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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 21, 1888, Image 1

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Toi. 73?No. 12,004. #
WASHINGTON, D C., FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21. 1888.
TWO CENTS.
THE EVENING STAR
s POLISHED DAILY, Except Sunday,
AT THK STAR BUILDINGS,
lortfrvwt Comer Psnaiylviaia Ave. tad lltk 8t, by
The Evening 8tar Newspaper Company,
A H. KAUFFMANN, Pra't.
Tit Irema Stab U served to eabacriber* In the
dtj by earner*, cm their own account, at 10 cents par
W'k. or 44c. par luouth. Copies at the counter. 2
coat* sach. By mail-poatag* prt-p*id- ."At mM I
Bto th one year. $0. *ix luoutha. $.1
[Entered at the Pu?t Office at Washington. D C.. ao
asooud-clasa mall matter.]
Tn Wuilt Stab-published oa Friday?#1 a
year. poaLwre pre|*id. Six ;uoatha. o0 centa.
r?"All mall snbarriptions mnat bo paid In advance-.
% So paper aoat louger than la paid (or.
Rate* of advertising made known on application.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
A LARGF STOCK OF THE CELE
brated SmithSeld Htma. C. C. BKYAN.
1413 N. y. are.
THOS G. HENSEY. REAL ESTATE AND
Insurance Broker, baa remoTed hi* office* to
cbe BulMlmr. 1300 F *1 n w., where b? will
continue hi* buiune** a* a Real Eat ate Manager and
Conveyancer, and Insurance .Went
Hou?e* w.ld and rented, eatateo managed, rent*
?allaetei and loan* negotiated. Inaarance placed In
tb*- beat couipaniea, local or foreign, at the lowest rata.
dl4-lm
?" MLI.E. M. J. PRANDI HAS REMOVED
fO from Mr* Bant'* to Mr*. Haninon's, 1329
F ?t she la now prepared to dc Shampooing.
dl-lm*
JAMES & HATS A CO?
3271-3 M St..
(largest assortment of Decorated Dinner and
Tea Seta, Fancy ulaeaware, Chamber Set*. launpa and
ilousefuniishlngs to be found in (ieoivetown. Call
aid see for yourself before going to Washington.
dia-st
GROO\VS INSTALMENT HOUSE.
739 AND 741 7TH ST. N.W.
Cheapest house In the city to bay your Furniture,
Csrjets, Oil Cloths, Matttntr*. Baby Camagea. Refrig
erate,r?, Stove*, Ac Everything In the Ho\isefunu*h
ii.g line sold on credit aa cheap aa they can be bought
elsewhere for caah. _
ME MAKE AMD LAT ALL CARPETS FREE OF
tnyVl COST.
DR. S. T. MASON DENTIST, 1201
. ^ Pennsylvania avenue n. w . opposite Palais
If j-alT twelve year* practice in this city, baa extracted
over 20.000 teetli with nitroua oxide oa: teeth Ailed
and rocoanc natd. artificial and crown teeth inserted.
I ,oc8-3ru
FOR CORRECT STYLES VISIT
O^EN,
THE TAILOR,
corner N. T. are. and 10th st n.w. oc30-2m
X IANO JUAMPS.
*
Id Brass. Silver and Wrnught-Iron. The LARGEST
Stock, the HANDSOMEST Stock, tha CHEAPEST
Stock. Until Christmas all oar Noveltis* will ba
Cheaper than elsewhere.
HAY WARD A HUTCHINSON,
dl.lBlm 424 ?th i
JOHNSON & IjUTTRELL
Have a splendid assortment of Drees Good* at 15,
?JO, 25. 37% 50c. to * 1. Beautiful All-wool Plaids at
50c. An immense line of Hdkfs., Mufflers and Glovea
from 5c. to $1.50. A full stock of Table Linen and
Napkins, Fancy Towels and Tidies White Bedspreads
from $1 to SO. Bed Comforts and Blankets from 75c.
to $12.50
Muff?. Boas and Stole*, from 50c. to #8. Fancy
8oa(<*: Gloria and Silk Umbrellas, gold and allver
handle*, from $1.25 to 89. Fancy Gossamers.
All the above-named Goods suitable for Christmas
presents, and no fancy price*.
Store open until 10 o'clock in the evening.
JOHNSON * LUTTRELL.
<120-3t* 713 Market Space.
Geo. Ryneal, Jr..
418 SEVENTH STREET N. W?
DISPLAYS AN UNUSUALLY ATTRACTIVE
STOCK OF BRONZES. SCONCES, STATUARY,
CHANDELIERS, LIBRARY. PIANO, R0CHES
* TEK AND B H. VASE LAMPS; ALSO DECO
RATED GOODS. ARTISTS' COLOR BOXES AND
OUTFITS, AND DRAUGHTSMAN'S SUPPLIES.
