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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, September 24, 1888, Image 4

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CITY AND DISTRICT.
MSPECTI.Itl THE TBIMS.
? A?*?f ike BrfHfrMina
'*? fww???trli?a UixrlcL
Dr. Stratton. who baa been Inspecting Sou ?hem
trains for tbe put few weeks, said to a *rt* re.
porter ysatrnlay that the number of persons
arriving be re from tbe south were increasing each
aAjr- numbers of persons, be sail, bad
arriv d trom Henderson vile, N. C., sod many of
tuese passengers state. 1 ibat they were leaving
tbelr bomes on account of tbe yellow fever.
Shortly after tbe ferer Droke out In Florida the
re-odects of Hendersoavllie sent an open luvlta
tloo to tbe peopte of Florida for them to come to
lteqdenonvllie. Large numbers of tbe poorer class
Jf persons srton arrived, *nd tns boarding bous>?
were overcrowded. One of tbe refugees said tbe
resident* bad expected tbe wealthier residents to
accept tftrir invitation and were disappointed
witu tiie class of persons who came, for tuey not
only did not br.n,- mucb wealm with them, but
they brought tbe yellow rever. To-day. he said,
Henderson vnie was almost deserted; business was
at a standstilL and many or the residents will be
tlnabcialiy ruin* d. Out' gentleman, who arrived
ob a morning train, told Dr. stratum tiiat be w.is
In business in Hend.-rsonvllle. lie said that be
nad Just put in bis tail and winter stock, but that
be bad lucked up his store and would not return
until sometime alier frost had appeared at bis
home, at which time he exited his stock of goods
would be ruined.
Dr. Strattou also bad a conversation wifb a ptiy
Mclan from Florida, who spoke io bun about the
deatb of Prut Proctor. Wben Proi. Proctor
left Florida, the physician said, he was
as well as be could possibly have been. He was
suffering with Bright'* disease o( the kidneys He
supposed tbat the usual yellow fever treatment,
a sweat bath, was given birn, which produced con
gestion of the kidneys and ibat be thuugat was no
doubt the cause of death. Dr. Siratton sold that
while the fever was rapidly spreading and a great
many persona were dying, be thought tbe number
of cases and deaths reported from tbe fever were
exaggerated. He did not meaa to say that false
reports of the disease were made, but he thought
that every person who bad a pain or an ache Im
agined that it was the result of the fever, and
was treated for the fever. In many of these
cases tbe doctor thought the patient might
But have tbe fever, and the usual treat
ment for It might cause death; or
death might be caused by their real complaint.
In making the Inspection I)r. stratton says that
he comes ac:r?s many peculiar persons. Many of
the passengers act auspiciously, and some refuse
to tell their name or where t uey are stopping.
Such pei sons are watched more carefully than
others, some times it Is found that tnese persons
have purchased tickets I rum point to point so as to
throw persons off the track. One man who ar
rived Saturday pretended thai he was Intoxicated,
and refused to give the doctor any Information,
lie was shadowed to a Saloon on 7lh street, and
when a podcemau put him turough a cioss-exam
lnation he became frightened and save the desired
laiormauon.
Out lurked.
Tint SXJUTOKS DIFCAT D I* CHICAGO ON SATCKDAT?
or IKK OAMKS.
The Senators lost a game to Chicago on Satur
day through sheer hard luck. The score was 3 to
2. The lnfleld work of the Statesmen was magni
ficent, O'Brien putting out 21 men. Fuller put
out 2 and made 10 assists. The batteries v^ke
Dally and Mack, and Van Haltren and Darling.
The home club won by lucky batting. William
son and O'Brien each made a home run. There
was but one ball, beside the sate hits, that went
outside of the diamond, and that was captured by
Bbocb. Washington made 3 hits and 0 errors, and
Chicago 4 nits and 2 errors,
Philadeipnla won from Indianapolis 0 to 5, by
scoring mice to the Hooslers once In the eleventh
Inning. The batteries were lleaiy aud Dally, and
Sanders and ll> meats. The fnailes made 9 lilts
and 7 error-, and Indianapolis 11 alts and 5 error*
Detroit wuu from New York 6 to 3. uruoer aud
Bennett, and Welch and o'Kourke were the bat
teries. The champions m >de 9 lilts and 0 errors,
and the oianis t> bits and 7 errors.
Boston won from Pittsburg, 7 to 1, by scoring
four times in the 4th inning. The batteries were
Morris and Carroll, and Sowders and Keily. Boston
made 13 hits and 0 errors, aud Pittsburg 5 hits and
4 errors, Kel.y made two singles, a double and
a triple hit.
At K ibsas City.?Baltimore ?, Kansas City 1: at
Cincinnati?Ciuc.nnatl 10, Brooklyn 3; at Louis
ville?Athletics I, Louisville 1 (12 innings;) at St.
Louis?-St. Louis 11, Cleveland 2 (tlrsi, game);
Cleveland 4, SC Louis 2 ^seeund game.)
grSDAV GAMES.
Sanaa* City 14. Baltimore 5 (tlrst game); Baltl
more 3, Kansas City 1 (second game): Brooklyn 8,
Cincinnati 4; Louisville 9; Athletic 2 (Urst game)
Athletic ti; Louisville 4 ^second game); SU Louis
14, Cleve.and 4.
The s uator^ begin the last home series to-day
by crosMug bats at capttol Park with the Oiants,
the leaders of the league. On Friday next the
Hooslers will appear lor three sanies, and a hard
tight Is to be expected, for on this series much will
defend as to the relative positions of these two
clubs. Then on th 3d of OctoOerthe Pittsburg
team will play, followed by Chicago. Tue season
will close with a s> rles with Detroit, the Hist
game being scuedu.cd on the lit a, and the last on
Ule 13111. t
The Canoe Into.
rsooaajf o?thi keoatt ? to taks place this after
noon.
The regatta of the Washington Canoe Associa
tion will take place this afternoon opposite the
club bouse on Anaiostan lslano. The program of
the races is as fodows: sailing race?Canoe scape
wheel, I. P. Llbbey; Bonlta, A. A. Hassan; Tonic,
C. K. Marshall: Lapwing,F. S. Williams; Centaur,
l". A. Mas. u; loia, W. A. Cowles; Wlndllower, A.
S. Flint; Meteor, 1. B. Linton. Tandem paddling
race?canoe loia, Cow.es and Oertel; Julia, .Mar
shall aud Moure; Aloha, Kimball and KandalL
Paddling race?canoe Wlndllower, A. s. Hint;
Aloha, A. A. llas an; Julia, F. N. Muore; Peterboro.
Mar hatl; loia, T. K. Oenel; MMl ierer, J. A.Oliver.
Tandem padding race, single paudies?Canoe Ked
Wing, T. K. and Pred.oert -1: Alma, A. 9. Flint
and J. Kaudali; Julia, M irsiiall and Mo.re; loia,
Cowi sand lla-^an. Vpset race?c .noe Nomad,
Marshall; Ke.i Wing; Oi-rtel; Lizzie Mac, Kimball:
loia, F. N. Moore. llurry-skurry race?Canoe
Nomad, Marshall; Ked Wing, Kunball; Wanderer,
Moore; Julia, Uer.el; l*olouiac, Kandali; loia,
OerteL 'lout nameai?Canoe Ked Wing, C. E. Mar
shall, puncher; T. i- OerteL paddier; loia, J. Kan
dali puncher; F. X. Moore, paddier; Nomad, J. A.
Oliver, puncher; A. s. Flint, paddier; Aioua, A. P.
Spencer, puncher; , paddier. The paddling
races will be oue-Ualf mile straightaway.
Tras?lrn of Meal Kulaie,
Deeds In tee have been Ul?-d as lollows: Myra H.
McNabb to C. A. c'iine, lot 2, blk. 40. North Uni
versity Orounds; $100. F. K. Windsor to J. J. Ed
son et aL. In trust, lot 11, blk. 4, Whitney Close;
f?,oOU. Ary KlUabeth Watts to John Miner, pt. 5,
sq. 0O4: $l,:kSL. H..D. Cooke et al. to OelU Chap,
pel, lots 44, 54 to 57, M4 to ?j, an l tSN, sq. 857;
|d,.s>0. Oeua Chappcl to U. C. 1*. Kern, pt. sub
sq. 910; $l,?u>. Catherine ila/.elt to T. B.
Boube, pt. P tcis Mill Seat, lot 2 and sUOs A, F to
L; . W. Mat v to W. K. Woodward, trustee, pt.
14, sq. 7SO; ?. A. M i.Hen to Fannie
TwlUli'-ll, iots 13. 14, 34 to 37. bi?s. 3, 17 to 19,
bins. 4. 23, and 3?i, b.k. 3, Burrw.ie; ?250l Same
to Harriet A. Twiicued, lots us to:i2, blk. 4, Burr
vlUe; H J5. Jerome s. N.isli lo Ale\. iiuiues, lot
11, bl?. 6, Wuitn. J" t lose; *2.5011. A. 11 tunes to
Martha u. Nasu. siime- urcpeity; C. V.
frott to Luc K liurt ard. suo 40. s>). 618;
W. C. McBride lo Kmi.) ?. Noyes, suo 7;i, scj. 194;
. ?m..> smuu to B. 1. Jlcv awley, pt. ?ub41,
sq.atl7;?75a Kvelina Magrundy et ul. to Nellie
Fr< euiaii, suo 57, sq, ln2; $?. Neille Free.nan to
Kveilua Magrundy, san.. property; J?. James T.
W ard et aL toe'. H. cragin, pt. 23, s?j. 1?2; |?.
Lelghton * Pain. 11?e-s. to Helen K. Pearl, low
20 and 22, blk. 31, Brookianu; *?70. W. il. Kol
iins lo Martua A. Martin, pt. 13, sq. 79S;
s. . A. Kennedy to W. L. Moore, sub 132, so.
iMtH
Ju?t Hla Lock.
From Life.
Miss c .ara?"It distresses me greatly to cause
you pain, Mr. W orcbestersulre, but 1 love another.''
Mr. Worchesiershire?"Ah, meMiss Clara?"1
have always supposed i hat you were lukrested In
Libel suupsca. Mr. Worcnestershire, she Is a
noble gir.. Mr. Wor.'h'-s er?:dr????Ah, yes. Miss
Clara; but 1 had tbe same luck with her thai i
have just had with tou."
isi ? ?
