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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, October 28, 1887, Image 4

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CITY A NI) DISTRICT.
THE FATE or THE AN%Rf HIKT*.
Point* from ibr Artnmrau in tfce V.
v. Xti ;>rcmr ( ?uri IctlrrdaIN
In r losing his argument in defense of the anarch
is* < tsfore thel\ a. supreme court yesterday, Mr.
Tttcser s dd: "We have a right, la my Judgment,
to tbe writ?to b- heanl oc the question whether
the constitution has been violated In ordi'r to com
pass tbeconvictionof these men. It 18 true they
are said to t?> anarchists. If the court asks me
Whether I have any sympathy with them, 1 have
only to say tliat the court knows ue too well to
suppose that I have any sympathy with these un
happy and misguided men: but they are men, and
they are entitled to the same protection that I am.
The same constitution Is over us all. I ask the
cottrt to Interpose its shield and protect these
men, because I may need it myself. I know no
anarchy abroad iu mis land which the American
people need fear except anarchy Ui the adminis
tration of Justice, f fear that when anarchy
dons the ermine of Justice aDd administer* lynch
law, in violation of the supreme law of the land,
whether the prisoners' point cau be sustained Is a
question you . an only iJecl.le after an examination
if the record and a hearing, strike after you hear,
but don't strike before you hear. 1 pray that the
court win, th^r-fore, award t his writ, Tor, if I do
tot mistake, tie-re are evldenoes In this whole
recoru which will demand the reversal of the Judg
ment. "
IS THIRS A FKDKRAL QriSTtO* IS VOt.TID.
Attorney uon. Hunt, for the state of Illinois, ar.
gu-d that to warrant the Issuance of the writ It
ni ist appear from the record, first, that there la a
federal question lnvolv.il; and second, that such
question * as raised and decided In the state court.
He was not as well informed as he would like to be
with regard to the exact, points upon which coun
sel for the petitioners relied. In the nrst part of his
argument Mr. Tucker planted himself squarely
ti!?n in.- rights wnich belonged to his clients,
under the fourteenth amendment; but In the
latter part he . hanged ground slightly, and ln
si -t.il that the first I. n amendments were declara
tions of individual rights, and then that they were
*11 c. mprlsed In the provisions of the fourteenth
aiuen.ltn nt. ll>' said that the complaint was
Dot mat the prisoners had been deprived of
any rights, privileges or Immunities guaranteed
b> the constitution, but that they were deprived
?>l right - t btough an err >neous construction of the
Jaw. -lvt ill. iirrs did not claim in the Supreme
? i.urt of thr stale that the Illinois act of 1K74 Was
repugnant to the constitution, treaties or laws of
in-'I i,ire.J >tat. >: nor that the authority of the
i .un was exercised under It, but that the act was
<*"bstlt?tlon il and \ old, and the court exercised
Its pow.r In violation of that law. petitioners
wervtri- I In the courts of the state under the
laws of Hi state, and that constitutes due process
of law. It is not material that this or another
court muni rale differently tiud-r the law. Due
process of law Bit-ana 'law of the land.'"
tub raise.niks aicoitPkr all tub rights war
KANTIih SV LAW.
Mr. Hunt argued that the Jury that tried the
ra.-?- h.i.l ?????n properly and legally chosen, and
that the prLsoiters Ua.l been accorded all the rights
w irrani.il Ui'i.i by law. lie >ald the Jury law of
linn.. - bad l?*.n in*' common law ail over the
V?#elM?t.~, and the ;>r.vision-, of tlie law ob
)e te.| to in i M-.. .i .? a id !>? en on the statute books
t.f in- Mate lor thirteen years.
Wl'li relation t . sjne, and Flelden. he said he
uii.|. r>to<?i it w. ti..1 !-? urged bj counsel on the
.-t her -i.le tli.?t t b? ??, being fowgnefa?Flelden an
Englishman aii l s; i. s i ? .ertuau?Were protected
to the tre li-- bet w* ii the I nited Mates and
their r?~?|?.;;*, governments; that they should
hat liulbUhl.'.t !? ? ause the treaties poinded th it
riiu< ns ?>: l.i.g aud and le-miany il\lng In ihe
I ni' d s" Hi - -nan have all the rights and prlvl
l?V*~- guar am ????.I l?> law lo cilU'nsof the I tilled
Male-. it i . 'r ities were railll.il. "I
. i. ~i h.ti i!in ?..1 ii* the i onten
ttou."
Tue chief Justice.?"In wnat r?- jx*ct Is It said
that 1(11-V . i .. -sih--? itueusuipof t.r-a? Britain?''
? ?^n. Mirir. "Ibej were to have ail the prl\l
leges of Ail.' n at the dale of the treaties, and
Kin ii.--*- pre. lieges we couteud was trial by
1 .ry t;1- r I ne I iw- then lu force. No laws eould
I- pi-- i ... i;a:iu in ir condition uuder the or
fbui. la? - the highest law."
All.ti.. i.. , ral Hunt replied that If this were
t> ?. t ti-n tu< p. i- aer-s without being . Ul/ens, were
1' 'il'- i i-'i'-.i:-, above the laws of the state
w hi U they set at defiance.
tiii; iiuriiiito t|i i:vriui.
Jlr. W filer t:aplains the Kniitr I'avorcd
fc) th?- SuuthrM Kcriiva.
Mr. M. I. Weiler. secretary of the Kast Washing
ton i it if--ns" Assoc iation, who offered the resolu
tion adopted by Citizens' Association No. 'J Mon
day night. opi? >sing tiie en truce of a steam railroad
Into the cltj by any street west of lt?th street east
and north of Pennsylvania avenue, said to a Star
reporter yesterday, wh-n nskeil as to the various
pi wis proposed lor bringing the Baltimore
ami Ohio tracks into junction with the
Baltimore and Potomac tracks, "We don't
want ttie tracks either on or under 11th street nor
'-"d street, nor any other street I am In favor of
the plan proposed by Major Twining, which Is
that the Baltimore and Ohio tracks should skirt
the city. The present Washington Branch could
be switched off toward the cast at a point about
6a*> yards north of the boundary and
from there i-oul.l tunnel under the lane between
Mt_ i ill vet Cemetery and the Trinidad estate, so as
to atold running on the surtace of the Bladens
burg r??a.t The tracks could then he run through
Isnerwood aLs I prti|iosed at the meeting the other
night, aad enter C street east between vKlth and
'.'1st streets. They would then take a southeastern
curse to a point opposite L> street atd then south
westerly to where they wouid intersect with the
tracks of lb Baltimore and Potomac Railroad.
Tt.? Metropolitan Branch within th-j city should
be done away wun entirely and connected with
the Washington Branch at a point north of Ivy
cn.y. W" don t want a tunnel on 11th street. It
wmi.d virtually destroy ten squares of property on
that str*s"t. 'WiijrT- simply tiecaus.- the tracks
would have to run on the surface frota the Bound
ary t?. V or i. street, where they would tane the
tunie L The plan W" propose is the nost feasible
and the cheapest, although we :idjnll that it will
require a few tiior> miles ot track. Besides, it will
tart ly advance the value of property in the ex
treme eastern section of the city."
DUirln National 1.nard.
a a"7' or orm ttus?chasou im dikkkrixt
OkOASr/ATIOSi.
A business meeting of the offlcers of the district
National tiuard was held last evening In the
< IB. ? rs' room of the Washington Ught Infantry
? "pn, by order of Brigadier-teeneral urtlway, for
t it i irpose of reporting to him reganllng their re
sp.- tive . ommands. similar meetings will be held
evry Thursday evening. General ordway wasuc
e nalmC last evening by lnspector-te-neral
liig-. .w Klfle Inspector Millard, andcaptalnciay
AfT.-r the ousineiM nes ting capr. Miller drilled his
? ii.piny, and the following promotions in that
1' mpAuy were announced after competitive exain
liiatii.n: oscar clwii, to third sergeant; (iturge
It. M ifOf, to fourth sergeant; J. K. Madden,
nrth sergeant; tieorge H. Tucker, T. W. Shomo
aiid M u intosh, to be corporals.
lbe following appointments have been made In
t ie laigan Camp t.uanl: Klrst sergeant, Thomas
A s^an. r; second sergeant, W. K. Evans; third
>? ry-e mt, t haa. Davis; fourth sergeant, I). K. L.
Waiion; quartermaster, I'hlllp A. SUrtln; corpor
a.-. Mi.'hael A. Skinner, Walter A. Test, Oola A.
Macy, and Charles w s? heyer. Honorary mem
1> rs -lecUsd?Dr. Donchee Charles Hupertus, T. A.
? u- lM'L >"*n<h.ii'.curun, Henrrftuper
n1*- ?! Marmailuke, H. H. Bayly, I). Merhllng.
l -Light the company win march to Mrs. John A
U gan s house and present her with an honorary
in -mber*s certlflcate.
Tbe Sheridan Kin-s win be merged with the
Ordway Klfles to-night, and tbe new recruits Will
be sworn Into t he service
rtili "J18 lwu"<1 T??e?day honorably
di?* tr^irih: fr?m N*t louai tiuanl, l apu Annrle
Mac*, y, vo. B, 4ih battalioa, from the lijth inst.
Klrrtlosa of Officers.
The gnidents'Association of th-j National Col
lege of i*harma. y h- id a meeting at tbe college,
street and rennsyivanla avenue, last night,
anil elected the following ofBcers: Francis W o.id,
pis-sliknt; Frank C. Severn**, vice-president;
Archie f?. Lohnesa, secretary; Kdward Boyd, treas
urer.
SUr of none Lndge, No. 12,1. O. O. T., has elec
ted the following officers: chief templar, C. K.
? eaid'tilld; vice templar. .Miss Annie Kulle
maiding secretary, MlssOenla Zen; financial ?e?'
retary, Frank Crown; treasurer, I. h. Unman;
chaplain. Miss s. E. Northern; marshal, W W'
M a. y; gjard. Miss Belle Lukel; sentinel. Frank
Lanri.au; musical director, SL O. /,.??; librarian.