REASONABLE PRICES. dl5-8t
d *
J 1ST The Things
MB
CHRISTMAS PRESENTS.
Eleoant Brass Table*, with Onyx Tops, SI 8.00 to ?45.00.
Elegant Brass Easels, from $6 OO to $ 15.00. *
Elegant Cherry and Oak Table*, from SI.45 to 910.00.
Piano Lamp*, very rich, from $10.00 to $28.00.
Bras* Tables, Wood Top*. S3.75.
Plush Piano Cover*, all prices.
portieres, all pricea.
Lace Curtain*, from 90c. to $100 00 per pair.
Japanese Bric-a-Brac.
FurRmra, $2 09 each.
J*l?ne*e Screen*.
Sofa Pillows.
Articles in other departments suitable for Holiday
Gifts: We have Fana, Glovea, Neck Fixing*. Hoaiary,
Jewelry Pocket-books. Handkerchiefs Do 11a, Albuma,
flush Boxes. Bronze and Bisque Figures. Writing
De?ka. Portfolio*. Booka, and many other thing* to
?elect from that we are too busy to think of now; bat
if you want to see just tha article your fancy euggeeta,
or iota of thing* yon never thought of. it la really
neceasary to visit us. We will lay aside any article
for yon until desired and keap ia safe condition.
Our Stock of Christmas Good* was never so varied
bafore. We have tned very hard to supersede our past
lendid ahowinga, and feel aa if we had done so.
Aak for "Sponge, Holder and Moistener," given free
to the children during th,? week.
LANSBURGH k BRO..
dl4 4'.Mi 422. 424 and 428 7th St. n.W.
Established 1840*
FRANK M. LEWIS,
to Baiimel U^a'Sona.
JEWELER AND SILVERSMITH
on
DEALER IN FINE STATIONERY.
1215 PENNA AVE..
OFFERS SPECIAL BARGAINS FOR THK
HOLIDAYS.
?
FINE FRENCH MARBLE CLOCKS. AT
$16. $18. $20 aad $25.
K *
LEMAIKE OPERA GLASSES (tha beat
a
>
$4. $&. $6. $7 aad
FRANK M LEWIS,
1215 PA ATX
MAR. PARKT OFFERS FOR SALE.
ill. a* ran
BRADBURY PIANO WARKROOXR
1225 Past
Soma at tha Choice** _
sedan, Blotter*, etc., ate..
at m
Y PIANO WABEKOOM&
^L^V^-paintedCBl
etc.. eeer seen ia this city;
SPECIAL NOTICES.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE
?vST^iiioutl meeting of the stockholders of the
N ation*] Praw Brick Company will be held at the of
fice of the c< mi-any. Hoom 31. CorcorM Building, in
the city of Vulupiton, D. C., on the 25TH DAY OP
JANUARY. A. D. Is89, at 12 o'clock m.. the object of
nrh meeting being the election of director* of Mid
company for the ensuing year, and the transaction of
such other business aa mayprojierly come before the
meeting. OTTO C. REINECKE,
d'Jl-law4w Secretary.
IEETING?AN ALL-DAY
Id at 215 4H street n. w..
a Tendon of souls and the
, HOLINESS MI
service will be held i
Jtmaa Day. for the conversion _
sanctitii jtion of believers. Topics: Regeneration. Wit
ness of the Spirit. Entire Sanctificatlon, When and
How Obtained. Practical Holiness, and Experiences.
Consecration service at 9 a.m. Intermissions from 12
to 1:30, and from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Come. d21-3t*
7~JUST RECEIVED.
Strawberries. Fresh Tomatoes, New Potatoes,
Bermuda Onions. Cucumbers, Brussel Sprouts, Burr
Artichokes. Mushroom*. ludiahes.Cream WhiteCelery,
Hsrtl Whitehead Lettuce Very fancy Tangerines,
Mintlerines and Sweet Florida Oranges. Extra large
Swift Pomegranates. Choice Turkeys, Geese, Chick
ens, and Ducks.
Fruits and vegetables of all kinds. In fact every
thing desired for ? Christmas dinner can be found
CANNON * CHANDLER,
78, 77, 78, 79, 80. and 81,
Center Market.
7th at. Wing.
Marketing delivered promptly. d21-'_'t*
CHRISTMAS
At the
CENTER MARKET.
The dealers in this mammoth market have In their
preserving rooms fresh from the country, and will
place before their patrons, the finest display of market
products and Christmas luxuries ever offered to the
citizens of Washington.
The Center Market will be open:
SATURDAY, Dec. 22,from 4 a.m. to 11 p.m.
MONDAY, Dec. 24, from 4 a.m. to 11 p.m.
No market on Christmas Day. d21-3t
PHII.ADKI.PHIA SWEET BREADS.
