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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, June 27, 1885, Image 6

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musical astd dramatic.
*XW STARS A2TD XJW PLATS?A PIRATKD
VEKSIU.X Of ?TH? MIKADO" TO BI PKBSEN'TED?"?CAl*Oi?"?AI-aKMATOB
TABOIl AND
in* ckitics, rrc.
Mr- Robert L. Downing** play, "T&fly-Ho,"
by Joaquin Miller, has been cut down to three
a<-ts and otherwise Improved. Mr. Downing
wul start out with it In August.
? Miss Mary Anderson has commissioned
^r* O. Wills, the English dramatist, to rewrite
the play of "Ingnraar." The drama,
abounding in piquant and strong situations, Is,
In the opinion or the London (juem, "spoiled
by the stilted language." Miss Anderson is at
present visiting the lake district, and is staying
at Glen thorn, Ambleside. She spends the
*iays in driving and mountaineering and the
evenings rowing on Lake Windermere.
?It Is stated that a location has practically
J>een secured in Chicago for the erection o? a
large tneater and club-house for the presentation
of German drama and opera. Mr. Am l>erg,
of .New York, Is the promoter of the
'Scheme.
? Tom Keene has engaged Gustavus Levick
s his leading man for next season.
? George Learock Is about to start oat as a
tar on bis own book, in a play called "Waverly
Britt," originally produced in Chicago some
Jrears ago under the title, "Philip (jordan, Jr."
? The 3U0th performance of "Adonis," at the
Bijou, >"ew Yerk, took place during the week.
? Tne work of the Mexican Typical Orchestra
(at the Star Theater, New York, Is commended
bv the critics of that city as unique and remarkably
attractive In Its way.
? It is said that Manager Duff, of the Standard
Theater, New York, intends to put on "The
Mikado,' Gilbert A Sullivan's new opera, although
the American rights have been bought
by John Stetson. Mr. Imtl, It is said, "has no
thought of profit In this production, lie merely
wishes to test the sentimeut or American
audiences on the subject of theatrical oony!
right."
? All efforts to bridge the chasm between
Harrlgan and Hart, the New York variety actors,
have thus far proven futile. Hart insists
jipon g"ing it alone, and Harrigan has accordingly
nired his own company lor the season.
I ? Lawrence Barrett will open his nekt season
'At St. Paul, Minn., on August 31st, under the
^management of Mr. Arthur B. Chase. Mr. BarU
add to his repertoire n?>xt season the
old English comedy, "The Wonder."'
? John Madison Morton, the well-known LonMon
dramatist and librettist, is said to be wriGolden^
Comedy lor Do Wiley and
. ?"The Biack Hussar" has passed Its 50th performance
at Wallack's theater, New York, and
Is still drawing well.
?Miss Effle Johns, the well known light come.
4y actress, died In Chicago last week, aged 26.
?After much hesitation, and making and
breaking of Desolations. Miss Hose Cog hi an is
said to have again finally decided to star next
season. She will, it is announced, have another
play to alternate with "Our Joan."
? Great preparations are making at the
Casino, New York, for the production of
** Nanon" there on Monday night. Mr. Francis
Wilson, who Is to do tne Manruis de Marrillac.
has returned to New York from the west* and
rehearsals for the new opera are going on vigorously.
Mr. Gustavus Levick has been engaged
to play the part of Louis XIV. All the seatTfor
been eSSi11* ?* "2*anon" Luve long since
? Charles Evans, of the theatrical firm of
831(1 to have faUen heir to
$o0,o00 bythe death of his father.
? Mr. Thoe. ?. Garrett has quitted the position
of dramatic critic of the St. Louis HepubIt?*},71,
a^ter. twenty-five years' service, during
which he has achieved the large fortune usu?VLlf?k?
by Journalist.s, and Is now about
his wealth by publishing a collection
vt w dramatic writings under the title. "The
Mask of the Muses."
? Verdi Is understood to be giving the final
touches to his new opera, " Iaeo," which is to be
brought out at La Scala/MilaL.
~~Mr- Augustln Daly, who Is in Chicago with
his company, Is completing arrangements to
take It to London next spring. He said recently
that he had received several offers to return
to England with the company this summer,
bulne ha-* decided to remain in this counth?
Pr?^ nt. and to mate the second
entrance of the company on the London boards
toore opportunely timed thau was the first oue
? .we We,Le there before," said the mana^er,
it was when every one was leaving the
city tor tbe country
?The wife of George Thatcher, the mlnstreL
died last week. H
Miss Lillian Russell closes her season at
toe New Y ork Casino to-night. Nexl week she
appears in Boston in "Polly."
Mr. Edward Harrigan will change the name
of the New Park theater, New York, which he
opens on August 3, to the Theater Comique.
? John T. Raj-mond isone of the few individuals
who have ever prospered "In Chance1"*".
but he Is said to be flourishing at the
Madison Square theater, New York.
?George Fawcett Rowe has written for Miss
Fanny Reeves and Mr. P. A. McDowell, of the
Madison Square theater, a new drama, called
Madge; or, the Gambler's Wife," wnich will
be put on the road next year.
Marius de Lazare is a very previous exotic
librettist of New York, who has written a
burlesque of "The Mikado," Gilbert and Sulllu.w
which he contemplates proBoston,
M. De Lazare should wait
until people have seen the original bciore he
Comes forward with his burlesque.
? Mr. J. W. Morrlssey, manager of Mile.
Rhea, has secured the opening of two new
theaters for his star early next season?the new
Walnut street theater, Philadelphia, and the
National theater, in this city. Mile. Rhea's
repertory next season will be as follows: "A
Dangerous Oame ' and "The Power of Love "
by Mans; "LadyA^h^
l'<irron, of the Chicago Inter
Ocean; The American Countess/' by Howard
Carroll; Ebb and Flow," by ifllet Rhea herself;
"Frou-Frou" and "An lWiuIS Mutch."
-Ex-Senator Tabor, of Colorado, like many
other Ignorant amateur theatrical managers,
objects vehemently to the critics telling the
'Sfe afjln'
fuse the critics admittance to his house on purchased
tickets, and it is said many wtnbft^rJprfo/m
U^" 10 play tbere ln consequence,as the
performances are ignored by the papers. When
the swelling in Mr. Tabor's bead goesaown, aud
he has pas.-ed out of the amateur stage of management,
be will see that to be of any value to
Th ^Mi1 Puk>ilc criticisms must be honest.
The public soon learn to utterly disregard the
th.-atrical notices of papers which invariably
alike eC!sUicl<? over artists and hainXaitera
The Speetres of Marathon.
nmr did you see him arise? did vou mind
?<?w he rod* In the moonlxht away iiiie the wind.
And never a prim of his horse's feel
? as left on the turf behind??
1 have somewhere read that the bnrfed slain
to arise from their graves a*:ala
Hl thv midnight hour
Un tiie uid MaralLouiaii plain;
M of!en *5.* Ihieerine shepherd descries
T>' ? " i" silent -urprise,
V of Y:" ?H-t of the cumloif f<jh
Ll*e m luot thai shorewai il ll;es;
fcr? <*M"ti?des rldfnsr his roend
iV "" ,hl' far-faniHl ground;
u ith ? ii" U4t:U'ls fwigitt once more?
W 1th arm., thai nia*e no sound.
Of,trembling vapors the banners are.
1 hv MH-.trs are v apors, va,N.rs alar
*t , TT ,"!S r^1 an,J r**tre.it to their ships
At the si^n of the morning star.
I have, read that nev.-ra n^jrht mar be
jk- i ,k V*lou s1"'" swe?'l^ >?? lromtheses.
A1? H O L ?des. aii.l thM (;reeka ar*a
And tbe Persianj,?they al ways lleel
the (;r^k' have
It* ? i *" Irw,i"rn w as sa\ ed of old!
w!,!'n"'1 fr.ItJ shore to shora,
Ano iM \ o.ces are manifold.
iv 1fn<1 where the brave have died,
I hf lr d^-d* and memories ever abidel?ii
oid HIid are spectres st times
ou Uie pu?ln or green hillside.
*heh bacneps wave on the mldnleht air
Ai TihZ I , ,the Kuara oftL" is there:
ti, on ViU'h trembling fold
iii??rltteu word.'Jiew arer
Old memories?these are as armed men
Tt i re!.K " th^ir arms; agaiu
The} tw e the foe. when he thinks of strife.
AiiU iire sOitnt COQquvrun then!
Tl^ not In vain. In thf onc^ rfd
That, ^ons defender,
a" sentinel |>aces unseen on ins beat
And by greener tents Instead.
I>om their silent encampment under irround.
Thej hear and arise ai.d forever confound
n-'F ?*"*?try s invader, although they strive
hh arms that make no sound.
Saxcju. V. Cbua
Prof. Klrin*s Comet,
1"rum the Louisville Coorler-Journal.