Lucln<la Uruber; trustees, L. IL Lanuian, Win.
la*an, f. s. crown.
Nrrso-c,LTr**r*? shsixi" EirutDiB.-M. Smoii
abim n < further expenments with tiring nltrtv
gly erlne froai gns at Newport. H. 1., yesterday,
were very successful- Nine shells were tired.
Three were thrown against masonry U> prove that
the noui'an tie nred without tbe discharge of the
piece. TLe .instance was 4S yards.
IS?
As Istsrxational t'osrcBSNO os SroAa.?
Baronde W ornas, parliamentary secretar}' lo tbe
Brit isb b<?ar I trade, has informed a Liverpool
deputation which waited upon him. lbat all the
po?er\ including France, bad consented to Join In
an international innference at an early date to
discuss ibe question of sugar bounties.
Ijrs 1"*>-sions r?a Fhksch Ksvonmosirrs.?
Tbe Kr is ii < ...ituls-r of deputies ye>ierday, by a
voteof.cti to ISJCt, adopted a credit tor the pay
?er.t of ble |s-tisions to persons wounded In the
revolut.. Ii ot IMJi Tbe leaders of lbe groups of
, the truth of the report thai diS
sen*!oM have broken out among them.
Aswits Taarr Wins a Siit.?Agues Ethel Tracv,
tbea. tr. N who was the principal party In the
fan. . ir.ey v?..; . is., rec.-vred a\erdu t lntbe
hopo ine i ourt. New York, JesiertUy. of Jl ^ooo
against Mrs. J. :i ? H. I oudrey as executrix of Na
t i a.i i . in.' judgaw watMl
Sr.*.ir.g ott oi transactions with regard lotheold
I obt. t. It mn ". fsidrey sued Commodore Oar
[ri?ju lo cvau^ei i.iin to settle tbe MLssourl Psclllc
litigation, lieu .dc tb" note which fell into Mrs.
Tt M Whaiic. se . ral years aga The defense w*s
tAat tbe a. te was trauduieut& obtained.
? >si
scicins r.K a TKi.ci.RAm orsaaro*.?Wm. Mur
pby. thirty ? uve years okl, a telegraph operator t*
u* FiXal Teie.'raph<'OL, Inade a deU rtnined effort
to nimiult sub-lde In New York yesterday. He shot
kiruiel: in ibe left breast, cut bis bead with a
?mall |i.'nkaif.', fr^. lured bis skull with a stove
Ufter, ale I then tried to bang himself with a
Osum-uae. Ue will probably die.
??CHWOXrg 6KEAT DAI.
Lariat of lb*- rwMNIloM ?( the
Ue ?t?L MkmhalPi Ora
tion.
The profession In Richmond la honor of the
laying of the corner-stone of the Lee monument
wis nearly an boar In pawing a given point. The
window* and every other available elevated place
1 along the line of march were niled .with people;
I mainly ladles, who cheered the wet processionists
' by waving hats and handkerchiefs. The scene as
the head of the colum marched into the mono-,
ment grounds was (despite the drtale) very In
spiring, Gen. Wade Hampton and Oov. Lee riding
in front, side by aide, as lovingly as when in other
days they commanded the cavalry of the army of
Northern Virginia. The cavalry escort, the dis
tinguished guests In carriages, veterans and mili
tary, all combined to make a brilliant pageant.
The statue oi Fame crowning Lee at the en
trance of the ground was surrounded by about 100
veterans, inmates of the confederate soldiers'
home, and as the head of the line approached they
unveiled the statue and Ored a salute. This statue
1$ a plaster cast of the colossal one on an imitation
granite base. The enthusiasm of the veterans of
Lee Camp Home was touching to witness as they
recognized so many oi their old leaders and com
rades in line, and greeted them with an old-time
Confederate yell, which. If not as strong as In
former days, was at least aa hearty and sincere.
The grand stand, to which admission was had
only oy tickets of Invitation, was soon filled, while
many thousands stood In the mud and rain.
The Marine Band of Washington played "Dixie,"
"Thestar spangled Banner' "Yankee Doodle,"
and other popular airs, while the veterans, the
GranC Lodge of Masons, and other organizations
took the places assigned them. Despite the con
stant drizzle, which soon increased lo a hard rain,
the people held their places wit h amazing pat ience.
A veteran voiced the sentiments of all when he
said: "We used to follow Marse Bob In much worse
weather than this, and surely we can cheer
fully stand this to do him honor." Gov
ernor Lee called the assemblage to order, and
Hev. lv. Moses D. Hoge, of the Presbyterian
Church, who was an Intimate friend of Gen. K. K.
U>e, offered a fervent prayer. In which he flunked
God for the life and example of K. K. Lee, and
prayed that his old soldiers aud rising generations
might imitate his many virtues. The Grand Lodge
"((Virginia Masons took chargeof the corner-stone,
and In "due and ancient lorm" proceeded to lay It,
At the conclusion of the ceremonies Gov. Lee, In
the name of the Lee Monument Association, re- i
I celved the work from the hands of the grand inas
1 ter, and expressed the hope that the monument
might "be as enduring as the reputation of the
soldier whose memory it commemorates." At this
Juncture the rain became so heavy that the gov
l ernor, after consultation with others, announced
that further exercises would be suspended.
Among the many ex-Confederates present who
were greeted with cheers and applause as they
were recognized by the crowd were (ien. W. H. F.
and Capt. Henry Lee, sons of the dead chieftain;
(?ens. Made Hampton, Joseph E. Johnston, Jub&l
I A. K irly, j. i?. luiboden, Bradley T. Johnson. Geo.
11. steuart, L. L. Lomax, Kobt. Kat.som, Mat Kan
son, Kppa Hunion, ex-Gov. Wm. Cameron, United
States >enator Jno. W. Daniel, also CoL Chas.
| Marshall, of Gen. it. K. Lee's staff.
THK KV1NING S KXKKCI8KH.
A vast assemblage gathered in the hall of the
I house of delegates in the evening to witness the
postponed exercises. Gov. Lee called the meeting
to order, and introduced Gen. early, who presided.
Gen. Karly was greeted with thunders of applause
He referred to the original formation of this mon
ument issoelatlon, over which Kx-I'resldent Davis
presided, and paid an flouuent tribute to the (11s
iiugui-tie.i ex-president of the Confederacy, and
regret ledjhls absence irom Klchmond on this occa
sion. H- said he knew he gave utterance to the
sentiments of the vast assemblage when he ex
pressed tne hope that Mr. Davis would be In Klt-li
ni' nd at the unvclilngof the proposed monument.
Gen. Early said that Lee needed no monument,
but "we owe It to ourselves to erect It," and that,
however certain men may go back on their prin
ciples, the noble women of the south would be
ever true. CoL Mccabe, of Petersburg, then read
a poem, w ritten for the occasion by the late James
Barron Hope.
CM- MARSHALL'S ORATION.
CoL Chas. Marshall, military secretary to Gen.
I^e, was then introduced, and delivered the ora
tion of the evening. In opening he referred to the
existence of peace throughout the Vnlon, and the
fact tnat all n-sldents of the Southern States were
ready to deienil the country against Its enemies.
CoL Marshall discussed at lengtn the causes of the
war. He said that "it Is almost universally as
sumed as a fact that the war was waged by the
Federal Government for the overthrow of African
slaverj, and by the South for the maintenance of
that institution. But the overthrow or slavery
was an accident of, not the object of, the war.
The general result of the secession movement up
u> and including the time Texas became a member
of tne confederacy, on March l?Ml, was lo place
the weeding Stales under the laws of the Govern
ment trom which they seceded, the only change
being that those laws were to be administered and
executed by confederate officers instead of Fede
ral officers, secession gate no new protection to
slavery, and lus Immediate practical effect was to
establish two governments instead of one to exe
cute suiist.iutlaliy the same law." coL Marshall
then sketched the action of individual seceding
States, the effect of the attack upon Sumter, fol
lowed by Lincoln's proclamation, the action of the
border states. "Virginia promptly took her place
In opposition to the proclamation. To the people
of the south the cause was one for which ft was
an honor to light and a glory to die, and In Its de
lense lloben t.lward Lee drew his stainless sword
and won his deathless tame. We are hereto-day
to honor ourselves t>y doing honor to the memory
of the foremost champion of thai cause. The war,
instead of m.dnt.ilnlng the honor and Integrity of
the l aion, destroyed that Vnlon in all but a terri
torial sense by substituting conquered provinces
for rn-e States, and Instead of enforcing the laws
of the i ulon, established over nearly half the
I'nlon military and martial law. The actual re
establishment of the i'nlon, with all the blessings
we enjoy under it, has coale through a reaction
agaln-st the policy of force and despotism.
I.KF.'S MILITARY llIttTOKV.
"It is Impossible for me to apeak of the military
history of Gen. Lee. Klchmond Itself is a monu
ment lo his military genius. But I must hasten
on to what I regard aj the greatest exhibition of
the heroic na!u?- of Gen. Lee. I have not time to
speak of the many incidents that came under my
observation during the war Illustrative of his
character, am showing how he acquired his won
derful influence over the troops under his com
mand. 1 ean tiest describe that influence by say
ing that such was the love and veneration of the
men for him that they came to look upon the cause
as?,en. Lev's cause, and they fought for it because
they loved him. To them he represented cause
country and alL The wonderful lniluence of N'apo?
leon over his .soldiers had for Its foundation the
love of military glory. It appealed to no noble
sentiment. It was as intense in wars of ambition
as In w ar for i he defense of the country. Napoleon
was the idol of his soldiers. Lee was the Idol of
his men.
"You have all heard the anecdotes connected
with his appearance in the midst of the charging
rolumnes at the wilderness and at Spottsylvanla
Court-Hou-e, and how the affection of the men
lorced h;m to avoid the dangers of the battle. But
there Is on- Incident, for whl. h I am Indebted to a
1'fderul soldier, Illustrating the character of Gen.
Lee. i doubt if it h is a parallel In the annals of
battles." The speaker then read a letter from
John K. D;? Is, of < >hlo, who was in Gen. Foster's
I nlon command In the battle of August lil wh.