7oc. a Pair,
at the
It PALACE MARKET.
E. B. BARNUM k CO. CALL PARTICU
POS lar attention to their MARK-DOWN sale for
cash until January 1. and to-day they emphasize Boys'
and Children's Goods. It
PURE CIDER AND CIDER VINEGAR.
We manufacture our goods and guarantee
them pure. We are now booking orders for the holi
days. EMPIRE STEAM CIDER CO., 611 7th st. n.w.
Telephone 349-5. d21-2w
MASONIC.?A SPECIAL
_. A-A M-!
December 2a. ibbb, at l :ju o'clock p.m.. for the ru
pose of attending the funeral of our late brother,
Robert P. Barbour. A full attendance la requested.
Members of other lodges are fraternally invited to be
present.
By order of the W. M.: WM. A GATLEY.
d21-2t Secretary._
AN EXTRA DISPLAY OF CHOICE BEEP,
Southdown Mutton. Spring Lamb,
At the
It PALACE MARKET.
. BIGGS MARKET WILL BE OPEN ALL
day
MONDAY. December 24.
No market on Christuiaa Day.
By order of Company.
dh-:tf R A. CRONIN, President.
A LARGE STOCK OF MAILLARD'S AND
Whitman's at prices ranging from 15c. to
80c. per pound; also Ridley's broken Candy, U pound
papers. C. C. BK\ AN.
u20-3t 1413 N. Y.ave.
for holiday presents, such as
Pocket and Table Cutlery. Carvers. Nut
Crackers, fcc., go to A. H YOUNG'S Hardware and
Hcus< furnishing Store, 507 7th at. n. w? opposite P.
O. Department d20-4t
DELICIOUS HOME-MADE CAKKS IN
great variety. C.C.BRYAN,
d20-3t 1413 N. Y. are.
k^SjA MEETING OF THE STOCKHOLDERS
of the Washinirton and Georgetown Rail
road company, for the election of directors, will be
held at the office of the comi*ny, Georgetown, on
WEDNESDAY, the 9th day of January, 1889.
The polls will be opened at 10 a. m. and closed at 12
m. Transfer books will be closed on the 2d of January,
1889, and opened on January 9,1889.
H. HURT, President.
C. M. KOONES, Secretary. d20-14t ?
RICHARDSON & ROBBINS' PLUM PUD
ding. Kenne<ly, and Holmes fc Contt'a Fruit
Cukes, Aunt Abby's Mince Meat. Boiled C'idjr, Crab
Cider. C. C. BRYAN.
d20-3t 1413 N. Y ave.
MANTEL and CABINET ORNAMENTS
rORf ESTER AND DAULTON,
N HUNGARIAN AND CROWN DERBY.
The Most C omplete Mock in the city.
ROCHESTER AND DUPLEX LAMPS.
CMBRELLA AND DECORATED PORCELAIN
SHADES.
GAS FIXTURES, PORTABLE STANDS and GLOBES.
& S. SHEDD k PRO .
aao 432 9th St. n.w.
FLORIDA ORANGES, TANGERINES,
Mandarine, Malaga Grat>es.
C. C. BRYAN.
d20-3t 1413 N. Y. are.
_ NOTICE OF REMOVAL?I HAVE RE
. moved my office to the new marble front
l<finr. 1419 G st n w . where 1 shell be pleased to
see my friends and clients.
ROBERT L FLEMING.
d20- et V Architect.
N ROYAL W
r
^i<?Iug.
FOR PURE CALIFORNIA WINES AT THE
lowest possible prices, go to the
SONOMA CALIFORNIA WINE COMPANY,
<120-2w 317 9th St. n.w.
SPECIAL MEETING.?
A special meeting of the Young Men's
Chnstisn Association is hereby called fir FRIDAY
EVENING. December 21, st 7-o'clock. A full attend
ance Is desired to transact business of Importance.
d!9-3t* S.W. WOODWARD. First Vice President.
CHR1STMA8*TREES.
_ Christmas Trees, of all sizes and good rihapes,
nursery grown Imported Immortelles and Onuses.
Cut Flowers, etc.
JOHN SACL,
dlfl-4t* 621 7th St.. opp. Patent Office.
BRADBURY PIANOS-HOLIDAY STOCK
now in and we urge buy era to call early
and make their selections, thereby avoiding the rush.
We are better prepared than ever to please all, as our
stock is the largest In the city, and being manufactur
ers, can give you factory prices and more liberal terms
than any dealer or agent can possibly offer.
dl5-(Jt F. G. SMITH. 1225 Pa. are.
important!
_ Our Holiday Organ stock this season sur
Lasses anything we have ever before attempted. We
ave now on hand the finest assortment of Palace and
New Eug Organs ever shown in Washington at prices
that defy competition Over 50 styles, |25 to >400.