Cm* Oat by Auserlcma ?.irl?.
Trom tkr Loodou Truth.
America sent this year ber usual contingent to
Homburg. 'l'ne American girl has almost entirely
cut out tne English girl in public favor. She cer
tainly has more to ay tor herself, sue dresses
better, and Su? flirts better. She comes to burope
with an ardent desire to remain mere?the wife of
an Englishman With a UUe. Lveu If she falls In
this, she luoroughi) d? u. rv-l., provided that
kiie c^n iiuna, to 11 ri wuu royalty. What
always amuses me with these young Udles Is lhat
each oue explains mat the others are not In
society -at home," utterly ootlvlous ul mo fact
tnat no oue In Kurope < ar ->?uat tuey are "at
home,'* provided Uiat they are pretty aud agree
able abroad.
All ( bias.
An old writer saya: "A long chin declareth a
man to be peaceable, yet a babbler. They tbat
have little cuius are mucn to be avoided and taken
heed of, for they are (uil of impiety and wicked
ness, and are spies like unto s iy uts. H the end
of the t hin be round. It is tbe sign of bice man
ners; but the chin of a real man la square."
Joa^sia .Hilm mm* Hi* Daagbter.
fioa Currant Literal ura.
It to a pretty weU-known tact that his daughter
dues not hold ber gifted father In that admiration
with which the world regards him. He left ber
among the Indiana too long. It spoiled ber tem
per and dwarfed ber appreciation of genius, A
lew years sgu Joaquin got out an riliftun dr
lu-i* of his poems, wtucti he embellished with like
nesses of blnisel: lu various puxumtt|ue costumes
and attitudes?Mr. Miller among me sierras, Mr.
Muter ua Mount shasla, Mr. Mliier shaking hands
with the filibuster chief. Mr. Miller on horseback,
and ao on. One plate be reserv d for nu> daughter,
Mis* Myrtle Miller. She had the post of honor In
the middle of me book, and was sealed on a pranc
ing mustang, ber hail 11) lng toward t he top of tbe
page and a lurid light f fleet behind her. Joaquin
sent a copy io Miss Miller, wltb ins dialinguisned
autograuu on tbe By leaf, she glanced through
the book, appreciated lu contents, ran a pencil
through her own name ueneam the wild and reck
less (enisle, and anting below it: "Mr. Miller,wnea
hs was a girl,* *eni 11 bacs to him.
THE WCTHIR1 KOVME.
lay HkHwaf rial fie,
M Ike BI|M QiaiaMlM
The dreadful affliction of the city of Jscksonvllle
grows worse dally, and although the place la
almost depopulated there la a steady Increase in
the number of cases of yellow fever. on iaiurday
163 new cases were reported, hot only 6 Oeatha
occurred. Of Saturday's new oases 108 were
colored people. At a meeting ot the Cltliens
Sanitary Association Saturday a resolution was
adopted urging Congress to make a thorougn
scientific Investigation of the origin and i
of the fever in Jacksonville In 1887 and 1
On Sunday there were one hundred andI th?t?
three new cues reported, Hinet^ whiehwers
colored people. There were ten deaths rejwrtea.
A (dTurabifl chanare Id th? wwU?r ycswruay,
t.!eu a strong dTe?t wlud.prangnp.g^ r^
to a hope that the worst "Li?,"
almost certain that many bund^ colored people
nave mid fever and recovered
or physician*. Tne old ^eo^ thatthey arenot
liaule to contract yellow fever baa Ueeo fxploOW. i
1. has been demonstrated tha^they ^ a|mostjia
^rSiyutai ^tSSntV? ?*3Z
tne fever is complicated NeJrMS
old and eminent loeal physician said. Negroes
never (lie of yellow fever unless they call in a |
a<Therexecutlte committee ot the Sanitary Associ
ation heia a Joint meeting wlth the reuef commit
tee Sunday to discuss complaints of abuse. Nu
merous cases ot fraud have been discovered, and It
is beueved that hundreds of colored families have
obtained relief through the different member*, so
as to attempt to lay up supplies for winter. These
will be cut off as rapidly as discovered, and sent
to the refuge camps or be put to work. Chairman
Stsnseli'B young men have found over a hundred
d'-Hiitute white families who havs not applied for
"ur.kporter has wired Miss Clara Barton to recall
Col southmayd, in charge of the Red Cross nurses,
lie is reported to be making trouble and dissension
here, and impairing the efficiency of the medical
bureau thereby.
There were two new cases of fever and one deatn
at McGlenny on Sunday. Fever has also broken
out at Greenland. _ _
So great has been the exodus from Decatur,
Ala., that scarcely 150 people are left In the town,
'i wo new cases ot yellow fever were reported yes
terday. The city Is well supplied with physicians |
and nurses. __ . .
A perfect panic prevails In Memphis. It is esti
mated that fully 4,000 people have left there since
Friday. They were principally women and chil
dren, the wives and families ot merchants ana
others, who, on the announcement ot the outbreak ,
at Jackson, took alarm. Business is virtually at a |
standstill, country merchants cannot come to tne
city under the present quarantine regulations, and
every small town adjacent has locked Its doors.
Local freuht and passenger travel on all rallro .as
is suspended. It Is the same from Louisville soutn
to Mob le aud New Orleans. At many ot the sta
tions the south-bound trains, those coming from
Si. Louis, Chicago, Cincinnati, Louisville,andeyen
farther north aud west, are not permitted to stop.
All freight and passenger trains on the Alabama i
ana Great Sout hern Railroad have been aban- |
> toned, owing to the rigid quarantine at Chatta
nooga and at other points on the line. The Mem
phis and Charleston trains cannot enter Chatta
nooga. Arrangements will probably be effected
wnereby maU and express matter can be delivered
between Memphis and Stevenson.
Thrf Bsat Like Liberia.
COLOSXD PEOPLE WHO OO TUEHE FROM THS CNITBD
STATES SOON WANT TO CO** SACK.
The New lorfc Sun of Sunday says: The bark
Monrovia, capt. J. H. Rogers, is Just In from the
west coast of Africa with palm wood, palm oil,
4c., to Yates t Porterfleld, the shipping agents of
the American colonization Society. On board the
Monrovia, returned this trip from Liberia, were
Missionaries Mr. and Mrs. Cole, Mr. Dlggs, and
Mrs. M. B. Merrlam, and Mrs. Sloan, a colored emi
grant, with two children and another emu
Kraut. All had had enough of Liberia, but de
clined to say anything that would conflict with
tue plans of the Colonization society. Mrs. Mer
riain, however, declared that she agreed with
former vilnl-ter to Liberia C. ii. J. Taj'lor, who, in
requesting Fred. Douglass to try and defeat legls
Laiion luieude<l to (aculut? the emigration ot col
ored people to Liberia, maintained tUat the states
of the L iilon were better tor them in every way
than Africa. Mrs. Memam added: . ..
"I don't see the necessity of taking darkles
away irom their friends here and planting them
down in the middle of a barren country with
fever threatening them from tne coast and hostile
wild tribes from the Interior. The colonisation
Society does what it can to make It pleasant for
the emigrants, but the task is herculean. They
ilve each emigrant six months* provisions, and
look after him for that length of time, If hs does
not before its expiration find his way to tne ceme
tery outside the city. Nearly all of the six months
is spent In getting rid of the climatic fever. Then
the emigrant Is a pauper in a strange land. He
has no incentive to work, and he just lounges
around, fretting because he can't get back to his |
American home."
capt. Rogers thinks the colored emigrants in
Liberia need a few white man Just to show them
how to get along. .
William Copplnger, the agent of the Coloniza
tion society, will send out another lot of colored
V^ople in the Monrovia when she sails, about
October 15.
Hubert Garrett's Larljr Eccentricities.
From the Philadelphia Time*. .
Now that Mr. Garrett Is known to be a victim ot I
paresis, old acquaintances of the family here
abouts are recalling his former eccentricities.
Robert Garrett has always been an odd sort of a i
person. At one time he was a collector of canes,
and he no doubt now owns more walking sucks
and fancy umbrellas than any other fashionable !
gentleman in the country. In clothing he was Just
is peculiar. His tailors were always engaged on
aouie new conceit of his in fashionable attire. He
was a most particular man about his personal ap
pearance. ue bad a hobby on dress aud style, and
uls wealth permi tied him to indulge it to nls heart's
lellght. 'lue stories about Mr. Garrett overwork
ing himself are all nonsense. Robert Garret took
life easier than any other railroad magnate in the
country. Ills fatuer shortened his days by con
stantly worrvlng over great railroad scnemes, but
tils sons did not follow in his footsteps. After his
lather's death, when Robert Garrett assumed con
trol and learned the true condll.on ot affairs, he
worried some at Hist, bu: the burden of the think
ing was done by Mr. John K. Cowen, his old friend
and Princeton classmate, who then and now abiy
tilled the position ot chief counsellor ot tae Balti
more and Ohio Co.
September Health Hints.
iXA-SONASUi COMMON-SENSB BCttOBWlOWS FOB THIS
MONTH MAL10N.
From the National Educator.
Large quantities of rain have fallen the past tew
weeks. The air Is surcharged with moisture, so
tnuch so that the walls In our houses are damp
aud the paper on the sides of rooms and ceilings is
giving way. This indicates a state of affairs
which needs careful watching. The raw, damp
moruiugs and evenings are fruitful causes of colds
and sickness. Damp walls, damp rooms, damp j
cellars, damp ground, aud damp clothes are pro- ,
Juctive of heavy colds. Sitting in a damp roon
nil one feels chilly, dressing in damp clothes ,
Wulch have been lying about on damp lloors In the
ulguu, damp par.ors, sitting-rooms, and school
rooms .n which there are as yet no fires will swell
the sck list and mortality bill most fearfully.
MUST SOW TO TBS INEVITABLE.
What is to be done? The weather cannot he
changed. These cool, damp September nights visit
us every year, only some years more so than
others, as the season la more wet than dry. Now
is the time lor fever; this is the month malign.
We cannot cuange the month, but we can guard
agalust exposing ourselves unnecessarily to the
dampness or remaining long In a damp, chilly
ruoui.
WHAT 8H0CLS BE DONE.