A number of I'nlon soldiers had been taken pris
oners. Gen. Lee stood cool and collected by his
horse gningorders, but when a piisoner told him
that a soldier had taken his hat Gen. Lee Imme
diately saw that the hat was returned. The
writer decUre.1: "I wondered at him taking any
notice of a prisoner in the midst of battle. It
showed whai a heart he had lor them." Conclud
ing, CoL Marshall said: "I think thLs story worthy
of a place beside that of sir Philip Sidney and the
wounded soldier.
THE SURRENDER AT APTOMATTOX.
"The dignity and grandeur of Gen. Lee never ap
peared to greater advantage than on the occasion
of the surrender at Appomattox. Others have de
scribed better than I can his appearance In the in
terview with Gen. Grant. Let me say, however
as the only confederate witness of that scene, that
<,'ran,t an.<1 who attended him
studle 1 beforehand how to conduct themselves so
as to spare as far as possible the reelings of their
Illustrious enemy, and show their generous sym
pathy for him In the supreme moment of his trtaL
ihey could not have acted their parts better than
""J otK-yed the pron.pung of the
noble heart of the true American soldier The
scene was In no way theatrical, but in its si ml
Pllclty it was dramatic In the extreme. It cM
only be painted by one who knows how to depict
victory without triumph. As "ieneral L?
stood confronting General Grant, berore
they began lo speak of the buslni-ss
they had in hand, a number of Federal officers
were near Gen. Grant, listening to the conversa
tion, aud some of them taking part in It and had
a stranger entered the room, ignorant of what was
taking ph.ee. It would never have occurred w him
that anything was going on but a pleasant con
versatlon among friends. Gen. Lee was calm and
collected. a.s dlktnlfled and gracious as I ever a. w
him lu the hour of victory. Through the n.iln
and humiliation of his position, his irreat
career about to close in defeat, and all that he h .d
done about to be made unavailing, he saw th?
path of duty, and he trod It with as nrm a foot and
as bravt a heart and as lofly a mien as If it had
b.-en the way of triumph. Perhaps the hlitbest
tribute ihat was ever paid to General Lee was nald
by General Grani himself at Appomattox. After
the meeting at McLaln's house, where the terms of
surrender were agreed upon. General Grant re
quested another Interview wlih General Lee.
"I pon his return to his quarters Gen. Lee in.
fonn>-d myself and other members of his staff
that lu his conversation with Gen. Grant the latter
had expressed the most earnest desire that peace
should be Instantly restored, and that not another
drop of American Dlood should be shed. He then
proposed to tK-n. Lee that the latter should forth
with meet Mr. Lincoln, and said that whatever
terms of pot Mention Mr. Lincoln and Gen. Lee
might agree upon would be satisfactory to the
reasonable people of the North and South, and
should have his own earnest support. He told
u*n. Lee that his Influence with the southern Deo.
p*e would secum their concurrence, and that Mr.
Lincoln^ coumvl would be acoepted by the whole
_ . * ?*xpressed the great pleasure
watch Gex Grant's noble and patriotic senti
?nents gave hliu, but declined to comply with his
request becau.se he was an offlcerof the confed
2T?iV: * could do nothing inconsistent
"?. "> conlederate government."
i?,~ i' concluded by quoting the follow.
experience of men
^1? me *? think worse of them
*erTe t??em; nor in spite of
lament, of errors which I now Me
and acknowledge, or of the present aspect of af
Th^n."n'?.'tutttm The truth la this:
Tne uwn u of Fruvkience in go nlow aud oar detires
uo Impatient, the work of progress is 00
li ??webia, the life of hu
jSf* llut <* the Individual so
brief, tliat we often tee onl/ um ebD of tlie ndrnnc
?? u?mi dttcouraged. It is History
that teaches us to hope."
"A SUiTtt MAN TBAN washington."
At the conclusion ol CoL Marshall's oration.
Oen. Wade Hampton was called upon and respon
ded in a few remarks, in the coarse of which he
Mid he regarded Lee eren a greater man than
_ *~?ln?lon? and spoke of the great veneration
,, e P^P'e or South Carolina had for the
dead Confederate chieftain.
Oen. Early then clotted the proceedings with ap
propriate remarks, and the gathering dispersed.
FlfhUaf a Devil Flik.
AN ADVENTURE IK A BOAT ON THE PACIFIC COAOT.
From the Han JPrmnclaco Alta.
Tuk's companion* saw a huge, shiny, serpent
like arm emerge from the water and twine itself
around his middle, a great scream broke from
his Hps and died away in a sickening gurgle as the
breath was forced out of him oy the compression
of the air. Cries of horror and fright arose from
Tuk's comrades, and they crouched low in the
boat and watched Tuk's struggle In the horrible
embrace. Their cries were redoubled when, al
most in the space of another moment, six hideous
looking arms arose in the air and began to whirl
around like a windmill on a breezy day. The arms
or tentacles then began to swish around the boat
as if they were feeling for the other Chinese, who
were moaning and crying with terror. Tuk's body
was still wriggling, and a gurgling came from his
throat.
TS.? of the wavtng arms were wound around his
limbs, binding them with terrlflc power. Then a
huge, Jelly-like body rose in the water close by a
junk, and by the light of the moon the terriiled
Chinese saw the huge, gaping mouth of the mon
ster, and the protruding eyes shot out a greenish
gleam. A new peril was now staring the wretched
flshermen in the face. The weight of the mon
sters tentacles, one of wtlch was clutching the
gunwale fast, was careening over the boat Inch
by Inch. The gunwale was even now almost on a
level with the waves, and the shivering, cowering
Chinese would be dropped into the gaping mouth
or lnto the embrace of the tentacles.
Fear at last seemed to nerve one of the Chinese
with a desperate courage. He crawled over to
where a large hatchet was lying, and seizing It,
made his way to the gunwale. Then, standing up
anu dodging a blow from one of the whirling arms,
he brought the sharp edge of the hatchet heavily
down upon the clutching tentacle. One stroke,
then a rapid second. The arm was severed, and,
at the same time, a wind struck the boat's sail and
y? her a ff?od distance away from the llsh ere It
could get another grip. The three men were safe,
with streaming eyes they saw the yet struggling
form of Tuk dragged beneath the waters, fear
ing another attack of the monster the frightened
nshermen got out their long oars and rowed the
junk as rapidly as possible from the place.
The Romance of a Blfambl.
A STORY THAT DR. GRANT, THE CONFIDENCE HEART.
WA8 A SON OF VICTOR XMMANIEL.
It is now asserted In Boston that Dr. Andrew \
Grant, bigamist and conildence man, who died in '
Jail while awaiting trial for swindling Miss Lucy
Towey, of Cambridge, whom he had married, was
none other than Dr. conley, who look an active
part in the Fenian raid on Canada, about twenty
years ago. Mrs. A. K. Gore, of No. 4~'(1 Saratoga
street, East Boston, claims to know Dr. Orant and
his history pretty thoroughly. She says that her
brother, Dr. McSheehy. of East Boston, formed Dr.
Grant s acquaintance while traveling in France in
lKo','. Dr. Grant returned with him to New York,
where Dr. McSheehy left him. He then married a
German girl, whom he afterward deserted and en
llsied in a New York regiment. Dr. .McSheehy did
klm again until urter the war in isou. In
iwa? Dr. Grant married Mrs. Gore's sister. Mrs.
Jane IK-Ianey, and after stealing $20,000 of her
money deserted her. He was next heard from at
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., where he was arrested for
bigamy and was sent to Sing sing. lie was par
doned before the expiration of bis term and went
to Europe again. Two years ago he visited Mra,
Gores sister in Chicago and tried to have his
daughter go with hlin, promising to send her to a
boarding-school.
cl*|me(1 that he an Illegitimate
?, i, tor Emmanuel, King of Italy, and was
exiled for conspiring against the throne. As I)r.
conley he was well known. He once kept a drug
st"re in Cambridge, Mass. He has been ldentitlec
from his photograph by several Boston and Cam
bridge people as Dr. conley, of the Kenlan raid,
and the Dr. conley who kept the drug store in
Cambridge. Mrs. Gore says she will try to get
possesion of any property Dr. Grant may have
left for the beneilt of his daughter by her sister.
Dr. McSheehy and Conley became Inseparable
companions In Paris, and It was during the course
of their rambllngs together that Conley is said to
have made known the secret of his birth. Ac
cording to his story he was born in Austria, but
was the sonof Mctor Emmanuel and Archduchess
AdelhinL of Austria. He was born In lH-fcj, two
months before Victor Einmanual and the Arch
duchess were united in marriage. Victor Emman
uel was at that time King of Sardinia, and did not
succeed to the throne of Italy until is?i. When
Uifre c,mld he *as transferred to the
custodj of an old abbot in Switzerland, by whom
scll'x'leU lu tl?e sciences. Among
other things he made a specialty of languages, and
so proncleut had he become that he could speak at
least live with fluency. The old abbot became, as
it were, a parent to him, and nnally the young
man s desires to know something of his parentage
became so strong that the good old priest told him
ail, even to the stain upon his birth. When the
young man grew up he went to Sardinia and
openly conspired against the king, and was forced
to fly. His alleged father supplied him with
l? America wan Di. McSheehy,
and when the war broke out he enlisted In a New
*''r} rejfiment, and is said to have been well known
among the Grand Army of the Republic men in
York,
Brorkuay With the (Sanlter*.
trying to sell ink which he CLAIMS will de
tect FORGERIES.
A telegram from Boston, October 26, says: Forg
er Brockway, who was recently released from sing
Sing, is in town, and is thinking of taking up his
residence here. He says he has an ink that will
detect forgeries. During his long experience m
the forgery business he has used many kinds of
inks and the one he has now Invented, he claims.
will detect a forgery every time. He arrived lu
this city a few day sago and soon alter met Inspect
or skelton on state street. Toblm he told his story
and requested the inspector to Introduce hliu to
some 01 the bank officials so that he might sell his
Ink. Brockway was very particular that the in
spector should tell the oftlclalst when introducing
him, who he was and what he had done. Jn that
way the most expert forger lu the world met sev
eral prominent bank officials and explained to
them all about his lnveutlon. The next day
Brockway called on Superintendent small. Chief
Uanscotn, and Superintendent Cornish, of linker
ton s agency, and told them the object of his visit
to this city.