Sold on 95 payments. Call and examine our stock.
dI5-0t F. G^SMITH, 1225 Pa. a?e._
BEAUTIFUL HOLIDAY GOODS.?
_ ^ . Bronzes, Artists' Supplies, Paints. Oils, Glsss
and Brushes. The Gladstone Lamp, t'ue latest improve
ment on the Rochester, snd the best lamp ever made,
is a specialty at SHANAHAN k BALDWIN'S. 1011
Pennsylvania ave. ilw d!8-6t
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT.
_ I will offer for sale from now until
L ristmas Diamonds that I have advanced money on
In new settings, constating of Earrings, Rings, (soli
taires and clusters). Pins and Studs st 10 per cent
stove ?mount originally loaned.
1 have also a fine line of solid Gold Jewelry (new) at
?cry low figures.
P. WALLACH,
Jeweler and Loan Broker,
408 12th street n.w.,
dl5-7t Two doors above Pa. ave.
_ THE CHEAPEST DRY GOOD8 YET OF
L fereii. One case Century Cloths, 8c. a yd.;
cheap at 10c. One case of Canton Flannel, at 10c.;
better than any goods sold In this city st 12fcfc.
For Great Bargains In Dry Gvpds call ou
lOB. J. LUTTREL,
dl5-2w 20th st. and Pa. ave.
MUTUAL CO-OPERATIVE BUILD
INO ASSOCIATION has removed to the
BURCHE Building, 1300 Fst. n.w. Office hours, H
um. to 5 p.m. H. A. HALL, President.
dl4-lm THOS O HtNSEY. Sec'r.
IN ADDITION'TO THE DRESSMAKING
AND MILLINERY DEPARTMENTS the
sisterscf St. Roee Industrial School have recently
added a department of Cookery, at the head of whicn
is a moat experienced and efficient French cook, so
that they are now ready to receive orders for Lunches
*t>ette!'SabaafCak*" " Ac* ** Cllicke11' p"'< 1,1,1 r* Cro
Full particulars may be leaned by inquiry
at the school.
No. 2023 G Street Northwest. dl2-lm
SPECIAL NOTICE.-I WISH TO INFORM
? - the public that I have no partners or agents,
and that I am not responsible for any engagementsuot
made directly through me. F. E1BNER, Leader Elb
ner's Orchestra. dl 1- iw*
offTceTof thF~mutu^alfire in
SURANCE CO. OF
Washixotox,
Policy-holder* an hereby notified to renew
Instance for the year 1888, on or before the LA8T
MONDAY IN DECEM|)ER(31st instant), 1888.
Washbotos. Dec. 8,1888.
r their
,? the
__ ?MBER (3lst Instant), 1
Please coma early and avoid the crowd of the last fsw
20t J. WESLEY BOTELER, Secretary.
R. H. T. LEOPOLD, REAL ESTATE AND
Insurance Agent, has removed his office to
he" building, southwest cornsrF and 13th
sib. n.w..second flour, where he will continue to con
duct the Real Estate Business in all its brauchee.
Real Estate bought and sold, Loai.s negotiated. Rents
coLI<s ted,Insurance effected In first class rieniisatea
at lowest ratse. dft-lm
; INDUSTRIAL SAVINGS AND LOAN
ctatton has removed to the BURCHE
I F st. B.w. TH08. G. HEMMtYT
?Jt EQUITABLE
CO-OPERATIVE BCILDaiO ASSOCIATIOR,
"EQUITABLE BUILDING," 100SF8T.
. 897L&30.64.
the 16th Ian
THOMAS I
JNO. JOY ED80H, 8ee*y.
Washington News and Gossip.
Mm te Advertisements.
Avr^rvK^TS n
ATTORNEYS Pajre 6
AUCTION SALES Pure 7
BOARDING Pure 2
BOOKS AND 8TATIONEBY Pare 0
BUSINESS CHANCES Pure 3
C1TT ITEMS _ pure 8
COUNTB* BEAL ESTATE Pure 2
DEATHS Fife 5
DENTI8TBY Pim 6
EDUCATIONAL. hgi 7
FAMILY SUPPLIES Pure fl
FINANCIAL Fx?7
FOR BENT (Flat*) Pure 'J
FOB BENT (Boom) P*ire 2
| FOR RENT (Hocsss) Pure :?
FOR BENT (MnciLunovi) Pure 2
FOR KENT (Hall) Page 2
FOR RENT (Stored) Pave 2
FOB BENT (Stablu) Pax* 2
FOB SALE (Houses) Pure 2
FOB 8ALE (Loth) Pure 2
FOB SALE (Misckllaxsovs) Pure 2
GENTLEMEN'S GOODS Pstre 6
HOU8EFTTBN1SHING8 Pmije 0
LADIES' GOODS Pure 0
LOCAL MENTION Pure 8
LOST AND FOUND Pure 2
MONEY TO LOAN Pure 3
MEDICAL Pure 7
MISCELLANEOUS Pure fl
NEW PUBLICATIONS Pure 8
NOTARIES PUBLIC Paffe 0
OCEAN STEAMERS Pure 0
POTOMAC RIVER BOATS Pure (J !