Fires must be made to takeoff the dampness,
even it for only half an hour in a day. Undergar- i
ments must again be worn. Avoid being out in the
dampness, especially after nightfall. Alwaya have
a bright fire after sunset. Do not retire at night
Into a damp bed, even if It should only feel damp. |
Uu not -silp on" your damp Ciothes, feeling sticky,
like molasses, where they toucn tne body, keep i
windows aud doors closed until the sun shines out |
brightly again. Remember that diphtheria, scar
let lever, malaria, rheumatism. Ac.. are getting In
their deadly work, and will carry off lo the grave i
their victims by thousands this fall again, not I
only children, but also adults, \V 111 you be one of
them? Multitudes ot children are laaeu sick with ;
different ma.adles, resulting troin damp school |
rooms, with possibly water in the cellars. Nine
tenths ot these diseases and deaths are avoid
able.
TAXI CABB OV TUB LRTLB ONES.
Parents, see that your children wear under
clothing. Begin now; never mind a few warm or i
even hot days; they can be endured much better
than subsequent sickness. The cool, damn days
and nights will soon have the majority. Do not
auow children to run around with bare feet and
uamp stockings at this season. Make them eat
somJtnlug warm before they go out in tne inorn
uu. It will not hurt you to observe tne same
lug. It will not hurt you to observe the muuc
ruies, though children are more sensitive, and
hence get sick more frequently.
uaakllaf la Vlrflala.
George Alfred Townseml says that the particu
lar vice ot Virginia Is gambling, and he relates
this incident of his recent tour through tne state:
"When 1 returned from Leesburg I beard two men
talking behind me for the apace of two hours, and
tu?ur whole coavsrsatlon was descriptive of games
oi cards held the night before?how one man had
held two pairs and another had a full, Ac. Into
this game these grown up men of respectable ap
pearance?men probably fifty years ot age?went
with a uunmue and a relisn that waa astonish
ing." At the Virginia villages, he says, you see
the young men ride up at about 11 o'clock and
hitch tneir horses. They enter the gruggrrtee, in
the back part of which, behind a sheet, art) tables
for card playing. There tney drink bad whisky
and wm sacn outers money Ull about A o'clock in
tne afternoon, when they mount their lussss and
nde I
ilia*
from the Sprliwftsld Union.
Squlllsby, who works in a photographic studio,
popped the question ?urmessfiiliy ue other nigh t
after which be remarked:
"And now I suppose you will allow me to take a
"Why, of course," she replied, would be la
perfectly good taste new."
-Tery well," aaid Squlllaby. -turn your bsad n
ss Often as you f?r Thin bus tbs opwsuou
how rma wot or on tu tgun on at nit
Nwk^wuw eesaoB ,
'SS
w^oao^* ??? "**" ^p?* ti>??
beyond itoTiiS U "* ,UDll?ht iMt
??S?t Tnis was at Fort Schuyler
of the fort. nJdbM^t!!; J^?*odj l*? commander
u^5a2? "? ^ w*?
throng a ???* * thrill of pride
thattLe tawSn^.1"1"1 <* course ?? "??
?na or Tory Ltt?u*^nd^^? J,urolj' ?nU(llie^,
war, and that th? ??w|M?ay? in caae of
tortreaa would thm??ii^P?sln,f Wone waiu 01 Ul<-'
for* imvtora'dtumtoie like a house of cards be
tSScw^ViM'"rfS 1Ul1 ttM> looks of the |
on to uET ESLiLT- 'SP"*""?- He walked
what a aokti??iV^l!L ^ Hliltary people know
th* guard la; howLUrS1?*#? ^ lllJ tuniln? oul 01
are off dutr A. sentinels who
Jump Inunine^Bi?!.1*el*e t^ir muskets.
officer has pSaied? * "present" until the
0BAW> TF**t? wtmnr oct.
shouted ??Ut "* *UArtf' commander of the post!"
ho^t. 00 ?utp in front of the guard
loud en^JS fgeneral ?PProacb?1- He called it
wake ud MmhM.T*?" regiment to near and to
Show o/^2SZ5St" f?rt- Then wiui a gr at
ordered himiSif ? .-w eU 0Ter 10 llw gun-rack,
tOrtSt d^f-f ^L'1 ln-" "> ?ome to attention,
to "BresenT^Viwl^?s the general approaohed came
general rS?eit?^lh? ^ remarkable unison. The
slon thatiS?.?2i compliment with au expres-s
lUe ^
bad laM^nlgnu' reUef 18 8lct He was'very
rank?1. *** -""Mil ordered himself to break
PlysJaue Hi** doubtless strained his |
ofue dlSKl?^^ marcbn<' over to the ena
orer a Dnit?d^??jr?u? "a duties as sentinel
the storri^.i forL At least. mat's the way
there are fond ^?^n?.?imJltarjr men' *ua oertalnly
uereare good grounds for believing it. Meager
the garrtsons ln*?/^ !? aPPj?.to lhe condition of I
**wwmu?Z222r ^but UMMonn
"?J5? 0F T4CTICB ??*wrr wajjts.
Ucu^iiu. J?? armjr needing a new form of
ofSliSl! ,nnmUon 01 two more companies
N*ria why, Its all nonsense," said a
SP0*1"tneotlJ?r niffbt. alterhear
21 WiJJfffS ?"? lurned out*o? Uen. Jack
uSw set MS! J1?"*1 8tates Armyneeds is a
s?ar???S5
feasirJ?Sa
K?J!S
av'^^sjasi^jsssfis
Tfc? Al?ak?? Cold Fields.
DIBTVTE ""LY TO A*IS! AS TO WHKTHSR THBT ARE
A. rw, ? ?* A"1UCAi' TBKaiTORT.
An Ottawa dispatch says: A matter which mar
strongly tend to strengthen the already strained
reuuons between the Dominion and the uS
States has presented itself in connection with the
in brftisn J-it
tuey are wSrkmg ou cmto?%S^rs'WUo beiteve
the British autloritw u.^*^. iemlo?->r. and
Jurisdiction, u rear^ * tn? Ut"r **?* tbelr
IrST11'8 W,U Uer
ttm0fUnK between tt,e solicitors ln
was arranged. But Mr8 m?St lntereste<1
I am told Sax he absolutelfiSrlZJT8? not tUero
t&iic witii his wi r? h ^ to see or to
uaderstaDd ttiaL n * an(* ^aVe to
hlsparfaf^efone^ C?^'S
os?S^ijffSS^rsM
?wiSl0lTp2rUye^rS"dl
a quiet pluceind dnves S Sbe 18 ,lvlQ* "?
^ of Ptue av^
p.H^r,,T*.^rh"? S"PP*^ ?? W D?ad.
I>JiP?tch to tlie London Dally TelMrrmDh
rht? eiaerly gentleman residing in the Kue Roche- I
?n7z:eVu?rzrz^
reS^^T^ ssr:g5
SiS^SSr1^!
lier hUaOaiiil sent h?? ^ . ? m(,y wa? ^r?<i,
to take som * rewise nn Ul ar\^S-roo^
serrant having DlaJmi ?nm? . Mtd' and *
on a tabif h. ni, wine and broth
armchair in the bedroom and aJS?1*" lnt0 *n
to sleep. On awakC a'tT. ^h?We?l aoun(1,Jr
found that the broth had dl^Di??il?0rnJ.n4{ Ue
tie bottle of wine wm haU imnf? lhal
alarmed, he went to hlswir^in fSFi7- ?ecomlQ8
J^L5er.?" told her wh??hi?
sswaKffs^jaSSfSS85^
but to come in. Tuf hisLn **> airald,
butsoon rushed out wlthia^i^room.
lie had seen nis uncle's VtilL Th^ . i ^ ?n eua
aMSi?as
ln gemug his pa3o^uicken n?if n 081 dlfficulty
Stand that he w^S nSt Sl?teWV.^ 10 uuder
^ aftase-sgtisrvs
zsnsssssz =sHPor"
Sfffc?.aff^lona'te at^fton Vrn^hw011
had shown him after his aumwU^S relatives
this world, everythlnir was auolwn?SPaTture rrom
comfortable all round? i sliom!i appr *nd
tor of the quarter had not ?, hUHt tue dt*>
tne demise of the wrfnhT un^ ?h^COnnrI,H'<1
luve taken a new lease of me. ' *eema 10
? *
Sun fnrepentant
From the Chiotiro Time*.
lom Folejr, the well-known bii]UH<*f ... .
^ *?P ^ve of success wSD(t^
L. Moody came to Chicam in* .k? _ -""igni
Miau. reviTM tweuim. OMOM.^JfToS
s ?a-un's'ssf ?d ftlv^ I
swa?;2TrWio?IrHsS
^-Jhy.m. u- A ?uCimtr.'uft
"What'U ltbe,s r7"
and sa1dtn^Mr.t^oie^1 j ^m t^udrf^tIlr
decided to come over to ulr h M you have
n " w us. i have your note
"You have no note of mine that I ain't able to
take up," sale Tom, eyeing him as though he
thought him a deputy sheriff with an execution.
"Who are you any way7" i
"l am Moody, tne evangelist?dont swear la my
presence, young man!"
-Well," said Torn, "I think one way and you
think another?l'U go my way and you go yours.
What's that? 1 never wrote you any note. Some
oi the gang have been kidding you."
The evangelist tore up the note and walked,
sadly out. Some of the boys had signed Tom's
name to It and had written that he had attended
a Moody meeting, desired to reform and give up
his business, and solicited the call that the evan
gelist made.
From the Philadelphia Record. i
Preacher (at Waifs' Mission)?"Tea, my dear |
children, you little know of the blessed influences
which now snrround you. M/ son is here with me
to-day, and I will ask him for a leaf from his own
experience. Stand up, my son, and speak so all
the children can bear you. How were you led to
the sabbath school?"
Preacher's Hon (Qercely)?"By the ear."
Twm Haiaed is Tea*.
Froa Um Burllnrtoa (Vt) Free Press, Sept 30.
quite a number of saver oertlQcaiee are in circu
lation in this city which have been raised from 13
to $ia The two large dgures on the back have
been obUterated and the figure "J" on the face cut
out and a figure "10" Inserted, being held in place
by court-plaater. Where the word "two" is spelled
out the last two letters are obliterated, leaving
only the "U" It Is well calculated to deceive, an*
less the Mil Is particularly noticed.
eC m Baaal 1 raaslljr*
from Um Cartoon.