44A* Happy at) a Prim', Wife."
From the Pall Mill Gazette.
There Is only one happy woman in Russia?the
priest's wife?and it Is a common mode of expres
sion to say "as happy as a priest's wile." The rea
son why she is so happy is because her husband s
position depends upon her. If she dies he is de
posed and he becomes a mere layman, and his
m,h "??.? away ironi hlrn and distributed,
half to his children and half to his government!
Ihe dieadfui contingency makes the KusoUn
priest careful to get a healthy wife. If he can. and
makes him take extraordinary good care or her
after he has secured her. He waits upon her In
the most abject way. she must never get her feet
wet and she is petted and put In hot blankets if
slit has so much as a cold In her head it is the
greatest possible good fortune for a girl to marry
a nobk-T" ly l,elter be theVK
~ -
Monument to Gen. JonN C. Breckenridge.?
The monument to the late Oen. Jnoc\iBrtvk^n
rl' r K! n^Ti""k't0?' Ky - wU1 1)6 unvelle l Novern
?f! , ^ Jhe occasion will be observed by a grand
^.i aniJ "a'ftary parade. The oration will be
delivered by senator J. 8. c. Blackburn The bronze
statue is now in Lexington ready to & placed
The Capes Against Gould and Sage. District At
torney Martlne in New York yesterday presented
to the grand Jury the papers in the criminal case
?????<* la?eny "firalnst Russell Sage and
krpUfht by tae bondholders of the Kansas
Pacific Company. The grand Jury returned the
documents to the district attorney forinvesuga
8ad Sequel to a "Horning" Expedition ?At
Romulus, Mich., J as. Poet, aged liny-two, and Marv
jtorbea, aged forty-five, were married on sunda/
bi"^rnyr?rV.e?lnK a crowd or men 40(1 am
bled for the purpose of "horning" the newlv
marrled couple. After making ail the racket thev
J,??*. ^ crowd left Mr. Poet's piac/
moved a short distance to a house occupied by Don
Felton and wife and their six small children and
This 80 rriKSd
Mrs. Felton that she got a pistol to protect the
household, and In the excitement accld -ntaiiv
sttoubuutrk ,n 1116 aMomen-Her SwiKg
Burned to Death in Hii Wagon.?At Hastlnes.
Neb., Augustus schoocke, a farmer, started home
In his wagon i uesday night under the influence
.<?fJh,Uor' 1V1 lighting a clay pipe set Are to his
clothes. He was evidently too onink to battle
with the flames, and was burned alive and fell to
^.,..^slde-...WUen fouud the body was in a
crouching position, as though Schoocke was in the
act of trying to get up when he died.
_?r"CtAI. H*ITRNt OF the Balttmoei ELECTION ?
Tj!*'?el?ctlon return Judges met in the Superior
Court room in Baltimore yesterday- and slirnei tlie
K- strobe received W.WvoiL
Bartlett 30,345 votes, and itr Wm i
Ogden, the labor candidate, 130, making LatrobeW
majority over Bartlett 4,425 and his majontyover
w.t&r'1 The voteVor the
water loan ordinance was 12JRX; against it 1,015*.
Indian squaws Brain a Rival. Two Santm
jneTiLS^11810 * HW-breed Indian naSnSl
,^ere Niobrara, Neu.
i ? murder o( the third squaw in tin
Sf" 1,ou*lM>?d. The two women had each
three of tl1? affection of Joe until about
ch^LfT? ^ ^en he feU a vicUm to the
nam^i UDg^WMl F?tty Santee maiden
raah0nt';jz and added her to his domestic
T*0 W(*ka ago Lashonta mrsSir
two^wrL?h8u?E?clon ?? once fellontheother
?...?rw*j itnuicriJ POtfflAH
U? lattera no, Dlnixulu,
?IgrftiiM trw Gkmi Brttala.
There are no signs yet, says the Sr. James' Go
trtte, at tbe slackening of the tide of emigrstlon to
the United States. England, Scotland and Ireland
each sent last month about 1,000 emigrants more
than they sent In September, 1880. Tbe number
of foreigners sailing from English porta was slight
ly less; but this may mean, and we fear does
mean, not that foreigners emigrate in lew num
bers, but that they are embarking at Havre and
Antwerp rather than at Liverpool or London. For
tbe first nine months of the year the United States
has received about 170,000 persons of British ori
gin and nearly half that number of foreigners. It
will be a curious question for the ethnologist of
the future how far this large percentage of other
races has modified the characteristics of the origi
nal British stock. Australia shows a marked ae
! crease, the numbers this year being 24,000. against
' 32,000 a year ago. No doubt the terrible tales of
' the "unemployed," who have to exist on as. a day,
have something to do with this; but probably the
withdrawal of the free and assisted passages by
the different colonial governments has a great
deal more. As for all other places out of Europe,
they have one point In common?that the Irish
avoid them. The Irish furnished 30 per cent of all
the emigrants; but to "all other places" they only
sent 4TiO persons out of a total of 1:1,000. of which j
more than half was supplied by England alone.
Lelci w a St??e Favorite.
A St. Louis dispatch says: D. A. Honlg's Lelex,
which won thejmlle and a furlong race at the
Plmllco races last Friday, beating Volante, Swift
and Belirlnger, has ears well attuned to public ap
plause. ills career is unusual, even in these days
of equine surprises. While temporarily broken
down Lelex was worked In St. Louis by S?-ott;ft
Lynch, undertakers, and being a well behaved. In
telligent animal, and accustomed to the average
music turned out by a theater or grand-stand or
chestra, be was taken from the somber part of
hauling a hearse to play quadruped roles L .ev
eral theater companies. As the four-legged -i?o
in Joe Murphy's "Kerry Gow" and the prmd |
bearer of the soldier lmthe "Black Hussar," he has ,
been equally successful, although evincing a pref
erence for the opera. In roaring comedy he ap
peared in Hanlon's " Voyage en Suisse.'' uts tuea
ter services brought him no higher compensation
| than $2 a night. ^
Knows Nothing op Dynamiters.?Mr. Joseph
Nolan, the Irish member of parliament, whose
name has been brought Into tbe dynamite case in
London, denies emphatically that be has any
knowledge of dynamiters. He says that he be
lieves a base attempt has been made to implicate
him with such persons. The inquest proceedings
in the Cohen case, in his opinion, had been de- 1
signed to assist the nefarious policy of the govern
ment.
Tekribe Accident at a Fcnkral.?At a funeral
near sycamore, Ohio, Thursday, the team attached
to the hearse ran away, and the vehicle was re- i
duced almost to kindling wood. The coffin was |
dashed to the ground, the lid torn off and the
corpse rolled into a ditch by the roadside. Other
teams took fright and a general panic ensued;
women fainted, men jumped from the carriages
wagons were overturned, horses became entangled
lu the general wreck, and several persons were
more or less seriously Injured. The Hev. Mr.
Howells, who was to have conducted the funeral
exercises, was perhaps fatally Injured.
Furnishing Cigarettes to Schoolchildren.?
The act of the last Illinois legislature, prohib
iting the sale of tobacco, cigarettes or
cigars to any minor under the age of
sixteen, has been put in force against pro
firletora of candy and cigar stores in the vlcln
ty of public schools lu Chicago, which have been
furnishing cigarettes to children, and a number of
arrests for the violation of the law have been
made.
A Town Flooded.?The standplpe of the Seneca
Falls, N. Y., water works burst yesterday after
noon. The roar and crash were tremendous. A
column of w ater 30 feet in diameter and nearly
100 feet high caused a flood which damaged prop
erty to the extent of $2.">,000. No one was injured.
~pianos7and" organs' ~
HENRY F. MILLER PIANOS?OB AND. SQUARE
una Upright. The meat beautiful and u rfect
piano made. J NO. F. ELI.IH ft CO.,
o2H-lm 937 Pennsylvania ave., near 10th at.
C1UILD SQUARE AND UPRIGHT PIANOS; TuE
f beat medium grade piano made.
JNO. F. ELLIS <1 CO..
o3S-lm 937 Pennsylvania ave n.w., near 10th st._
EW PIANOsVsQUAHE. UPRIGHT AND GRAND,
at moderate prices and easy term*; old instruments
taken in payment fur new.
JNO. F. ELLIS ft CO.,
o2fi-lm 937 Pennsylvania ave. n.w., near 10th ?t.
WEBER" SQUARE PIANO, IN GOODCONDITION,
with stool and cover, at a bargain.
JOHN F. ELLIS ft CO..
_o2S-lm 937 Pennsylvania ave. n. w.. near 10th st
HAINES BROS. HQrare p!ANO. IN OOOD CON
dition, with stool and cover, at a bargain.
JOHN F. ELLIS ft CO.,
_o2S-lm 037 Pennsylvania ave. n. w., near 10th st.
WEBER BABY GRAND PIANO, IN GOOD COi?
dition, with stool, at a bargain.
JOHN F. ELLIS ft CO.
o28-lm 037 Pennsylvania ave. n. w.. near 10th st.
UPRIGHT PIANO*. A LARGE ASSORTMENT
vary little used, at low prices.
JdHN F. ELLIS ft CO..
o28-lm 937 Pennsylvania ave. n. w? near 1 Oth St.
PIANOS FOR RENT~AT MODERATE-PRICES.
Also Moved, Tuned, and Repaired.
JOHNF ELLIS ft CO..
o28-lm 937 Pennsylvania ave. n. w? near 10 th st_
LtQRA WEBER PIANOS ROSEWOOD CASE:
Oi)mU carved legs: 7S octave, with handsome
atoTTandcover JNO. F. ELLIS ft CO.,
o2K lm 937 Pennsylvania ave. n.w,. near 10th st._
6QAA DECKER BBO.'S ROSEWOOD CASE,
(JO Wcarved legs, 7H octave Grand Square with
ttne stool an J cover. JNO. F. ELLIS ft CO,
o2S-lin 937 Pennsylvania ave. n.w., near lOUi at.