"You may look out for a brilliant comet ln the
southwestern heavens early in August or the
latter part of July," said ProL John M. Klein,
Kentucky's astronomer, to the Courier-Journal
correspondent last night, during a moonlight
promenade with the star gaxer. "Upon what
theory do you base such a prediction?" I aaked,
" Well, the fact of the matter ls that I have no?
ticed for several nights the unmistakable path,
or orbit, of the comet. Look, do you see that
great streak in the heavens resembling somewhat
the milky way. It is the path or orbit of
a great comet, and that great streak of light la
the ^as**uus matter that follows ln the wake of
a comet. It is impossible to see It at present,as
It travels in the orbit of the sun, whose brilliant
light during the day prevents the human eye
from gazing at It. The deflection by the latter
part of Julv or August will, however, bring It
al*>ve the horizon during the early evening
hours, when it will be plainly visible and when
it will be of the first magnitude." As Prof
Klein has heretofore predicted and discovered
ouuiets with unfailing accuracy, the fulfillment
rf/hM prediction will be looked forward to with
nnini by the scientific world generally.
*
>
"HIM* UPO-X THE BABTHOLDI
STATUE.
Tho Reason Whj Contribution* to the
Stelae Were Slow.
dk8crtptio* ot the site selected fob the
great pharos?a better one might have
BEEN SELECTED, BUT IT'S A GIFT-HORSE
CASK.
"Gath" In tb( C^cfintSl Enquirer.
New Yore. Jane 22^?The day of the celebration,
or rather ol the reception ot Bartholdl's
great statue, I took one of the Iron steamboats,
so-called, which make a fleet to Coney Island
and Long Branch, and passed the pedestal of
the statue. The pedestal rises above the small
island of Bedloe's some Blxty or seventy feet,
and presents a rather Incongruous mass to the
eye. I have my doubts whether the figure,
when raised there, will meet the
IMAGINATIVE IDEAS
of the sculptor. He, according to his own account,
entered the bay of New York, which is
very different from any harbor in France, or,
indeed, in Europe, and waB surprised to see
what to him seemed a kind of inland sea with
numerous islands, some of them of a mountainous
lorm, often well wooded, and with continuous
towns and villas, forts and piers, extended
through and around this double inland
sea.
He was amazed, and I have heard the same
expression from Frenchmen and other foreigners
when they came up the bayofNe'w York
011 steamers to myself or fellow-passengers. The
water-ways of America often terminate in these
huge ports and estuaries which give a strange
mingling of nature and man. The ports of
France resemble our Pacific ocean roadsteads,
and generally have to be constructed where
some little stream enters the sea by digging and
moulding, and when you get inside, even at
Havre or Marseilles, your vessel has to go into
docks dug out of the ground.
Perhaps the finest of the harbors of France is
Bordeaux, where a large river passes toward the
sea, and steam craft go up this river as up the
Delaware or the Mississippi to the piers of the
city. Many of our
AMERICAN HARBORS HAVE NO EQTTAIJ9.
Poston, Portland, Providence, New London,
New York, Hampton Roads, San Francisco, all
show these remarkable navigable and landbound
pools or channels. M. Bartholdl, with a
Frenchman's instinct of art, and recollecting
the great wonders of the autique world, conceived
the Idea of illustrating the harbor itself
by erecting a great Pharos. He was far ahead
of the artistic instinct of the United States.
Here the practical dominates at all times, and
one reason why the money was not promptly
raised for the pedestal of the statue was a certain
feeling that the statue itsslf was a wild
Frenchman's thought. Had the statue been 1
designed forNew\ork Island a local interest
would have been attached to it which is to
some extent lost in the short distance between
Bedloe's Island and New York Island. The distance
maybe two miles from our battery.' I
have held, since the conception of this statue,
that it should have been built upon the batterv
itself, at the termination of New York Island,
where the multitude could have gathered
around it and appreciated its splendid proportions.
But the bay of New York between the
battery and Staten Island is about six miles
long, and to erect even this great statue onethird
of the way down the harbor will much
diminish its quality to the eye, and therefore
to the mind.
The Washington monument at the capital
city loses much of its power by l>eing placed
within the delta or gully of the city. There are
heights around Washington of two hundred to
three hundred feet, ana had the Washington
monument been put upou one of these it would
have been visible for a great many miles. But
Bartholdi grasped the first impassioned idea of
the monument when he saw the harbor. It occurred
to him that "t a very beautiful harbor
should be seen the Pharos illustrative of libertv 1
welcoming the races of the earth as they canie '
up the lower bay, passed through the Narrows,
and debouched into the upper bay. !
As he alone projected the statue, it was no
person's business in particular to reason with !
him about the situation. He exhibited at our
centennial celebration the lorearm, hand and
torch of the statue, very nobly modeled, and
this portion of the subject alone would have
procured a public purchaser in New York.
Every sculptor and student of art commended
the
DELICIOCS MODELING
of the hand and torch. But, reasoning from the
plans of the people, artists in general doubted
whether such a piece of clear imagination as
erecting this great human tower down the bay
would give the effects the sculptor hoped. The
American people are lamentably short in the
antique imagination. Our most imaginative
writer, Hawthorne, was more fanciful and metaphysical
than imaginative. He had nothing of
\ ictor Hugo in him. The French imagination
partakes of that ol Virgil and Homer: the Latin
races draw their being from the antique world,
where llumer puts upon a rocky island his giant
Cyclops, with one eye ranging over the seas, and
hurliug stones miles outward at appr*>acliers
and victims. I venture tosay that not a thousand
Americans in the hundred years ol our republic
have grasped in the spirit of Homer that huge
conception. To us it belongs to the domain
of ruble. When the Statue of Liberty will be
raised, ;.s there is now no question it will be, it
will be nearly 306 feet above low tide water in
the bav. This is about three-flfthsof the height
of the Washington monument; it is the height
of the largest average cathedrals of Europe.
But those cathedral towers are a great mass,
and they often stand upon plains where they 1
exert their impression to a vast distance. This <
Pharos in the bay of New York, though it will t
be three hundred feet high, will not be more <
than twice the height of the masts of many of
our vessels, and the surrouuding landscape is 1
particularly bold and lofty, and the Orange '
mountains, which overlook the bay, probably ?
rise to the height of one thousand feet, and Staten
Island, which is only four miles away,
ha* heights probably of five hundred feet.
The little island where the statue is to be is a
MERE SPOT
in the bay, though large enough to have been
fortified as one of the defences of New York in
the day before Rodman, Wbitworth, and
Krupp. I only repeat what you already know
when I say the pedestal of this statue will be
8*2 feet square and about 90 feet high, or perhaps
140 feet above the usual tide. Then from
the top of the pedestal to the highest point of
the statue, which is the torch held out in the
woman's hand, is al>out 150 feet, some twentv
feet higher than Trinity church steeple, and
nearly the same height above the towers of the
j Brooklyn bridge.
But the Brooklyn bridge Is a mass of towers
and network, quite comparable to the money
j put into it?namely, some 818,000,000. The
; cost of tlie pedestal of Bartholdi'g statue, and
of the statue itself, will probably not be more
. thau 8">00,000. Again, the island the sculptor !
has selected is not exactly in the eye ot the
i city of New York; it stands off toward the Jer- ,
sey shore, and when you go down the bay to
pass through the Narrows from this city you j
leave the statue something like three-quarters
ol a mile to your left. It all the shipping of i
New \ ork were to pass right under this Pharos \
it would have a more distinctive effect. Had
it been put up on the little island where Fort
Lafayette stands, right in the Narrows, every I
vessel passing in or out of New York would '
have goue beneath the legs of the Colussus of
Rhodes. Still, a gift horse is not to be looked in
the mouth, and this great statue will undoubt- '
edly be one of the wonders of the modern 1
world, as it is the highest of all the colossi ever ,
made. . j
I have wondered whether the bronze of which 1
this statue Is partly composed?the rest being
of iron bronzed to the same tone?will not be- j
come st? dark as it oxydizes that the lineaments ,
will be lost to the human eye like those beauti- 1
ful lineaments in Crawford's statue of Freedom 8
on the dome of the American Capitol. Crawford
put up there a grand statue of Freedom leaning
on her shield, with Indian plumes in her iiel- I
met, and you can see how beautiful this design
is by looking at some of the government banknotes.
In the course of time the figure has
blackened, and you see merely a black and
somewhat harmonious mass up there. Nevertheless,
Bartholdi's figure may have some influence
upon the narrow imagination oi the
American people, reduced and stunted by
nearly two centuries of a worship of the practical.
-* *
Snlelde Resulting' from a Joke.
THE CAUSES that LED to robert stinson's
committing scicide.
A telegram from Boston, June 23d, Bays:
Robert Stlnson committed suicide last week at
West Stockbridge. He was twenty-three years
old, and the son of ex-Judge Stlnson, of Norristown,
I'a. He had spent several summers at
West Stockbridge, coming all the way on his
bicycle last season. Mr. Stlnson met Miss Clara
Edwards, of West Stockbridge, and the acquaintance
ripened into an engagement three
years ago. He was studying law and hoped to
be admitted to the bar next spring. He started
from home a month ago on a visit to West
Stockbridge, stopping on the way at Oswego.
Ijew \ork, where he officiated as best man at
the wedding of a college friend. One evening
as he was lowing on the lake with Miss Morrow,
his friend's sister, she Jokingly said that she
thought the young lady in Massachusetts had
better be informed ol his gallantry to the fair
ones of Oswego. He replied in the same vein. I
and at once gave Miss Morrow the address of
Miss Edwards, telling her that if she did not i
see him the ne*t day she had bettex write St
once.
