from that of the whole
continent. Christians are here generally called
to service by chimes, instead of the tolling of a
sinqjabell, as is usual abroad. Our chief use of
bellWff for bell-ringing,almost unknown abroad.
To be sure, In Belgium, all the great churches
have carillons every hour, and In some cases
every quarter?many every half-quarter. At
Antwerp, Malines and Ghent, it may be said
the bells are always going, and at the first of
th?se cities one may occasionally hear a long
piece played on a hundred or more bells. But,
upon the whole, the continent tolls bells; we
ring and chime them. The Reformation was
the great point of divergence. At that date,
and long after, the popular party in our parishes
melted the big bells into smaller ones, convertrng
peals of three Into five or six; and, upon the
whole, the big bell went out of favor. Popular
feeling must have been against big bells, or at
least very Indifferent, when Henry VIII. could
stake and lose at a game ot cards all tne old
bells of St. Paul's. There has long been
a reaction. For a century our village
church bells have been increasing in
weight as well as number, as a large
proportion of our church towers testify bv their
shattered state. Parliament itself has contributed
a great impulse to the change of feeling
by building the tallest clock in the kingdom,
and by trying to furnish It with a fitting peal of
bells. It has unaccountably failed so far, Big
Ben No. 1 having been condemned from the
first; No. 2 having been found incapable of
standing the blows of its own clapper. The
reason oi this is a mystery in which a wise man
will not rashly Intrude. Bell-founders stand on
their honor, and resent any reflection on their
skill, or on the casting, as one well-known
amateur has found to his cost. So we must
have time to explain why failures, that one does
not hear of abroad, should be taken as almost a
matter of course in this country.
The Butcher-Cart Game.
Superintendent Walling, of New York, was
DRY GOODS.
-yyOODWARD 4 LOTilBOP~
Ml PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE. Ml
Offer a Fine line of
SCOTCH LACE GINGHAMS, at 35c. per yard.
Recently sold at 45a
Elegant 8tyW PRINTED SATTEENS,
Reduced to S7^e. per jirl
A 8rlendid Quality of PRINTED LINEN LAWNS,
at 13 He. per jwd, worth 17a
A 25c. Quality PRINTED LINEN LAWKS,
at 17c. per yard.
Pise Quality all pure LINEN PRINTED LAWNSi
at 21c. per yaxd.
ABOVE ARE SPECIAL BARGAIN8.
BOSTON DKY GOODS HOUSE.
JelS
-yy M. 8HUSTER A SONS,
HAVE A LARGE 8TOCE OF CHOICE PARABOL8
WHICH HAVE BEEN REDUCED IN PRICE
AND WILL BE SOLD VERY LOW.
PONGEE PARASOL8 in great Tariety.
BLACK and COLORED PARASOLS In choioe stylea.
Great inducements are offered in FOULARD SILK*.
DRESS GOODS. GRENADINES. EMBROIDERED
RcBKS, SPANISH LACES. GUIPURE EMBROIDERIES.
BATI8TK ROBES. Ac.
MOURNING GOODS of every description and In the
beet quailtiee.
Beautiful SATINS at 50c. We can show C5 pieces of
very choice d< sitnis in tlieee very deairable kochIm.
LINEN LAWNS (pure linen) at 20c,
MVOne Prick.
W. M. SHUSTER k SONS.
919 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE.
THE BE8T IS THE CHEAPEST. je!2
gUPERIOR QUALITY.
CHOICE DESIGNS.
50 Piecee PURE LINEN LAWNS, at 25c.. reduced
from 37
4-4 FRENCH BATI8TES, in 8tripe? and Polka Spote
for Combination Suits, at 2jc.. former price 30c.
New PARIS SATIN ES, in select rattoniB.
Beet Quality MERV LAWNS. at37Wc.
FOULARD SILKS, at 75c., reduced from *1.
Rare Uanraina in HUMMER SILKS.
Rich BLACK SILK GRENADINES, at *1.25 and fl.50
BLACK SATIN RHADAMES, from $1 to|3.
BLACK SILKS, beet makes, from 75c. to $3.
"Marked Down Prices" on PARASOLS.
FINE DRESS SHIRTS, fl.
GAUZE UNDERWEAR, LISLE GLOVES.
LADIES' LINEN AND MOHAIR DUSTERS.
