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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, June 17, 1887, Image 1

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THE EVENING STAR
pi BLISHED DAILY, Fxcppt Sunday,
at THE STak buildings,
worthweft Omer pemiyitim* Are. ?nd 11th St, by
The evening Star Newspaper company#
s. 11. kauffmann, j-verx
Tttt r""t") >T?r )? ,rrrr<1 to *nn?c"fs?>r< tn th?
el?? l.y rarn-rs. ofi their own acromit, at 10c*ut? pe*
?????* ui 44 p<-r ri ??nth. copie* at the counter, 2
t- ?? ??a<-fc my n.ai; prepaid?oo cent* a
b 'nth. ?iuey??r. *t>. six months, t'S
at the Poet t'uice at waahioyton. d (X. m
?r< vad i'lmf mail matter ]
tm ?tktt s>ta* j>nb!i?h?<1 on Friday?el ?
je?r po?ta*e prepaid si* uiouth*. SO centa.
If rva;l subwrirtiona must 1 m paiu iu sulvanc*|
e< l a; er aeut lonirwr th-.n 10 paid for.
l.airs of a<ivtrti?ii!ir matle knowu on application.
Vol. 70-Na 10,635.
WASHINGTON, D. C? FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1887.
TWO CENTS.
AMUSEMENTS.
KERN AN s nil A I"ER AM) SI MMER UARDEN.
"AM. MULDOON.
Champion Wrestle;- of America,
MAISADA SORIKICHI.
ChimriuB Japanese Wrestler,
IN A ORAND W RESILING CONTEST.
T.!?\ . ffer t- sny one w^iliirura f.JI from either
f . 'r * iu. or ??>0 to any one tht)' canaot d?frst in 15
i mute* vi*. a ir r Jin I -*]>eciaity >how and a Concert in
Oar'i n. Next week Howe'* New York Spe< ialty
| >-lt?
\E* NATIONAL theater.
FITZGERALD'S OPERA COMPANY.
LAST TIMES OF
NANON.
I>i*t Wr*i?Ton** Strai-ss' A Night it? Venice.
Reserved <eat-< and .">0 <? -tit>*. Now un sale. JeltJ
A
LBAL'GH'S or an D OPERA HOL'SE.
?venimr< at 8-l.V Matinee Saturday at 2.
Orai.il Production of Lecorq'i < binning Opera,
OIROELE-GIHOFLA.
First appear*-. ? t tiin Cdebntol Prima Donat,
MISS LET1TIA FRITCH.
First Appearance of the Popuiar Tenor,
CHAS. J. CAMPBELL.
Admission 25 cents.
K-*~rve>l Seats 50 cents.
V13 N-xt Opera?LA BELLE HELEN E. _
PULAR PRICES POPULAR PRICE3.
po
HARRIS' BIJOU THEATER.
THE BOY TRAMP;
OS,
THE MANIAC MOTHER.
Performance Every Afternoon and Night.
Nsxt Y*'sek?SAM'L OFPOSEN. JelO
P ANOKA MA OF BATTLE OF BULL BUN,
I5?h St., tw.i blocks sooth of Pennsylvaniast*
Ti e irst realistic Battle Scene ever painted.
t I tl from 9 a. m to 10 p. w. fe!4
EXCURSION'S, PIC-NICS, &c.
\Tt RMONT AVE. ( HI!rsT T AN SUNDAY SCHOOL
F.Xc l LSI'N to OLYMONT. on Steamer PILOT
BOY. SATLRDAY. tlie 1*1H INSTANT. Boat leave*
wnarf at 9 :?) a. m., and returns about 8 p.m. Tickets,
J?5 cents each. It
^JARROLL INST1TUTeIEXCURSION
TO
BAY RIDGE.
TUESDAY, JUNE 01.
?! > i?l train leaves 11 c B. and O. Depot at 8 30 a. m.
Otli r trai -?it ave ;? 15 a ni., 4 15 ana 5.15 p. m.
'1 ra'ti? return at S 15. f? -50 an.l 9:30 p. m.
'1 .ckets >'811 be c i tamed at Depot from committee.
K und trip, * 1,0?J. Je 17-3t
(EXCURSION ?>F ML I 1 ? >1 OLIT \N M. E. OHIKCH
J t.? MARSHALL HAi.L MONDAY, JUNE -,'7,
sifiwwr PIL?>1 BoY. Kite rtyimr by Chinamen.
Various irauies and unm>eiiit nt.?. Tickets, -5_ccuts.
Let the children come. Jel7-3t*
rp iE ME?'HANit's* PLEASURE CLCB WILL GIVE
I \ N.N UAL FAMILY EX<1 RSION to MAR
MI M.L HALI?on MoNDAY. JUNE 20. 18x7, Steamer
RliOWSMlTH vvili iea\e7tust. wnarf at 9:30 a. m .
ar-' *> 3tl i n Tickets, admitting Kent, and lady. 50
i--i No improper persons allowed. jel7-2t*
WIFT PALACE STEAMER T V ARROWSMITH.
FOR COLONIAL BEACH,
SUND AY. JUNE 19,
From 7th-st. ferrv ahart.at S 45 a. m., sharp. Fare
r :i? ?! trip. 50c. children 25c. Daily trips commencing
Jir,e'Ji>. Jel6-3t
( ' HAND EXCURS! N BY T M. IIEALY BRANCH
W Ihlsfl NATIONAL LEAGUE to River View,
MONDAY. JUNE 27TH INST. The steamer MARY
V. VSllJNOTON mat-* two trips. Leaves Oeorjretown
at s * bi -i'-venth-arreet wharf at 9a. m. and 7 p. m.
Tickets 50 cants. JelH-9t*
1 FAMER CORCORAN WILL MAKE TWO SPECIAL
> Mi. - t. Marshall Hull n FRIDAY, the 17th and
h\Tl Rl> %Y. th? ISth t?f June. Leave wharf at foot of
7th at. at 10 a. m. and t> p. in., return in# at 4 and 10
I. tlx.
1 -in lie" wUhiMr to can enjoy a day or evening at the
ai* ? e delightful resort, where every accommodation
av ! ( ciliiy will be atforded for comfort and pleasure.
M-.-alsaud lunches served at all hours. Fare round
trip 25 cents.
>s
< ? SUNDAY the hoat wiil make two trips at 10 a. m.
and ?; :>?) p. in., rt tumlnK at and 8 p. in. Jel6-3t
COLONIAL BEACH.
; POPULAR W ATERING PLACE
AND EXCURSION RESORT,
T> palace steamer T. V. ARROWSMITH. ex
I r :i:t- -l lor *he service, wi'l make reifular daily
: t.ie Re??-h ^x.-ept on Saturdays'mi ami after
-? \1"H JUNI' leaves 7th-street ferry wharf at
N 4 . ;l tin ;rs at the Beach, and home at 9:30
p. .i.. >1 hefreshments, and Meals served ou
*t-ar >*r t?l at hot'-L
i r.tu:. ? trip. 50ct*.. children.25 cts. Jel5-*2m
AY RIDtir^ " BAY RIDGE!
B
SUNDAY. JUNE 19.
SUNDAY NEXT. SUNDAY NEXT,
And Dally at.d Sunday thereafter, trains will run to
B\Y RIDOK! BAY RIDGE!
TITF Vt 1 KN RESORT OF THE CHESAPEAKE.
DAILY \N1> si'NDAY. DAILY AND SUNDAY.
Laii i:o\i. extended direct to pavixjuns.
(.Ill \T IMPROVEMENTS. FAST TRAINS.
Ttauls leavi B. and O. Depot durinar week at 9:15 a.m.,
4 15 and 5:15 p.m.
Sundays at 10 am., 2, 3, and 4 p.m.
GI1F\T M' 'I NTED sWURD CONTEST.
1HI l.-^OAY. FRIDAY, aud SATURDAY,
June 23. ^4. J5.
Contestants: DUNCAN C. ROSS. SERGT. WALSH.
CAP'l. P. ST. CLAIR, C APT. OAR
Rlgt'ES. CAPT. ORLOFSKY.
BOUND TRIP. BOUND TRIP.
*1 91 *1 91 $1 91 91 91 91 91 91 91
W. M CLEMENTS, C. K. LORD,
Jel4 tit Manager. Gen. Pass. Agent.
j^OWER CEDAR PolNTi
WASHINGTON'S CONEY ISLAND.
Excursion season opens June Mtith and daily there
aft-r. Mm: -, Boatixur, Bathii.tr. DmdBf, rishiiiK'.
? Li p?**i aii i t??-?t excursion out of Washington. New
and Hiatfintkeiit fant palai'e steamer Henry C. Bishop
*t1! ?t*v - In t of 7th-':reet whart daily at 9 a. m.. re
turaii ^, arrive at s :i?) p m. For si>ecial rates Sun
day scbooisaLid ur?ai::/atiou8 shotila apply to
si L1-HENS< >N BROS., 7th-street wharf.
Round-trip 50c.. Children. 25c. Jell-3m
fl^UL STEAMER PILOT BOY CAN B? CHAR
JL tered to ru?l
EXCURSIONS TO OLYMONT.
For further in!' rr:.?ti.in muuirt at office.
?>?.?.> iiu :?UJ PENNSYLVANIA AVE. N.W.
K1VER view" for" 1887.
Wiu-L:: <:.hiulV M -t Popular Resort. Steamer
MARY WASHINGTON
w . lea\" her whar! every si M>AY at 10 !50 a.m. and
. i: ;t .-r.inB- at v.' a;. 1 8 p.m. Tickets. 25c. Every
W 1 1 Ni si Ai at 9 a.m. anil 6 30 p.m. Returtnnf.' at
i: a 11 p.iii iii.it-. . FauiUy days at K1'? ER
? iiw ? . r: SA'l Cl.DA'i. ?eavin>r at lOajn. Return
l:.- ?t 5 Mu i : . I ickets. 10. Prof. Proctor's Dancing
?. a; i;?ver Li'--* every Saturday eveninir.
1 i ? at i. :>-J p.m. lu tunnng at 11 p.m. Tickets.