0,1 ?A STKINWAY ft SON'S BOSEWOODCASE^
0??JV7 octave, with atoo! audcover.
JNO. F. ELLIS ft CO..
_o28-lm 937 Pennsylvania avu. n.w., near 10th st
QOAA HAINES BRO.'S, BRADBURY. VOSE ft
ViiWF Son's, aud other Pianos in good condition,
with stool aud rover. JNO. F. ELLIS \ CO.,
o2S-lin 937 Pennsylvania ave. near lOttj st. n.w.
D I ("A BRADBURY. NUNN ftCLA 1(kTeMER~
n J 'J V/hoii and other Pisnoe, stool and cover in- I
eluded. JNO. F. ELLIS ft CO..
o2S-lm 937 Pennsylvania ave. n w? near 10th st.
Ct "I J FISCHER AND OTHER PIANOS.
WXUU JNO. F. ELLIS ft CO.,
937 Pennsylvania ave. u. w.,
o28-lm near 10th st.
PIANOS FOR BENT; GOOD STOCK;""
Moderate Price.
JNO. F. ELLIS ft CO.,
o2S-lm 937 Pennsylvania ave. n.w,. near 10th st
6. L. Wild Si Bros..
(09 7tli st. n w. Established 18C4.
Kranicb ft Ba<'li and other fine pianos aud organs at
lowest prices and easy terms. (1 re it bargains lu second
hand luatioo. pianos and organ* moved. exchanged. or
rented. Tuning and retiring hotiestly done. o22
HALLF.T ft DAVIS PIANOS IMPROVED UY NEW
patents. Uprights a specialty We keep a fine
stock of oar Pianos, which are selected with s|>ecisl
care for our Washington agent, and which will be sold
at the lowest possible rates and on monthly install
menta. BALLET ft DAVIS ( P.. Sll 9th st. n.w. ol
Decker brok pianos; famous'for rioh
up? aud l*-auty of tone. Known everywhere as
the highest grade instruments
SANDERS ft STAYMAN.
ol-3m 934 F st. n.w.
f>lAN08
FOR RENT, AT
BANDERS ft STAYMAN"8.
ol-3m 9.14 F st. n. w. _
WEBER PIANOS FULLY MAINTAIN THEIR
great reputation. Finer than e\ er in tone aud
woramanahip. SANDERS ft STAYMAN,
_?1-3m 934 F at. U.W.
PIANO RENTING
A SPECIALTY, AT
n1 SANDERS ft 8TAYMAN-S,
934 F st. u. w.
E8FiSle^08-?TH.E NAME A GUARANTEE,
r ischer Pianos, fine tone, great durability. Mod
erateprice, eaay terms. BAN'dW ft ?AYMAN.
_ol-3m 934 F st. u.w.
PIANOS 1
FOR RENT, AT
ol om SANDERS ft STAYMAN'S,
?l nm 934 F it. mw.
THE NEW E8TEY "PHILHARMONIC" ORG AX
a^u eight 00 cbt^1 ??? ***?
... - ana, t lgnt stops, #00. Monthly payments of
oli^ SANDERS 4 STAY MAN,
0l"3m_ 934 F at. n.w.
Victor Becker,
Exix rt in Tuning and Repairing of Piano# and Or
gans; 25 years'experience. Work warranted. Pricea
moderate. Jine Pianos for rent and sale. Terms
eaay. ^inwwnnHOl 9th street n.w. al3-3m
1>OR SALE?
f STEINWAY ft SONS' GRAND SQUARE AND
UPRIGHT PIANOS.
A fnll assortment constantly on hand. Tertna and
prices reasonable. E. F. DROOP,
Sole Agent, 92o Pa. ave.
KNABE ft CO. seven octavo Square; musically aa
good aa new. Price. ?200. E. F. DROoF,
93T> Pa. av?L
MILLER ft CO., Boston, seven octave Square. Price,
?173. EMERSON seven octave Square. Price, floO.
Other Upright and Square Pianos from (25 to 1700,
for rent or aale upon reasonable terms, at the Muaie
Store of _ E. F/ DROOP,
Late W. Ok Metxerott ft Co.. 923 Pa. are?
a28 At the old atand.
RRR OCO .. rf m KSS.
R R C 0 II H -
RRR O HHH S8a
R R 0 C H H . 5
R R OCO H H BaVl
MUSIC STORE, 085 7TH 8T. N. W.
Pianos and Organs for rent aud sold on monthly
pay me I] ta Agents for New England. Sterling and
THE UNRIVALLED SOHMER PIANOS.
We offer great bargains in second-hand mstrumenta.
Importers of fine violin*, bowa, striura. ftc. SO.OOO
copies of a and 10-ceux sheet music. CatalogUM^ree.
CBICKERING AND HaRDMAN PlANOS
To rent and sold on monthly payments.
Pianos repaired, stored, tuned, and moved.
W. O. METZEBOTT ft CO.
an23 903 Pa. ava, near 9th at
SI R A
A
A^
P nxo&
SECOND-HAN D flANuli * -
i-HAND PIANOS. A
"^rtts&s^sSbett.
jn WM
Do Not Purchabr
UNTIL TOO SEETHE EMERRON FT ANA
AU?^
EDUCATIONAL.
1>R1 VATE INSTRUCTION IN LATIN AND F.NO
J lloli Branches, at rradeiK* of pupil U iinml Ad
drem B?i oik*. ?B088-OI*
CHORTHAND IN TEN LESSONS BT universal
fl Plxmatmph;. brletot, most legible
Leas oni by wait Circular* free.
PERN IN SHORTHAND INSTITUTE.
o2R-lm* DETROIT. MICH.
i YOUNG LADY. EXPERIENCED TEACHER OF I
A,FJUfli?h branches, fonlpi "
wishes situation in school or
K~ood nferami Addreee VISITING
office. o28-3t*
i languagea and uiuaic.
' a* visiting governess:
[ting TEACHER. Star
THE ART STUDENTS' LEAGUE WILL RE-open
its day and evening Life, Portrait, Antique and
\vster Color Clsasea November let, at 1113 I'enn ave.
8
Instructor*? Mr. A. G. Heatou, Mr". De Lane*) W. GUI, I
Miss Sylvester and Miss Adam*. o2fl-13t*
Graded school! primary, intermkdiate i
aud advanced claasss. New England metuoda.
Thorough work. KINDERGARTEN DEPARTMENT.
Froebel system. Twelfth year. Heat of references.
Principals: MISS susie POLLOCK, educated in Oer
many, formerly of Boston, and MISS CATHERINE
NOERR- 1127 lath st. n.w.. uesr Mass, sve c*7-5t* |
AGENTLEM AN WISHES TO give LESSONS IN
Greek, Latin, and Euirliah branches. Excellent ,
reference* Terms moderate. Addrcas Boi No 4. star
office. o?-2flt*
I^RAWING AND PAINTING-ACADEMY OF
Jl J Fine Arts, SO* E st? presided over by Mrs.
1M0GENE ft. MOKRELL, who has had twelve
tuedals and studied fifteen years in Europe with the
most celebrated artists. To prevent children forming
careless babita of drawing. they will be received Satur
days, at four years of age and upward, for almost noth
ing. Instruction in every branch of art, from drawing 1
of all kinda to portrait and historical painting. Evening
classes for ladies aud gentlemen Mondays and Weunee
daya at 7. s27 -2ui*
MISS MARY SITZ,
Graduate of Leipaic. Germany,
Will receive pupils for Piano, Vocal Music, and Ger
man. Late of the Conservatory of Music of Pittsburg,
Pa. For tonus addreas 313 D iO.w. og0-3f
ilNUING." VOICE CCLTURETaND 8ELF-AOCOM
panlament (Italian "Caatabile" method).
Signor FAB1ANI, from Europe,
oa.VCf 1017 12th at. n.w.
tlRAYON PORTRAITS TAUGHT IN FIFTEEN
j lesaoua: no knowledge of drawing neceaaary. satis
faction guaranteed; lesson hours: ? a.in. to ,r> p.m.,
also 7 to l> p.m. J. W. REYNOLDS, Boom 13. May
Building, cor. 7th and Ests. 032-gw*
A SUCCESSl-UL"COLLEGE TEACHER (LADY) I
will give music lessons at the homes of the pupils
eta. per lesson. E*pecial attention to beginners aa
well us to pupila advanced. Address or rail on
TEACHER between 0 and 7 p. in.. 220 3d st. n. ~
ol5-2w?
LG. MABINI'8 DANCING ACADEMY. MASONIC
? Hall. F and ttth ats. n. w. Class days, Tuesdaya
aud Saturdays. For particulate send for circular*.
o21-lm
Elocution."
The SHAFTESBURY METHOD is the finest in the
world and the most highly indorsed. It teaches NA- !
TIK ALNESS in Reading for Home and s<?iety. aa
well as in Dramatic Expression. DIPLOMAS AND
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES ISSUED. Leasousin
Class or Privately. Thirty two page catalogue free.
MARTYN COLLEGE OF ELOCUTION AND ORA
TORY. 313 0th at. n. w.. half a block eaat of City P. O.
o20-lm
J T. SOUTHARD, TEACHER OF PIANO.
. r ? Season bnriiintng Monday. October 31. Will re
ceive pupils at Oltt M st n.w. Arrangements can he
marie oy leaving address with J. F Ellis ft Co . Music I
Dealer* lertus 420 per quarter of twenty lessons.
olOJw*
THE FRENCH SYSTEM OF SOUND SCHOOL IN
New York city, IS west ?:id and 275 wast 12,'ith,
!>. nig now conducted by able teachers, MLLE. V.
l'ltl D'HOMME is happy to inform ber patrons that
she will retun to Washington and open her own school
lor French students at 715 Hth st. Call from Novem
ber 14. Monday?, Wednesdays, or Fridaya. between
3:30 and 4:30. A practical use of the language war
ranted in thirty lesson*. Buy the Student's Help, at
Free's and at Ballantync's; complete in aix parts. #2;
?ingle part, 35c. Reference*: Hon. and Mrs. S. 8.Cox.
oiy-3m
lt ASHINGTON ACADEMY OF TELEGR APH Y,
031 F ?t. n. w? roi uis7. 8, and 9. ocl8-lm*_
APITOL HILL kindergarten AND SCHOOL.