Little Dick?-i am so glad to hat* a new little
brother now. lie aad sister and 1 make three,
dontt wet"
Mamma?"Tea, dear; bat what of that?"
Dick?"Well, tne re's only two drum sticks to a
chicken, and one of as will get some other part
now. iHl be the ooe aometuaea. rm Ured of drum
_ Witt MS '
Prom the Liverpool Ooorisr.
At Marseilles the other dap a man. who fancied
hie wife would look well In oetnch leatheia, en
tered a railroad truck wbenu were eevcral birds
to pull it out when the aeuieh kickea and
him on the epoC
Isaac Keene, a merchant from XvansvUe Ind.
waa robbed at the Union Hallwaj staUon m Indi
anapolis o* Saturday of a diamond acarf Dtn astT
mated to be worth between 90,000 and t&ooa At
thstUM the sutloawMfuu of people.
Tk? British AmiUllw ?? Ctrwto.
mr abb mot so bad tmt all, wan hot ucb
too mn-Kinnno rourraa on rum umion
OP KBM, WOMKK AND U0RSES.
From the Loudon likansk.
In tbe Biological section I tie vexed question of
stays nod tight lacing was discussed in a separate
department. Tne attendance of tue fair sex was
?specially large. The general expectation which
they apparently entertained that the paper would
condemn ihe wearing of stays was, however,
agreeably disappointed. Mr. C. & Roy, profeasor
01 pathology at Cambridge, and Mr. J. Q. Adams,
university administrator of pathology, wuo had
announced a Joint paper "ou the Physiological
Bearing of Waist Belts and Stays," blessed instead
01 banning these arttctea.
They have lately been making some patho
logical experiments, and had found that a good
deal oi the blood stored uselessly in the abdominal
veins la, by slight pressure, placed advantageously
at the disposal oi the muscles, brain and skin.
This explains bow men, as well us women, In
suncily employ some method ot abdominal com
pression, wearing waist bunds or belts, or the more
eiuuorate corsets, at periods or Increased activity.
No doubt tashl n has sometimes led to distor
tion 01 the female figure by means of stays, out
li not laced too tight the modern corset, by
clasping tne waist aud supporting the bosom and
buck, constitutes a convenient combination of the
different lorms 01 girdle which nave been touud
useful by the women ot all civilized naltous iroiu
the remotest times. Of couke uuring sleep they
are put ofT, but during hours ot exertion, social or
Otherwise, reasonable tight lacing Is h.ted U> in
crease mental and physical activity. They, how
ever, cautioned young ladles against carrying tuls
to an injudicious extreme.
By the way, it was suggested to trainers of
horses that U they girthed on the racing saddle
behind the ribs instead of over them tney would
thereby gain lor the horse the same anvantage as
was experienced by the loug-dlstance runner irorn
his broad, tight leather belt.
Several pn> sielans immediately attacked the
paper. Br. Wllbenorce smith considered it a most
dangerous one u> be read to an assembly like that,
lie declared tue evils of tight lacing to be manifold
and terrible, and that It is perfectly refreshing to
find a girl the muscles ot whose back- have not
been witnered by wearing stays. Miss Becker took
the otner side, and advocated rigid aud not elastic
stays, at the same time giving her approval of
modern fashions as better than some dress re
forms.
I.adlm In South American Theaters.
From the Time*-Democrat.
Marcus A. Mqyer, the well-known theatrical
agent, who managed Pattl while she was on her
last trip to South America, In a letter to a friend
I In New York from Montevideo, says:
"The girls here are the loveliest I ever saw.
There Is ohe part of the hou^e where the* only
allow ladles. That Is the 'Cazuela.' It Is the
circle Just oelow the gallery, or '1'araiso,' aud
oue Of the male sex is not allowed there, apd
ladles are not allowed to wear bonnets in the Ca
zuela. The front row is reserved, aud we charge
16 for these seats. The back rows are tor tne ad
mission tickets to t he Cazueta, and for these we
get $1.50. At about & o'clock the young ladles
oommeuce congregating at tue door, aud there
they stand until 7 o'clock and keep up such a
clatter and row that tue police often compel us to
open the doors and let them In at 6:3a You
snould see the scramble. They are worse
than men or boys. They take the seats back
of the front "row, and those who are lucky
get a seat, while the unfortunate damsels are com
pelled to stand up. This place will hold about 800
women; and it Is a beautliul sight to look up at'
them in all the colors of the rainbow?beuutllul
brunettes, ail bedecked In diamonds. At the close
ot the performance a platoon of soldlen*?lllty
men?forms on each side Of the door at the exit
to the streets and keeps the crowd back, so that
the young ladies can depart In peace, and us they
go they are met by their brothers or lathers or
some escort to see them home."
No Vtore Fancy M< |n in the WbIU.
From Clara Bell's New York Letter.
I am able to tell you definitely that the round
dancing ot the ensuing winter, as done by the
swells ot New York, will be quietly graceful, with
enough action in It to avoid all the resemblance to
the performers of the comical dolls' quadrille, and
yet quiet enough to be unlike the motions of the
ballet. Every summer fanciful round dances are
introduced at the watering places, and very pretty
tuey are for the children. Uiown-up people are
tempted to Indulge in them, uud t ,ey often do so
nimbly and without awkwardness. The past
season's specialty In this line was the York
waltz, which differed from the plain waltz
by Introducing a sort of halt and kick
in each revolution. Boys and gtris generally did
it in a pleasing and sightly manner. Men were al
most luvariably awkward at it. Some of the young
women succeeded and some failed In their prac
tice of the York, which was an adaptation ot a
ballet movement seen last winter in the terpsl
chorean interludes of opera at the Metropolitan,
but there are three dancing masters to whom 5th
avenue people go every autumn for auntie prelim
inary ti alning In order to be made ready for the
wluter dancing campaign. These expositors an
nually agree upon a metnod ot instruction, and
they have decided that there shall be no tolera
tion of fancy steps In the waltz for the coming sea
son. This decision will oe accepted by all the
beaux aQd belles of New York swelldom, but of
course the dancers ot other cllleB may do as they
please about lollowing this exampie.
English Rule lu India.
IT BAS ESTABLISH KD A riYSTKM OF HEPRKSSION
AMONG THE CONQUKKkD NATIVES.
There is something to me utterly incongruous
In slavery, In form or in name, where English rule
goes; and this will sooner or later tell in India,
says carter Harrison in a letter to the Chicago
Mail. Let me give some facts that win illustrate
tny thoughts. At table d' note in Calcutta one ot
a party ot gentlemeu opposite tne said tome:
"\ou are a stranger here," X see." "Yes. but how
did you know it? (for there was nothing in tny
dress to show it, and I had not been talking). "Be
cause," he leplied, "you say please to that servant
of yours and thank hlin ? ueu he serves you. We
never do that. They can't understand it." I
laughed, and told him we had a myth In America.
It was a tradition ot Qeorge Washington, who
Ufed his hat tu a poor negro because he couid not
be outdone in politeness uy a slave, lie rejoined:
"That will do lu America, but not in India; It
would soon ruin the servants. They are a lot of
niggers, and have to be treated as such." I told
him these -niggers," as he called them, were learn
ing something, and were already demanding a par
ticipation in tue making of laws, and that the tn.
gllsu ought to try to elevate rather than repress
them Into a lot oi slaves. The companions ot this
gentleman said noihing but seemed to approve of
what he said. Agalu: I visited a merchant's
office, also Id Calcutta, to Inspect some shawls to
be shown us by some Hindoos. 1 bought a small
ring shawl, and tluding 1 had left my wallet in my
room, told the native he could go with me to the
hotel tor the pay. The proprietor, an old resident,
saw me to the door. I got into my cab, inviting
the native to take a seat by my side. This he was
about to do, when my friend lmperlousiy mo
tioned him to mount with the driver, saying, "We
never let those fellows ride with us." Now, this
Hindoo was a man or elegant manners, clean aud
bright, and 1 was told was rich. But it would not
do torhlinto ride Inside with a white man; it
would spoil him and others. He bad to be kept in
his place.
lsatva man In uniform at Delhi kick a cooley
from the car simply because he had put the offi
cer's package on instead or under tne seat, 1 could
name a dozen such Illustrations, and trom all over
India. 1 did not once, except at Lord Dufferiu's
and at a powe ful commissioner's, ever hear any
thing asked lor by an Englishman, or even ordered,
in that tone whlcu sotiens an order into a request,
it was always au order, and of the most dictatorial
kind; an order rarely used in old sluve days In old
America, except on the cotton ulautallons, and
scarcely ever tn Kentucky or Virginia. I was
speaking In Ceylon with some resident English of
the beautiful little buliocks and the pre.ty carts,
and ot the ease with which they could be made
ready, and expressed my surprise that I had not
geen th?in used by the lorelgn residents. They all
said that it was a pity that the foreigners could
not use them, they were so cheap, convenient, and
pretty; but that they were used by the Cingalese,
and, therefore, It would not dd for the governing
classes to be seen In them; and yet the t. lugules ?
are a neat, graceful, cheerful, and very bright
people, tar more intelligent than the Georgians ot
Caucasian.
I did not, while in India, see a single instance of
a tree, friendly mingling of white and native
people except among the high-born natives and
the rulers at grand entertainments. I saw no
native and Englishman in wuat might be called a
friendly and equal Intercourse, aud from what I
could learn trom the Eugiish residents tnere is no
such thing as familiarity bet ,veen the Europeans
and natives, and the majority say it is right; that
these latter are a conquered people and should be
treated as such.
An Old Koiuan t?anie.
From the New York Son.
Teacher?"Wuat was the name ot the great re
sort for sports and amusements In ancient Home?"
Smart Pupil?"The Colosseum."
Teacher?"Name some favorite pastime of the
old Romans."
smart Pupil?"Running for Vice-President."
Economy in Dress.
From the Philadelphia Record.
Dressmaker?* There doesn't seem to be stuff
enough here to make a train three yards long."
Society Belle?"Dear met How much mora Is
needed T"
"About half a yard."
" Well, take u off the neck."
An Actor's Bets.
From the Albany Journal.