PIANOS AND ORGANS Pj*e 0
PERSONAL. Pure 2
PROFESSIONAL. Pure 7
PROPOSALS Page 2
RAILROADS pa^re fl
SPECIAL NOTICE8 Page 1
SPECIALTIES _ Pure 6
THE TRADES Pure 8
WANTED i Help) Page 2
WANTED (Situations) Page 2
WANTED (Booms) ^ Page 2
WANTED < Miscellaneous)^.. Patre 2
WANTED (Housas) Pure 2
WINTER RESORTS Page 7
WOOD AND COAL Pure 0
Government Receipts To-Day.? Internal
revenue, 9415,2%; customs. 9588,954.
The Bond Offerings To-day aggregated
945.500, as follows: Coupon 4s, $30,000, at 128%;
registered 4s. 93.500. at 127% and accrued in
| terest; 912,000, at 127% ex. int.
The Following Post-offices will be made
5resid?ntial on the 1st of January: Athens,
enn., Athens, Ala. and Edenton, 8. C.
The President has approved the joint reso
lution to pay the officers, clerks and employes
of Congress their salary for December, 1888, on
the 20th day of that month.
Death of Major Collins.?Major Joseph
B. Collins, a retired army officer, died yester
day morning at his residence, 1522 K street.
The funeral will take plaoe to-morrow morn
| ing. the interment being at Arlington.
An Important Ruling.?Assistant Secretary
Mavnard has informed the collector of customs 1
at New York tliat, after due consideration of j
the subject, the department has concluded to i
authorize him. in case he perceives no valid
objection to such course, to suspend the appli
cation of the change in classification of nat
trimmings of silk and other materials, result
ing from his decision of November 7, subse
quently affirmed by the department, until Jan
nary l'next. and to apply it to all invoices of
these ^oods entered at the port of New York .
on and after that da^. "It is believed." Mr. |
Mavnard says, '-that the adoption of this j
course will work substantial justice to all per- j
sons engaged in the importation of these goods, j
and at the same time protect thk government
against loss and relieve the administration of
the service from complications which may
arise from the application of instructions
heretofore given."
Surrendered and Sentenced.?The com
missioner of pensions has been advised that
John T. Taylor, of Egleton, Hamilton county,
Ind.. recentlv convicted in the United States
court at Indianapolis, for forgery in his pen
sion claim, has surrendered himself to the
jurisdiction of the court, and was sentenced to
imprisonment in the county j lil for 30 days
and to pay a fine of 925.
Going to Chicago.?Supervising Surg.-Gen.
Hamilton, of the marine hospital service, has
been granted a six months' leave of absence by
Secretary Fairchild. to date from the 1st of
January.' Dr. Hamilton will go to Chicago to
become the editor of the journal of the Ameri
can medical association, to which position he
was recently elected. If he is sutisfied with
his new field of labor ho will resign frcm the
marine hospital service at the end of his leave.
Surgeoti Walter Wyinau. of the marine hospi
tal service, will be temporarily in charge of trie
bureau, but all matters beyond those of rou
tine character will be referred to the surgeon
general for instructions.
DISTRICT GOVKRXMEXT AFFAIRS.
building permits
were issued by Inspector Entwisle to-day as
follows: Matilda Wagner, four one-story store
buildings. 1822 to 1828 14th street northwest;
94.000. Jno. Myres. brick dwelliug. 444 Frank
lin street northwest; *1.100. \V. H. Sleeper,
carriage factory at Takoma park; 92.500.
Daniel O'Brien, to build colonnade in hotel,
New Jersey avenue and C street northwest;
91.200. Rodier A Gallagher, addition to hotel,
107 btli street northwest; 91.200.
LIQUOR I.ICENSts granted.
The Commissioners yesterdny granted bar
room licenses to Patrick White. 2d and G
streets; Wm. Carlev, 902 26th street; J. W.
Heckinger. 208 6th street northwest, and Mi
chael Liston, 7th-street road, and Frederick
Rose, of Lincoln avenue, in the county.
Wholesale licenses were granted to Fraiik
Hume, 807 Market Space; J. L. Barbour. 614.
616 Pennsylvania avenue, and John Cull, 2041
& street
MISCELLANEOUS.
Hume & Co. and W. D. Clark have Written a
request to the Commissioners to have Market
Space swept.
The Commissioners to-day pardoned Henry
Fields, who has been serving in the workhouse
as a suspicious charactcr. Fields was turned
over at once to the sheriff of Prince George
county to answer a charge of pig stealing.