22 :td at. a. e.. Miss CORNELIA F BOYDEN Prin
eipal. Eleventh year opens Monday. October 3. For
circular and infonnation address the principal. al5-2m 1
w OOD'S C/OMMERCIAL fecHOOL,
000 F st. n.w. Individual instruction.
Special attentiou given to Rapid Writing, Rapid
Calculations, Commercial Correspondence. Book-keep
ing (Eastman system), aud Type-writing. Terms
reasonable. COURT F. WOOD. Principal. auln-3m
FRENCHLES80Nit PRIVATE OR IlTTXASSES.
MADAME A. I'ELE (from Paris) will give lesson*
at her residence and at pupils' homes. Excelleut pro- I
nuueiation and thorough instruction. 910 15th st.n. w.
ol4-3m* ,
PF.NCERIAN BUSINESS COLLEGE. COR. 7TH
and 1> st*. n.w. Entrance on D St.?I stablUhed 22
years. Thoroughly equipped Young men and women
trained for business or official positions. Three course*.
Practical business. Stenography, Typewriting. aud
Graphophone; ltapld Writing, studenta may enter at
auv time. Year scliolai ship, quart*. ly, or monthly in
stallment tales. Graduates always in demand. Illus
tiated circulars free at College office or by inaiL
H. C. SPENCER, Principal.
SARA A. 3PENCER. Vice-Principal. ol3
AN HONORED PROFESSION FOR LADIES OB
tained at the Washington
NORMAL KINDERGARTEN INSTITUTE
for the training of teacher*. Lectures, 0:30?7:30 P.
11l. For particular* cail on Mrs. LOUISE POLLOCK,
1017 10th at., principal of National Kindergarten.
ol2-lin
w
w
JJIANO LESSONS.
MISS CLARA HARBISON,
Pupil of Wm. Mason, N. Y.,
?9-2m* 8 Grant Place, bet 0th, 10th, G and H *ta.
R8. W1LLIMENE BROMLEY WILL RECEIVE
MRS. W1LLIMENE BROMLEY WILL RECEIVE
a limited number of pupil* for the study of Piano.
For terrna inquire at HALLETT ft DAVIS' Piano
Room*. SII 9th at, n.w. ofl-lm'
J^ORWOOD INSTITUTE,
A SELECT BOARDING AND DAT SCHOOL FOB
YOUNG LADIES AND LITTLE GIRLS,
Nos. 1212 and 1214 14th at. aud 1407 Maaa. are.
MR. and MRS. WILLIAM D. CABELL, Principal.
The three buildings are all closely connected, one
with the other, aud nee South and East, with good,
open play-grounds in the rear. The sanitary appoint
ments are perfect, and the hygiene of the whole estab
lishment is in accord with the latest aud moat enlight
ened views upon that iuii>ortant subject.
The course of study is complete: Primary, Inter
mediate, Academic, and, when desired. Collegiate, with
full lUploms, of which Mr. Justice Miller, ot the Su
preme Court of the United States, say*: "1 know of no
?cliool for young ludies whose diploma commands a
Uiwher respect than Norwood Institute."
In addition to this course of study, which embraces
a thorough English education, advantage* of the first
unlet are provided lu all other branches of polite and
eleirant culture adapted to the finished development of
firls.
Terra* have been made as low as is compatible, in
Ibis city, with the complete comfort of such an estab
lishment and tbe employment of fine talent in each
D?partmeut of Instruction.
References: The patrons of the school. o5-lm
washington SCHOOL OF ELOCUTION AND
TV Oratory, 904 M st n.w., Mrs. M. STEVENS
HART, Principal. Voice Culture, Elocution. Lawa
uf Oratory. Diplomas awarded. Elective: English
uid College Preparatory. o4-lm
STAMMERING CURED?REFERENCE TO llEsf
dents of Washington and others who have been
permanently cured. Scientific methods. No secret.
No trick. Mr*. M. STEVENS HART. Principal Waab
lugtou School of Elocution. o4-lm
DRAWING AND PAINTING TAUGHT BY COM
Iietent teachers. Terms $.'i per mouth, three les
ions a week. Special classes ior children on Saturday
it $1.50 per mouth. Studio 821 11th st n.w. o3-lm*
PROF. J. F. GERMUILLER, TEACHER OF PIANO,
Organ, Vocal Music, and Harmony. Es|>eciallyat
tentive to beginner*, as well as to pupils advanced.
411 I *t. n.w. il-2m*
MISS NINA CHANDLEB. TEACHER OF MUSIC.
Special attentiou to beginner*, aa well as to ad.
ranrea pupil*; beat references: terms moderate. 1112
M at. n.w. _ oDlm*
MRS Uf ANN'S KINDERGARTEN AND) 4Kn
US. UIaNN'S PRIMARY 8CHOOIJ j a>u
kindergarten NORMAL TRAINING CLASS.
1018 Sunderland Place (one block south of Duuont
Circle). F'irst term begins October 3,1887. bl-3m
CHI >OL OF MUSIC (ESTABLISHED 1877)
1HEO. INGALLS KING. Principal. 1305 H st
a.w. Hours till October 31, from 2 to 5 p.m. Church
jrgan for practice. ae30-4m
M
T. VERNON SEMINARY,
1100,1104,111U M st and 1130 11th rt.
French and English Boarding and Day School for
Young Ladies aud Little Girls.
Academic, Intermediate and Primary Departments.?
Commodious new school building.contalniug CH APKL,
SESSION - ROOMS, CLASS-ROOMS, and OFFICE,
iritli steam bmting and best modern improvements,
ready foroccupaney this fall.
Thirteenth year begins OCTOBER 0.
For circulars apply to Principal,
*3-4m MRS. F- t. ROMER8._
A GRADUATE OF HARVARD, TEACHING IN
H Waabingtou, desires pupils alngly or iu small
?lasses. Inquire of MR. JARV1S BUTLER, K.'H F at
L*. s!5-3m
A RL1NGTON ACADEMY,
I% (J21 7th st., opposite U. S. Patent Office.
A Select School for Roys and Young Men. Autumn
?enn begins SEPTEMBER 12. Day and Evening sea
lions. Careful and thorough instruction in the com
non Eiiglish branches. Bookkeeping, Shorthaud,
Sigber Arithmetic. Algebra, lieometry, Latin, and
Ireek. BURTON MACAFEE. A.M.. M.D., Principal.
sl-.'Im
Instruction on the violini
I Mr. H. DONCH will resume giving lessons
1 SEPTEMBER 19.
Residence, 008 H at. n w. ?12-3mo
SUE McDONALD-ELLIS 8CHOOL.
Cor. Massacbusett* ave. and 17th st.
rlish and French Boarding and Day School for
Young Ladies and Little Girls.
Fifth Year begins September 28,1887.
Primary. Intermediate, Academic, Wellealey Prepar
atory. Art and Musical Courses taught by a corps of
lineteen teacher*. Tuition include* instruction in
English. French, Latin, Peuinauahip, Class Drawing,
ma Class Singing. A special herdic ia employed for
:he use of pupils in distant parts of the city. Fur dr
tulara addreas the principal. MISS ANNA ELLIS.
? 14-am
HoLLIERE HOME AND DAY SCHOOL FOB BOYS
L/ under 14 yearsof age. A lew pui'ils taken in the
aniily. luclEN E a COLLIEBE. A.M..Waahingtou,
t> C.i 1638 I st n. w? near Arlington Hotel. Open*
k-tnber 31- cloaca June L
"Instantaneous Art ot New Forgettlnr"-?ee
ipecisl Notices. W-M
"'-'iS llM&ia CHAH w.
arged
mary. Intermediate ana tiurn acnooi tor uotn
fifth year begins SEPTEMBER 20. in an en
building with larger corps of teacbara, aU pro
laL Instruction in F.ngllak, Ma them* Oca.
Kor
Principal.
A RT JCHOOL?MKS. M. B. PIKFS STUDIO IS
A now at 1530 PierfcPlace. aa formerly, when she
ntl be pleaaed to meet bar classes ** usual.
nstrac&on U givao in evary brwnob ot art.
MTS8 EMMA GRAY (CHRISTIAN SCIENTIST)
M.ha* ratnrned to tbe city, and will receive patients
g?Uggg? mnrmuLum, 1B16 O st m-wjol-lm'
ROSA BAND, TEACHER OF elocution
I voice culture; preparsa ladlas and genUenan
dramatic stage. Particular attantioo ia sivea
EDUCATIONAL.
nLfABThm COMMERCIAL COLLEGE.
?U .113 Hth atn.?, Mar City H-tofco*.
_ Ths Highest Standard Businsas College la America.
D?J and Evening Sesalona Students can enter on any
nek day. CauWw baa on application at Cullen
Office, on flrat floor, ftxm 9 a. m, U> l? p. m.. or by m?3l
F O. MAKTYN. Prmtdent. C. E URNER. C. R.A M .
Principal *16-3iu
Private unsoira in all okadu o#
I ntudy. to adults confidential. prepares lorooliag*
hSBanlk West Point, all examination*
?28 IVY INBTITUTllaw. eor 8thsac Earn. ?.?_
I The BERLITZ SCHOOL OF LANGUAGES.
WASHINGTON. T2B 14TH BT. W. W?
Boa toe, 154 Trc?*ODt8t.; Brooklyn. 40 Court 8t.;
New York. 2.1 W. 2Sd St.: Phi la . 1523 Cheettiut at.
Thorough training in Kit nob, German, Snnltli. Ac,
Conversational knowledge in OXt or TWO TARM*.
? 10 in amall classes: alao private leeaona.
Burhwi rvf-rences. 1'artna bwiii m? . al?