A good story is told ? of an actor who recently
paid a visit to Coboes. He had but S3 to reach
home, and the thought struck him that it he could
get some one to bet with him be might attain the
desired amount. He entered a saloon kept by an
Irishman, toid him his plight, saying he wanted to
make a bet. "All right," said the bartender, who
bad just purchased a ham; "I'll bet you SLSO that
you can't carry this ham across tne street and
back without laying it down." Ihe bet was
promptly accepted and the actor seized the ham
by the string, walked across the street and back,
and laid the ham on tue floor. "You've lost," said
the Irishman, "you laid It down; but here comes a
friend ot mine and you can get even." The friend
readily bit at the ball. Me seised the ham, walked
across the street and back, and nung the bam on a
book, thus winning the stakes. It Is not known
whether the actor Las reached his destination yet.
Mrs. Veneering (in brao-a-brac store to daugh
ter)?"There is as elegant vase, Clara, and It's
marked tea I think f wiu take it." (To clerk)?
"What is your lowest price on this vase, sirT"
Clerk?"Slxiy cents, madam." Daughter-!*come
on, ma."?ItaKU
It is pretty Bard to raiss a child without tnmng
your temper occasionally. The samesddUbs toa
oar window.?Renter* Wnhww,
DrVAI baking ?
KUIAL POWDER
ABSOLUTELY PURE
Li^hjjwect VKolcsome Bread
Delicious Pastry
EDUCATIONAL.
The, Washington scuojl of fine aui
*nr?r,TiLy? Desira, Vernon Bow, MS Penn
I W^Y??"5 (Oil and water color) Modrlirur,
Cnr?a *>?*??. *0. Call or send foi
1 ln??
(T^nlthnll ?<1A FQHT BY TH? -SATDKAL
ngjr
^ . CLINICS.
I ?,?8?lUr amlrR " the t reedmen'a Hospital trill be
| held durin-r the winter a. foil we
Medical?Evt-ry Sunday alternoon at 2 o'clock. be
ginning October 14, by Prof. Hood.
rwn2~Slr*T*nr S?tur^ar at 4:30 P. m.. beaiumn*
^M^S.r,ii,l'y-,,ro'-Qr,h?iaor VwrtZ ' De,numn*
l.iw? *irr?r ?enl r ?*id'ou will be held resru
?rL?.r tbe ?"Pervlaion of Prof. Purvia.
J ^ by lirsh2d ni? * h8'd ^ ftf0m 1? *? 2
1 c^nlV8 t>? held Sunday morning* for
EKjTaa"ClSi""" " "" ?~
vSriSf^re zwtzf&ss.
0. B. PUK\ 18. .secretary,
I 11X8 l:tth at. n. w.
TH.E ,?f,?<iNALI)"ELLISJ KCHUOI^ 1306 17TH
I v>.nit, i&:4i "" ???. ?nd 1023 N it Enirllah and
HTfi ? ??*rd}n**ud Diy Kchool for young ladle* and
v?T?rU year bewins septJmbe? 28.1888
..!l . m*tlon ?dareaa the Principal,
| _ ???W-lm Mimi ANNA ELLIS.
MISS E1CHSTADT WILL RESUME HER IN
atructiens In Mu*lc October 1: term* reasonable.
f?in'i''Ti'uov in<iuire at tt. U METZERoTT k CO .
1A1V IT It. D.W. K2Sj*2t*
MI?S J. A. DaBNEY, TEACH KB OK MUB1C,
1010 K at n. w.
Bpeelal attention ifeeii to beglnaera.
larma moderate. ee2?-lm*
I HE OOLUMBLAN UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL.
...THE FACULTY.
JAMES C. WELLING, LL. D?
__ _ Presideut,
. "?e Hon. WALTER 8. OOX. LL D..
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the District
Professor of the Law ot lteal ancfpersonal Property, of
Co itract, and of Crimaa and Misdemeanors.
, *h? Uon. WILLIAM A. MAUHi, LL. D..
AMistant Attorney General ol the United state*.
Professor of Equity Jnri?pru.lence. of Common Law
and Equity Pleading, of the Law of Evidence and
the Law of Partn-rahip.
The Hon. FRANC 8 WHARTON, LL. D.,
? Solicitor of the Department of btate.
Profeaaor of Lrimin 1 Law and Lecturer on the Law of
Natlona.
The Hon. AUGUSTUS a. WORTBINOTON, LL. &
Ex-Attorney of the United state* for the District of
Columbia,
Lecturer on Criminal Pleading and Practioe.
_ V\ ILL1AMIF. MATTINGLY. A. M..
lecturer on Practical commercial Law.
HENRY E. DAVIS, A M., LL. M.t
Aaalataut Attorney of the Di-trict of Columbia,
Aaaociate Profeesor of Practice. Judge of Moot Court,
and Lecturer on the Hiatory ot English and Ameri
can Law.
GEORGE TICKNOB CUETIs, LL. D.,
lecturer on the Law of Patent*.
BOBEBT C. FOX. LL. D..
Treasurer.
GEORGE L WILKINSON, & 8?
Ketrlatrar and Librarian.
The exercises of thia school will be reeumed in the
University buiKiimr. southeast corner of loth and H
streets, on WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3d, at 0 o'clock
p. in., when the nnouncemeuta for the year will be
made, and sddre?ses delivered by members of the
'*?DIty. The opeuinir addreaa will be commemorative
j . ???,tory ot the hctlou1 end itarraduatea. from the
d*t' of 1U onraulzation in 18^0 and of lu reornnlaa
tion in 1863.
Librae, with the lanre addition* made to
it, will be open by day and by uitfht ior lurpoaea of
atndy and ri aearch.
1 he special cou?e on tbe Law of Patenta. to be de
livered by GEORGE TICKNOB CURTln, Eaq., author
"f, ? standard treatise on that subject will be open to
all the atudenta of the School. Pereons d^lrlnjc to at
tend thia courae alone will make application to tha
neKisirar after October 15. tor uilormation coucerniiiir
tU? feei of 4c.
An addiUonal Lecture Hour has been annexed to the
dally 8-S910118 in order to make room tor extraordinary
lecture Courses durinjf the year.
J""1 ?.n JPyllcatlon at the book
;tore?,P' W B. Morrison, 1334 t' sL, and W. H. Low
dermilk A Co.. 14^4 F at., at the office of Fitch, Fox A
?tte*"ildi?aaredtoa*ylTimi* ?nd liXh ,U* orby
, - ^-'O JAME-t a WELUNG. President
PIANO LESSONS-MISS CLARA HAiuaoo-N, PC
pil of Wm. Mason. N. Y.
8 GRANT PLACE,
ee20-lm* bet. 9th and 10th. G and H nw.
A YOUNG LADY AN EXPEBII KCED~COLLEGE
Ur du .te, will take claaa and private pupil in the
i-uuruacee. Mathematics and all Eng.ish branche*
Address Box #0. Star office. ael!0-lw*
VV est^end ART SCHOOL. " "
? ' Ml?? W. KELLY 'London Medalist). Principal,
lo30 10th st. n. w.
To.acoommodate the numerous m id la attending thia
, achool a second Mtudio haa been n?xl at 1223 15th
at** o v',n'the Prmc1^ attanda three times per week.
ae^O-lm
ID
|R JOHN CACLFIEI.D
will resume lessons at 1012 14th at ,
opposite the Hamilton House,
ael9-3m* October 1,18?8.
A HARVABD GRADUATE DEsIKKH Pl Plia
slnirly or In amall claeses. Apply to
n PL'iNAM. A
ael8-3mo At Bandera k Stay-man's. 634 F at. n."w.
Guarantee to teach any one to make
a Liie xize Crayon Portrait in lo leesons no
Knowledge of draw-In* necessary. Call and examine
w?>rk. J. W. REkNuLDb, May Building, cor. 7th
,im K- aeltt-ttt*
MAHINPS^ DANCING ACADEMY, MASONIC
Hall. 9th and F sta. n.w -Mr L G. Marlni'a
Aiudemy Will tv-"|K-u on SAT CRD AY, OCTOBEB 8.
Joh8. ior the receptiou of Pupils and Formation of
Classes, at i o'o sck p.m. For particulars see circular
tone had at the halt aeltt-lm
r?()9,TMV.8I0.(PI?N0{ WESSONS BT BUCCESSl
TEA^HEl^lod^ataw. "eUln* ^VelS^"
rPHK 'LLEGE OF PHARMACY
WiS**#' Seventeenth Session on
1UESUAY, OClOiiEB J|, 188K
h Tie??^if?.'iCv """'""tlou for Matriculation will be
ColleweSliS X* " 1 ?'cioc" P.m..lnthe
ruansffliis!
. . ?*,rBet n. w? between the houra of 9 and 11
? sel? 011 commencement of the 1 act urea.
Anew illustrated ciRnni.an"
OP
in a<ivauu*ej an3 Mtuat.ou. $230 and (2.M) i v'tr
Prol. J. CK1NEAR, A. M-, Principal. Send for circu
1*f- ael7-2w*
.^io^no*0^'8 8CHO?I* ?WTHYEAB,
StPTEMBEB 19. 1888, at
1110 L.at. n. w. ee3-lm*
^meyOo^nt^Md' Broo^rUle^Mont
(tomenrOount^* MA' ?~?kevUto. Mont
MISS HILTOlfi"
ENGLISH AND FBENCB SCHOOL
pn.5?'2?2!!*-ycTOBfcK !? ?-l Vermont ave.
Pupils raoelTed tor individual matructlon ae6-?m
annum. Boys of any u? P*r
L. & BISHOP. H ?Ji AUst^r
pBIENDS- 8ELEC1 BCMOOL, lblw BT N wl*
of eiffht teachers*, ill ? ?5o* wltn ft corps
itructlon in Eugliah. M.themaSa }il
?HanSSlI
" -? *u2?-a??P
KEW WINDSOR COLLEGE AND Wtvtmno ?
inale ooile*.; wparato buUdiuis JSi i2S?
TO^'vrtth^JSTS? ful1 n^duatS;
JEXJ.Y. D D
l>unbarton, e^a P?ma* are. ? Jo X at
SsTt.. CAPITOL
chyws forSUructto^
and polite daportiuent AcaJamte work. I
ladies deeirtnar a more
rlisnes thoroUfrttiy traln<-d ~"*jmuon
branches. Muaic, Frsaoh and
dies not illtnrtinir the achool^^l
SMS11
sv itss.