Laucuiv uown and back, and at the trrounds on
: .i ?t Pavi.io:, . u the lvt. iuac River, on all trips
i* sjaday. Li;i> hu>? Bai.d ou Sunday. No ol>
v. ? -.j' p?rr?es a.lowi d on ai.y of the aU'Ve trips,
-ners. Ac., apply tc E. S. RANDALL, CapC
B
Jt j 10 &ivFR VIEW
'?-r?5-im SWII^teAT
OBION nv siT.v C(Jastin-o track.
Men iutiit? and Miners' Transportation Co.
Ste^mshu s sail from
Baltinn -e via Norfolk to Boston.
I verj M 'l.Cay. fhuin?.i.i>. sud Friday. 4 o'clock p.m.
h-> : k--r at ? <!'..ii:-?uatloc* unsurpassed,
lar- .:: ; :i.* al- and main .saloon, stateroom
l?rti.-. si -..". n ji l trip. Upper deck state,
r ? ertfes til (oosd IliaFor further in
: ?in.an. .. tixc ular* at all tne Hotels in Washington,
d appo to?
A L. HUGO INS, General Ajrent.
Long Dock, Baltimore.
Telephone Baltimore 247. my21-3ni
H*) loli 1 HE GREAT FALLS ANI)_ CABIS
J ? R'.!?-*?:- Stea::i Packet EXCELSIOR makei
Ifi ri.- .. c tr.!? i :? -?l ND.ViS, mondays. WED
>EM'AYS and ER1DAV S. Alternate <ta)s for charter
L ?at i> avc* H.W.. and Canal sts.. (ieoigetown, 8 a.m.
Far-. ."?*- . r> u:: i trip, ior information apply to J. G
ki J M. WATERS. myvo-lm*
Daily excursions?
SALOON STEAMERS
Leave hourly from 7th-street ferry wharf.
l'_ u ile.?< n the FoSou.ac for 15 cents. myl9-lmf
STEAMER DIXIE P.'l NS DAILY. MAKINOTBIP*
? Every Hour frvm ?'nn.berland's Boat -House, foo'
F ?tre-.t ind New Hampshire avenne aud foot o:
H:*h ftreet.tie, rfefiwn, Stoi ping at Holtaman'siAud
Ilv. Table Ro?'k. Boat Club and l>ixi- Landln?(S
t .rst tni' ui> at 9 a m. las; trip down at 10 p m.
E a:.d trip. UAc . Children, loc. Reduced rates foi
large ,^?rtir-. Te.ephone call 563-2. my 18 lm
Marshall hail-this delightful rb
?err op* n f. .rt!.? season. Meals a la carte. Lunch
C'oitee. Tea, "'?liik. Ac.. Ac . for Excursionists.
^ -ainer W. W. CORCORAN loaves every rnornin? a
10 i'ch* a. returning at 4 p.m. on bunday* per ad
?ert.s :uent. ap22-3m
0 L'U lliXHIBIT OF w OOD 31A NT ELS,
TILES. AND FIRE-PLACE FIXTURES
ITa? been selected and arranged with care to meet th
artistic wants of Washington purchasers, aud on
1 rn es are about 25 per cent, less thau New York price
Jvr .ess desarablc selections.
HAYWARD k HUTCHINSON,
tt>30 424 9th street
1"rltt Jars Jelly Xumblebs.
ICE CREAM FREEZERS. WATER-COOLER8.
bee rioeraiors. icr-crushers, gate err
STONE PILTERS. JEWETTS FILTERS,
liefore purchasitnr, examine our WATERMAN an
K?W DINING-ROOM BRFRIGEBATORS.
wilm arth a EDMOwrrmr,
Importers of China and Glass Ware,
*> 1205 Psaasylranls i
SPECIAL NOTICES.
I. O o7 F.?THE OFFICERS AND MEM
bers of Mount Nebo Encampment No. 8,
will lueet to-morrow. Saturday afternoon, at 4 o'clock,
to attend tlie funeral of our late Brother Richakd
Koblrts. THOMAS W. FOWLER,
It Scribe.
I. 0~(\ F. MKMHKHsOf THK ORAM)
W~-^, LODGE. EXCELSIOR LODGE. and MT.
NEBO ENCAMPMENT will meet TO-MORROW (Sat
urday) AF1ERXOON. at 4 o'clock sharp, for the our
j>ose of attending the funeral of P.O. Richari> Rob
?iits. [It] COMMITTEE.
? NOTICE.?THE ANNUAL MEETING OF
. -- the stockholder* of Colonial Beach Improve
ment Company will be held on WEDNESDAY, 13th
July, at the hotel. Colonial Beach.
It* R. H. EVANS, Secretary.
?READ THE BALTIMORE ARGl S, PL'B
r? Imbed evary Saturday. For sale at all the
hotel*. Bright editorials of purely democratic flavor.
Washington correspondence, in which gossip of the de
partments is a feature, and an interesting collection of
news and pleasant Saturday and Sunday reading. lt*_
, DECIDED NOT TO HAVE AN AFTER
noon Bus*. It*
WOOD MAXTELS.
SLATE MANTELS AND TILES.
ROCHE'S,
Jel7-lm* 497 C street northwest.
,1 HAVE THIS DAYSOLiTtO CHARLES
W. WOOD all icy interest in the business.
Book and Stationery, heretofore conducted by him for
me at 915 Pennsylvania ave. JOHN J. MURPHY,
Trustee. Jel7-3t
THE PENN9YLVANIALIVE 8TOCK IN
SURANCE CO. notifies all policy holders that
the thirty days of (Trace on May assessments expired on
JUNE la. Those in arrears will call at office, as no
losses are paid on death of animal when policy holders
are in arrears. Tli? following persons having claims
in May assessment will call at office and receive their
money: I
E. M. BOTELER, 735 8th at. s. e.
R. M. BROWN. 1252 7th St. n. w.
J. L. ALSOP, 1315 otb st. n. w.
J M. WHEATLEY, 200 Indiana ave.
FRANK WKIGHT, 14th and Boundary.
E. J. HANNAN. 517 11th st. n. w.
C. H. MANN, Manager,
Jel7-2t 100G F st. n. w._
EIGHTH DISTRICT CITIZENS' ASSO
_ ciation.?The members of this Association
wholive west of the 7th st. road north of boundary,
will meet at Lnioti Hall. Howard avenue. Mount Pleas
ant. ou TUESDAY EVENING next, June J 1st, at 7 30
o'clock, to hear the report of their delegates to the
Committee of One Hundred. and to take snch action
thereon as may be deemed advisable.
Jel7-14m-2t* BY ORDER OF THE PRESIDENT.
WASHINGTON, D. C., JUNE 17, 1887."
_ Notice of Dissolution.?The copartnership
heretofore existing between JAMES A. BATES and
ROYAL E. WHITMAN, at 1407 F st. n.w., under the
firm-name of BATt.S Ac WHITMAN, Real Estate. In
surance. ami Loan Brokers, was mutually dissolved
May 17,1887. JAMES A. BATES,
ROYAL E. WHITMAN.
The nndersigned will coutinue the business of Real
Estate, Insurance, and Loan Broker at 1407 F st. n.w.
jel7-lui JAME8 A. BATES.
MY WIFE ALICE HAVING LEFT MY
bed and board without Just cause or provo
cation. I hereby warn all persons not to trust her on
lny account, as I will pay no bills after this date not
contracted by myself from this date.
Jelti-3t* W. W. CRUBAUGH.
SPECIAL NOTICE.?DISSOLUTION OF
_ COPAETNESHIP.?The copartnership here
tofore existing between HELEN B HENDERSON.
MARY L. HENDERSON and 11. W. HENDERSON, at
11 l:t F st. n.w., under the firm name of R. W. HEN
DERSON It CO., was mutually dissolved April 30th,
1SM7.
The business will be continued at the same place by
R. W HENDERSON, under the Ann name of R. W.
HENDERSON & CO. All persons indebted to the late
firm are requested to make prompt settlement to R. W.
HEN I>ERSON, who will receipt for the same.
Respectfully, HELEN B. HENDERSON.
MARY E. HENDERSON.
R. W. HENDERSON.
THANKING MY FRIENDS AND THE PUBLIC FOR
the patronage so trenerously extended to tue in the
past, and soliciting a continuance of the same,
I am, most respectfully, yours,
Je lt>-3t R. W. HENDERSON.
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION ?THE CO
_ partnership heretofore existing between W.
R. Hall and T. S. Deiihani, under the name of Hall k
Denham/House Painters, is dissolved this I4th of June.
1887, by mutual consent. Thomas S. Denham will
continue the business. All persons bavin? oills against
said firm will present thein to T. S. Denham aud he
will receive payment of all debts due the firm. W. R.
HALL, T. S. DENHAM. Jel5-3t*
JUBILEE. JUBILEE. JUBILEE.
_ Residents of Washington who may be will
ing to aid the St. George's ?>ciety in raisins a fund to
turnisli an 1 maintain the sitting and reading room for
convalescents at the Garfield Hospital, in commemora
tion of Queen Victoria's Jubilee, are solicited to notify
or remit their intended donations to fhaa. F. Benja
min, president of the St. George's Society, room 95,
Corcoran Bnildiny. or to Geo. Franris Dawson, 224
11th st. n.e_ Dr. (.lias. E. Mai lam. 1231 N. Y. avenue,
Lewis Abraham, 1311 F st. n.w.. John Cook, treasurer.
tilH l'.'thht.u.w.. or to any member of St. George's
Dedication at the hospital, Tuesday, June 21, at 5
p. m. Jel3-flt
BEAR LITHIA WATER.?INDORSED BY
the leading physicians for all Lrinary and
Bladder Troubles, Kidney Complaints, Sc. Read tes
timonials in Past oz Sunday. June 12
This water is for sale by E. P. Mertz. 11th and F sts.
n.w.: Pitzer ? Co.. .">01 East Capitol St.; C.S.Price,
4"-.'0 7th st. s w.; Remslier^ k Elliott, 1008 14th st. n.
w.; Sotuoron k Btvker, 1307 32d st. n.w.; Hull's
Pharmacy. 9th and P sta. n.w.: W. G. Duckett. 22d st.
and Peunsylvania ave. n.w.; W. C Williams, corner 1st
and H sts. n.w.: C. B. Scliafer, 1010 F st. n.w., and at
all first-class drug stores. Trade supplied by E. P.