She did not see Stlnson the day follow!ng. so
she wrote the letter. Miss Edwards received it I
In due time about a fortnight ago and was n
greatly shocked to read that Stlnson had mys- r
teriously disappeared, and that his Oswego l
friend felt little reason to doubt that he had I
been drowned in the lake. When she finished *
this sentence she swoomed and remained <
unconscious for some time. Her father at once ^
telegraphed for particulars, and in a few hours i
there came a dispatch which read: i
"Robert has returned and is alive and welL It I
was all a Joke."
Stimcn went to West Stockbridge the next t
Tuesday. While there he heard so much i
about his reported disappearance that he bo- 1
came morbid and tor the first time in his life l
took to drink, apuearlug one evening in the ]
presence of his atfiunced intoxicated. He was t
o shocked, upon recovering, at his conduct 1
himself,*1 purchased a revolver and shot ]
Tktscht tfee ttrtag waa Tied to It. <
From the Chicago Rambler. 1
Hungry guest?How Is this? I ordered a steak {
and a poached egg. I see the egg; but where is ,
the steak?
Sable attendant?Dat's all right, sah. De steak I
aui undah de egg waieon ?
NUGGET HUNTING.
Persistency and Lnek-Each Has Its
Share in the Success.
From the San Francisco Call
An old miner who followed the gold excitement
In its devious wanderings in Australia,
California, Mexico, and British Columbia, related
to a Call reporter a few days ago several
instances of lucky discoveries:
"An old Dutchman brought the plodding
method of his race to the work of gold digging
in Australia. All of his companions had boldness
and dash, but few had the stolid persistency
in the face of bad luck that this Dutchman
possessed. He had been plodding along
for several months digging a tunneL Heavy
dull clay was all about him. Not a promising
sign beckoned liim on. He seemed to get more
settled in his determination to work the tunnel
to the end the more unpromising it looked. He
had been working on in the face of discouragement
for several months. One moraine he
was making his way into his tunnel, ana before
he had gone fourteen feet his heart sank
within him. There in front of him was
his tunnel caved! The path that he
had laboriously dug into the hill was
clogged with tons of earth. But the quality of
his character asserted itself. Most men would
have volleyed oaths at his 111 luck, and packed
up their kit and left. The miner moved more
slowly than before, but he started to work
again in the same tunnel. He crawled into
his tunnel, and with his pick and shovel set to
clearing away the hill of earth that blocked his
Eath. He had not struck a dozen blows with
is pick before the sharp iron point struck
something solid. Mechanically lie bent forward
and cleared away the earth, and there before
him was a big nugget, as nuggets go,
weighing fourteen ouftces. He crept out of the
tunnel, bringing his precious nugget with him.
and when he got into the fresh air and heard
the birds singing, he sat down and wept. No
one begrudged the Dutchman his luck.
"A nuggety country that has been only partially
worked is lust as good a field as virgin
soil," continued the miner. "The spots that
have not been touched may be the very nests
of the precious metal. It is dangerous to leave
a single foot of ground unworked. The for- i
tune of a lifetime might thus be passed by and
lost lorever. There are many instances of Just
such cases. There was a poor, shiftless fellow,
with a wife iu rags and children in squalor.
The whole family used to go into the diggings
together and shift about till they had got I
enough to buy something to eat. They kept
sinking lower and lower. But one day they
straggled into the diggings, not having energy
enough to push on abreast of the workers.
They fell to picking a little pillar that bad
been left standing in th3 midst of the
diggings, all about it having been worked. I
do not think it could have been more than
tbree feet across, certainly not more than
six. It was a spot that had been negleuted as
the diggers pushed their drifts ahead. The
squalid family began work on thi? solitary pillar:
all they hoped was tor a few grains to feed
thom for the day. As the man continued listlessly,
the sunlight was caught up by a speck
in tbe pillar that glistened and flashed. The
eyes ol the poor fellow saw It; he thought his
work for the day was done. He-knelt down to
clean away the dirt from the bright spot. As
he did so the shining metal grew to larger proportions.
Immediately the whole family was
around it in eager haste to uncover it. The
further they cleared the soil away about It the
furtner it seemed to recede. Alter working two
hours with growing astonishment they saw
the full outline of their prize?one of the largest
lumps of gold ever found. That was the luckiest
find ever made.
"The Mount Moliagul nugget was found in a
most peculiar place," resumed the miner.
"There was an unusually rich diggings in the
vicinity ol Mount Moliagul, Victoria, that had
made a hundred men rich. It had been
thoroughly worked in every direction, and it
was thought that every grain of gold in the
neighborhood had been collected. The crowd
Lfian once made the camp a busy scene of life
dissolved as quickly as it had collected, leaving
the shanties to the mercy of the weather, which
soon made them a picturesque ruin. Off toward
the east there was a solitary tree stump
standing on a pillar of earth that bad not been
cut away by the gold hunters because of tiie
old roots ol the tree that spread through the
soil. It was not more than ten feet in circumference
that had been left by the diggers.
Une day two miners came to the deserted
-'amp, and stopped- over night on the site
of the old earnix afcuiAp struck one
of them as a singular ?featnre "Of * the old diy?ings,
and being ? s^UffiF miner, he knew
that one part ol a rniggfety country was a?
likely to hide the precious metal as another.
It occurred to him that the ground under the
itump was as likely to prove rich as the portions
of the neighboring field that had yielded
so much gold. He resolved to work the Utile
tnound the next day. His companion, however,
was anxlods to be off to the latest diggings,
where the excitement was at the highest pitch.
Hut the first miner who had resolved to explore
the solitary patch of the deserted diggings,
persuaded his partner, and together
they set to work on the.oW stump. They began
t>y undermining one sice of the stump, bat before
they had dug in three feet they discovered
in enormous nugget, one of Che most valuable
that had been found in the whole diggings.
r*uey continued their labors and uprooted the
stump, but did not find another grain of gold."
Street Car Politeness.
IBS MEN LESS considerate OB" WOMEN THAN
formerly?
From the New York Tribune.
"Have you noticed," asked one gentleman of
mother in an elevated railway car the other
lay, "that men ar^ess.cqj^teyy* to women
ban formerly? See boty jmany women are
standing while tbe%<?is ipe'ttNed with men
vho look like genwmdu. You and I can renember
when such a thing could not have been
;een in any car filled with respectable persons.
Vre we becoming less polite as a people?"
"1 think," was the reply, "that in real politeless
and in deference to women we are not
osingground, though I have noticed thechange
hat you speak of in some of its outward maniestations.
It has been gradual and not with>ut
wellniefined cause. Women are themselves
esponsible for it. By their manner thev seem
0 demand as a rl^ht what men are only too
:lad to confer as a gift, and what they expect to
>e received as such. After a man has given up
lis seat in a car a lew times without receiving
1 word or even a smile ol thanks he usually
binks it about time to stop. It is amazing how
*ude a woman can be in a public conveyance
Alio iu private circles is the very soul of grace!
md cannot receive the smallest attention with>ut
prompt acknowledgment.
"A few days ago I saw a young woman entor
i car at Grand street, accompanied by avoung
nuu. A gentleman immediately rose and gave
icr his seat, which she took. At 9th street a
)erson sitting next to her left the car, and the
gentleman who had relinquished his seat was
ibout to take the vacautone, when the young
voman moved over into it, motioning to her
oinpanion to take hers. I think that gentlenan
will be less prompt In his courtesy in l'uuro.
"Do you see that woman over there with the
en-year-old lad by her side? When she came
nto the car a few stations back, a gentleman
rave her his seat. At the next station the seat by
ler was vacated and she pulled ber boy into it,
tV omen were standing In front of her at the
'me, but she saw no reason why her boy
bouid be sacrificed to them. Do you ever see
i woman request a child of hers to get up and
rive his seat to a woman? I have seen such a
hlngoncein a while, but not often. Men are
is essentially polite as ever, according to my
bservailon; they are simply learning the lesson
yomen tcach them, and discriminate as to the
Imes and places where they can exercise their
joliteness without wasting it.",
Here t lie train reached an up-town station and
he gentlemen worked their way through the
urging crowd and stepped out on the platform.
A Reminiscence.
from the Century Brlc-a-Brac.
There was a time, fond girl, when yon
Were partial to caresses;
Beiore your graceful figure grew
Too tall for ankle-dresses;
Wben "Keys and Pillows," and the rest
Of sentimental pastimes,
were thought to be ; he verv best
Amusement out of class-times. *
ou wore your nut-brown hair In curls
That reached beyond your ltodice,
Quite in the style of other girls,?
But you I tlioug.it a goddess!
I wrote you letters, long and short.
How many there's no telling)
Imagination was my forte'
I can't say that of spelling!
We shared our sticks of chewing-guia.
Our precious bits ol" candy; I
Together solved the knotty sum.
And learned the art ainnnUU
W bene'er you wept, a wo All lump
Stuck In my throat, delaved there!
My sympathetic heart would Jump?
I wondered bow it staid there!
We meet to-day,?we meet, alas]
With salutation formal;
I m in the college senior class,
You study at tbe Normal;
And as we part I think again,
And sadly wonder whether
Yon wish, us I, we loved as when
We sat at school together!
Frank Dempster Sherman.
Women as Dramatists.
tO REASON WHY THEY SHOULD NOT SUCCEED?
THEIIi POWER TO PORTRAY LItfE.
'rom the London Standard.