For catalo^et cr rartW? ^?!S?J
1?W6 tf &.WLW. a.9. Moktaucji; tm. x>..TS<5?
Mn:
00 gysawM3E'HgKTa
7sshrsRw
it
EDUCATIONAL.
Elocution. Oratory ?
"lb# Alt ol *1' Arts; no person's adocmtlan i. coan.
plete without nr-Emm-toX. ???*?? ?? ??>
"Few i*>reoue know what puw?n "-rr ?r? until
this Art develops them.'?.'ianni
"If I had m?iii only sufbcient to *1ts mtm ?
daughter bat ?uf kind of education, I should^?!.*!
this Art It will fit tbiui forcvery <lc^?rtut't of lif*v
ur other traimn* ?'-Henry Ward B*Jke?
Collegiate Olimi commence October*. 1KKX
I-NON-PROFE881UNAL COURsE IN tLLK'LTTIOlt
II-FBOFE^sIONAL COl'RSE IS ORATORY
III-PBOFES8IONAL OOCUI II Ai TING
THE NON-PRoFEsSlON AL cStlfik ta lSid??.
tion in itaeU; pmoni ol any awe wi.l Bui it fu.K eou*l
to the training of my Seminary or Collate. It enibraoUa
^ong other thing.: Voa^l aui Phyan^VJo ?22?
* oioe Culture, 11-onunciat>ou. 1 n>r.?i? lieaa7.LT
English Author*, Conversation. and Shalteapiare
PHOFESSIONAlTcbURSE IN OKATORT
embrace- aiuonir other thinira: 1. study and 1'racuoa
Urat. ,ra and Oratory; 3. Open
'ufn; 4. CLmaxea; 5. Perorations, fl, bxteinpum et>ui
BpeaklngfT. Actual Practice in Palmt (SatS^Sf
Actu*l~Practice in Addr eeing -he Jury; M Actual
Practice lit Lecturing; 10. Act .?1 Prae'ice In After
Uinner speeches; 11. Actual Practice in Aneodote
Tallin*; lit Political 8pce?b?e, is. l>eU>te 14
Mastery of the EngUab Lamruage. lu ArtiaUc Head'
lu#; 10. l>ramaUc u*.ture.
THE PROFESSION AL COURSE TN ACTING
embraces among other thin**: Mechanlceof Actlnir
Efif' Couutcipart Acting, Noene Actln*; full
P.ay Actln*; "numn*;" study of Actor* and Play.
Htat-e Buaineea; atatce settin*. Dramatic laeatun
FacUl t*pi*ajaon; Pantoni me. Pareouation. ,lai?t
Reading, and Comedy. 1 hia u the only Cole** 111 the
n , Stataa that PERFECTS a pupil lor the staare
tJl.i"" ""J01*"1 b> rrotes-ions. w, have
testimonials from I . ^ Attorhey-tieueral A H Oar.
laud, Bishop John P. Newman. I) u Prof. Alex M
C. Xowiiaaml, I. B. Hay.e**q..and Luu
dreda of other*. Wall-known actor*, clewryuien law
yen. phyalciaua, teacher* of allium*, teacher* oi elo
cution, and teacher* of actu,*, aa widl me ao.ne of ihe
mo*t prominent business men and .octal people of the
city, and al?o member. ol the I . s Senate and Houae
of Bepreeeoiativee have been pupils het a
LESSONS in CLA>8 or PRIVATE 48 pane Cata
{jfu ORATORY*^?,h?fLi;UE u0r.
AND ORATXiR*. 313 6th at. n.w. ihaif a block east
City P. Ul. Washington D. C. seLi
OCHOOL AND E1NDERUARTEN. N1 AH MA-HA
Ochuaetta are, 1127 13th at n.w.; Miii, i^lTocK
and N OEHK, Principal*; fourteeut ti year. reopen* Sent
11; German. Drawl n*. and Calisthenics fi>? "ay
Urn are and att* ndance.
Tfachsr*' Train in* Claaa. Oct 1 \ eal5-12t*
ROCKLAND SCHOOL FOB OIRLs, SANDY
u JihS!^ ???tfoni*ry Connty- 114 18 mile* north
01 liaahiturton 1 ity. reopen* September 18. 1 borumrh
trainimr; home government. hea.th carefully a tended
to;number Urnitad. For cucuIm* a.idr,?a HENRI
U HALLO WELL. A. M, UaiaJ bandy Spmur.
Ma >Vi.V3iu
TS? fIFTEEKTH SESSION OF THE MISSES
} ffey aachool ior (rtrl* *nd little boy* will open
MpteniUer 17, *t 1430 Corcoran .t. selO-m.wAa.lm*
Madame a pele. well-known for hi b Ex
cellent pronunciation, will ^iee French I minnn.
or 1,1 c'aa^e.. Hurhaat recommeudatlona ?10
loth at. n.w.. near the Arlington Hotel. ael-3m* ?
IkfR. AMDMBU LOCI NAECKKR,
1 . l-t08 8th Kt. n.w.,
?iu recetre pupil, on \ iolin. Cornet and Piano, com
mencing September L auaT^lm*
,ToriX? LADIES^COMPHlSES
Enirliah. Claaaical and Normal l>e|>artmeiita. with
*ui?enor laclllUt-*for muweaudar;. b.11 j torcau.oirue
to & I. mill. Prea.. Ha?(. r.town. Mil aui'o^w
Mrs. w. d. allenT ~
- TEACHER OF VOCAL AND
1223 30th *t IN&TRI ME.\TAL MUSIC
Q.EOROETOWM UNI VERS ITY?8CH0OLOF LAW
BEV f. HAVEN RICHARDS, a J
. President of the loivenitr.
CHARLES W. HOFFMAN. LL D?
Dean of the Faculty.
HON WILLI*M A Bit HAKDSON, LL. D.
(Chief Juatice It. s. Court of i laima )
Lecturer on Statutory and Ad1nin1.tr.11ve Lav and
Leical Maxim*.
,, hon. ch krlem p. James, ll. d
(Justice Supreme Court. Diatrict ot Columbia.)
Uscturer on the Hi?tory of the I^w.
HON. W1LLIA ?i M. MERRICK, LL D,
(Justice supreme Court, District of Columbia )
Lecturer on Constitutional Law, commoci a aw i'iead
lecturer on Equity Pleading ana Practice and Ad.
miralty.
JAMES O. P laNE, LL* D..
Lecturer on the Law of Real i state, the Law of Evi
dence, Criminal Law ana Torts
JOShPH J. DAKL1NGTUN, 1LD
LactUMrr ou thc Law ol 1 erjonal 1-ropertr. Contract*.
Negotiable laper, and lK,maa.lc lielationv
GEORGE E. HAMILTON. Esq..
Lecturer
on the Law of Partoeraklp. Corporation*.
Practice, and Testamentary Law
Moot COURT:
Circtilt Court?PRoF. GEORuE E. HAMILTON
. Court of Amieala?PR' 'Fa. CHABLl 8 M Hi >FP
MoRbiii M" Mt-KK1CK makiuTf:
Introductory lecture and announcement# for the en
tuin?r term at the Law Buildinir. corner ?th and F
?treeta northwest, on WLDSh>*AY. October a. at
p .JO v. nu Ail interested are most cordially invited
to st tend.
The 1 brary, located in the Law Buildlnjr. with ion
modiona rea limr-ruom* attached, will be open lrom 8
ni daUj eicept bundays to atudents
and alumni of the school. The number of Tolume*
ha* been doubh d since the clew oi the la*t term. and.
beai"e* the leadiuv retx.ru, now embraces the latoat
>**t-booka upon moat leral aubjecta.
The secretary can be aeen at the Law Buildln* from
0 to 7 p. m. aaily lor miormation. enrollmeut, etc.
courae of atudy, terma. etc . can be
had at bookstorea of H. IL Morriaon. 13:t4 F meet
northwest, and Lowdermila A Co.. 1404 F *tre t
1 V *? s. Thonai>aou'* dru.- atore, 703
15th street northweat. or on a; plication, neraonally or
by letter, to the und*r*l#nea S. M VEATMAN
*el0-4w Secretary and Truaaorar.
THE WASHINGTON CHOOLOF ELOCUTION
and oratory. 904 M at. n.w.
j-erenth annual aeaaiou b- irins September 19
Private and class instruction <lav and evening in
VOICE CCL1U E an l UKaToR SSSSSiJ
and irtrla in EnirUsh Branches. Modern 1 -antmatrw*.
Latin, Mathematics, Vocal and lnatrumeotal Mualc
ptam. .ertugauccessful.y cured. ae8-45t* '
FHEXCH8Y8TE MOF SOUND SCHOOL
OPENED SEPT. 17. AT 723 13TH ST.
i^earn to "l*ak French correctly , to pronounce it
well. Take leasona from an r-xnerle 1 iced and auocewif ul
teacher. MLLE. V. PRL'D'HOMME'8 methodiTat:
tiactire, thoroiwh and rapid. In thirty leaaona ahrc .n
e^twoy^ra-knowled**. Trial leaaon freef^T^ tan
atfl4-3m Brf#rM,c~' Hon- and Mrs S. a Coi
rpHE COLUMBIAN CNIVERsnY
4^ Preparatory School oi?us Sertcmper 24.
The Columbian College opens September 24
?h! opaL.GiSb.VL
School of Dentistry op^nN October 1
Ihe Corcorau Scientific School opens October L
J 2 ' nivarsity Law Schoo, opens October 3.
'f Cataksrue* or other Information addreaa
a?l-3ni JAMES C. WELLING. 1.1. n Preat
JJRR- ANNIE LOUISE KlW. I I.' -
a.lVlmCI AiiD pL*NO-FORTl INSTRUCTION.
-,el-lia ?4? New York ara- n W.
'?fl^Hlt CEDARS"?A BOARDING AND DAY
?l"??ww8C:eii9IkroR YOCNG LADlEa
RE-OPENs OCTOBER 1. Address
**1~8m MIBS EAKLE. 1916 35th at
MISS BATCH'S CI IL SERVICE IS8TITUT AND
Burineaaschool. 1207 10th at. n.w. Oi?n all the
Pupils prepared for all examinations. se4-lrn*
IHE CORCORAN SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL
x
i- w .KHE COLOMBIAN UNIVERSITY.