"Special Attraction*" In New WHITE GOODS at
Popular Pricea.
CHUDDA and SHETLAND 8HAWL8.
PARIS EMBROIDERED "CASHMERE FICHU8.
from $6 to *30.
fl t wrr u r?-iL: o?n_
iur oauuu^ OU118.
W~ Plain Figures and Correct Prices.
cSSSo FEE A TTTT OO KN H
r B E AA T O O NN N
?SSSo EE A A T O O N N N
o 5 E AAA T O O N NN
?SSSB EEE A A T OO N KN
PPP EEE RRR RRR Y Y
PPK RRRRYY
PPP EE RRR RRR YY
P E R R R R Y
P EEE K R B B, Y
(Successor to Perry 4 Brother.)
Pennsylvania avenue, corner 9th street
Established 1840. JclO
00DWARD & LOTIIROP,
921 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE. 921
RIBBON DEPARTMENT.
6-in. White and Blue Watered SASH RIBBONS, at
60c. per yard.
6-in. Rink Striped Satin and Moire SASH RIBBONS, at
87^c. i>er yard.
SPECIAL BARGAINS, which can not be Duplicated!
BOSTON DRY GOODS HOUSE. je!3
^BOUT FIGURED SATIXES.
CHOICE DESIGNS ARE BECOMING SCARCE;
ORDERS GIVEN EARLY IN THE SEASON
ENABLE US TO OFFBB THE
FINEST GRADES IN NEW
PATTERNS AT
50 CENTS.
%>
TYLER & CHEWNING,
JelO 918 7th STREET NORTHWEST.
y^OODWARD A LOTHROP,
921 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE. 921
GLOVE DEPARTMENT.
We have Just opened a line of
BILK MOUSQUETAIRE GLOVES.
In 6, 8 and 10 Button lengths, in Black and Terra Cotta
Shades, now the desirable thing in Glove wear.
Please examine, at the
BOSTON DRY GOODS HOUSE. Jel3
QUR IMMENSE ASSORTMENT
OF NEW AND BEAUTIFUL LAWNS, FIGURED
/
FRENCH LAWNS. FIGURED LINEN LAWNS,
FIGURED AMERICAN LAWNS.
The largest assortment of Lawns in Washington. Pure
white all Lfnan Lawnn only 25c.
Colored Silks, navy blue, dark green and other colors,
50c.
Handsome Black Brocade Silks reduced from SI. 50
to$l.
Black Silks, immense assortment, 50, 62, 75, 87 cts.,
$1. $1.25. $1.50, $1.75, $2.
Nottingham Lace for curtains. 15, 20, 25c. to $1.
Bleached Table Damask, all linen, 50c.
Dinner Napkins, all linen, 75c. dozen.
Black Cashmere Shawls, pure wool, $2 to |10.
Double White Blankets, $2.
Black and Colored Cashmeres, pure wool, double
width, 37.1$ to 75c.
Nun's veiliua-. pure wool, (In pink,) 25c.
Colored Cashmeres, in pink and light blue. 50c.
Pure Silk and Wool Black Grenadiue reduced to $1.
Black and White Striped Silks, 50c.
Nun's Veiling, (black,) all pure wool. 25c.
CARTER'S,
_}e8 711 MARKET SPACE.
\f ATTINGS, MATTINGS, MATTINGS.
Hi.
IN GREAT VARIETY OF STYLES.
LOOSE COVERS
for Furniture Cat and Made to order by our Philadelphia
Artiut.
"WINDOW SHADES,
LACE CURTAINS
AND UPHOLSTERY GOODS
In Great Variety.
CARPETS AT REDUCED PRICES.
SINGLETON A HOEKE,
801 MAREET SPAC?
All orders for STEAM CARPET CLEANING receive
prompt attention. my*26
"yyOODWARD & LOTHROP,
921 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE. 921
DRESS GOODS DEPARTMENT.
82-in. CREAM NUN'S VEILING,
Elegant Quality, only 37\c. per yard.
45-in. CREAM NUN'S VEILING, BENG ALINES*
SHOODA*S BEECH CLOTHS,
at 50c., 62%c., 68c., 76c., and (1 per yard.
All Good Values.
BQ8TON DRY GOODS HOUSE. Jel3
^fcJ^EDPCEDt" "REDUCED!"