Mertz. Ag?nt for the Company. J13-Gt
THE ~~ - ROY AL TEA AND COFFEE
Store," 3273 M St., Georgetown, are >elling
tlieir good* lower than any similar store In the Dis
trict. Give u* a call. Jell)-2w*
JAMES 8. HAYS JfcCoT 3271 M 8I,
__ Georgetown ?Crockery, Housefurnishings,
t -. - are offering Ref rig- rators. Water Coolers, Ice
Cream Freezers. Fly Fans, Window Screens, Fruit Jars
and Jell)" Glasses at bottom prices. JelO-Uw*
ROYAL HOT AIR~ FURNACE. FIRST*
class Latrobes and Ranges McGrath's Hand
made Mantels, Murphy's Arctic Milk-Can. scientific in
its construction, practically demonstrated to be
sui*nor to all others. Estimates cheerfully furnished.
All work nrst-claaa. J. W. CONSIDIXE, 1235 7th st.
n.w. my25-lm*
__^~PHOSVITJC-THIS COMBINATION, OF
Calisaya, W Ud Chernr ?nd Horsford's Acid
1 Lospliates, is a popular and efficient Brain and Nerve
'1 ot.K, and a safeguard against Malaria. Sold at MIL
LI RN'S PHARMACY, 1429 Pennsylvania ave., in
Lotties or on draught with soda water. 115
Jxo. W. Couox. J so. w. Macabtmt,
Member X. Y. Stock Ex.
CORSOX k MACVRTXEY,
GLOVER BUILDING. 1419 F ST. X.W..
Bankers and Dealers in Government Bonds.
Deposits. Exchange. Loans. Collections.
Railroad Stocks and Bonds, and all securities listed
on the Exchanges of New York. Philadelphia, Boston
and Baltimore oought and sold.
A specialty made of Investment Securities. District
Pcnco and all Local Railroad. Gas. Insurance and Tele
phone Stock dealt in.
American Bell Telephone Stock bought and sold. au7
fc. 8. SHEDD & BRU
GAS FIXTURES..
PLUMBING, HEATING. TINNING
Job work promptly dona.
ap2 432 9th st. n.w.
I. J. BROOKS,
GAS FIXTURES, Ac.
No charge for Hanging.
Lowest Rates.
f5 531 15th st, Corcoran Building.
THE REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT
COMPANY, OF WASHINGTON, D. C.
INCORPORATED APRIL 29. 1887.
Capital stock #5.000, divided into 200 e.jual shares
of the par value of *25 each. Monthly payments <10
on ??x h share.
B)*>ks are now open for shares.
Subncnptiouana payments can be made at the office
cf the Secretary daily from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Copies of
the Constitution, explaining the object of the Associa
tion. its advantages, Ac., will be fur mailed upon appli
cation to
Eugene Carnsi, President, 4SH Louisiana ave.
Bushrod Robinson, Vice-President. 319 7th st. n.W.
August Peterson, Trustee, LeDroit Building.
Win. John Miller. Treasurer, 4SU Louisiana ave.
Hun. J. A. Swop*. Trustee. 214 A st. a.e.
WALTER H. ACKER. Secretary.
Office. 1008 t st. n.w.
Office hours: 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. ap30-3m
THE 2D SERIES OF STOCK OF THE
3d Co-operation Building Association, will
issue June, 1K87, payment $S per share per month,
euutle holders to purchase #l,0l>0. Books uf Sub
scription are now open at the following placee:
A. Depue k sou 828 4Jj St. s.w.
A. Archer 4H and I st. a.w.
Walker k Davis 11th ana Md. ave. a.w.
Thompson k Co 10th and La. ave. n.w.
W 1. Walker 1411 G st. n.w.
R. A. Walker 7th and Q sts. n.w.
b. H. Walker 630 La. ave. n.w.
A. DEPUE. President.
J. T. PETTY, Trees,, 7th and Va. ave. aw.
O. T. THOMPSON, Sec., 902 Pa. ave. n.w.
my21-ln?o
drTrobbkt BEYBURN, JR.. HAS BE
__ moved his ofBoe aud residence to 714 13th
st. n.w. v>Ace hours 7 to 8:30 a.m. and 5 to8. pjn.
Jel-lm*
-j WISE MEN PLACE THEIR ORDER FOB
Shirts early in Spnng. so as to have them
I roken in for wartu weather;so place your order now
with P. T. HALL. 908 F st. n.w. mh29
LIME. LIME.
JOHNSTON k LIBBEY.
(Successors to Cartwright k Johnston),
MANL'FACTl'RERS OF LIME
sp20-3m Kilns ana Office 1035 29th st. n.w.
Mme. J. P, Palmes.
1207 f STREET NOBTHWE8X
IMPORTER,
Will close out the balance of her EARLIER IMPORT
ATIONS AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES to make
room for IMPORTATIONS OF MIDSUMMES
8TYLE8 OF WATERIVO-fLACE HATS AND BON
NETS, all of the latest and most approved fashion.
>0
Washington News and Gossip.
The Scfplemkxt or The Evening Star to-day
contains an account of St. Paul's Chapel, Base
Ball News, The Story of the Rahway Murder, The
End of an Interesting Real Estate Suit, Transfers
of Real Estate, a Report of Jacob Sharp's Trial, an
Indiana Seasatlon, The American Derby, a Story
of a Runaway Locomotive, and Telegraphic News.
The advertisements are classified as follows: Auc
tion Sales, Educational, Proposals, Summer Resorts,
Ladles'Goods, Family Supplies, Pianos and Organs,
Hotels, The Trades, Railroads, Potomac River
Boats, Ocean Steamers, Housefurnlshwgs, Books,
Wood and Coal, sewing Machines, Financial. Dent
istry, Medical, Undertaken.
The Seed Association Surprised.?Commis
sioner Colman, of the Agricultural Department,
has received from the officers of the American
Seed Association, now in session at Philadelphia, a
copy of a telegram sent, by them to the New York
World. The telegram, which the World was re
quested to publish, asserted that the association
was utterly surprised at the attack upon Commit
sioner Colman, and denied that that association
had in any manner censured that official.
The Examination of the $l,600 and $1,400 clerks
at the Quartermaster-General's Office will take
place to-morrow morning at 0 o'clock, at the rooms
Clvil-semce Commission in the west wing
"5RLW Hall? and the$L200 and $1,000 classed
nei? Wednesday. There will be
a reductlonln this office at the last of this month
of four $1,200 clerks and four copyists.
Those who Leave the City during the sum
mer can have The Stab mailed to them for any
length of time, and the address changed as often
pLcUnadvance6 aubscrlpUon mu3t ^ Invariably
Among the President's Callers to-day were
Senators Brown and Cockrell, Representatives
Hlount, Crisp, Clements, and Stewart, of Georgia;
and Mccreary, CoL Swltzler and
% 0rdway. Benj. P. Palmer and IL c.
Borstel, of Boston.
Army Leaves.?First Lieut. John R. Williams,
3d artillery, has been granted fifteen days' exten
sion of leave. First Lieut. Wm. C. Borden, assist
ant surgeon, granted one month's leave. Major
days- leave1"1"' corps ?r enfflneers. granted fifteen
Discharges at the Government Printing
Office.?Four bookbinders and several ladles em
f0lcUn2 room at the Government
Printing Office were discharged yesterday. It is
reported that another discharge will be made to
aay.
Personai?Representatives Felton and Mc
creary, ex-senator McDonald, S. a McClure of
New \ ork, and E. A. Barclay of Chicago, are at
rif J* B' McDonnell, the book-keeper
of the House of Representatives, who has been off
??na Ration, has returned.??E. cTBlhs and
ai? Elmer of New York, and C. W.
Doubleday of Cleveland, are at the Arlington.
SiJ" v Gould of the Washington High
has been appointed lecturer on compara
tive social statistics at Johns Hopkins Unlver
?t7* H- K. Thurber of New York, C. G St.
John ana J. g. Everest of chlcago, and T. E. Bond
of Boston, are at Wlllards.
Society Note*.
Minister and Mrs. de Reutersklold gave a dinner
last evening to the visiting French admiral.
L v lnges, of the French navy. The other sruests
?ere %,ret?rZ and Mr8- Whitney, Mrs. BonaSe
the French minister, and Henri
Garnault, aide ae camp lieutenant to the admiral.
Minister Roustan gave a gentlemen* dinner to
the admiral on Tuesday evening, and on Wednes
day took him to visit the President, and in the
afternoon to visit the various points of Interest
Mrs. Whitney held a gay levee at Grasslands on
Wednesday afternoon from 5 to 7. Mrs. John Davis
hoste?wUth!?,thnMrs' tt?btJon' and ^ared with the
S of ?h{L day- others present
ere Mrs. Berdan, Mrs. Hobsnn. Miss Stoat Baron
and Baroness Rosen, Baron von Zwitwiu, the Gw?
othei?ln,3ler'Janl3Ch, the Misses Col well, and
Mrs. John Davis goes to Lenox on Tuesday.
Miss Edith Card is visiting friends at Relay.
Mrs. s. M. Bryan and her children have gone to
their summer farm house, near Brooks.
Mrs. Pin son, Miss Pauline Acklin and Miss Duke
next wi?k.FaUqUler WWt? SulPhur Springs early
Senator Manderson is in the city, stopping at
Arlington, unci has taken an aonrtmpnt tnr
himself and Mrs. Manderson at tlie Portland
Before Mrs. Palmer left New York she concluded
not to come to this city, but to go direct to nptrr.it
Which she did. Mr*. Palmer 1^
her health during her year s sojourn In Europe and
will return here in the autumn. ana
Senator Cameron was in the city for a few days
the early part of the week.
Dr. James C. Welling leaves Washington to-day
for Hartford, and after resting there a few weeks
flk"KtSLieStf(1Unle33 PreVeQte<1 b^on
Mrs. Cabell is at Norwood, Nelson Co. Va.