MVnema'ica clasaes In the loU.,wtu* branches
1 1*#8 session beginning October
aLgEBRA GEOMETRY^ TRIGONOMETRY, ANA.
LYTIC GEOMETRY, CALCULUS.
All recitation* sre held alter 0 o'clock in the eranimr,
??<J the claaaM are oj^n to both sezea.
?. ^2riTOR?r ^formation application mar be made to
K. T. JRIsTOE, Dean, or to H. L. HODuElNS. Pro
faaaor of Mathematical. ael-Im
\|7 ASH I N OTOK
" KINDERGARTEN NORMAL INSTITUTE
tut laa train in.- of teachers,
-. . , with
?o4al Klndenrarte.i and Primary School.
. EatabUahed 1874.
Mn. LOUlsa. POLLOCK Principal.
n.l 1017 10 th .1
Kf ARTYN'S COMMERCIAL COLLEGE AND
i'l school of Teleirraphy and Type-* nun*. 313 0th
at- n.w? near City Poat-OIBce. K-liool reopened Sep
tember 10 h. Pupila may autar at aay time. Coix>au>
atudenu not admitted. "The Highest Standard Bual
neee College In America."
FRANCIS G. MARTYN. President; C. K CRN EE.
A. M. U K. Principal; has graduated 18,000 pupila,
now filling lucrative poaltiona in every part of the
world. Tlae diploma of thia collage la always an aid
to persona eeekmg nuploynaant.
A full corp. of inatructora. All twain Ilea taarht
that are fou d in any aiuul >r collare. Ktstt pupil
recelrea careful attention uatll each atudy is thor
oughly mastered Caita 1 ugne tree on appilcatloa. sal
Kindergarten normal training ""??
FOR LAD1E? AND TEACHERS
1918 Sunderlard Place, aouth of Dupont Circla.
Fall tam cpaaa NOVEMBER L^68K^
eel-la Mjh LOUISA MANM.
HfOUNT VERNON INSTITUTE, 1330 I 8T?
1 ranch and Eagliah selectlchool for GlrU
Baafina Its eerenteeuth year MONDAY, OCTOBER 1.
New year begins OCTOBER 1,1888. -l.l
fpHK BEKLm SCHOOa, or
EDUCATIONAL.
Bt1 KGEsS "PrtartpaJa. ??*-!?
PfflVATt INSTRUCTION" IN PR1MAKV (HTB
gtivz&a ?sssJKasr *?if .S?
JACENOK.lBNlQal eal7-?w? I
MBTaND mm ALFRED BTJaCWTLL MC"?
PuiUa. unf 'r or ib clwM, la rtwi.oh Itwl ah II
ah iiTtaWKbaT and Mathea?t>ca. Pnptl. tanf*t at
^,r wSSSST ANara-. 10*4 I7?fc?.? w. ?eA-*w
Law Dviimn
?ational unitebnitt.
1ACULTT or LAW.
Bo* ARTHUR MvARTHCB.
it* Jwtm of the Hupreane Court of the
llMnrt of ColuualN*
rawouL
How. SAMUEL r. miller.
Justice of the KaprsaiM Ooart of Um Uaitad
HiatM.
Profaaaor of latai national and Cooatituttooal l?w.
Boa WILLIAM B WEBB.
1-acturar on Mml J n rtaprudenoe and Prertloa
JAMES 8 BOULER. Easi.
LKtinr on tuimrila and DonmUf Helationa
H. a CLAUOHTON. I<4.
PrufMm of Coaunoo-Law P ea tin*. Evidence. Kqsltr
Jurisprudence tod Pieadiu*. Oomit. I1 ud
tUUUM Law, and CrtwIMl Law.
EUGENE CABC8L Em) .
Proteeeor of U? of K>?l and PnoMl Properto. Obb
tncu and Negotiable I ueirumanta, and J adaa
of the Moot Court.
CHAR. 8 WHITMAN" Fag..
rrof?ur of Pateut Law and Fnrttia
Tha Law Department of Uw National Cnlnrritr will
ro-oi??u MONDAY. OCTOBER 1.IttH*. at 7 O'CLOCK,
at tbe Law school Buildin* lOotl I it a w. All
lntereatad arc cordially InT ilad to br praaaat at Um
openiuar eierrieea
Catal aruee containing the twentieth annual an
aoiiDCMDnit are now mad? an 1 can be obtained by ap
piyui* w Um uaderairned.
EUGENE D. C ARC SI. Secretary,
OflVoe 1008 Fat. nw?
?el5-to lo Waahinfton. D. C.
The Frederick female seminary. loca
tioo Leautitu. and lieaiiUUll. a law and wall-ap
pointed facu.ty. thorough inetruction irlven la Art,
S. lei.ce, Mu-h. I-ativue*', Elocution. and I'aiiathenlca
Elpenee moderate. For ca.aloarue and term* addreae
W. H. PLRNKLL. L LI),
Pn^i.ifHt,
aelS-laao* Frederick. Md.
Ma* wetl announcer to hi* fkiends
and the puldic that h. will receive puiula lor in
etruction id L-iUd^cai* PaiuUutf. commenc n* Septem
ber 17th, in studio and out dour -ketciiliar._
Terine imren u|?oii application at Studio li,ln ?er
dod how. M?-~> h. ata aa 16-lin
MISS TAC1E A. DANIEL WILL REhUME HER
claaa in \ oic* and llanolorta inaiructlou. October
let. Residence
laP 71f? 5th at. aw.
PAUL MIEBSCH.
I.ilV Rhode laland are.
Instructions aiven ou V i .lonoello aud Piano. Mual
cal Theory tborvuvhly tauirnt. aal4-l?*
N "EXPERIENCED LADV TEACH 1 R. A OlU
leve irraduate. deelree private pupila or claaee* lo
a a< booL Latii. and Metiieiuatiua a apeyali \ Addreae
Boa llil. Star olln e. ee!4-llM*
uMiraui tutVoLrnoKiEED. a ne* era I
t?in tbe art. Anne l'bouoirrapby tautrhi la 10 aunpla
lcaMna Proficuncy attained in tbrer montba.
CLA.->t>K8 NOW Foil Ml NO.
Private taltiou d^ily. 1 ypra numr tauirbt free <i
clijive. s?-ud atamp for pruapectua W aahiu- ton School
921F at. B.w. aelO-li* I
VV A^HINGTOS CONKEkVaTOKT OF MI MIC. KT. I
M Cloud BulldiUtc. ytn aud F a'a T*enti.-tb year. I
Piano, Otwan. > olee. > loan. F'luW- Cornet, sc. Free
adraataaea. O. B. BCIXARD. IHractoc. aa4-l?* I
ABT iCBOOL. 1530 PILBCF PLACE.
Mra M. H. Pikc'a atud.o reoiwna the lat October,
wbrn Mra. Pili<- ?ill be pl>??e i to mart bar claaww aa
uauaL Mra. Irike bnn?r? with her from abroad the I
laU'at Ideaa ou ? Idna Paiutlmr. in whlcb abr baa bean
iuu< b lub-reetrd durtii<r hrr European tour.
btudiea lor rent. ael3-Im*
ME. DAIbH.
? SCHOOL Cf FLOCCTION
Ki>ecial trainliur for children and new beciuuara.
a. l.viui ltKJW inth at. U.W. I
EDICAL DF PART MINT.
taLOiMiUuW K DMVF.R8ITT.
W'aHhimrton. D. C
The fortieth a-ealon of thi? Medical i?lK?e will bavin
on MONDAY, OCTORER L HM*8. in the new aud wall
equipped Colin#* buildinr.
Bat. b U lith and 10th ata.
For announcement and 1 urtber parUi ulara. addraaa
O. L. MAUBLDLtt. M. D-, Dean,
an22-42t Mu Vt are.
L> MElv?oN~I NHTITUTF,
|j y .4 14tli ?t. bet. I and K ?ta..
Itrlect Claaa ua. . ud Matin marital School for Touiur
Mtn aud Mo\ a
Bevina Ita thlrty-aaveiitb y>ar MONDAY, SEPTEM
BER -'4.
Preparea for Harv rd. Yale, Pnnceton. Johna Hop
kina. ?ud other Colie^ea and I uireraillea. lor tlie
8. icutiflc ^cnoola, 1. K. Miliary and Natal AcadcBiaa,
and for imaineaa. For parnculara addreaa
au'.'?-lm CH Ah B YoU>U. PrlnnpaL
M
PROF'. hHFXDOS'S DANCING ACADEMY NOW
open f r tbe reception of pupil* MoNDA V H, * ED
N nllA'i 8. aud HAlL'RDAYtL Oall or aend for ci x-n
A
lara, 1004 F at. u.w. auK3-Ha
"VOliWOOD INSTITUTE?KELECT SCHOOL FOR
JXGIMLa? >ppi? at 1407 Maa aw. Mr aud Mra.
W D. CABELL, mill l|iala bebool u|<ena Sei t-uil? r
2Mth with lull corpa ol luatrucuira ^Jyll-.?m_
HI HIM EOOOA1 ION - BOOE - KEEPING.
l-euuiauahip, Ariihmettc. Grammar. Ortho*rai>hy. I
Hiatory, 1 >-L>e-wrltluir. Aa.; raj id pnarreaa. reaaoualle
te nia Call after 4 :M I'.m. WOOD'S COMMERCIAL
SCHimJL, _? otn n.?. Latabliabad 1SK.V au-i-?ia ?
Cl LliMAN^MU.K AN ACADEMY.MJ4 0 NT. M.W.I
I Keop- na Mou.laj. September 10.
Eufrliah tirauche* lu the torauoou aud G<'nuan Id tha
ai ernoon. B "ka uaed are tlie aauie aa lti I tie Public ?
hclio.de. Kltfht school ou Tneaday. l'huraday and
FrkliT.
au'.'5-lm* HCGO KTERSCHNFR. Prlnripal
CADEMY or THE HoLY CHONH, MAKs. A\E_ I
?iilre-oi?u MONDAY, ?< ptemlier 3. hp rtai at
tention will b" mreu to tbe onran. piano, harp, milt >r. I
and l>an)0. alao to peraperUve drawiu?. lalntina lu oiL
wat>r-colora. aud luatra. Gold inedala aud dl|>l<.uiae
aw,.r led to vradmt' a lu the Academic couiae. ol a-bicli
the hirber matbeiuatica lorrna a leadiu# featura Plain
aewina-. taucy work, aud tlac lauauaarea tauirbt without
ektra cliarice. au2o-lm
y ATloNAL MEDICAL COLLEGE.