The Commissioners have notified School
Trustee Ross that the building inspector has
inspected the Seaton school building and finds
that there is no plastering loose.
The Alleged Alaska Outrages.
EXAMINATION OF AGENT OLIDDBN'-NO MORE
TESTIMONY TO BE HEARD UNTIL JANUARY 7.
H. A. Glidden, an agent of the Treasury de
partment at the seal islands of St. Paul and St.
George from 1882 to 1896, was called to-day as
s witness by the House committee on the
merchant marine and fisheries investigating
the alleged outrages and restraint of liberty
in Alaska. The witness said he had read the
charges of outrages, Ac., published in the
newspapers recently, but he said he did not
think there was any truth in them. His head
quarters, while agent, were on St Paul island,
and he visited St George once a year. He
had neVer heard of any cases of criminal as
sault on the island and no complaints of se
duction of females reached him. If there had
been any complaints to make he would have
heard of them, as ths people looked upon him
as their protector. Witness said the men em
ployed on the islands by the Alaska company
were kind to the natives, and their presence
I there tended to elevate andcivilii* the people.
On cross examination by the attorney for the
company, the witness said that he had
never had any connection with the Alasks
company; also, that while he was agent his
authority as such was never resisted by the
ictnti of the oomMnr.
This dosed the investigation for the present
end the committee adjourned until the 7th of
January, at whieh time other witnesses who
have been subpoenaed by the committee are
expected to be pressut
? Bwiatow Order Modified.?This
morning in the Kqnity Court, Judge Cos, in
ths case ef Wood against BlakelyTinjunction
to restrain ths payment of money to the Bheffer
sad Blakely Novelty troupe (now at Kernan's),
the restraining order was mniHied so that ths
AT THE CAPITOL TO-DAY.
ARCHITECT FRERET'S OFFICE.
The Senate Adopts the Resolu
tion to Investigate It
Then Goes on with the Tariff BilL
THE NICARAGUA BILL.
Under Consideration in the Honse
The Senate.
Mr. Chandler presented three additional
memorials, numerously signed, from three vot
ing precincts in Orangeburg county, 8. C.,
alleging denial of the right of voting at the
late election and praying an investigatioa. Re
ferred.
Mr. Hale, from the committee on naval af
fairs, reported back the Senate bill giving the
Pensacola and Memphis railroad company
right of way through the United States naval
and military reservation near Pensacola, Fla.
Passed.
THE PUBLIC FBIXTINO DEFICIENCY BILL PASSED.
The public printing deficiency bill was re
ported back (without amendment) by Mr. Hale
and passed. It appropriates $68,000 for that
purpose and ?5.000 for the observation of
the eclipse of the sun on the 1st of January
next.
THE PROPOSED investigation OF THE SUPERVIS
ING ARCHITECT'S OFFICE.
The resolution offered yesterday by Mr. Tel
ler for the appointment of a committee to in
vestigate the affairs of the supervising archi
tect of the Treasury during the administration
of the present supervising architect was taken
UPMr. Vest moved to amend the resoi :tion by
making it include also the administi '.Mon of
the last supervising architect.
Mr. Teller accepted the amendment.
Mr. Allison inquired of Mr. Vest what the
object of the amendment was.
THE CONTRACT AND DAY'S WORK SYSTEM CON
TRASTED.
Mr. Vest said he took it for granted that the
proposed investigation was not a personal at
tack. He intended none by his amendment.
But if he had learned anything as a member of
the committee on public buildings and grounds
(with which he had been connected ten years)
it was the absolute and unquestionable vice of
the present system in regard to the construc
tion of public buildings. He would put the
whole matter of the construction of public
buildings under the contract system, which, he
said, was infinitely superior to the other
system. In that connection Mr. Vest told
of a conversation which he had recently had
with Gen. Casey (' the best administrative
officer in the erection of public buildings in
United States, if not in the world"), in which
Gen. Casey compared the cost of frescoing and
plastering* in the south wing of the State. War
aud Navy building by dav's-work (flOS.OOO)
with the cost of like work in the north wing
(exactly the same dimensions) by contract
(>"3:1.000)?the latter work being done in one
thir J of the time that the other occupied. Mr.
Vest also referred to the slow manner in which
the work on the capitol parapets was being
carried on, and to tlie new library building,
which, he said, would not have been completed
during the life of the youngest Senator if it
had been left under the dav's-work system.
He said he had known the present supervising
architect, Mr. Freret for many years, and he
believed that it would be found on investiga
tion that the trouble of the whole matter was l
in the svstem. and was absolutely inseperable
from it." He spoke of the investigation of the
office some ten or twelve years ago. when it
wax shown, he said, that there was a -ring' in
Washington which controlled the giving of con
tracts for public buildings. ,
THE OLD INVESTIGATION.