We hrre to-day placed on our center coaster a large
lot of FRENCH and ENGLISH DRESS GOODS for 25
eta. Xfceae goods hare been selling at 60 and 62^ eta.
"They are a Genuine Bargain."
SURAH 8ILXEL aattabie for Evening Dresses, In
Cream, Light Blue and Pink. (1.26; same quality sold
elsewhere at (L 60.
Our stock of LUPIN'S GRENADINES, In elegant
styles and qualities, cannot be excelled.
LINEN LAWNS, 12*a.
CANTON GINGHAMS of the beat grades 12*o.
LONSDALE CAMBRIC, 12*c.
100 dcaan fuB rag. HOSE, 26c. a pair.
mo do? An iiiwHMwHti?wniniwi>iKmHigfB?
at SI-60 per doaen.
Our atook is varr large tn afl departaaant*, and prtsas
vatylow. Wa iaroa tw^ertine
"OHE PRICK ONLY."
TBUSVEL Jk 1 *1 ?ARK.
mlS 808 MARKET SPACE.
gUMMEB GOODS.
We axe rocehring dally our supply of Saaosr Dress
Goods, comprising a full assortment of White OrjrandiesTFrench
Nainaioks, French Mufla. French Masalias,
India Unena plain and printed Linen Lawna,
printed Jaconets, Percales and Batteena; French Zephyrs,
Plaid and Strijied. Table Damask. Damask Table
Cloths, with Napkins to match; Belgian Linen Sheetings
andPiilowLincns, all* tilths and quahliw: French.
Russia aad German Toweie aadTowehng; Umbrellas
and Parasols in new designs. Also. Whits, (Stack and
nuer Mattings in choice patterns ; Ftor Linens, ail
tiOOB, BBO. *00.,
m mm w muw a.w??wni hbttt hopsx
DRY GOODS.
'J'HE FIRST STORY OP OUR DftfEHB*
CILD1NG IS UK
>
It win now be iuiOxmI forward with dl?i>*?rh. Ww
must rreptre for removal. No old rood* will b*
taken into the new irtom. We intend making It an object
for every lady who ie now in need, or wbo la ion
likely to be in need of Sprint and Summer DRJ
GOODS, to call and cianiiue the
EXTRAORDINARY BARGAINS
we are now off<>rln*. On account of th? back wards*!
of the mwmui, we are left with too many imode on hand.
We have determined to sell them, and mill them we win,
aa we are bound to raiae lota of money to pay for tmlidin*
and to lay in etock for our grand opening, aaconl
to none in the country.
We have Junt reduced all our COLOKED DOLLAR
Dll'lva to 75 CCOtB.
Our BUCK rURE BILK RHADAMES, from
to tfo ouato.
35 Pieces most beautiful rattern* of ALL BILK
BROCADES. from fl.50 to 95 opnto. Ttit* la a
rare liartrain and cannot be repeated. Ail our Drsai
Goods way down to Uaii price,
C, 000 rieoes WHITE GOODS of every dosrriptto*.
These arc of our own inu>ortatioa, havlufr ordsrsd
them an far back as last November. We lmsoaioalated
the quantity and ordered more than our retail
trade demand*. Tberef'W, be it known that pnoa
ball be no object, and they muft go.
Wesellaflne VICTORIA LAWN at 8 rent*, which ti
retailed everywhere at 12J* ceuU.
HDo not consider this idle talk. Evwy lady in Wub>
Ington knows the mairnitude of our stock, which w?
cap safely Ktate is three timec as large as the rtock of
any other merchant in this city. Therefore, i rflpart
for Bargains I Aa by the time we move Into our NEW
HOUSE, we expect to reduce the stock to the smallest la
the city. The Goods are all freeh, having- sent all oat
old traeh to New York auction, to be sold to the hlyhat
bidder. Call early In the morning to avoid the irmnnn?
rush.
LANSBCRGH A BROTHER,
404 AND 406 SEVENTH STREET NORTHWEST.
mlS
LADIES1 GOODS.
JJATH FOB THE
SEASIDE AND MOUNTAINS.
We have Just received the LATEST PARISIAN
STYLES. suitable for the Seaside and Mountain^
which we will exhibit during the coming week.
MRS. M. J. HHNT.