MEDICAL AND DFNTAL DrpARTMFNTN OE THE
COLUMBIAN DNIVEIiSITT.
The atxty-aereDth winter aeaaion wiU berla Octobar
L 188N. and end March 1, 1HSU. in the new Colleaa
Buiidiac. 132j U at. u.w. lorcixvuiaia aud wloriu*
Uou ua imU uopartiueuu autliwaa
Dr. A F A Klta
r?? 13th at. B.w, Waahimrton D.1
Telephone call WK5. jrJ4- Jm
hMSOToS ACADEMY. hAUL Bl ILDING,
__L ?21 7th st.. ot'p. 0. R Patent Ofioa.
Fall term oi 1SSS beviiia Saptauibar 17.
Lay aud avanuiv aaaaioua
blhluN MACAFEE. A. M.. M D.
Principal.
Circnlart at Ranl'a Seedatore and the Bookatoiaa.a 153a
aTHK~COLlTERE BoME AND DAY SCHOOL.
J_ (Thirteenth Y.ar). A Select luatltute lor a Idnuted
Numlierol Boya Eiurllah^t laaatca,French. Matbemat
Ko aitra chanfe lor FVench. ncbool Ofiesa OC10
Bk,H 1 and oioaaaJ L >' E 1-1538 1 at fcw. near the
Arhnirtou Bot' L LLtlEN E, C.COLL1E1.E A, M..
Principal, relens by aiwdal permiaaiou. to Mr. E.
F Runrs. ol Rnnr? & Co.. Banker*, Senator Juo. R. I
M Ai raon. of New Jeraey; liou. Tboa F. Bayard. Sec
retary ol State; Judve Andrew Wylie, CapL F'rauota
B Kauiaey. L'. S. N.. and ot .er patrona ?a'J 1 -3oi
r pENCERIAN BI SINES8 ?'? >1.1 -F ? ? F. THREE RM
> tin Hoora. National Bank of the Hepablic Buildina.
corner 7 th anu Data a. w. F"it? ?tr?t car llnaa i?aa u.?r
tlied.or. InaUiuUoneatabliahed 18(14. A pra< ti al buai.
nea- education that qualities youuatmen and w. lie'i. tor I
?eii -support and uaelul livea. Day and evenliur aeaaiona
1 he buaineaa cxiilra- embracee S|>encera' Rapid W nt
in?. ortliavraphy. tha Eiurliah L*turua?rn. l> rrealMnd
euce.Rapld C*h-u atlona.Bo'Akeei'iuc adapted to every
variety of bu-dtie<a. Buaineaa l racUoe. Vocal aud Phyai
eai Culture by tue D. laarte a> ateua: Clnoa uici ud.uir
traiuiuvlor ciurenahip. Moral and Hocui Culture, ale
nienta of Political Economy and Couii. Law; Oouil.
Oeutrraphy. Tuition lee* Vearacbolarahip. day aaa
atoms tan m uiha, payable on cutannc. art11 or In
mouin y luatalmeuta of CIO each, 870. By ti equ r
ter. ten weeka. ivyahle on etiterimr. (20 Nifht ana
aiona: laarx-h T|i $5(1. three montha. 81A aiaual
ty uraea: Dep rtment* lor Htamr a pay. Pitniaa nbort
hana. TytwwntUHr and tha uranoouhoaa; Fracucal
Euvliah braliChea. Delaarta hcLoul of Ekpraaaviu.
Write or call tor illnatrated annual announcement.
School year btvlna Monday. Sent 3. < olWt open for
arratureinent* on aud alter Mo'dav Atur ,'ii HENRY
C.SPENCER.IX.B.Principal. MraNARA A.8PENCER.
VK-e-PnnvipaL L. GARFIELD aPAM-A*. Secre
tary. aaU
A1
1223 15th St.
The XIMEB SERB'S School for Tom* tart'ax and
Little OirU will open WEDPENDAI. NEFT. M. A
liar a United number ?f Boanlina Pa
^JT. VERNON 8EM1NABT.
1100. 1104.1108. 1110 Mat aad 1138 11th A B.w.
BOARDING AMD DAT SCHOOL FOR IOCRG
nnna aKD LITTLE UI1A
Foartaanth yau opena
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1
r ANNAH MOM AC^DEMY-MJ^UJ^AND
of qoMt
( artful train inc. thoroarh inetruction.
Christian Room in healthy
FBRNCri THOROPGMLY MABTERRD lj?
yaaia by tha beat of all aaethcNa, namely ? TwB
ooobm mk H. LARBOQCk, the oaaly aattwa ,
"MmNN. pufaar- -* -1
l B03 lttth el. a w
MD. BIGHT
S b42SJ^^ ^!^U8?^d
parvulttad au bowrd la duha if Neeared. Tana vary
? -war-i.'sijrafit
A FEW IOBDS TO IDYE
wtta w?
W*mu prMnMM tM pubJc <
advsrustng m41vik to m round tl
or journalism. This claim w I
firmly-established fact*, which sre wen
the oaMlrriUM or *11 imnwi inn mug |
uiunlcatlug with tM public In nytrd 10 Uf bwto
ness proportion ?iuuw. it fmu prima* ty ss
the broad and solid foundation that Tbs ?v*n?tr.
cuUtes In tM city wbw? printed a larger oumM
0t copies la proportion to population tMa mv
paper to tM world. Aud not only to tu nrrnaiin
UK laipest and fetiest, but it la atop tb- nor tonns
the paper goes tot alooe into tM Moda * tM
peopto at tM District or coiumbu aa a to**. Ml
Into their bom**.?into tM families or alM?w?
and into thoot ot lM money-spending aa <rxi m
tM money-earning portion or tM oommunity.-da
a lurger raUo than any dally journal at t ? ssrsi
circulation that can M named. By reanoa at tM
fuilneea. fmehnean. iu reliability or tu sews
local, domestic. and foreurn. IU Independent anl
fair treatment or aU public queouuna, iu muui
rent and effective aeration to local lntere-ia. and
IU cloae attention to matter* witn wMeh tM
household. and eapeclally iu lady MBiton, are
conorrned, T11 wtan la everywMre m igui?ed
and admitted to be, in every quality, tM Mating
and favorite newapaper or tM National?apitai.
alike la tM eounung-num. tM and ute
family ctrvle.
In aupport or tMa* ut atemenu attenti * i? t a
vlted to thr tables below. TMy not only skew tift
circulation and ndvartlidng patnur or tM paper
toi tM aevrral year* named, but, by tM rwnarira
ble increase abown In both deparunentu in naofe
month over tM corresponding month in IM pre
vious year, they alao Wuatrate, m tM moat for
cible manner poaalbie, tM
paper la MM in tM city ot iu I
who are beat able to judge ot IU menu aa a newa
paper and iu value aa aa advertising Medium.
Tbeae are tM figures referred with
compariaon la challe^ed:
nan.T cuctumw tu irnvwi wr.
itM. two. ?<
Jturtar ..
Knncanr.
Hanoa ?ii.M* ?i.lM
Aran. **.471 M,?T *Mfl
1UT M.4TI M.SM M.P4*
J1*a. 11.*33 tS,Wl CVIII
Jtrr ?MM U.1'
Aronrr ?UIU *-J.aB4 B4.MM
sifimin tl,Ml M,3M
Ocroann tf 1.4*7
Notimbbs M,M? KMU1
Da
Dally average tl, 111
ll
xniu or *bw a?v
1? m m.
1 wo. If
JimiT t,TM S.W*
KBBBCABV VtM Mil t^ll
M*?cn ...AIM 1NM 11
A nut. MT* l.l? Mfl
Mat &,*?* 4,1*1
Jr*B .3,47 4
JCLT MM a,?u
Acorn mm tm 3,17*
bni-rsMBsn 3.xin 4,?h Ulf
OCTOBUL 4.414 4.NW b, a
Novbmbbb. 3.N4* 4,'IM
llKUUL JB.HU
Total 41.4M 44.VI* 14?bA
Increase. 4^11 k,l?
Oil* and ftounlp uf R'oitovKm, Itttnat * IA
I solemnly twear that tM figures la tM
two comparative statewenu are true and
in every particular. p, a Nor m.
Treasurer Erenin? Star Newspaper On
sworn to hud subscribed to-fore me Uu %l
teenth day ot January, A. D. mm.
A. B. Killt, (Notarial!
Notary Public. | Mai. |
Of tM total circulation given above, tM I
tM est atn.ihment show that an average of i
copies were regularly delivered each day bp car
riers at Uie homesor permanent fubteribm within
tM city. Uf tM remainder a daily avor^e at
?,431 copies were sold at tM offloa. In tM
and railway stations, Ac., and 00 tM 1
newsboys, making a grand local average
tM city or <4,4*1 copies dally, and lea vug aa
average or l,?3S copies to M sent to 1
Kilters beyond tM District Unas by mall, 1
and railway trains.
In addition to tM large and constantly Uteres
lug fixed subscription list above referred to. K may
be aald that at tM 8,421 copies sola within Ms U?
tu a larger proportion are bought by peri ?snst
realdenu or tM city, living in lodging*. *e, Mt
bouse holders, while tM residue goes into tu. 1
at transient visitors, tram all parts or tM c
who each year come to tM National lupMal U
greater numbers and for longer period*, and wh*
furthermore, largely represent tM weli-u*4
purchasing portlona of tM communities tb
they respectively belong. TM less named la a
clans of readers alone weU worth ranching; Ml IS
ta to tM pMnomenally large permanent arma
tlon of tM paper, and eapeclally to IU unparsllsm
hold upon the household and family cirot* (Mt
tM attention of adverussrs to parUcuis
reeled.
A oompertnoft or tM I
representing tM entire 1
or ColumbU will
wiuun iu Umn
for about every eighth Inhabitant, af
race, creed, age, or 1

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