Mr. Morrill remarked that the examination
alluded to had entirely exculpated the then su
pervising architect, Mr. Hill.
Mr. Hule went over the points of the investi
Satiou of the supervising architect's office in
lr. Hill's time, and said that it had resulted in
the complete exoneration of Mr. Hill.
Mr. Vest suggested that Mr. Hill had been
'?PERMITTED fo RESIGN."
Mr. Hale?He was restored and held liis place
for a long time.
Mr. Hale went on to say, in relation to the
imputation that Mr. Hill had retired fronvfhe
office with a fortune, that, so far from that be
ing the case. Mr. Hill had been a poor man be
fore ho went into the office, had been a poor
mau when he went out of it. and had gone pa
tiently and laboriously to work aud had been
earning an honest livelihood since.
SOME OF THE RESPONSIBILITY RESTS UPON CON
GRESSMEN.
He did not believe that contracts were made
under the dictates of a 'Ting." Much of the
trouble in the office arose from the pressure
brought to bear in regard to public buildings by
Senators and Representatives. The compensa
tion of the supervising architect was entirely too
small?less than that of an architect employed
in erecting private and public buildings in the
states,, so that he wondered that any good
architect could afford to take the office.
Mr. Call argued that newspaper statements
did not justify aresolutiou ot inquiry. Although
he should vote for the resolution, he desired to
express his Borrow that such a habit should
^Mr^Teller did not understand his resolution
to be a reflection on the supervising architect,
although it might be n reflection on the man
ner in which the fluties of the office are per
formed. He supposed they were done just as
they had been for the last twenty-five years.
The vice was in the system.
mr. oibson's view of it.
Mr. Gibson spoke of Mr. Freret as a citizen
of Louisiana whom he has known for years,
and than whom he had never known a more
honorable man. Unless there was some sub
stantial ground on which to base the resolu
tion the best thing would be. under the circum
stances, to refer the resolution to the com
mittee on public buildings and grounds.
Such investigations should not be set on foot
on vague, nebulous, hypothetical newspaper
statements. An American traveler, in Europe,
he said, might suppose, from the impressions
left there bv surly newspaper statements, that
the Senate of the United States was the repre
sentative of a mob and not a of moral and en
^Mr? Teller disclaimed an attack on anybody
by his resolution. iV ..
Mr. Vest remarked to Mr. Gibson that he
supposed that the ground of the resolution
wus the charges contained in the Washington
Potl, giving names and dates. -
Mr. Gibson under those circumstances with
drew his suggestion as to a reference of the
resolution.
MX. hill wad bum restored to office.
Mr. Sherman (who was Secretary of the
Treasury when the Hill investigation waa made)
said that that investigation had left Mr. Hill
untainted, and that (having been temporarily
suspended) he had been rwtored to oflcs.
Mr. Hawley moved to amend the resolution
by striking oat the preamble and merely m
structing the committee on public buildings
and grounds to investigate the conduct of the
office. . .
Mr. Spooner referred to the testimony taken
by the committee an civil-service reform,
showing that the gentleman who had beensent
from Washington to select a site lor toe nag'
ham ion (N7t.) public building had been
guilty of -
THE GRAVEST AMD OBOBUOT
He should never think of imputing that to the
supervising architect, bat it showed the neces
sity of an investigation of the offioe.
TBI
Finally the
g set id by Mr. Hawley, aad
since 4th March, 1886, was taken up and agreed
The House bill to remove the political dis
abilities of John H. Parker, of Virginia, waa
reported and passed.
Mr. Chandler gave notice that on the first
day after the holiday recess he would mote to
take np his resolution for the appointment of
a committee to inquire into the Louisiana eleo
tion of last April.
The bill for opening the Lake Borgne outlet
in Louisiana was reported back adversely.
THE COTTON SCHEDULE or THX TARIFF BILL.
The Senate then, at 1 o'clock, took up the
tariff bill, resuming its consideration at sched
ule I?"cotton manufactures."
Vest mored to amend the first paragraph
Of the schedule (813) by striking out the words
ten cento per pound" (applied to thread,
Tarns, Ac., valued at not exceeding twenty-five
cento per pound) and inserting the words
? P*r cent valorem. He said
that a superficial examination of the
whole schedule would show that it was got
np in the interest of the New England manu
facturers who could not compete, in the
coarser cotton fabrics, with the manufactories in
Augusta,Oa., and who bad to depend on the finer
cotton fabrics. He quoted from a speech of
Mr Hiscock's to the effect that "American
cotton manufacturers could export the coarser
cotton fabrics into the English colonies and
compete there successfully with the English
manufacturers." -
SAYS THE PlOTICTm TARIFF DID IT.
But Mr. Hiscock, he said, had not given a
reason why the United States had lost the
carrying trade. There was no question (in Mr.