The Mexican minister and Mrs. Romero called
upon the President today, who saw them in the
blue pariOr. They had with them Miss Jaurez.
the daughter of the Mexican president, who has
bteu in Europe during the past year and is now
the guest of Mrs. Romero. Two young gentlemen
from Mexico were also of the party. Tfc vi^tore
passed from the blue parlor to the east room and
looked on while the President received th?
A Flay Incident Four Years Ago.
how the captured colors of the eleventh iowa
regiment week returned.
The following scrap of history is of interest in
connection with the hattle-tlag incident, and the
attitude taken by the Grand Army men of Iowa in
relation to the visit of the President to st Louis
In September, 1883, the famous Crocker's Iowa
Brigade, of which Gen. Belknap was president,
held a reunion at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. At thLs rZ
union, among other stirring events, was enacted a
^nethat was widelycommeStwl m and^
plauded in Iowa and neighboring States, kv
special arrangement Gen. Govan, of Arkansas, an
ex-Confederate, whose troops had capturedShe
flag of the Eleventh Iowa Regiment at Atlanta
after a desperate struggle, was present at the rr'
tUnu?i"d r2L^allywlUrnf'(I lhls hard-won flag
to the Iowa regiment from whom it was canture i
lis colonel, A. J. Saunders, of Davenport Iowa!
delivering an affecting speech of acknowledge*
rnent and thanks in the presence of the BrSSe
veterans. Subsequently a committee of thmuvas
appointed to secure contributions from thevet
V this regiment for the purchase of a gold
headed cane for Gen. Govan. This was duly acl
coinpllshed, and the cane, handsomely engraved,
v as sent to the Confederate recipient. This flair
has been exhibited at subsequent reunions and
creates unbounded enthusiasm.
- ??.
Discontent in Hawaii.
XALAKAUA'8 SUBJECTS ON THE BRINK or RETOLUnON
News from Honolulu, brought to San San Fran
cisco by the steamer Australia, which arrived yes
terday, shows that the government there has
been searching for and detaining arms on the
ground of public safety. It Is asserted that the
people have become exasperated at the king's ac
tion m fortifying the palace walls and taking in
supplies of ammunition there, and that the Ameri
cau and British residents have appealed to their
r^PS'"Je.S?vernment8 for Protection, and have
asked that a man-of-war be ordered to Honolulu.
un}0l?d ~hat a revolution has begun.
The Rev. Dr. J. A. Grusean, who han been in
Honolulu for several years, who returned on the
i: "%hen I left Honolulu, on the
< th inst., the place was in a condition of seethlmr
ntj hut the king bad not been deposed!
What has happened since, of course, I don't know
Everybody in the islands had agreed that some
change must take place In the mode of govern
ment. The Chinese, I am told, have been arming
themselves or late with rifles and revolveiuA
line corps has also been organized by the whole
population of the Island, ostensibly for target
practice. The Chinese are the most discontented
people in Honolulu. There are two Chinese com
panies there, one of which paid the Ring ton qoo
,?,r 'h.e op,um monopoly,$30,000 of whlchwas
OTer to the treasury and the remaining
M>,000 retained by his majesty as -backsheesh?
The other company also paid $75,000to the Im
pecunious king. During the reign tftte fourth
wng a bill was presented to him lor his approval.
zL T,.lcLh a regular civic government was to be
established. In a furious rage he tore the docu.
ment containing the radical Innovation Into
pieces, remarking as he did bo that he would have
no man in Honolulu bigger than himself."
Employers an4 Employee
The Amalgamated Building Trades council In
Boston have sent to the Master Builders' a?^h.
tlon their reply to the demand that union men
shall not boycott non-union men by refusing tc
work with them. Among other things tJianvSfn.
Council says: . ^ ^
"J*e 2?. after most careful investigation, em.
phatlcany deny that our organization, either bj
laws, resolution, or otherwise, hare as a bodj
w^en any steps to compel our members to adopt
K?>lti?ursei yet? at the same time, we wish l(
to be fully understood that while we have not ob
jected to working with non-union men. and an
wJh"* working with them peaceably every day,
we still retain to ourselves our rights aa Individ,
uals to work or network for whom and with whoa
THE FLAU8 WILL STAT.
The President Reconsiders the Matter
and Rescinds Mis Order.
REASON'S WHICH INFLUENCED HI*?O0NGRE8B HAS
THE POWER TO DISPOSE OP THE FLAGS?HOW THE
NEWS WAS RECEIVED.
The following letter was sent to the Secretary
ot War by the President yesterday In regard to
the disposition of the flags captured hy the Union
forces during the late war:
"I have to-day considered with more care
than when the subject was orally presented
to me the action of your department direct
ing letters to be addressed to the Governors
of all the state offering to return, If desired,
to the loyal States of the Union flags captured
during the war of the rebellion by the Confederate
1 forces, and afterwards recovered by Govern
ment troops, and to th# Confederate States
the flags captured by the Union forces, all
of which for many years have been packed In
boxes and stored in the cellar and attic
of the War Department. I am of the opln
| Ion that the return of the flags in the manner
thus contemplated is not authorized by existing
law nor Justified as an executive act. I request,
therefore, that no further steps be taken in the
matter, except to examine and Inventory these
flags and adopt proper measures for their preser
vatlon. Any direction as to the flnal disposition
i of them should originate with Congress. Tours,
1 truly, Grover Cleveland."
In consequence of the President's rescinding the
order to return the flags, the intended application
by Messrs. Boutwell and Shellebaiger for a man
damus will not be made. They found It Impos
sible to prepare the papers In time to file yester
day, ana now it Is unnecessary.
HOW THE NEWS WAS RECEIVED.
There was great rejoicing in Columbus, Ohio,
when a dispatch was received announcing that
I the President bad countermanded the order to re
turn the battle flags. Gov. Foraker received un
limited praise for the prompt action he took in the
matter, calls had been issued in many places for
meetings of Grand Army posts to protest against
| the contemplated action of the War Department,
but the meetings were postponed when the an
nouncement was received that the President had
revoked Gen. Drum's order.
SENATOR SHERMAN SPEAKS.
Senator Sherman, speaking at Mansfleld, Ohio,
of the feeling of the Union soldiers concerning the
battle flags, said: " Their flags, their triumph, and
their sacrifices are their pride and glory. This
Administration does not appreciate this feeling,
and cannot understand It. Their hope, their aim,
and their pride seem to be in the principles that
were defeated by the Union army and in sympathy
with Confederate Ideas. They think it very
! strange that Union soldiers should be moved by
the return of rebel flags won In battle, and do not
seem to appreciate that this surrender is a mark
of regret that the flags were won. Tdoubt If any
case in history can be found where such a con
fession was made by the successful party. If the
President thinks this is a trifling matter he will
be greatly mistaken. The sentiment of patriot
ism Is stronger than party ties."
NOTES FROM VARIOUS STATES.
Gov. Ru9k, of Wisconsin, has written to Gen.
Drum, requesting that the flags captured by the
Wisconsin troops be returned to the state. Gov.
Martin, of Kansas, telegraphed a protest to the
President yesterday against the return of the
Confederate flags. A resolution was Introduced In
the Michigan legislature yesterday, calling upon
I the President to rescind the order. Meetings wore
held in Illinois, California, Massachusetts and
other States, and resolutions passed discounte
nancing the return of the flags. Gov. Thayer, of
Nebraska, telegraphed a protest to the President.
At the G. A. R. celebration at New Haven yester
day, at which were commander Falrehild. Gen.
Lounsberry, Gen. Sheridan, Gen. Sherman and
senator Hawiey. commander Falrehild made a
speech, concluding by saying that he spoke In de
fense of the Southern people, whom he felt sure
would feel insulted by having those flags thrust
upon them. Gov. Lounsberry Bald that he should
enter a vigorous protest against the removal of
any flags from the capltol at Hartford, and the
State would never consent to their removal.
A DISPATCH FROM GOV. FORAKER.
I Gov. Foraker sent a dispatch to the Philadel
phia Pres* saying: I oould stand the rehabilitation
I of Jeff. Davis and the joining of him and Cleveland
' toeiriogiesot-cmfcotmaaarfiiil ilMi
keep the peace while Homer was ordering*Sheri
dan to keep out of the Shenandoah Valley and
Henry Watteraon was speaking of the dependent
pension bill as a .lnlment to abolish vagabondage
by pensioning a lot of tramps; but I began to lose
my temper when the President of the United
states went fishing on Decoration Day, and made
up my mind that the time has come to draw the
line when In ignorance or defiance of the law he
usurped authority to order tne rebel flags re
turned to the seceding states. Not that I have any
affection Tor the dirty rags, but because they are
emblems of treason that are wanted for no other
purpose than public parade and to fire the South
ern heart with pride for a lost cause that ought
never to be recalled except with shame, because
It was the crime ot the age. The people ot Ohio
are not ready to recognize the Southern Confeder
acy, and they do not Intend to do so. This State
will not surrender any rebel flags.
THE SUMNER EPISODE.
In 1873 Senator Sumner attempted to abolish
the emblems of internal strife by the lntroduc
i Hon of a resolution In the United States Senate,
that the names of battles with fellow-cltlzens
shall not be continued In the Army Register or
placed on the regimental colors of the United
States. The Massachusetts legislature then passed
resolutions denouncing the action of the senator
but the day before Sumner died. 1874, the legis
lature revoked its resolutions or condemnation.
| GOV. LEE'S SENTIMENTS.
A special to the Baltimore Sun from Richmond,
says that Gov. Fltzhugh Lee, In discussing this
matter last night, said: "Southern battle-flags did
not originate with southern soldiers. While they
would have accepted again their banners bathed
in the blood of brave comrades, they recognize
that flags captured in battle are the property of
the victors, and are content to let them remain in
their charge. Flags captured from Northern
troops by Southern soldiers have been returned.
| The country should not again be agitated by
Sleces of bunting that mean nothing now. The
outh Is part and parcel of the Union to-day, and
means to do her part toward Increasing the pros
perity and maintaining the peace of the republic,
whether the flags rot In Washington or are re
| stored to their former custodians. If any man
hauls down the American flag shoot him on the
spot; but don't let us get Into trouble because
other flags simply change their resting place.