Of all the puzzles presented by the Intellectual
inferences between the sexes perhaps the most
>erplexlng is the failure of women to write
^dramas There seems to be absolutely no
eason for it. We can understand, at least
mrtly, why there should have been no female
iaphael, or Newton, or Darwin?no painter or
itudent, or naturalist of the absolutely firet
lass?uud can even comprehend why tLu?h
?E!fLs?Vd.y niu?lca? tnuch^menandX
a capacity for Instrumentation
, there should be no female cumber
of even second-rate mark. 0001
The argument that women's minds laeir
iuniity2^solarm0^?11 puHhed an ab>
fcctoSat itM^ Sf9?rdfO?? with all Recorded
tit lea*t us a Drovisioniii hvjothesls
to explain what else would be lnex'
?} does not meet the case of the
lrama, or give us the smallest reason for hn_
me thing cMd In |tu tL.fSSS.e5
?nrt?/^?S
_?Irra.UKl?tr """nation." English women in
particular have rivaled Englishmen uwriten
^^".and this in department oFthel?t
which call more especiaIly?or dramatic power.
*
AYTTR'S 8 AR9 AP arilla operates rad)
leal It upon and through the blood, and Is a safl
reliable and absolute cure for the various disease
complaints and disorders due to debility, or to an
constitutional taint or Infection.
Avoid bt all means the use op oalc
mel forblHouscompltfluts. Ayer's CatharticPill
compounded entirely of vegetable ingredients, ha\
been tested for forty years, and are acknowledged 1
be the best remedy ever devised for torpidity of tb
IKer, costiveness, and all derangements of the diges
lve apparatus, Je23
? ' i
Frightful Case Of .A. Colore
man. ;
I contracted a fearftil case of blood poison In 188!
I was treated by some of the best physicians in A
lanta. They used the old remedies of Mercury an
Potash, which brought on rbeulnatism and impalrc
my digestive organs. Every Joint in me was swolie
and full of pain. When I was given up to die, m
physicians thought It would be a good time to test tt
virtues of Swift's Specific. When I commenced takio
S. S. S. the physician said I could not live two weel
under the ordinary treatment. He commenced to gi\
me the medicine strictly according to direction
which I continued for several months. I took nothic
else, and commenced to improve from the very firs
Soon the rheumatism left me, my appetite became a
right, and the ulcers, which the doctor said were tk
most frightful he had ever seen, began to heal, and to
the first of October, 1884,1 was a Well man again,
am stronger now thau I ever was before, aud weig
more. S. S. S. has saved me from an early grave.
LtM McCLEN DON.
Lem McClendon lias been In rtie employ of tfc
Chess-Carlev Company for some years, aud I kno'
the above statements to be true. At the time he begs
taking Swift's Specific he was in a horrible conditio)
I regard his cure almost miraculous.
W. 15. CROSBY, Manager.
Chess-Carley Co,, Atlanta Division.
Atlanta, Ga., April 18,1SS6.
Fur sale by all druggists.
Treatise on Blood and skin Diseases mailed free.
Thk Swift Specific Co., Drawer 3, Atlanta.Gi
N. Y.. 157 W. 23d St. 11
Shiver, Shiver, Shiver
m this
. IJ
sweltering, sweltering weather.
Not from malarial causes,but by exercise of the powei
of the Imagination. In order to produce such an e
feet it is necessary that the surroundings be la cor
sonance with the idea.
When the thermometer Is way up In the nineties th
sight of an Icicle, even though it be an imitation, ha
a tendency to reduce temperature several degrees 1
imagination. Therefore, if one would- "Keep Koo!
when "Old Sol" is pouring down his wrath he mus
have constantly before the mind's eye that which su(
gests Arctic Ideas.
The idea materializes in garments composed of
FROSTY FIBRES,
thousands of Coats and Vests of which are on exhlb
tion and sale at
ADLER'S
TEN PER CENT CLOTHING house,
at $1.97 per Coat and Vest
The principle of Protection, as advocated and prai
ticed by us is no mere bagatelle, neither is it a pr<
tense, but a stern and sterling fact, which has been s
clearly demonstrated and fully established that th
People have rushed to ournupport with such unanlr
Ity that at times we have been compelled to tur
them away empty, being uuable to fill their order
We have over-leaped every barrier, brushed awa
every obstacle and are now fully prepared to met
every demand for
MEN'S, YOUTHS', BOYS' and CHILDREN'S
CLOTHING
of every conceivable shade, grade and style, at price
that causes a panic to seize the Old Fogies of the trade
Aside from our other advantages we beg you to r?
meinbtr that we make uo had debts, because we sel
for Cash only, thereby avoiding all unpleasant core
plications, the most outrageous of which is requirini
the good customers to pay for the bad.
Selling goods, as we do, at exactly Ton Per Cen
Above the Actual Cost of Manufacture it does not r?
quire any great mental strain to comprehend th
meaning of
r T 'I ABLER ON THE BRAIN.
But In order that you may take in the situation In It
entirety call at
able r'3
TEN PER CENT
CLOTHING HOUSE;
STRICTLY ONE PRICE.
627 and 929 Seventh street northwest
southeast corner Massachusetts avenue.
Always be sure that you are in the Right Place. S?
"ADLKR" over the ddoa
*UT Open evenings until 9: Saturdays until 1L
Note?Having been notified from the factory tha
our order canrioi be filled in time there will, in con
sequence, be no sale of Otllee Coats, on Tuesday even
tug. tlie 2:ju inst. There will be a sale, however, oi
Thursday, the 25th ii.st. and will continue throughou
the entire season on Tuesday and Thursday niglits o
each week from 7 to 9 o'clock. jel9
Seasonable A.nd Proper Clothing
to get clothes to look well in win
TER IS NOT SO DIFFICULT. THICK WOOLENS
CAN BE SHAPED AND MADE TO KEEP THI
SHAPE, BUT THIN AND COOL FABRICS RE
QUIRE KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE TC
FASHION INTO COMELY GARMENTS. TC
MEET ALL THESE REQUIREMENTS DEMANDS
AS YOU CAN READILY JUDGE, BETTER SKILI
and CARE, AND WE CLAIM THAT BOTH
HAVE BEEN EXERCISED IN MAKING UPOUI
PRESENT SUPERB STOCK OF SEASONABLE
and PROPER CLOTHING.
robinson, parker <& 00*
ONE-PRICE CLO THIERS,
S19 Southeast Cohneb 7th and D stkkkts.
Je5
13 a kg a ins: Bargains!
BARGAINS I
We are now offering, at greatly reduced prices,
ODD LOTS IN SUMMER GOODS.
Men's Hand-sewed TIES. Strap or Button, for $4.50
per pair; former price SG.oo.
Men's Hand Welt OXFORDS, $4.25 per pair; formei
price ?5.00.
A lot of Boys' OXFORDS, former price $3.60 and
$4.00, now selling for $^.50 per pair.
In regular goods we have one of the largest assort
ments to be found in the city.
Our 1-adies' $2.<*o CURACOA KID BOX TOE, BUTTON.
are still in the lead.
For $2.50 we can give you a fine BOX toe or COMMON
SENSE CURAt"OA K ID BUTTON, aud guar
amee them to give satisfaction. For $3.00 we can
give you a beauty.
In Low SHOES FOR TiADlES we have all the
latest styles, at the very lowest figures possible
Ladies' fine CURACOA KID OXFORDS, hand-sewed,
$1.50.
Ladles' fine CURACOA kid newport ties, handsewed
?1.50
Ladies'^ fine CURACOA KID BUTTON, hand-sewed,
Lad1<^fl'ne FRENCH KID OXFORDS, hand-sewed,
Ladies'^flne FRENCH KID EDISON, hand-sewed,
LadW fine FRENCH CLOTH-TOP EDISON, Louia
XV boel $4.00
Ladles' tine french edison,LouisXVheel, $5.00,
and
LARGE variety of misses* and CHILdren's
low shoes and slippers.
Also, a fttll line of Ladies' and Misses' White Operas.
wm. h. rich
one-price shoe store,
JelO 7X7 Market Space.
GI"old Dollars
i
Will not be found in the heels of all our Shoes, bat
olid comfort and durability can betfound In them.
Take a memorandum of these prices.
Ladies' Fine French Kid, Button, $4.
Ladies' Fine French KM, Button, Hand-torn, $5.50.
Ladles' JCId Foxed Button, Hand-sewed, $3.50.
Ladies' Fine Seamless Oxfords. Hand-sewed, $3.50.
iAdlca' Fine Kid Opera Slippers, from 75c. to $3.
The "Golden Slippers," for Gents, only 75c.
High and low Shoes made to measure^ either fbi
Ladies or Gents, only $5.
Our &mous,npat, stylish and durable $8.60 shoea
Cor Gents' are warranted to give
The great demand for them ensures us that
equal cannot be found elsewhere.
GEO. W. RICH,
400 7th st tur.
DRY GOODS.
r_ Extension Of Busiseu
B,
>.
^
>- As we are now extending oar building through to
f' 8th street, It is necessary that we should induce our
0 stock, to make room for new goods with which to
ie stock our new building. We shall commence to sell
t- our present stock at such low prices that we are satis
fled, when the time comes to move into oar new building,
we shall have only new goods to display. Remember
that the stock we propose to sell is not OLD
stock, but
D NEW AND SEASONABLE
3.
t* goods, such as no one will regret baying. As an ex|d
ample, we will give a few articles as Leaders, as we
^ have not time or space to name alL
y
ie
g
:s
: WHITE GOODS.
s 86 Inch India Lawn at 5c. per yard.
j 80 inch Plaid India Linen at 1'iVgC. per yard.