RAILROADS.
gALTIMORE AND OHIO RAILBOAD. *
SCHEDULE IN EFFECT OCTOBER 16TH. 1887.
LEAVE WASHINGTON FROM STATION. COB NEB
OF SEW JERSEY AVE AND C ST.
For Chicago and Northwest, Exp. Daily 10.55 a. m_
0:40 p.m.
For Cincinnati and RL Lous, Exp. Dally 3:16 and
9 -.40 p.m.
For Plttaburg and Cleveland, Exp. Dally 10:55 a.m.
8 55 p.Ul.
For Lexington and Local BtaUoua. 110:10 a.m.
For Philadelphia, Newark, aod W ilniimrton, 7.30 a.
m., 1 :25 p.m. and 4 30 p.m., daily. fciprt**.
For intermediate points between Baltimore and Phil
adriphis. tft:00 a.ni. and t4.35 p.m.
For Singvrly and Intermediate pcints, 13 15 pm.
For Baltimore, 5:00. ? 30. 6 +0. 7 30. S 30. V 45
aju., M:10, 1 "j, 3.15 (45-n>inute train). 3 30.4 30,
4 35. 4:40. 5:30. 6:4ft. 7:30. 8:25 and 11.30 p.m.
Sunday*. 6:30. 7 30. 8 30. 0.45 a.m.. 1 25. 1.3ft
3 :30, 4:30, 4 .40. 5:30,6 45, 8:25 and 11:30 p.m.
For Annapolis, 6 :40 and 8:30 am., 12 10 and 4 35
p.m. On Sunday, 8 30 a.m_ 4:40 p.m. Leave Annap
olis, 6:40; S30a.ni.. 12:05, 3:50. 6:30 p.m. Sundays,
8.30 a.m.. 4 10 p.m.
For Way Stationa between Washington and Balti
more, 5 00,6 40, 8:30 aan.. 12 10. 3 30. 4 40. 6 45
and 11.30 p.m. On Sunday*. 8 30 ani. and 1:3ft
3:3C, 4 40.6:45 and 11 30 p.m.
For Station* on Metropolitan Branch. t6 45 a.nu
4 40 p.m., fur principal atationa only: *{10 10a.m..
t.*> 30 and *8:55 p.m. {On Sunday stop* at all Sta
tion*.
FcrGaithersbunrand intermediate pointa. t9:05a. I
m., tl2:30 p. m.. f5:3S.
For Boyd'* and intermediate atationa. 11:20 p.m.
dally.
Church train leavoa Washington on Sunday only at
115 p. m., stopping at all atationa on >letrupol:tan
Branch.
For Frederick, tl0:55 A m.. t5:30 p.m. Sundaya,
1:1.> 1\m.
ForHagerstown, tlO 10 a.m. and t5-.30rv. m.
Train* arrive from Chicago, daily, 6 20 a. m. and
4 20 p. in-. from Cincinnati and St. Loui*. daily, 6 20
a. m. and 1: lft p. m.. lrom Pittsburg, daily. 7 -.20 a. in.
and 4:20 p. m.
From Philadelphia, Cheater, and Wilmington, 10:45
a. m? 3:05, 8:00. and 0:30 p. m., daily, and tl:50
p. in.
From Slngerly and intermediate pointa north of Bal
timore, lO flO a m., daily.
Trains leave Baltimore ftr Wsahlugtonat.VlO, <1 .10,
7 30. 9:00, 9:05, 10:00. aad J0:30 a-m., 1215,2 15,
3 00, 4:10, 5:05, 6 00.6 30. 7:45, 8:30, and 11:00 p.
m. On Sundaya, ?J 30, 9 .00, 9:Oft, 10 00, a. ni . 1.20,
2:15, 4:10, 5:0ft, 6:30, 7 45,8:30. and 11:00 p. Ui.
For l.urmy. Natural Bridge. Roanoke and pointa on
Shenandoah Valley Hailroai *3.15 p. in.
tExcept Sunday. 'Daily.
Baggage called for and checked athotela and resi
dence* on orders left at Ticket Office, 010 and 1351
PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE.
W. M. CLEMENTS, C. K. LORD,
ol.? Manager Gen. Pass Agent.
The great
PENNSYLVANIA ROUTE
TOTHF. NORTH. WEST. AND SOUTHWEST.
DOUBLE TRACE. SPLENDID 8CENEBY.
STEEL BAILS. MAGNIFICENT EQUIPMENT.
IN EFFE< T MAY 16. 1S87.
Traina leave W ashiugton, from station. corner of Sixth
_ _ and B streets, as follows:
For Pittsburg and the West, Cbicaifo Limited Eiprev
of Pala>-e Sleeping Cars at i>:."iO a. m. daily; Faat
Line. 0 50 a. in. daily to Cincinnati and St. Ixmis
with Slrepinir Cara fixini HarnxburK to Cini inuati,
and Buffet (Jar to St. Lout*: daily, except Saturday,
to Cliicairo. with Sleeping Car llttaburK to i'hx-atco.
Western Expreaa, at 8:10 p.m. daily, with Sieepuur
Cars \SaHiiiiiKt? u to Chicago and St. Louix, aud
HarrinburK to Cleveland, connecting at Hamaburit
with through Sleewin for Loujavilie and Memphia.
Pacifi<- Expreaa, 10:00 p. in. daily, for Pittsburg
atid the Went, with through Sleeper Uarriaburg to
Chicago.
? BALTIMORE AND POTOMAC RAILROAD.
For Erie, 1'anandaiirua. Rochester. Buffalo. Niagara,
10:00 p.m. daily, except Saturday, with Palaiue
Cars Washington U?itochester.
For Williainsport. Lock Haven and F.lmlra. at 9:50 a.
m. daily, except Sunday.
For New York ana the hut, 7:25, 9:00. 11:00 and
11:40am., 2:00, 4:10. 10:00 and 11 SO p.m. On
Sunday. 9 00. 11 40 a m., 2 00. 4 :10. 10 :00 and
11:20 p.m. Limited Expresa of Pullman Parlor
Cara, i):40 Am. daily except Sunday, and 4 00 p.m.
daily.
For Boston without change. 2.00 p m. every day.
For Brooklyn, N. V., all through trains connect at
Jersey1 City with boats of Brooklyn Annex, afford
ing diroct transfer to Fulton street^voiding double
ferriage across New Y'ork City.
For Philadelphia 7.25,9:00. 11 00, and 11:40 a.m,
2 00,4 10, 6:00,10:00, and 11:20 p m. On Sunday
9.00 1J 40 a.m.. 2 o6. 4 10. 6 00. 10:00, aad
11:20 p.m. Limited Expreaa, U 40 a.m. week
days and 4:00 p.M. dally.
For Baltimore. 6:35. 7:25, 9-00, 9 40. 9 50. 11:10.
Mid 11-40 Am . 12 0o. 2:00. 4 <>0. 4 10, 4:20,
4:40. 6:00. 8:10, 10 00. and llTio p.m. On
Sunday, 9 00. 9:05, 9 50. 11-40 am., 2:00, 4:00.
_ 4 10. 6:00.8:10.10 0ft and 11:20 p.m.
For Pope'* Creek Line, 7 25 a.m. and 4 40 p.m. daily,
except Sunday.
For Annapolia, 7:*5and 9:00 am., 12:05,4:20. and
6:00 pjn. daily, except Sunday. Sundaya 9 00
a m., 4 10 p.iu.
ALEXANDRIA AND FREDERICESBURG RAILW tY
AN 1)^ALEXANDRIA AMD Vi AsHlNUTON RA1L
For AlexandiiA 6 00. 6 45. 8:40.9:47.10 57 a.m.;
12.04 noon, a 05. 4:25, 4:35, 6:01, 8 05, 10:05
and 11:37 p.m. On Sunday at 6 1)0.8 40.9 47.
10 o7 a.ill.; 2 30, 6 01, 8 0ft and 10.05 p.m.
For Richmond and the South, 6.00.10:57 a.m., daily,
and 4:35 p.m.. daily, except Sunday.
Trains leave Alexandria for Washington, 6 0ft, 8 00,
9:10. 10:15, 11:07 la.; 1:20, 3:00, 3:23, 5 10,
<:05,9:32 and 10-.42 p.m..aud 12:15 midnight
(except Monday ). On Sunday at S^K). 9 10 and
11.07 am.; 2:00. 6:10, 7:05, 9:32, 10:42p.m..
and 12:16night.
Tickets and information at the office. nortbe*st cor
ner of 13th street and Pennsylvania avenue, and at
the station, where orders can be left for the checking of
baggage to destination from hotels and re ? idencea.
CHAS. E. PruH. J. R WOOD.
General Manager. fa28) Qen'l Passenger Agt
PIEDMONT AIR LINK,
Schedule tu eKeict Sei>tember 5th, 1B87.
8:30 A. M ?East Tenn Mail Dally for Warrenton.
Gordonsville, Charlottesville, Lyn< liburg and .Station*
between Alexandria and Lynchburg. Blue Ridro
Springs, Allegheny Spring*. Bristol, Kuoxville, Bonis.
Calera, Montgomery aud New Orleans. PoUinaa
Sleeper \VasbitiKton to New Orleans.
11:24 A. M.?Fast Mail Daily for Warren ton. Char
lottesville, Oordonaville, Stations Ches. A Ohio KoutA
Lynchburg. Kocky Mount. Danville and Stations i>?
tween Lynchburg and Danville, Ureeusl*?ro. Raleigh,
Charlotte, Atlanta, Biriuingham. Montgomery. New
Orleans, Texas aud California Pnlliiun Slee|?er New
Y ork to Atlanta, in connection with Pullman Sleet-er*
Atlanta to New Orleans, and Mann Boudoir Sleepers
for Birmlngliam. Vii ksburg and Shrevejiort. Solid
trams Washington to Atlanta. Doe* uot connect far
C. and O. route poiuu Sundays.
3:3a P. M ? Daily except Sunday for Manassas,
Btraaburg aud intermediate SUtiuu*. Connects at
Biverton with S. V. ic. It for Lurav. arriving 8 p. in.
5:30 P. M-?Western Express Daily for Warreutoo.