They will not go into the hands of standard bear
ers."
GEN. SHERMAN AND GEN. FAIKCHILD.
The N. Y. Hun to-day says: The denunciation by
Gen. Lucius Falrehild, commander-in-chief of the
I G. A. R., of President Cleveland's order that *he
captured confederate battle flags now held by the
War Department at Washington be returned to the
Southern States, raised an echo all over the coun
try yesterday. Gen. Kalrcnild himself abated not
a Jot of his fire in the matter, though his early de
parture for New Haven soon put a stop to the ex
citement about the Fifth Avenue Hotel. Before
he went he had a long talk with Gen. W. T.
Sherman. Gen. Falrehild was able to see the re
l porters for a moment only, but he said: "I have
never mixed up politics with my duties as com
mander of the G. a. R., and have been
very particular about stirring up sectional
feeling by actions or sayings. But what I
said last night I deemed it my duty to say,
i and to say as I did. These flags were captured In
| battle and given to the War Department for safe
keeping. I believe the governors of the once Con
federate States would not receive them, but would
send them back. How can they keep them? The
flags represent no government that Is In existence.
it Is an outrage upon the Union soldiers that
these emblems should be returned to the Southern
States, and I do not withdraw any extreme lan
guage. There will be but one opinion among the
Union veterans, and the sentiment does not come
from any sectional feeling, but from that of love
for the Union. The Grand Army men have never
had any but the kindliest feelings toward the
South, and in our meetings we have been careful
| to avoid anything that would rouse sectional feel
ing, but we cannot submit to such an outrage as
Gen. Sherman, before his departure from the
city, condemned the order in the strongest terms.
' Outrageous and shameful were the mildest char
acterizations he used.
THE PEELING IN THE SOUTH.
A dispatch to the Hun from New Orleans says:
The President's order in regard to the return of
the Confederate flags and the objections raised to
it caused almost as much stir fcere as in Northern
cities, and was generally discussed to-day by ex
Federals and ex-confederatea ? large majority
of the members ot the Grand Army of tne Republic
expressed the opinion that the order was issued at
I the wrong time, and would have the effect of
checking the cordial fraternal relations now being
established between the veterans oi the North and
the south. There seemed to toe a decided differ
ence of opinion among the Confederate veterans as
to whether the President's order was wise.
, Gov. Lee has been invited to deliver an address
on the 4th of July before the Tammany society of
New York.
Cardinal Gibbons had a reception at Notes Pane
Convent, Baltimore, yesterday.
The Baltimore police are trying to break up the
dance-house evlL
A report read at the convention of master car.
builders at Minneapolis states that 25,037 locomo
tives in the United States killed 1,406 employes,
and Injured 6,548 during the past year. Nearly
one-half of these Injuries came fromc oupllng ears.
A lawyer named Henderson crossed the English
channel from Dover to Calais in a six-foot canoe
yesterday in eleven hours.
John Woodward, a resident of Frederick ton, N.
B.,who was visiting relatives in New Albany, Ind.,
committed suicide Wednesday toy piercing his
heart with a pair at sdssora He was an official
under the dominion imnii nm?i and at one time
served in the British army. Despondency from 111
hrnlH ?'mm Hi. ????.? ?. ??? ??--i
? Sudden Death of W. H. Lint.
?if Tn rksui.t of a blow on the head as was
8UPP0SED.
About 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon William H.
Lint died (suddenly at the house of James A.
Greene, No. 929 5th street. His sudden death
gave rise to a rumor that his death was the result
of a blow on the side of his head, which he had
said was Inflicted by a man, and Coroner Patter
son Lint came to this city about ten
1 5^.*? '.rom Somerset, Pennsylvania, and
?ampl0^(148 a galvanlzed-lron worker at
establishment on O street. Two or
&g0 he 101(1 Mr8* Greene that he was
SliE? vere P4111 ln the left ear, where he had
thaV^a m?n the nl?bt before. He went to
H J morning, and nad been working every
but often complained that he felt
a severe cold a few days ago,
^med to get worse. Yesterday
IS ? home about 7 o'clock, but returned
Lnrt for breath. Drs. Barker
UiLyepe called In, but Lint died In the
n^nnrj^ruL... Jjsornlng coroner Paters >n and
onS nlSL. Tyler, assisted by Drs. stockstlll
ana Barker, made a post-mortem examination.
a^th was caused by con
gestion of the base of the brain, and had no connec
tion whatever with the blow, if one was inflicted.
It was probably the result of the heat or the ex
cessive use of intoxicants.
o?r.P?i!7iLZPJ70?<?CASB.?In the case of Louise D.
; Pel2? wu for alimony for her
support and that of two children, which had been
before Judge Merrick for two days, the court at
the elose^oF the hearing yesterday suggested that
1)6 T?u " the Papers could be taken from
o?L^i^Kthel.lntefest8 or the public would be
tIiereby. He suggested that the parties
settle the case, and to give them an opportunity
to do so would hold the case open. This morning
5&1!fl?J?ndant declined to do this, and the court
directed an order to be drawn allowing the com
plalnant for herself and youngest child $75 per
month alimony, remarking that he did this on the
allegation of desertion. The defendant entered an
appeal pom this order. The charges made by the
complainant were desertion, bad treatment, Ac.
J?h? case was argued by Mr. G. E. Hamilton for the
complainant, and W. K. Duhamel for defendant.
AnIndictment Nolls Prossed.?To-day, in the
Criminal court Messrs. D. E. Cahlll and T. c.
Taylor called attention to a pending Indictment
against the three Italians. Vlncenso Pollto.
Franzisco Gerace and Ignacio Caruso, for the
larceny of a watch, ana the district attorney
entered a nolle pros. The question as to the
disposition of the property was left until to
morrow.
I A Cutting Affray on the River Front.?Be
tween 9 and 10 o'clock this morning a light oc
curred on Riley's wharf between two colored men?
Strother Carter and Alexander Johnson during
which it Is alleged Carter cut Johnson in the neck
with a penknife, Inflicting a painful wound. Car
ter was arrested by Sergeant Barry and Officer
waish, and the injured man was taken to his home
in Pierce Court.
Affairs la West Washington.
Improvements.?The brick work of a row of five
dwelling houses being erected at the corner of &5th
and P streets for Mrs. Thomas Weaver, Is com
pleted. The fronts are of select and ornamental
brick with bay windows to the roof. The houses
are two stories high and contain five rooms each.
The cost will be *13,000. Mi. James Young is the
contractor.
A Dangerous Pavement.?Horses attached to
vehicles passing Hong the south side of M street
between 31st and32d streets continue to slip and
fall dally on account of the dangerous grade there.
><o less than three horses fell yesterday afternoon,
doing no little damage to the carriages to which
they were attached.
Annual Excursion.?A most enjoyable day was
spent at Colonial Beach yesterday by tho members
and mends oi Covenant Lodge No. 13. L O. O. P..
it being the annual excursion of the lodge.
A Leaky Water Main.?considerable water la
S?S^.oraWKa.u'a waMr mua " 018 Mn*r
Temperature and Conoition or Water at 7 A.
M.-?reat Palis, temperature, 77; condition, 18.
receiving reservoir, temperature, 79; condition at
oS^SSnZft.125 0011(11 tlon at south connec
tion, 20; distributing reservoir, temperature. 77
condition at influent gate house, so; effluent gate
Reported for The Evening Star.
Tee Tax Bill (Question.?The finance commit
tee has now under reference an ordinance extend
ing until July 10 the time (fixed a few weeks ago
at July l) within which taxpayers may get a dis
count of 10 per cent on paying the taxes of this
year. This is intended to give the collection of
this year s taxes to the new collectors, who do not
come into office until the 1st of July.Tt being un
derstood that the clerk of the council will not de
liver the new bills to the collector until July 1.
^nder the law the clerk is obliged to post in a
book "the returns 01 the assessor within forty-five
days after the returns have been made," and "de
been made before the 1st of July, and by that date
more than half of the taxes were collected. Thus
(as the percentages pay the collectors) over half
the salarys has been paid to the collectors before
the 1st or July, and under the usual rule this nav
ment would come to the old collectors lnsteid of
the new one& The tax bills bear no date, except
the year; but are understood to date from
March oth_ In each year, u nder Judge Kel th's de
cision In the Gunnel case the taxes "are Hens on
real estate from the commencement of the year
for which they were assessed." Under citv At
torney Stuart's opinion of June 28,1878, "no one
thorize the collectors to retain the tax bills
In their hands beyond each year." The matter will
come up at the next council meeting
The Pistol Investigation. -The investigation
whether the pistol left by the colored boy,
Dick W UUama, with Sefer Blouse was picked up
on the site of the Arnold murder, has re
sulted so far in the release of Flemmlng, one of
the colored boyB arrested, and the holding of Wil
liams. W llliams says he bought the nlstol from a.
colored boy in Richmond, and that he bandit before
the murder. Mr. Wm. Crockett, however, testifies
that he saw the pistol that Williams had at the
circus before the murder, and that pistol was
very different from the one left by Williams with
^ The pistol left with Blouse suits
the bullet taken from Arnold's body. Further in
vestigation is in progress.
notes.?The Sacred Heart Novena, which has
been nprogro* at St. Mary's Church here, was
^ othJ? ,m??1ng by solemn service and
music at ? o'clock. A large congregation at
tended.?1 he Corporation Court him adjourned
untilJuiy. Its lastbuslness was to make Isabel
G. Johnston executrix of Dr. W. b. Gregory Julia
A. English administratrix of z. English-' C A
Yohe administrator of J. stelner: rTt lupm of
J. R. Beach and W. JE. Belloi^y of T. M. Portal?
??The ordination services of the year will take
place at the Theological seminary, near this city
next week. T. W. Vaughn (colored) and J. w!
Johnson (coloredj will be among those who will
be ordained.?The numbering question will
come before the city councilagain at its next
as It will be necessary that the houses
which Eave lost their numbers have the figures
renewed before the free delivery system (roes into
operation here. B
Refusing1 to Discuss the Evictions.
DILLON'S MOTION REJECTED IN THE BOUSE?THE
pakneluts8 MAY BE SUSPENDED TO-NIGHT.