11 This is exceedingly cheap,as the goods are fiilly
ie worth 25c. per yard.
y 36 inch Cheese Cloth in all colors at 8c, per yard.
We have one case of Beaut i ftil|Figured Swis*, which
we will close out at 12^c. per yard.
ie .. i i
w
0
a.
LAWNS
500 pieces fast-ootar Lawns at 4a per yard.
300 pieces yard-wide Lawns, the most select patterns,
at 7c. per yard, worth 10c.
fc. Just received, 4 cases of 4-4 Lawns, which will be
_ closed out at tPfec. per yard; actual value, 10c. .per
yard.
*> .
, f
uic njuunj a't
*" -ii(t fini. ,
i, m
BLACK GOODS.
rs
f. In this department we have a great variety of all
i. kinds of goods for mourning wear, marked at greatly
reduced prices.
ie
a
n "
L"
It
I- DRESS GINGHAMS.
We have the greatest variety of Dres?Glnghams
ever before exhibited In this city. Those in search of
wash dresses should not fail to ?xauiiue our stock
before purchasing, as we are confident that you can be
suited out of our immense assortment. We have
them varying In prices from 8c. per yard up. We are
selliug a % wide seersucker, in all colors, at 17c. per
yard, worth 20c.
y
y STORE OPEN EVERY EVENING UNTIL 8
e O'CLOCK.
a
a . . .
i.
y.
!t LANSBURGH A BROu
Je25 420.422, 424,426 seventh street.
Cheap Satines And Batiste.
S
5. *
m
11
1- 1 CASE 3,000 YABDS FIGURED SATINES, 20c.;
S USUAL PRICE 30c.
I CASE BATISTE, 2,500 YARDS. 12JfcC.; USUAL
t PRICE 15c.
1 10 PIECES CRIMPED SEERSUCKER, AT.T, COLB
ORS.
WE PUT ON OUR CHEAP COUNTER A LOT OF
FIGURED COLORED GRENADINES, HALF
SILK, 15c.; SOLD FOR 75c.
A LARGE LOT OF DRESS GOODS, 5c.; MANY OF
THEM SOLD FOR 37^ AND 50a
1 CASE TENNIS STRIPES, SATINE FINISH,
121aC.: FORMER PRICE 25.
PARASOLS AT LESS THAN COST.
a geo. j. johnson <fc luttrell.
Je24 713 Market Spaca
t ???
i Sole Agents
t
t FOB
moschowitz model waist linings.
save time, trouble and money.
GREAT REDUCTIONS HAVE BEEN MADE IN
THE PRICES OF OUR CHOICE STOCK. SILK
GOODS HAVE NEVER BEEN OFFERED SO LOW
AS AT THE PRESENT. WE ARE OFFERING
THE GREATEST INDUCEMENTS IN ALL
GRADES OF CHOICE SILKS AND WOOLENS.
SPECIAL PRICES ON PONGEE ROBES REDUCED
FROM $30 TO $20, FROM $20 TO $15. LARGE
i STOCK OF FRENCH SATTEENS. 150 PIECES
CHOICE STYLES AND BEST QUALITY BATISTE
' 15a, REDUCED FROM 20a UINGHAM ROBES
. REDUCED FROM $13.50 TO $&
) W. M. SHUSTER & SONS,
? 919 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE
' ONE PRICE. Je24
GENT'S INDIA GAUZE SHIRTS, 3&fra; WORTH
50a
Gent's India Gauze Shirts. 50c.; worth 75a
I Gent's Balbriugan Shirts, 50a; worth 75a
Closinsr out Spring Neckwear at half price,
i Finest Sat teen Drawers only 50a
Spring Weight Undershirts. 50c.; worth 75a
Medium Weight Undershirts, nearly all wool. 50a
/ COMFORT SHIRT, made of Warnsuua
rotten' baa Richardson's 2,loo Liren bosoms,
reinforced, ready for the wash to1?, only 85 cents.
This is thfe Uest fitting, best made Shirt in tt*?
market.
Remember! only 85c. for the Finest Dress Shirt at the
BRANCH BALTIMORE SHIRT FACTORY.
myjQ lOOtt F STREET NORTHWEST
HOUSEF URN IfcjHIN GS.
The Ridg way
DRY AIR REFRIGERATOR.
ALL SIZES, STYLES AND PB4CES.
J. W. SCHAEFER <fc BRO,
1 No. 1020 7thst n.w.,
JelO Bole Agents for the District.
I
Here We Are Again,
i WITH THE SIXTH r.ARintn OF OUR
1 EUREKA CHAMBER SUIT,
SOLID WALNUT, MARBLE TOP. 10 PIECES
COMPLETE, FOR $43.50? BEST VALUE
EVER OFFERED FOR THE MONEY.
GREAT BARGAINS IN AT.T. OTHER GOODS
, PREVIOUS TO TAKING STOCK, JULY 1ST.
w. h. hoeke,
Jel8 801 Market Space; 806 and 810 8th st
i
Singleton <fc Fletcher,
FURNITURE, CARPETS, BEDDING AND UPHOLSTERY
GOODS.
STRAW MATTING, BABY CARRIAGES.
LOOSE COVERS FOR FURNITURE, ETC., ETC.
Remember, we guarantee prices to tie always the
In TV HIT
*15 7th stskr Nobthwxst,
my9
Vapor Stoves.
Do not bay until you hare examined oar large as*
sortment, of five different "*?Vtn. especially the im
proved CROWN JEWEL and the DAVIS SINGLE
GENERATOR STOVE, haying only one bonier that
you have to heat, then the others are ready for nsa
Call and see them, in llatxea and prices.
w. 8. jen kb * ocx,
*P9 717 71b street
/^obfulency.?recipe and note8 how
Qctobw'Ti.rtrvZtUaot merely
LADIES" GOODS.
MME. VON BRANDIS, MODISTE.
Formerly with Lord A Taylor, New York;
Win. Burr <t Co., St. l.ouls. Ma \ .
Salts made at the shortest notice. SuperWy fKOflt,
reasonable prices and satisfaction guarantem. " J
Evening Dresses. Bridal Tro*?e*us a suecfclty. '
Je2?lm* 9Q7 Pcnn. ave., ;over M. WUlians.)
^JKS. B. m. MENGEBT. 419 9TH ST.' N.W.
Art Embroidery materials of all kinds. Infants" l-aoe
and Shirred Caps. Shawls, etc. VInest trades of Zephyr
and Knitting % urns, all at reduccd prion.
Stamping promptly dona jelO-3m
Mrs. iselma ruppert,
608 9th street. oppo?4te Patent Offle*.
Large and complete stock of ladles' and Children's
HOSIERY, CORSETS. SUMMER UNDERWEAR,
Silk and Lisle Thread GLOVES and MITTENS.
EMBROIDERIES, FLOUNCINGS, ALL-OVERS,
In Swiss. Nainsook and Cambric.
CHANTILLY, FEDOR A.ORI EXT AL, EGYPTIAN,
MEDICIS AND OTHER TRIMMING LACES AT
REDUCED PRICES Je9
e e k o v a l,
MME. T. B. HARRISON,
1337 F ST. N.W.,
Will remove to her new store
No. 1329 F ST..
About Jane 25th, and until then will sell her
choice selections of Imported Summer Mllliuery
at greatly reduced prices.
TRIMMED STOCK AT ACTUAL COST. jeP-lm
20 Per Cent Off.
ENTIRE STOCK OF
PATTERN BONNETS AND IT ATS.
At
MRS. M. J, HUNT.'S
_jo2 13?9 f street Northwest.
BC. DOUGLAS' DKV rLEANING ESTABLISH
MENT AND DYE WORKS. 1336 J4thst.,bet.
N and Rhode Island ave. Si*ecial attention given to
the cleaning of Ladies' Evening Dresses. Velvets,
Plush, Laces, ?c., are cleaned perfectly by this process.
silk, silk and Satin Dresses beautifully cleaned
without being rim>ed. Kid Gloves cleaned and dyed.
Crape Veils dyed and finished oguaJ to new. iny25*-tiiu
J* C. Hutchinson:
IMPORTER
FINE MILLINERY,
REPRESENTING TOE PREVAILING PARIS
AND NEW YORK STYLES IN CRAPE, MULL
AND LACE HATS AND BONNETS, FRENCH
FLOWERS, FEATHERS, NOVELTIES FOR TRIMMING.
TROUVILLE, BRIGHTON AND NEWPORT
SHADE HATS.
WHITE SUITS OF CHOICEST DESCRIPTION.
BLACK SILK AND CLOTn COSTUMES. paraSOLS
IN ALL THELEADINGSTYLES. ENGLISH
AND FRENCH JERSEYS, PERFECT FITTING.
COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF DRESSMAKERS'
FINDINGS
JTrevIse. Part*, 807 Pa.ava,
FOSTER KID, 8ILK AND LISLE GLOVES,
mrltt
d ouglass'.