Gordonsville, Chariotteaville, Louisville, Ciucmnau
and Summer resorts on and near Line of Ches. and ohio
Boute. Pullman 81e.*|*-rs and Solid Trains Washing
ton to Louisville; also for Lynchburg, Bristol. Chatta
nooga. Memphis, Ijttle Bock and all Southwestern
Points. Through Pullman Sleeper* Waahinifton to
Memphis without cnauge
11:00 P. M.?Southern Expras Daily for Lynchbur*,
Danville, Baleigh. AsheviOe. Charlotte, Columbia,
Aiken, Augusta, Atlanta, Montgomery, New Orleans,
Texas aud tialiforaia. Pullman Sleeper Washington
to v< stou, '1 xas, vi. a outgomeri il
New Orleans. Pullman Sleeper Waahinglon to Angnata
without change
irains on n aahington and Ohio division leave Wash
ington 9:12 A. M? Daily except Sunday, and 4 45 P.
M. Daily; arrive Bound Hill. 11:37 A-llaud 7 10 P.
M.. lleturningleave Bound Hill 6:05 A M. Dally, aud
i ;W P. M. Daily excej t Sunday, arriving Washington
8 :.J0 A. M. and 3:5o P. M.
TU? -? ?? ?
^ ?-l6:45-A.'M. ^dl
8?KLS3aaf? 47^^P. m.; Stnu
fnlK'krU! slee.piu* C" reservation and information
fnniiahed.and baggage checked at office l.loo Penusyl
atl^uMenger Button. Peunaylvaua
Railroad. 0th and U streets. J AS. L. TAYLOR,
*?' General Passenger Agent
POTOMAC RIVER BOATS.
Daily line to forpolk foutuess Mon
roe. AND THE SOUTH.
Steamers GEORGE LEARY and LADY OF THE
LAKE, one of which leavea Waahington dally at 5 jvm.
Close connection with Boston and Providence Steal
ers. also with all other rail aud steamboat lines.
Steamer Leary lauds at Plney Point going aud return
ing Monday. Wednesday and Friday.
Steamer Lake lands at Cornfield Harbor going aad
returning. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturdays.
Knox and Lloyds express will call and check bag
Kf a: hotel* and private residences. Telephone-call
ry. 745-3. Lake. 94
Passengers rates will lie on and after the loth $2 for
straight ticket and $3 round trip.
W| X. VERNON! MT. VKRNON!
STEAMER W. W. CORCORAN
Leave* 7th-street wharf dally (except Sunday) for ML
Vernon and River Landing* aa far down aa Glymont at
10 o'clock a- m. Returning, reaches Waahington
about 3:30 p.m.
_al6 L L. BLAKE. Captain.
1 PILOT BOY LEAVK8 7TH-8T WHARF
??. Tuesdays and Thursdays, at 7 a^n.,for
landings sa far as Matlox Crwsk. Grind
?
*""**E L. FOLSON, Agtnt, 7tb-*t whart
JOHN MoGAHRE. Alexandriav'x, Agent. >j-jiu
3R POTOI
ATTORNEYS.
LOOK! LOOK!! LOOK!!!
The Weekly Star. ? ? ? ? The Weekly Stan
m ?
THE STAR'S POCKET ATLAS OF THE WORLD.
w
AiaipMlllUltltnOrtlBIITMVmMttMWimTrUkMlHMtlpNBlBaUtMaMI
Of n POCKET ATLAS Ot TO WORLD to be give? ta every tut we subscriber to TRS WEEELT WTThM
during 1887.
THE POCK IT ATLAS ta a Ti?nwrtT priatsrt ttook ot 1SI pagee; BO art fui-p*ge colored ?M
setting forth the geographical features of the whole world in minute M?U; 101 are filled with r**A
lag matter, condensed Into a graphic presentation of *11 the farts In the social, religions, political MM
industrial history and condition ac evsry Bute and Tanmi la Ike rt.ioo. together with ?a color*
diagrams showing the relative strength of different Industrie* and of feSereut products in tmvms
States, aad other items too numerous to m?Uaa
The map* and data have been prepared with tba iMMt posAbM ear* and art believed to M
thoroughly reliable.
It Mm cents he enclosed with the subscription the pucEat Atlas win b* s*nt by man, postage piw>
paid, at subscribers risk, otherwise a will be sent by e* press at the subscriber* expense.
THE WEEELT STAR contains Associated Press and Special Dtapatcbe* from all parts at <M
world, reports of congre** and all the uovernment Departments, ratted state* Coaru, w Mhimrtos
News and Gossip, Political, Personal, Society tad Local Affairs, Stone* by tbe Leading Author* >< u?
World, bright correspondence from all points of Interest, Wsealy Mew Tor* Letter* Horn Afti.-ts*
Fashion, Religious, Literary, and Agricultural Note*?In abort, everything that abouiu be id the bn*?
paper of the most Interesting city at the country, it ta aa stghupag* papav of UQ-U loag w*?
ailed column* and oof *M<y Om Dollar a Year.
AH UNEXAMPLED OFFEB!!!
SPECIAL $1.90. SPECIAL $1.90.
THE WEEKLY WASHINGTON IT AX
I WEEKLY NSW
TO STATS POCKET ATLAS OT THE WORLD IB i
THE WORLD'S HISTORT OP THE UNITED ST
Tree Call, of auo 12 ma page*, copioualy Illustrated.
Together with a membership ta tb* World's Book aaS Haac
books and music can be bought at aa alaoat incredibly low pile*.
All these, two uewspapei* unequalled,
(a Book and Music Uatoaa ft
W
ta aa offer that baa never been i
ORDERS RECEIVED EITHER ST KAIL OR AT OCR
PAYMENT INVARIABLY IN AST.
ADDRRSIIM ALL CASKS
TO WKKLT STA*
FAMILY SUPPLIES.
Extra Mess
bloater mackerxu
Vary bmt Quality;
firm, fat and whit*.
n. w. birchh.u
majtmz.
Exceedingly Desirable Fecit
Just received
A HALF TON OF elegant EVAPORATED cali
FORNIA apricots.
Price Tery low.
ELPHONZO yoinq8 company.
>24 428 uu> iuwi north'
f locri Flock
the BEST flour IN the WORLD IS
COO feb RRR F.ke ?wl,
o O k R R k 5 ^* 1
c kb RRR EE *?
ooo rrr R R RRR
5:
the celebrated MINNESOTA PATENT
process.
Beware of imitation* of the Name and Brand, and be
?ore and aee to it that either aacka or barrel* re
"CERES."
And hare the imprint of
two GOLD MEDALS
*
attached. None genuine without the two fold
W. M. O alt t 00.
(14 Wholesale Flour and Gra
faust Beer Facst
cse only THIS beer and 1
HAPPY.
anheu
COR. 1ST AND ta AVE. i
FAUST beer FACET
WOOD AND COAL.
qoal aud eikdli1io WOOD.
^?s^svss^jsssrtsrtsrsst
wl?itlti?1 ?artret rataa.
HOUSEFURN1SH1NGS.
New Embroidery Material.
AKAZENE8 in all .hada* 10c. par doe.
1 IN SELL Id all <-ol..ra, 7c
Handaotue PLUSH ornament* 3. 3. 5 IMKI
pit*-*.
BANNER RODS. In all Dm. from lOr up
N>* 8TAMPKD LINEN IKWHHat raduoad (VMM.
MOMIE cloth NPl.AaHr.ltN. .it* .
7tf-wch BUREAU OOVEKft. 4-? .
At OPPENHKIMER'ft.
_ol5 S2g <Mh n ?.?, St Cloud BuUdinc.__
W. Ikytte Yor I 1?eami?b
OUR FALL STOCK OF CARPETS, FUR
NITURE. AND UPHOLSTERY OOODS
WHICH WE are SOW OPEKIRO. IF
STTLES are WOT BETTER. and
prices AS LOW FOR SAME CLASS Of
OOODS AS car RE FOUND. WE DO BOX
ABE YOU TO BUT.
BOJU. BlU DRIVES IN FURNITURE.
W. H. HO FEE.
i? SOI Market Kpaoa.
Heating Stover
In aelarumr a Haatiur Stowr tt will b* to y?ur inWr
?at to lnaiMct our ltumraae a**?rtni?ot, rmhrartna aU
?tylea and the latnat daaicua. wlurh w? at* o(I?nn? a*
luw prtrea Kaapuw ouly Oral- law ui> L.ui. ?. w an
pra|?rad to do aU kuida of rtpamiijr ui the boat ?
ner, ea|?rially LaUvOaaautl Funiauaa. Acau
fuU> aoDcitad
*.h. JLNES A CO,
?14 71? 7that m-?.
pARPETR.
^Waaiw dally raortrlnt our Fall Supply of f^rpwia.
compnain* all the new pat tarns iu Hurelom, L w?u.
and Hartford Wlltooa. Btfelow. LowpII. and H urtford
Bruaaol, Moqultaa is choice pattern*. Lowell and
Hartford Intrrauu. Ait Squama, aU ataaa. Ruavaud
Mat* in aU tha saw daa?pia. Furniture Covenua*.
Curtain Dnpatf, Laoa Cartaiua, awl '1 able cunnii
treat vanatjr.
eep2-3m HOOE BRO * CO.. 181 F*_
Ja Ba LkPRETX & BrO.
FonuarD with F. Hao*?u Hiaa A Oa __
A BIO BREAK In THE PRlCL OF WALL PAPER
For tha aaxt Uurtr daya wa will aall aU it hit* Back
16c. Paper* for 10c. par |aaoa.
Cii^id luirdan. 4?c. Othar Paper la proporttoa.
All order* for work i>tuui|>U> nwum
J. B LEPREUX A BRO, Um 7th *-*??
7th atiaatcara iiaaa tha door. inys-tf
BOOKS, <foc.
OCEAN 8TEA MEH8.
gHORT ^^hO^KUTb^ER LXOYP I. I OU
Saa*? Wad?Ocvt'sMk lfc Ei?*?! Uct7~2R
Rot. DL* ?? ??-?? .. .

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