In the debate on the crimes bill in the house of
commons last night Mr. Dillon moved to adjourn
so as to have an inquiry into the Bodyke evic
tions. The eviction of thirty-five families, he
said, had disclosed features of the greatest hard
ship. He charged Landlord Callagban with rals
never spending a cent
In improving the land. This same man, said he.
tfln^nr thin ha conjunction in evicting a
SS&fS SS^SgSplASS- The
MVln"Klf?Urto'SPQlnt a commlttee the Bame
o^fcretaiT -Balfour objected to comparing the
Bodyke evictions to theBelfast riots. He censured
Dillon for raising the question at this time when
crimes bill must be reported Friday.
He had no knowledge of police brutality. He
T w b^JIi*0"1 In support of evictions.
W. RuMrtI aeverely condemned Callaghan.
was tbe worst in
Ireland. But that merely showed the necessity of
allowing the government to proceed with remedial
legislation. The debate was continued by John
rv>fy 5? others. The motion was rejected.
?^i2?I&*Farma5 841(1 the government was
It is reported that the Parnellltes Intend to op
P~? *?? Smith s resolution closing the debate
wu???^e.re^f?"nl?llt a series of motions which
will lead to their suspension from the house.
?L4luqatoe KiLLSD.-Near Wilmington, N. C..
afew days ago, Mr. H. R. Grant saw an alligator
81(16 the road. At a distance of
about twenty feet he fired one shot from a pistol,
^alligator in the left eye, klll
Lnrt The alligator measured ten feet
wiia 2T. 111 length In Georgia when a man
Jf1118^alligator six feet long he is entitled to be
called captain, but a ten-footer dubs h?m "kurnel"
at once.
r??7- 3*** Vibgwia Will Settle.?Gov.
iff'.V? an address before the State Firemen's As
^aUon In Richmond yesterday, in referring to
debt said: "I hope I am safe 1a saying
01 vlIS(lnia will be settled. Erom
^P??easl think a final settlement will
fvoocosi ? auuiuSDlUclllclit irui
th ^ar future, and when that is done
nothing between old Virginia and
Kidnapped by a Dbsperatb Lover. The lady
.^'mapped in Paris recently was Countess
Campoa, the;<ttvOTced wile ot the Dde de U Torre,
5^SSS!S!??!?teM*r8,ul flarrsaa of Spain. The
at Pa^ bawTTMUtuted an en
eigetlc yaroh for the ImOj. but as ysthaveno
her to induce her to marry him.
T1,e Br?ke? Water nun Repaired.
CAPT.STM0N8 EXPLAINS how THE ACCIDENT OOCrRRED
The break in the 36-lnch water main, on L
street, between 81st and 23d streets northwest,
was located about 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon
and found to be similar in character and appear
ance to the break of several weeks ago. The water
was turned off by an order of capt. Symons, be
7.an<1 8 o'clock p.m., and when the work,
succeeded in balling the water from the
excavation which they had made In searching for
WOre taken to repair it by
Pfp Wltb a "Jacket." The men
night, and by 4 o'clock this
I .^la^ succeeded In making the repairs,
^?anr?^ * o'clock a. m. the water was turned on.
I t?,Va imons 981(110 * Stab reporter to-day that
was. almost an exact duplicate of the
i nmipt weeks ago, and was found on the
n ?.e plpe> wblch rested directly upoh
wf^n?.,EiSir*K11 was about two feet in length and
by the settling away of the
Jipr th^i^ toeen Properly compacted un
leaving it and the superln
y^Jjyttng upon the piers. The pipe
Smlf g condlt ton, and so far as Its
nronerir- L plcis 18 concerned was
rh2 pLi ^ ut roal fault Is that
1^? _?~th was apparently simply dumped
norf when ^?und the p!pe, and afforded It no sup
Pa^ on began to sink. Cap
in thfrJH?, believes that to prevent any trouble
the pipe should ne uncovered for the
3? f^t? uP?n the stone piers, and
win Properly compacted, and this
that portion of the pipe which was
toy yesterdays operations, so far as the
?a n^Jin^ ^ concerned, Capt. symons says that he
10 take the responsibility upon hlui
tfiJL r?!nar^ TP1?10 toe done of so costly a na
1 .d toe, nor has he any data as to
nilto whlch rests upon the stone
P-n^iJL8 wlU? however, submit the matter to
Ludlow upon his return from
ijong island, with a recommendation to this effect.
JnSH? wa5. very little inconvenience felt by the
off ot the water, because the poUce
^omptly notified everybody. Residents of Capitol
Hill were unable to obtain water alter 5 o clock p.
PJ-- Dut this was due to the increased drain from
??? naains by people who were laying In a supply
to last three or four days.
Mr, Blaine In England.
HE APPKABS IN GOOD HKAT.TH AFTER A PLEASAN1
THIP ACROSS.
A correspondent of the Philadelphia Press cables
from London last night as follows: Mr. Jas. O.
Blaine is safe in England, after an exceedlnglj
pleasant voyage. The steamer Ems, having on
board Mr. and Mrs. Blaine and daughters, passed
the Lizard, the point at which all vessels calling
at Southampton are first noted, this morning. As
soon as she was sighted a launch which I had
specially chartered set out to meet the steamer,
and in less than an hour I had boarded her ten
miles from t he shore, clasped the hand of her most
distinguished passenger, and given him his first
welcome to England. Mr. Blaine never looked in
better health or more vigorous, and the good ef
fects of the sea voyage are perceptible In the ruddv
color of his face and the Increased sparkle in hit
always bright eyes. The transatlantic trip was a
neve^mlssed'16 oney*ortoe escaped seasickness and
DISTINGUISHED HONORS TENDERED.
As soon as the gangway had been placed In po
sition United States Consul Pendleton boarded the
steamer and greeted Mr. Blaine. Be had secured
rooms at the hotel for the party, and conducted
them there. A moment later a special car was
?^J?ti,t-?e-?l8PS8al 2Lthe party toy the south
western Railway Co. This courtesy was promptly
declined. When the hotel was reached Mr. Blaine
was presented with an Invitation from the mayoi
of Southampton to attend the queen's jubilee
banquet in the city, but acceptance was an impos
sibility, and he returned a graceful reply to that
effect. A telegram was received from London
proposing to pass Mr. Blaine's baggage without
Inspection by the custom-house authorities, but
Mr. Blaine smilingly declined this mark of atten
tion. The distinguished visitor was highly pleased
with the kind feeling displayed on all hands, and
expressed his sincere gratification at the many
marks of consideration shown him during the few
hours he had been on English soil. The party win
remain in Southampton over night, but Mr. Blaine
would not divulge ms plans for the future. Cer
tain it is, however, thatThe suite of reams at-thc
hotel an net engaged beyond the night. When ]
arrived at the Waterloo station, London, late this
evening, I found a large crowd, attracted by curl
oslty, awaiting the arrival of the train, expectint
that Mr. Blaine would be a passenger, and thej
were sorely disappointed that they did not get s
glimpse of him.
Robbed and Thrown Overboard*
BOLD A8SAULT BT HIGHWAYMEN NEAR BOSTON.
About l o'clock Tuesday morning a gentlemai
living in Cambridge, Mass., was crossing the bridge
on his way home from Boston. When on the draw
he saw several young fellows standing on the
Cambridge side, but not thinking they intended t<
molest him he continued on his way. Wher
within 20 feet of them two fellows stepped on th<
curbstone, while the others remained leaning
against the railing of the bridge. As he started t<
walk between them the roughs on the curbstom
seized and held him, while their "pals" weni
through his pockets. The Cambridge man mad<
as much resistance as he possibly could, but It was
of no avalL The highwaymen, finding that thej
could not prevent their victim from crylnt
out for assistance, threw hln> overboard
The man being able to swim, he managed to reaci
the Boston side. He clung to one of the piles unti
his cries for help were heard by the draw-tender
who rescued him. He was nearly exhausted whei
taken from the water, and It Is doubtful if he coul<
have lived much longer. The murderous act wai
reported to the Boston and Cambridge police ant
officers in both cities are now working on the case
but they have not obtained any clue to the high
waymen. The draw-tender took the man to hi'
house, and when the stranger nad recovered lei
him go without asking his name. The loeallti
where the robbery was committed is a public
thoroughfare, over which thousands of people pass
everyday. During the evening there are a lanri
number of persons passing over "Cralge's Bridge'
as It Is called, until a late hour, on their wai
home to crambridge. A short time ago a Water
town man was robbed In the same way and wai
thrown into the water. Being unable to swimh*
was drowned.
??? ...
Hart Never Knew What Happened.?Peopli
were startled atOlean, N. Y.. Monday, by the trem
bllng of the earth, followed by a sullen report, an<
It was thought an earthquake had arrived. Th<
report was caused by the explosion of 40 nltro
glycerine cans on a wagon driven by Lew Hart
an oil-well shooter. The explosion demolished thi
wagon and everything standing In the vicinity
killed the horses, and hurled Hart's mangled re
mains several hundred feet distant. Several Deo
pie were felled by the concussion.
Wht He Died With His Tbocbebs On.?Jas
Nolan, of Kearney, N. J., died on Tuesday night
with his trousers on. He was sick for a week
and, though frequently advised by his doctor t<
remove his trousers, he persistently refused to d<
so. After his death $700 in bills and a bank boot
showing $2,700 to his credit In the savings ban!
were found In his trousers pockets. He was noi
known to have any relatives In this country.
Doo and Cattle Killing Pasties.?Reports front
the county of Calhoun, Fla., that an epidemic oi
rabies among dogs and cattle prevails there
Several persons, it la said, have been bitten by the
rabid dogs. Much excitement prevails in the
county, and dog and cattle killing parties are or
ganlzlng.
???
Death op a Minister.?Rev. s. C. Boston, a Bap
tlst minister, formerly stationed at Onancock.Va.
died at Pocomoke Clty. Md., Wednesday Mr!
Boston had been In delicate health for many years
and was, therefore, compelled some time ago U
Sve up all pastoral work and resign the charge oi
e Baptist church In Pocomoke city.