We have 100 Dozen LADIES" BALBRTGGAN
HOSE, sizes 8 to 9V3, our regular 47c. Hose-, which we
shall sell for 37^ per pair; three pair for $1 or $2
per box.
douglass1.
my6 Ninth street. St. Cloud Building.
rphe FEDORA DRESS SHIELD IS RKCOM-1
mended by the Leading Dressmakers.
It Is absolutely impervious.
For sale at all Dry Goods and Ladies' Furnishing
Stores. ap24-3m
French dyeing, scvuring and dry
Clean'rig Establishment New York ave. n.w.
All kinds of Ladies atrf Gents' Garments Dyed,
Cleaned and finished iy the most superior manner
Plnsb Cloaks, Velvet yTiid Party Dres-es a specialty.
Ladies' dresses done yn? without "being ripped. ANTON
<? CAROLINE I.KHCH. formerly with A. Fischer.
ap!3 ___
-ajjton ftshers
Chemical l?ry cleaning Establishment
No. 90b G Street Northwest.
thirty years' experience.
Ladies' and Gentlemen's Garments: also. Velvet an4
Plush Cloaks, Cra)ie Veils, I^aces, Glove: etc., are
perfectly cleaned by this superior process.
LADIES' EVENING DRESSES A SPECIALTY.
Gentlemen's clothes cleaned by this process will not
lose their original shape: and grease spots guaranteed
to be removed effectually. Price $1.50 ana $1.75 per
suit. <fx
MISS ANNIE K. HUMPHERY.
430 Tenth street Northwest
Makes Corsets to order in evrt-v stvle and material,
and guarantees perfect fit and comfort.
Her Specialties Ark?
French Hand-made Underclothing, Merino Underwear
and finest imported Ilosierv.
Patent Shoulder Braces, and all Dress Reform Gooda
French Corsets and Rustles.
Children's Corsets and a $1 Corset tMiss IL'sowa
make) that for the price is unsurpassed.
N. B.?French, Uerman and Spanish spoken. mrl4
Jrochon, corcoran building.
First-class Hair Dresser from Paris.
Three Patents and Five Medals ttom Expositions)!
Paris, Lyons and Vienna
Manufacturer and importer of
HUMAN HAIR AND FINE hair work,
Ladies' fine Hair Cutting and Hair Dressing.
Hair dyed and shampooed Iu a first-class manner
Wigs to order.
68 637 15th st. n-W.
GENTLEMEN'S GOODsT~
Just 1 Deceived
A JOB LOT OE GAUZE UNDERSHIRTS,
Which we are offering for 25 cents; the regular price
was 50 cents.
Also a full line of
summer underwear, hosiery, collars
and cuffs and neckwear.
SHIRfS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY.
COLLARS AND CUFFS LAUNDRIED lor 2c. each.
8. B ELLERY,
J18 1112 F street northwest
J UST I^ECErVEDA
Large Line of NECKWEAR, for 50c, 75c. and$L
Full Line of Fall and Winter UNDERWEAR, at
lowest prices.
Lai*e Line of DRESS BHIRTS constantly on band.
CHARLES HYATT, Proprietor.
THOMPSON'S SHIRT FACTORY,
816 F street northwest
se30 Opposite Patent Office.
SEWING MACHINES. &c.
"Vr?U WILL SAVE TIME, MONEY ANDANX
noyance by going to AI ERBACH S Reliable sewing
Machine Rooms, cor. 7th and H sts. New Latest
Improved Machines of all the standard makes. Make
your own selection. Sole Agency for the Silent New
American No. 7?A triumph of mechanical genius.
a most wonderful machiue. Simple, Silent, swift and
Sure. Bear In mind that we fhruish a legal guarantee
for five years with every machine we seli. S<*nd for
testimonials from over :j.OOO Washington ladies. No
drummers. No two profits. Send for catalogue and
price-list of 18 different makes of machines All kinds
rented, repaired And warranted.
C AUERBACH, corner 7th and H streets,
? , , . Washington, D. C.
Next door to Aaerbsch's Gent's Furnishing and Hat
Store. Je6
LADIES: BEFORE YOU PURCHASE A SEWING
Machine, we would advise you to examine the
celebrated light-running and ever-lasting NEW
HOME SEWTNG MACHINE Always ready to
work. The range of work done on this machine canDot
be surpassed. A child can manage it
Sold on easy monthly payments, and special discount
tor cash.
Be sure to try the NEW HOME before you bay.
& OPPEN H EIMER <fc BRO.,
52S 9th street northwest,
St, Cloud Building,
Sole Agents tor New Home Sewing Machine.
Good Machines for rent, by week or month. All
kinds repaired. my 18
SUPPOSE YOU LOOK IN AT McKENNEVS
Reliable Sewing Machine House, 427 9th st, and
see the New Automatic White. It is a little Daisey.
New Machines of all klnda
Renting and Repairing. mbl2
JVI'Caw. Stevenson & Orr's
PATENT
GLACIER WINDOW DECORATION.
A MOST EFFECTIVE SUBSTITUTE
FOB
STAINED GLASS.
COST IN COMPARISON, VERY LOW.
Easily affixed by any person, without removal ci
glass from windows or risk of damage. Sold by principal
Stationers, Decorators and Wall Paper Houses.
Colored Illustrated Catalogue, with foil instructions
and samples of the material, post lree 26c.
M'CAW, STEVENSON A ORR, (
82 BROADWAY, N. Y. ? * : '
j H fioii 1 I 2
AS AGENT WANTED IN EVERY GITY-1. > I 1
mylQs.tu.tb 2m
ScHILLENGER'S ARTIFICIAL
stone PAvrsG ca
Offioej-1418 New York Avrns
Artistic and floe wock in cement a specialty.
Our skilled workmen lay the following pavemsotsc
SCHILLENQER PATENT (BEST),
ARTIFICIAL STONE, A8PHALTUK, PARAGON,
GRANOLITHIC. NEUCHATKL, MASTIC
Kitchens. Sidewalks, Stables, Celiacs laML with neatnesBand
pntmptm* 0 jfrKTIIBIN. President.
Telephone caU 467-3. aytta
family supplies,
BKTIi'T ? BUTTER!' ? BUTTER - FRESH
k Ugl lua Rutter received dally, atic. wr pound, at
tlukn?_* MODGSONV, TJO l?th st. n.w..
opl^i* tenter Market.
J1 LOUR! J"5READ! I* LOI'R!
t^WDellght. only $1 ,5rt per Vi bbl. CtookV TVlight,
only . jc. per v bbl >w iss Prorew, only #1.75
Pr HpoL Whe Ptww, only S*e. tier V bbl. Roller
Family. only 91 40 per K| hbL RoLer family, only
XT*. *% bbl. Extra I tow ^ m u>
r bbl. Sugar Cured Should en, Hi* to T^-jC
Casaurds Hum. only 12?sC. i>er lb. California
i>iHn'iS ? r '.** J-0'' *<>c- I""1 ft1- lUxMi Uflw,
Rio 12 .. In and 2?v p?r lb Beet Java. 25 to .sc.
}",r '.{e 8?C- 1 ea ;n the city. Rest Butter.
O aud l*>c. per lb. uolden >vrup, oio, 40 and juc
per gal.
INDIA TEA COMPANT,
_J*1? 445 7th si aw.
3v" E VvRE sEI.LINO
THi. Bljsr rATKNT I'ROCKSS FIX?UR PER
. ? KARKI 1, FOK
ALSO. VAPRKY > HEKIN'Eli WRP, IX 5 AND
Tti^ t^KfSV BVV?i'T*' AT ?CT"s. ri li FOUND
Btr?l OLD t?< ?\ ERN M KNT JAVA UUFFKIL
KOASrm. CTS.
FIN?T RD? COFFEE, HO.V STEP. 17 CTS.
GOODS TO ANY' A MOV NT lMI.IVkRKI) FREE.
walker a wiu<;ht,
Jels-3w W> mi'i !?.">o Lo uisiana ave.
^ELLINO Orn f IN"B*T 1 * A TENT f LOUR
NOW, AT $1.80 \ 11I1U
BFST FAMILY 150
UKAXtLATKl) SUGAR* , ' 7c! lb.
STORE CUH1S AT 7UV>.
C. W1TMEK A CO.
JPuRE ^XaPLE ScOAJL
c,^ .e.hoVeJus' lari^ lid Of PURE MAPLE
2.?l*T?. Pomid. Patent lYoce*
."H.K *#.50 per obi. Sugar-cur?-d HAMS. small
Size. 12V, cents perpound. ?'h, i>ee?Tv-amery Hi *TTER
a*necUltv. six pounds pare LARD fin AO cents. A
ftill line of choice tfKOC'h HI fc> low for Htri'ily cask
Ooovls axnouuCug to or over delivered ft^e
POOLE, BUOt >K K A CO..
mv-^ t>44 Louisiana aveuua.
COO EE* RRR EKB ?SS,
C 0 E R R F 2^ a
2 ? ek hrr kb 8s< ?
C C F R R F ? 2 CCO
ERE R R EEB 6SSS .
THE CELEBRATED MINNESOTA
PATENT TKOCESS FLOUR,
Is without adonht tliemo?st BrAPTircLand the moat
Al TKlTiol s Flour in the world.