JelO 13<>9 F street north weiC
l^JRS. J. P. PALMER,
1107 F STREET NORTHWEST.
Will Open on
WEDNESDAY NEXT. May 24th.
Her Importation of
SUMMER BONNETS AND HATS,
Comprising all the latest shapes.
The last Novelties in Fabnos and rarest com tuna tie*
of oolong Just received from the leading bouses of Eu
rope. No cards. m20
DOUGLASS',
HOOPSKIKTS AND BUSTLES.
OUR OWN MAKKOF THE FINEST WATCH SPRING
STEEL. 50c. TP. ANY 8TVLE AND SIZE
MADE TO OKDtR.
HOOPSKIRTS OF *-REFUSE" HTF.FT^ 2Sr.
A fine French Woven CORSET at fl. usually Bold A
A Fine French Contllie Hand-made CORSET, at (L
This oorwet is Hold in other citr** at $ 1.50.
We have one sjKvial lot of Ohlldrcn'a Itafrular Mad*
HOSE, iu Cardinal. Blue and lirowu, at 25c. \> ouiu bs
cheap at 35c.
DOUGLASS*,
NINTH amd F STREETS
ml9
\fRS. C. V. SMITH IS R FX" EI VINO DAILY THE
iTL latoHt Htjloe of MILLINERY, iuchi<hu?r Round
Hats, Bonuetn, Flowera, Pluitiee, etc. 01<i LADIES
and BONNE'S CAPS a apeoa.ty. 618 ?th street northwest.
il 1
PATTERN HATS AND FINE MILL INERT
GOOD8;
BILK AND CLOTH WRAPS;
SIIJT, FLANNEL and CAM URIC RFTTS. the larrM*
and in out ek*raut assortment in the c:t>, made exclolively
to my order.
M. WILLI AN,
907 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE.
7 CITE THE VISE. PARIS. all
MME. WASHINGTON.
FASHIONABLE
DRESSMAKING AND TRIMMING RTORF.
1211 PENNSYLVANIA AVE..
Dremn. Suits, Continues, Cloaks, Ac., made in mips*
Tier btyle at fchort notice. L*<i ?n can liave Drowtw cut
and Dafiteu. and a i?erlect ht Kuarantoud. f9
J^JISS ANNIE K. HUMl'HEliY,
430 TENTH STREET NORTHWEST.
Makes CORSETS to order in every rtyle and matc-rUL
and guarantees perfect tit and
HER SPECIAL 1'IES AREFrench
Hand-made Underclothing, Merino UndervMff
and fluent Imported Hosiery.
Patent Shoulder Brace* and all Drcse Reform Goods.
French Corsets and Bu*tles. The "Hererile*" Map*
porting Const, for which Mm H. in f>i>ec>al
and a f 1 Cornet, her own make, that lor the prios
cannot be aurptwned.
N.B.? French. German and Snanlnh spoken. a9
HOUSEFUBNISHINGS.
YQ9 JUST OPENED
Afsw choice plecsa ?f HavOand k CcFa
SCULPTURED FAIENCE
sad other Fancy Goods suitable (or pmati
SIMPSON REFRIGERATORS*
ICS CREAM FREEZERS.
TRAVELING REFRIGERATORS.
FRUIT JARS AND JELLY TUMBLES*
WILMARTH * EDMON8TON,
DCFORTEBS OF CHINA AND GLASS,
jelO T09 MARKET SPACE.
J?DDT CELEBRATED REFRIGERATORS,
WITH SLATE STONE SHELVE*
HANDSOMELY FINISHED.
MADS OF K1LX-DBISD LUMSm
A flrst-olaM RcMrarstor st a mall ooat.
K. W. BEVERIDOB,
1009 PENNSYLVANIA ATI.
Sals Agsnt far ths P.O. ?
T> EFRIGEEATORS, ^WTT^ PORCELAIN WATS*
ICE CHESTS st low prtosa.
White Mountain and rmrissa FREEZERS.
WATER COOLERS and STANDS, (aUstylM.)
S^a^?S&bStuK55?^TCHESfc
*9 814 Ttfc stnst. I fr*
ffUlE CELLULOID TRUSS; THAT RET KB
K braika.^ negm^ww* ouVj^wys slsaa. aa4 am
jMam&j. :a?Y ^

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