: ?*
J AT GOULD ON THE "TELEGRAPH DEAI Jai
Gould was yesterday asked as to the truth of the
many rumors recently of the consolidation of th<
Western Union and the Baltimore and Ohio Tele
graph Cos. He said: "Itwould not beat udlcloui
thing to da If we combine and raise rates w<
will simply stimulate renewed opposition. w<
now have as good an organization as we can pos
sibly get, and there would be no object attalnec
in creating a new one."
Ex-Secretary Manning's Arrangements."?i
month ago the tenant occupying ex-secretan
Manning's residence at Albany, was notified u
vacate It, and now Miss Manning is getting th<
house ready for occupation. It Is understood tha
Mr. and Mrs. Manning will return In a few days u
resume their residence in Albany. Mr. Munlu
will be in Albany Saturdays and Sundays. sDend
lngflve days a week at the new bank lnNe?
York.
?
Probably Dbowkbd Hbreelp.?The womai
whoee body was found on the beach at Clifton
Staten Island, yesterday, was idSled as tha^
Miss Caroline jKiesler. Mm Richard Walker o
130 west 67th street, was a stoerof the de?
woman. Mrs. Walker, who thinks that her slate
tailed herself^ says that Caroline had not been t
??e_toer for along tlmeL but that she was not sur
prised at her absence, because she knew her to b
S^SgSW&ra?&&eg;
J?*? deceased woman was known as Mn
?^???2*% extensively," she continued, arte
recorerutc. It is thought some love affair or un
tortmuge^mariwa venture waaat *e bottom c
Mr. 8lnclalr Toosey, the well-known pabUshei
residence la new York yesterday e
Mats convention wl
4. The rppreeenbuiMl
Telegrams to The Star.
BURNING OF A LAKE STEAMER
The Tornado's Work at Grand Forks
ECHOES or THE BODYKE EVIOTIOHS
C0.1U0MS DEEPLY IJIPRESSE1K
ScbmUm Created by the
tke Bodyke lavmilfaU*a>
Special Cable Dispatch to Thk Evxxno 8ta*.
London, June 17.?The liberal members who
have been to Body Ice to Investigate the circum
stances of the eviction and rentals on the O'Cal
laghan estate made an enormous Impression In the
house yesterday. They had carefully collected
statistics showing the unprecedented and unwar
rantable raising of rent. The house of commons
never had a revelation of the kind before.
Members literally held their bre&th while the dis
closures were made by an English lawyer of great
eminence and two young liberals of good social
position. The Impression was deepened by the
utterly callous and flimsy way in which the gov
ernment met the unanswerable case put before
them.
BALFOUR'S DEMEANOR WAS SO OCTRAGEOU8
that one unionist paper calls for his Immediate re
moval. The government's responsibility rests on
the fact that they have deliberately suppressed
Sir Redvers Buller, who was directly condemned
by the home secretary law night, his policy of dis
pensing power being replaced by the uncondi
tional support of the landlords. The ulenblgh
evictions lost the government one big election bat
tle, and Bodyke Is likely to cost tnem another.
Chamberlain's proposal to Join hands wit h church
ill and form a new national party Is ot little prac
tical importance, as Chun-hill Is a discredited poli
tician. Yet It marks the final alienation of two
sections of the whig and radical party.
THE DYNAMITE STAKE
Is pretty effectually discounted here. The real
danger next Wednesday arises not from dynamite,
but from the unprecedented pressure of the crowd
In the streets and the abbey, and from the possi
bility of a panic through the fall of some stand or
scaffold.
THOSE CONFEDERATE IXUiS.
Gen. Rotwer Say* (he South Doenn't
Want Them, and Pnpoten to Ban
Them.
Chicago, June 17.?Gen. L. T. Rosser, of Virginia,
who is In this city, on being questioned In regard
to the proposition to return the "rebel" flags said:
"What in God's name do we want them returned
for? What will we do with them? The South
does not want them. Virginia does not desire
hers, If there are any. I say lets send all those
relics of that 'unpleasantness' to Washington and
there make a big bonfire of them. We should out
live those factional Ideas, and I for one don't favor
hanging those flags in Virginia's State capttol or
any other, for an eye-sore to future generations."
THE GRAND FORKS TORNADO.
Foot Person* Killed, Several lajared
and Twenty-five RalMlapi De
stroyed.
Chicago, June 17.?A special from Grand Forks,
Dak., says: This city was visited with a destruc
tive tornado yesterday afternoon. The storm came
from the west and traveled due east. Twenty
flve or more buildings, including the Catholic
church and the University of North Dakota, were
blown to the ground. The laboratory and museum
In the university were almost totally destroyed,
besides hundreds of smaller dwellings,storehouses
and sheds. The following were killed outright:
lira. FoUpt and her mother, Mrs. Davis: Cora Star
bird, aged twelve years; a man named Gummer
son. In East Grand Forks. The seriously injured
were: Mrs. A. Star bird and child, Mrs. Ed. Tlerney
and two children, Mrs. J. Andrews and two chil
dren, Mrs. Talton and two children. Mrs. Guyot
and daughter, at the University of North Dakota.
In East Grand Forks fourteen business buildings
were destroyed. Both bridges across the river
were swept away. The total loss is estimated at
f100,000. The storm was local The train from
the north was blown from the track about 4 miles
out, and rolled over a couple of times. No one
was killed, but many were seriously Injured.
During the storm last night Halver Leiand, of
Walle township, was killed. The storm Is reported
quite severe at Manvel and Ardock, where biuid
lngs were blown away. The Andrews family had
their house torn to pieces and carried loo feet.
Ed. Tlerny's house was overturned and his wife
Injured. The children were carried 150 feet and
not hurt. One of them, aged six years, was car
ried across the railroad track and lay there during
the whole storm. C. A. Myerstrom Is dangerously
hurt.
o
AN OVATION TO O'RRIEN.
Received With Great Enthuniaan on
Landing- at Qneenatown.
Dublin, June 17.?Mr. O'Brien, the editor of
United Ireland, who arrived at (jueenstown to
day on the steamer Adriatic from New York, re
ceived an ovation upon leaving the vessel. Scores
of deputations from various places In Ireland, to
gether with large contingents from Cork and
Queenstown, were at the dock to greet him and
escort him to the Queen's Hotel. An immense
crowd gathered in front of the building, and Mr.
O'Brien, In response to repeated calls for a speech,
appeared on a balcony and briefly addressed them
alluding to bis American experience and tnanklng
them for their cordial reception.
Mr. O'Brien, after receiving addresses from the
deputations this afternoon, will go to Cork, where
he will be tendered the freedom of the city.
?
A LAKE STEAMER BURNED.
Eight or Ten Persona Drowned in Try
ing to Swim A (there.
Chicago, June 17.?The steamer champlaln, of
the Dayton and Northern Michigan line, burned
up last night off Charlevoix. The Are occurred a
little after midnight. There were only 6 passen
gers on the boat, and the crew consisted of from
12 to 18 hands. Eight or ten persons were
drowned In attempting to swim ashore from the
burning boat. Tne champlaln lert Chicago for
the North last Tuesday at 9 o'clock.
Indiana's lieutenant-Governorship.
THE ATTORNEY GENERAL TELLS THE BOARD OF EQUAL
IZATION TO RECOGNIZE COL. ROBERTSON.
Indianapolis, June 17.?The State board of
equalization will meet next M onday. The lieuten
ant governor is a member ex-oftlclo of the board.
Because of the claims of Green smith and the dis
cussions that have arisen t herefrom, Secretary of
State Griffln asked Attorney General Mlchener for
his opinion as to the merits of the controversy be
tween smith and Lt. Gov. Robertson for the guid
ance of himself and associates on the board in de
termining which one to recognlre. The attorney
Gneral has replied In a lengthy opinion, revlew
g tbe election of last fall, and the subsequent
proceedings. He tells Mr. Griffln that CoL Rob
ertson is lieutenant governor and should be recog
nized as such.
Death of Ex-President Hopkins*
North Adams, Mass., June 17.?Ex-President
Hopkins, of Williams College, died this morning.
Wall Street To-day.
New Tore, June 17,11 a.m.?The stock market
was firm to strong at the opening this morning,
first prices showing advances of from v to % per
cent over yesterday's final figures. The trading
soon became extremely dun, Reading, Louisville
and Nashville, Pacific Mall, and SU Paul doing a
quiet business only. Prices were almost stagnant,
but had a Ragging tendency, slight fractions being
generally lost In tbe early trading, though Alton
and Terre Haute showed considerable strength.
The market continued devoid of special feature,
and exhibited no change throughout the hour. At
11 o'clock lt is very dull and heavy at slight frac
tions under the opening.
?f Fast Harses at Chicago.
Chicago. June 17.?Six car loads of thorough
breds arrived at Washington Park yesterday,
making a total of aome four hundred runners at
the track. The stables of "Lucky" Baldwin, Ed.
Corrlgan, and a large number of smaller strings
will be unloaded this morning, while bones sow
on the way will swell the number to fully 000.
The Mexican horses of R. Honey, which were ex
pected last week, have been detained at El Paso,
Texas, by the customs authorities, but will arrive
In good season.
M&
Princeton, N. J? June 17.?Next Tuesday atter
noon will witness a most interesting game of base
ball on the University ^roanda. A nine composed
VdUUUUllC V?UVVtOA?J stvonw "T? ? w. ti
of some ot the principal celebrities in the base bau
line who graduated from Princeton College wf tain
the past seven yean has Challenged the .
University nine to play a match game. Among
those who make op the Rue are Blckhaw, "8b,
who pitched such phenomenal curves for Prince
ton last year; Shaw, w last year's catcher and
captain; Schenck, ?ao; DaRkid, VI; Larkla, *??
Rafferty. *82:JLMoffatt, W. Moffatt, ?Z, a
Harris, VS. Thetcwra wfal on that da^be full
CIV7ILTT TO miLE FAIT
M mm m
tally ????? ?r
?. %
OnciM. June 17.?A special from Wabaah, iwL,
says: a sensation was created yesterday by the
arrest of saml Meyer*, superintendent of Mlainl
county Asylum for the poor, on a charge of ?*
saultlng and cruelly beating belple** feuiale In
mates of the institution. Constable Tsggert sp
prared before the county commt**looer? at Peru
UHl made complaint against Merer*. An investi
gation was Immediately ordered. r?*?ultlug in UW
anww. The principal complaining witness la
Minerva Taggert. the feeble-minded aimer of Con
stable Taggert, wbo baa been In tbe aaylum for
about nine year*. Ml Ha Taggert allege* the nic<*t
fearful and inhuman treaunent on tbe part a?