The Millers have not only the inmt p?rfr<H MI1L
roistamiiiK as it does all the most Unproved Mm-hinery
Invented tip to the present thne, but they pr<xlu -e
a Hour IsM'BuviEnhy anv mill in the world. To
prove that, we would simply stale that a Iwrire quantity
oft.jis nituinitiifni 1 lour is ship|ted aiiuually to
Europe and eatenM the principal Courts of the old
world. We Ucarantkk that it is made from selected
bard wheat crown In Minnesota and ]>aknta. It i*
an acknowledged fact, that in this Flour a i>erfeot senai
ation of the Klutinous particles of tb? wtn*at In't ry
and a thorough eliiniiiatuui of all n<iik and staivliy
matter has at last been readied, and is constspiently
Inore Ni"i hi viors, yielding more bread to the barrel than
anv other Flour. Tf.e l>e^t trade admits thai
Tom itthread mat .m: 'jualities it t* tlie ebeapeat, as
well as the nest, lor eit Iter lanalyor Imkcr s use, and
uuMirpaased bv euy Flour inaue. Every sa< lt aud
every barrel is warranted to ?ive entire saiulatuou.
STERLING'S ST. LOUIS FANCY.
One of the most beautlfhl Winter Wheat Patents
ever offered to the trade. It is unexcelled by any other
Patent except Ceres, and. will please the most exacting
bou?eket;per and salisiy the moal '"il'-i-rmyi
cuiV
OILT-EDOK.
A magnificent Winter Wheat I'ateob
RELIANCE.
A ?T5lend*<1 Mlnne?inta Patent Floor, made by the
celebrated Hungarian process. It Is a very ch??p and
beautiful Patent, within the rea>-b of all c)ae>r<e*. aud
we (ruaruulee will |fi\e isat.sfacUuu to tvwj1 vue wiiu
nilltfytL
GOLDEN HILL.
The reliable stand-by and the Standard Famtly
Flotir of the I'Strict. It Is equal In quality to a rreat
many high-priced Patent Flours, whnst It can b<?
boueht for considerable less money. We defy competltorsto
bring forth any Flour superior to CERES,
STERLING, UIL'lVElXiE, RELLANCE or OiJLUEN
HILL, aud we leel aa^ured that any housekeeper ? ho
tries theiu once wiu uev ei uae auy Uiu% cue. kuimtut
by augrucent
Wholesale Depot, corner 1st st and InOlanaav*
WM. M. OALT CO.
financial7
- ' iK - .
l3 RINCK &j W H1TELY,
: STOCK BROKERS. |
64 Broadwav. \ .
1HO Finh avenue.J York.
539 15th street (Corcoran HuiMlniM, Washlnetoa
PRIVATE S'lXX'K TELEURAPH. WIRES
BETWKEN
WASHINGTt?N, BALTlMfUtE. PHILADELPHIA.
NEW Y'OHK, BOSTON, ?kc.
IIENKKAL PARTnkrs.
James Whitkly, li. cmwcb Oaklkt,
Maynard C EYRK.
nrvRT H. D iiiue, Washington. D. C.
William R. Travkks, Special Partner.
Buy and sell on comiulssion all claat** of Railway
Securities.
H. H. DODGE, Resident Partner,
Quotations of Stocks and Bonds and Information regarding
the markets received through our wires InMautly,
direct from the New Y'ork NiK-t Exdmneo.
All orders execuu-d and reported promptly. Jel
pkofessional.
I EXERCISE ON EASY FEET IN THEOPE'NAIR
^and sunshine best promote health and longevity,
hence the elite of the world vLsll l?r. \\ liiu s establishment,
1410 Pennsylvania aveuue, op|*o.siie Wiilard
s hotel, lor the treatment ot Corns, Hunlous.
Inverted Nails, and all Diseases of the Feet. 25tli consecutive
vear of prac tice In Washington (Iialtimore
estb.. UN. Eutaw at.) Office fee if 1 a siuinc. uiy'^S
Madame payn (resident) manicure
uud Surgeon Chiropodist,-Finger Nails beautified:
Hang Nails and Biting of Nails positively enrol
Corns, Bunions. Ingrowing Nails aud all dlseas.'-* of the
Feet successfully treatad. Single Treatuieut, either
hands or feet, jjil. lUnims 5 and 0, t?45 In. ave. my T2
MME. BROOKE TELLS ALL THE EVENTSOF
LIFE. All businees confidential. Ijulies and gentlemen
5u cents each. 40S L street, between 4ih aud
6th streets northwest. myO-Sw*
MRS. I >R. J. SEM MES. St" BO EON C1111t? tprT
D1ST, MANICURE AND DERMATOIXXilST.
Corns, solt and hard. Bunions, Inflamed and Sore
Joints. Club or Ingrowing Nails absolutely cured
w ithout pain or blood. Uuudreds of testimonials of
the elite of Washington of remarkable cures. All
should try Mrs. semuiis' method of curing Bunions.
Mire, sate and permanent. Office; 1222 F si., 4 doors
Iroiti 13Bb, up one flight. mblni
WOOD AND COAL.
cw w OOU
JOHNSON BROTHER^
WHARFS AND RAILROAD YARDt
TWELFTH AND WATER STREETS SW.
BRANCH YARDS AND OFFICES CONNECTED
BY TELEPHONE
J?02 F street northwest.
1515 7th street northwest.
1740 Pennsylvania avenue northwwfc.
1112 Wh street northa-est.
Corner 3d and K streets northwest
221 Peuuaj lvauia aveuu? aouUiwest,
ialS
f
SSSS OOO H H L n TTTT Z7.7. ? KSSc
w, 0 C H H L II T Z ?SSs
O HHHL II T Z bSHK
c 5 O C H H L HTZ
OOO H H >-?-* !. U T BSS6
MILWAUKEE LAGER BEER
THE BEST IN THE DISTRICT.
ASK FOR IT.
8 A M' L C. PALMER, Aaarr,
Depot : 1234 29th street Northwest
Telephone. 454. <e4
^JlAckinaw Straw Hats,
THE CELEBRATED MACKINAW STRAW
HATS MANUFACTURED fcY DUNLAP A CO., OF
NEW Y ORK. NOW READY.
ALL THE LEADING SHAPES FOR MEN. BOYS
AND CHILDREN.
PEARL AND BEAVER COLORED DRESS AND
derby hats at
WILLETT A RUOFTS,
SOLE AGENTS ft* DCNLAP'S NEW YORK HATB
my5 VuO JPHUMarlTaoiaav%
i
9
dr hajnew
"V GOLDEN SPECIFIC,
lAi-ieeurrvE cure for drunkenness or
m Ut S-. > THE LIQUOR HABIT.
d.f g s?
It can be given in a cup of coffee or tea without the
knowledge of the person taking It la absolutely
harmless, and will effect a permanent and speedy
aire, whether the patten is a moderate drinker or an
alcoholic wreck. It baa been given in thousands of
cases, and In every instance a perfect cure has W- ;
lowed. Irximriiu. The system once impregnated
with the Specific, it becomes an utter iiupussfrbUityior
the liquor appetite to exist
GOLDEN SPECIFIC CO., Proprietors. 1
^ |
R. K. HELPHENSTINE,
Oonar lw yHOWIIC DRBOSTOB*
CW1 er writs tot olroi^i^s^SuwrtiotiM. dl?-s*
PIANOS AND ORG AN8. I
KKR ltB.rs I'IWOs. Itl HUm UEUAM
I " auil other hr*t -elan. Uitrunwiiii
Tuning audrepairing at U II KI HNX 6m frfll
)* ? 4Q7 lUUi w. > ''
1JAROAINS IN PIANOB
J V >tiv 7-ociave W K nabe A 0? Plano.917'(m% Irtt
Oin>(M,-)ic(iivr Xew Yoftt h?n? ..^.._11W ' ' '
OBf tMirltvr Raven A IImmd Piano B)ft
One ?-octtv* isteinway A mom' l*iam? >7A
larve a**ortnient of new PMbn and < >r*an? on*!
Stantly on haw! K1>? aKD F DRoop
I At** W. u M tT/.KKCTI A C*X
PENNSYLVANIA AVKXIK,
Kolt Agent lor steinway A butts', ?.abler Omi?
stem and other Planus.
fK !("! 1 A FUR V.KU
K NUN AA R R F
KK N N N A A f.BH FK
K K N KK AAA B R F
K. K M KK A A BBS kEB
TIANO FORTES
TJNBQTa i.rn *? ??- i ...
MANMill" AND DURABILITY.
secondhand pianos
AT AXi PRICKS. FROM *50 I TW ARtt
PIANOS FOR RENT.
wm. knabe a (x?.,
817 MARKET SPACE.
triT^fl _
lltMERSON l^lAXOS,
OVER 3?,?UO NOW IN USE.
A lborouglily tioi-eiass an<1 reliable ptaao Ml
omlium prif*.
PTECK A CO ANl> HA IS A <XV PTANO*.
rt?Tnw and Organs eschaiigwl. r?i<alr?d. l?Mi
boxed, and for reiiL Keui applied If pur liMHl
Rest and must complete HNfkiruut-ut ut Ac. is
the city.
I1ENRY FRFRRACH.
HIS F ?tr?at.
ni?9 Msnsglne Partner of the late flruiof Kills A'%
1 REMENDOUS jsACIUFICK _iSECONDHAND
PIANOS AND OROANa
7H Octave W(*er Square llano. >!?>
Elegant Octave Boston Made l*t?"" ,,,.? .. J 75
7 < mtvciiiM'tilc A Co. Piano ______ l<?>
TyOruvy Oiwu* i n and Fuller n>mi 11%
(i^Odnvr Nutinoi i 'lurk llmm
7 ?irUv? * 'talcirriiiK Ituii) - I !?