Meyers, and In evidence allowed great weltaoo
her hack and arms, where she Maid she had been
beaten by the superintendent. She has barfly
escaped with ber life. Tbe alleged brutal asaau.u
made by Meyers have been wholly unprovoked,
aivordlng to the testimony of others. Emboldened
by the story of the Taggert girl and t be arrent of
Meyer* srveral other helpless female inmate*of
the asylum have made similar statements and ex
hibited their bruised and blackened lliubs as evi
dence of the treatment they have received.
Meyers will be tried.
A Command tor t>ra. Hon I anger.
Pakis June 17.?Gen. Bou!anger will soon
reive * command In the army. An opening Mr
him has been effected.
Chicago, June 17.?chaa. HenroUn, the suspend
ed banker, said last night that of $:.oo.?u> liabili
ties on Wednesday he had liquidated 9900,0(10. and
expected In a day or two the balance would be n>
duced to $100,000. lie la confident of ultimately
paying in fulL
District Usvernment Affsln.
A CONTRACT RE AWARDED.
An order was made to-day revoking the awards
for street improvements In no far as B street sou'b
east, from 5th to 7th street*, Is concerned. ThU
street Is re-awarded to U. L. cranford, and will b*
paved with a distillate pavement.
THS SCHOOL BOARD'S NEW SrtJW.
The board of school trustees have sent the Dis
trict Commissioners copies of the minutes of t he
meeting of May 31st, and a copy of the rules and
by-laws amended at that meeting. They request
the Commissioners to examine and make such
comments thereon as may be thought advisable.
PROTEST! AGAINST A TEI.EORAPH POIJL
M. M. Slmms, of No. 1001 X street northwest,
Firotests to the District Commissioner* against,
be erection of s telegraph pole In front of his
bouse, and ssks "why not take another square
or a less pretentious premises."
a nut sidewalk for the Sew district bttlkso.
Capt. Eugene Griffin has m*ommended that the
request of Mr. T. W. smith, that an hexagon as
phalt tile side-walk be laid In front of the near
municipal building, on 1st street northwest, be
granted under the usual conditions of permit
work.
THK WRST WASHINOTON OAS 1 AMPS.
Several complaints have been made to the com
missioners about the condition of the gas lamps in
West Washington. The burden of the complaints
Is thai they are seldom cleaned or properly re
paired.
toe srsrasAM sfwfrh.
As soon as specifications can be prepared by the
englueer department of the work to be done in
laying sewers In Mt. Pleasant and L?e Droit Park
the matter will be plaoed In the hands of contrac
tors. capt. Symons Is confident that these newer*
will be In operation before tbe coming or winter.
It is also expected that the sewers for the Bureau
of Engraving and Printing and the quartermas
ter's corral, which work congress auilior1/?d the
District authorities ui superintend win l?e laid
during the summer. The sewer out let of t he cor
ral has been destroyed by t lie reclamation of tho
flats and the new sewer will be extended to the
river below the Long bridge.
THE STREET-SWEEPING CONTRACT.
F. M. Draney has been aw arded the contract for
sweeping the streets for 35 cents per 1,000 square
j ards. The contract price last yearw*s25>, eta., but
the work was done at a loss to the contractor, wM
a:d not bid again this year. The appropriation fas
the Incoming fiscal year Is $u~>,000, an Increase of
t7,000 over that of last year.
Srtl.OINO PERMITS
have been Issued by Inspector Entwisle as follows?
Conrad Wetzell, to erect two brick dwellings
$1,700, numbered ion and ill :?d street southwest:
Mrs. Edward Temple, to repair No. 900 E street
northwest ; $500.
HISCELI.ANKOrs.
The Commissioners have ordered thst Artlna
Sergt. J. L. Dalley be promoted to be scrge&nt ana
First-class Private L. B. Hat hway to be ?scond'
Class private, and that Gustavus A. shrader be ap.
pointed first-class private. H. Pot bury has re.
quested permission to name the alley running
east and west in square 73 "Stevens Place.'1
The building luspector has condemned the east
wall of house No. :trJl M street northwest. and or
dered It to be taken down and reconstructed
within thirty days.
A Trrrlklc Cyclone In
TWO PERSONS KILLED AMI SEVERAL KATALLT IM
SURED.
About 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon Grand Fork\
Dak? and vicinity was visited by the most de
structlve storm ever known there. Tel?-graph
wires are ail down, and complete reports are bard
to secure. M lss Cora Starbi rd and M re. A. M. Tap
pan were Instantly killed. The injured, as far as
known, number eight, Ave of them probably
fatally. About seventy-two buildings were leveled.
The North Dakota University was almost tot-ally
demolished, causing damage to tbe extent of
$12,000. The Catnollc church was completely
ruined and tbe congregational church considera
bly damaged. The JHamdt nlrr <m<l Herald build
ing was unroofed. Al?out :iu0 other buildings w ere
damaged to more or less extent. A train contain
ing a smoking car and first-class cosch was blown
from the track and down an embankment, rolling
over two or three times. Several passengers were
injured. The fon'e of the wind was so strong that
a heavy building belonging to the Austin Powder
Co. was blown fully half a mile.
in* In Lastolaaa.
ANOTHER TRAGEDY GROWING OtT OK THE WTTEOS^O
EVICTIONS.
A dispatch from New Orleans says: Another as
sassination has been committed in West Carroll
parish, growing out of the Wltkowskl affair. In
December last Simon Wltkowskl, the richer*
land-owner and merehaut in West Carrol],
and member of the legislature, was driven out
of the parish, his store burned, and his agent,
who was also postmaster of the town, assas
sinated. Wltkowskl had made himself very un
popular with bis system of crop mortgages and
evictions, and some attempt was made to excuse
tbe mob's crime by charging that be had ground
down the people of the parish, and that, he ha v.
log complete control of the legal machinery, there
was no relief for his victims In the courts. The
bitter feeling against Wltkowskl and the agent*
has never abated, and is as strong to-day as ever.
Among his agents was V. H. Tlllery, who had
lived for years In West carrel, but moved to
Ash ton, in the neighboring parish of East
Carroll, where he was managing one of Wit
kowskls plantations. Tiller was a popular
man, and was not known to have any personal
enemies. On Tuesday he went over to Floyd,
tbe county seat of West Carroll, to attend to
some business. W bile on his way home, acrons
ftanled by bis brother-in-law, J. s. <;rl*>wold, be
was waylaid and assassinated ten miles from tbe
town. The two were riding along the public road
through a dense wood, when a party of men, be
lieved to numberfouror more, who were lying con
cealed in the bed or a dry stream running parallel
to tbe road, opened fire on them with W incbes
ters and shotguns, Tlllery fell dead at tbe first
volley, one ball golug through bis brain and an
other cutting through his jugular vein. Either
wound was fatal. The mule which Oris wold rode
vas wounded in two places, but not severely, and
Grlswold managed to escape and give tbe alarm.
An examination or TlUery's body by the coroner
showed that, besides these two fatal wounds, he
bad received others in the heart, and was riddled
with buckshot. There Is no cause assigned for tbe
crime, except that Tlllery was Wltkowski's agent,
and that tbe assassins, who were part of tbe mob
that drove tbe Wltkowskls from tne parish, feared
that Tlllery was seeking In some way to bring
them to justice.
A Peculiar Knit.
HOW a YOUNG LADY'S BROTHERS ATTEMPTED TO BREAK
CP A LOVE MATCH.
For more than a year past Henry French, a
well-known yonng man in Wllkesbarre, Pa., has
been paying attention to Miss Mary Meehan, a pre
possessing blonde residing in tbe southern j?or
tlon of the city. French was despised by tb?
Meehans because be bad auburn hair. Tbe
mother said she would not allow ber daughter to
wed a man who had red hair. Mary said she
would marry him. Every effort was made to keep
the lovers apart, but without success. Last Fri
day evening, when the lover sought an Interview
with his sweetheart, tbe latter's two brother*
seized htm and placed him In a rough coffin con
structed for the occasion, and, closing the lid on
It, made him swear that he would forsake the
girl. French has brought suit against tbe Mee
hans before Alderman Groff for assault and bat
tery. He says tbey nearly suffocated him In tbe
ooffln. The Meehans say they have been worried
to death by French, wbo threatened to elope with
their outer. All last week tbe brothers took nights
about watching their sister's window for fear
th?t French would steal her away.
"Blrss Toe, My CHiLDiutH."?Win. Oakey in
duced Lola Fnta, of Erie, I1L, to elope with him.
Tbey tried to get a marriage license at Morrison,
but failed because Lois was but 17 yean old. Then
they went to Fulton, and there a license was re
fused. They started for another town, but just
about this time the angry father overtook the
young couple. The would-be bride promptly
threw her arms around his neck and pleaded her
cut so well that the old gentleman not only for
gave her, but helped them to get a license and a
preacher to Ue the knot.
Am Ohio Reservoir Blows Up with Dtjtamitb.?
The news was telegraphed from the Paulding re
servoir In Ohio Wednesday to the State board or
public works that the coffer-dam of the reservoir
was blown up with dynamite Tuesday night by
some unknown parties. The dam had Just been
repaired lor the second One. Tbe board tele
graphed the superintendent or canals at St. Marys
to go at once to tbe reservoir with men and can- |
non to protect It against thessenwho are "MM
that it shall tos absndonsd.
The returns from the local elections throughout
Wlscsnsln show that several thousand wotaen
voted at the city, village and township elections
mnder tbe new Isw which enables them to voce at
any election srhsre an officer is chosen who has
todswtthUeschoola^ ^ ^ ) ^ ^
?ylvanla to meet at Hsrrisbuig on Mpt?h? tc
he purpose of forming tbe Brewers' Assocla
ot Pennsylvania. Tfie call for the

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