Superb Walnut t "hi*' 1 'I Sl.tp iiryin 7T?
S?lopOrgan,6feet high .. , .. 4??
5 i ktave Organ, 2 *?<>|>? , . , n s?l
Walnut Uw. 6 Octave Organ.___ 15
Any of the above mention***! Instruments will he
sold at these extraordinarily low figure* ettbss for
cash or ou monthly payments of |o uml#lU|Ht
mouth.
sidney t. nimmo.
my21 4.13 7TII STREET NOKTTTWEST
TfALLET. DAVIS <t OI.'H I'PRIOHT ORAfD
J 1 1*1 ASmfltio** and harviuii* in iuy very
olmice slwk of Planus, If sold this month.
myW H. L st'MXKK. ?u Mth A nw.
HEINF.KAMP l^IANOS
Arc L'UBuri>n-?<M fhr Fine \V.irkmnn?btn. BrUlla"-y
ol "1 one and Extrern* DurabilUy.
Old Plnnos taken In exchange and full value allowed
Lowest Price* anJ Easy Monthly Paytnenta
UHANCH FACTORV WAREROOM*
*p2I ' 422 1Kb wret.
G# TJ? A\ it.P & I^RO..
7<H? Tilt Mre?'t n->rtliwe?t, sole Mrentn f>>T ?mm
the STIEFFand KHAN It H A ltA( 'II llhrffl
AN<? and <ially'H W underfill bdf-playtujfl I f I '
1 n-ii iinieni*. several liarvalii* <>ne?ui> u-uu?tn l"U'n
I aim Organs which bave Let>n ummL Ptauua and i ?rgaua
lor rent, tuned and rvpuired. >?o
'Ins CJelerrated
DYCTvERIIOFF PORTLAND CEMENT,
The aLroiigtw: and best known to the trad<-.
IE L. CHAN FORD,
Sole Agent fur I >ntrl<i of ? olumhla
ofllce-Ulh F ?t. u ?r.
Warehouse?IT. 1^ Ri?c.^>,n wharf foot of HHh tl. ?,w.
orders jimniptly tilled and deliveritsa made Vu any
part ot tl.e city.
pavements.
GRANOLITHIC, A UTIFTfTAL rto> F..
AM'llALTl M. NKll HATKL MA" IC \
str?*ets, sidewalk*. Ktahb-s, llaM'ment and ? ar
Floors, or wherever a nolid, aaiooth aud dui?i>i?
{uivenient or floor Is required.
< idlers proiuptl> attended to. and all work gua^an
Wei! lor the teru of live veara.
Nt IT1CE.
All representation* that the nimrework.ae now ??erfnrmiHl
by nie m an hifrin*?'inent of any rlgliiM of
others, or thul any court linn so held, ta iBCdrrwl
I guarantee all patron* of my murk against any
daimi or ?uiu lor daniagiM.
U. L. CIIANFORD.
1418 F at. n w.
Telephone call No. KSI. au27-uui
OFFICE OF W. W. EAMR. M.D.,
1249 HANOVER ?T,
rTTTTJ^I?EI>PH I A, DBCEM BEH 6. IMA
MESSRS EISNER A MEXUELHOX.
bULk AOEXTS OF JOIIAXX HOFP8
MALT EXTRACT V. 8. OF A,
3JO RACE HT.. PHILAllELPITT*.
DF.AR PTRS:?I HAVE t'SEIi JOHANX H<?# I'S
MALI KXTKACT K ?lt THE I'AST FIVE YEARS
IN MY PRIVATE PRACTICE, AND IUVK
WJUXD IT TO BE THE ItJ>T HEALTH KESTORINO
BEVERAGE AND IXJNIC Nl'TRIl ?VK
KNOWN. I HAVE FOI'ND IT E^PKCIA I LV
IN PERS* ?XM tUNVALW* lN<< H "M
FEVER, IN < ASES OF DYSPEPSIA. I'?H
MoTHE'HS NtTRslXO, AXI) IN CASKH <H
WEAKLY CHILDREN, AN1> A1>0 IN Lt N*.
TRoCRLIS MY A I rEXTIOlf WAS DRAWN l!Y
THE IMMKNsK I M 11 MtTATION SI Ml MO.MHLY.ANliAWil'TA
MILLION OF BOTTLES I-V
PORTED BY YOU HAVE PASSED MY IMIW
TION IN THE < VslDM Holsh SAll&^Ai'lvA
RLLY FOR HIE PAST FIVE YE ARB.
YOLRft, KEtsPFX"TFl'I.LY,
W. W. LA M B. M.D.,
CHIEF DRL'O IN"SPE< TOB C.
IMKT OF PHI LA DELPHI A
RFWARE OF IMITATION. NoXE OEXL IVJ?
WITHOI'T THE SIONATI RE OF mJoHA>X
1IOFF" AND "MoltiTZ ElsNER-' ON Till. M K
OF EVERY BOTTLE leW.th^t tu
Concentrated
chab ORrHARD
water.
THE GREAT RENOVATOR
rBET>. RECOMMENDED AND IXDORPFP BY
PHYSICIANS ALL OVER THE WORLD.
THE ONLY REMEDY THAT ACTS OX ALL OF
THE GREAT UlliiAXb OF THE ULMAN
bYBTEM.
THE liver.
THE KIDNEYS.
THE bTOMACH.
THE BO WEI A
PTTRE?RA FE?SPEED Y.
POSSESSES THE COMBINED MEDICINAL VIBTUEte
OF ALLTHE KAMOLo NATURAL
WATER*.
CONSTIPATION, KICK HEADACHE. DVSI KPSI
A are promptly cured by It. We control all tb< |T?>duett-of
tliese falu<iui- *pr"lng*?both Stdl* and nn-r
All genuine preparation l>? ar the "t 'rah Apple" 1 >ade
Mark OU the labels. ?.et the Ke&ullie "i ml) AW'le"
brand. Concentrated Water, lib tvnts; Genuinefeaito,
lu healed packages, at 1U ceuta ana 2t> cenUetw h
CRAH ORCHARD WATER CO., PruprletoM.
BLMON N. JONES. Manager
aplS-th^.to Lou*villa, Uf.
fg- CAPITAL PRIZE, fTS.OOO "%%
Tickets only |T>. shares In proporuoo.
J^OUIBIANA STATE LOTTERY.
" K> rin hrrrtvt! rrriffi/ thill tne mq.-~r*itr fhr
menu fur all thr M'mthly and Nrmi-Annual ItrawtHm if
the 1/tuuKina State Jyuttrry Ontf/a-V. "nd m
manaiy and rontml the /h numyt thtmaeiim*, arm 'Ml
tin tuntr art cinuturted with tumntf, fatrnar and tn <ro>*4
jaith toward all partirt, and *ot authorise the (b?v<*|f
to use Uiim crrtldrate, u ith lar-tuntlm uf Oar ngmOtwm
oOac/teU, tn it* adverUtanenU."
Incorporated In ISftH for twenty-five year* by (fta
Legislature for Educational and charitable purp>?*i ?
with a capital <if tjll .(KKUMIO?to whk-li a ra*??
fkind of over s."vx?.tHxi ha-s since been addtsl
B> an over** telntlug |M>nular vote lu ft-aiichl?*r wm
made a part o the present BUl? Cousututiou >d? I>a*d
Dvceiuber 'id A. D. 1H7H.
Itv unit) Jyfteri/ ever voted on and m(t? ted %tt?
ptt/ftU (4 any Hlalt.
It nrver traUt or
Its Grand blugle Number Drawiug* take Hm
ninthly.
A SPLENDID OPPORTTNITY TO WIN A ? OR.
TVNK SEVENTH GRAXD DRAWlNtil CLABS O.
IN THE ACADEM* OF MlblC. NEW OREEANs.
TUESDAY, JULY 14. lbbO.
IH'/d Monthly Drawing.
CAPITAL PRlfcE. f75.U00. V
100.0UU Tlckeu. at live 1 *>llars EacR
Fractions. In Fllllis, In proportion.
LiHT OF PBUUii.
1 CAPITAL PRIZE fTTAOOO
i do do 2.'.?W*?
l do do _ Dmnio
9 PRIZES OF fWiwO . . - 1*
6 do UWU 10 ?*?
lo do 1WO ? l<> otto
20 do fHA> l<> ??>
100 do - youuo
auo do WW uww
ftOO do - ttAIUW
APPROXiMAirioii nuxuT
ApproxlBuaUou Prices of $7ftO M 750
_s s z ?- Tja
1007 Pi Una am on 11 ting to jMMM
AppBoaBoD for rates to dubs should be maAs ?s(f a .
U> ifa ofttce ot the Otm-paay In Xe*r Orlesas ?
For further Lnfcjrm?u <ii write clearly, ftvtna M T
ddrssa POSTAL NOTES. Exprcw Money UMat
or New ^York Ex^hiuige in ^jriliuar? letter, t^nr
# > ^ ^ DxrPHIB,
New Orleans, La
Make P. O Mosey Orders payahte aad a4dr?B?
MEW OAUUS8 MATIONAL^RAME,^

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