Vest's opinion) but that it had been lost on ac
count of the high protective tariff. Great
Britain was permitted, to-day. to take products
from American ports and carry them to the
ports of South America. The Senator from
New York had alluded to that fact, but
had not protended to give one solitarv reason
iorit. In this connection Mr. Vest referred,
comnlimentarily, to Mr. Curtis' recent book on
tne South American countries, and said that it
had developed to him a new world of which he
had not dreamed. The discription of the Ar
gentine Republic, he said, sounded like a
romance, but was sustained by
facto and figures. That republic im
ported manufactured goods to the
amount of a hundred millions a
year, and nearly the half of
them came from Great Britain and
her dependencies, while the United States flag
was never seen in one of her ports. That was
because the United States had cut off the
reciprocity of commerce.
Mr. Dawes?What advantage would there be
in going 8.000 miles for a thing (a market)
w ?lc uan Set here at your doors?
Mr. Vest?Oh, yes; New England manu
factures can get it here, with enormous profits
going into their pockets.
Nominations To-day.
The President to-day sent the following
nominations to the Senate:
To be United States consuls: Wm. H. Robert
son of the District of Columbia, at 8t. Galle;
John Tyler Campbell, of California, at Foo
Chow; John Darcey Connolly, of California, at
Auckland.
^Rufus H. Steadman, postmaster, at Perry,
Danil W. Moseley, of Virginia, to be collector
of customs for the district of Richmond. Va.
House of Representatives.
In his opening prayer this morning the chap
lain referred to the approaching Yule time,
and invoked good will and peace to *11 man
kind.
On motion of Mr. McCreary (Ky.) a resolu
tion was adopted requesting from the President
information touching affairs in Madagascar.
THE PURCHASE OF RIAL ESTATE BY THE DIS
TRICT COMMISSIONERS.
Mr. Taulbee (Ky.) asked unanimous consent
for the consideration of a resolution to investi
gate the matter of the purchase of real estate
by the Commissioners of the District of
Columbia.
Mr. VVilkins (Ohio) objected.
THE CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS.
Mr. 0 Neill (Pa.) presented a memorial of
the board of trade of Philad Iphia in favor of
the bills pending for the constitutional centen
of 1889- the world exposition
oi issra. and the permanent exhibition of the
three Americas. Referred.
THE NICARAGUA* BILL.
The House then went into committee of the
whole (Mr. McMillin, of Tennessee, in the
chair) on the Nicaraguau bill.
The pending amendment was that offered bv
Sir. Spinola (N. Y.), limiting the capital stock
of the company to ?100.000.000.
Mr. Spinola said that m offering his amend
ment he was actuated only bv a desire to per
fect the measure. "
Mr. O'Neill (Pa.)?Yes, and you are
PUTTING BACE ITS PAB8AOE.
Mr. Spinola?And I will continue to put back
its passage if I do not think the bill a proper
one.
bij?r' O'Neill?It is a nice way to destroy the
Mr. Spinola?I would be persuaded to do
anything in the world for von except to vote
for a measure which does not fullv meet with
my approbation.
*T: P Neill?I hope the gentleman will soon
get it in shape and let us vote on it
Mr. Butterworth (Ohio)?You ' want the
amount of the stock to have a just and proper
relation to the cost of the work?
Mr. Spinola?Yes, sir; that is mv purpose.
Mr Butterworth said that the* people were
suffering from the high cost of transportation
necessary to enable railroads to pav dividends
?u .red 8tock- He thought that there
should be a provision in the bill-to prevent
that wrong as far as the canal was concerned.
THE AMENDMENT REJECTED.
The amendment was rejected?25?138.
The amendment offered by Mr. Stockdale
(Miss.), providing that none of the concessions
of the Nicaraguau government shall be changed
without the consent of the United States gov
ernment, was rejected?18?6&.
On motion of Mr. Payson (111.) an amend
ment was adopted providing that all the bonds,
stock, and certificates shall be issued at the
principal office in New York city. /
more amendments.
On motion of Mr. Payson an amendment was
adopted providing that all shares, bonds, cer
tificates and other evidence of indebtedness
shall be paid for only in cash, to be paid into
the company's treasury and used for corporate
purposes. ^
Mr. J. D. Taylor (Ohio) offered an amend
ment requiring two-thirds of the directors to
be citisens of the United States.
Plumb (111.) thought the amendment
an unwise one, as it would tend to embarrass
the company in securing capital abroad.
CAPITOL TOPICS.
THE UNION PACIFIC OMAHA BRIDGE.
When the Union Pacific railroad company
completed its new bridge across the Missouri
at Omaha several of the piers of the old struc
ture were left in the stream, creatine an ob
struction to navigation. A boat conveving
troops from the upper river struck one of" the
piers and waa sunk. The owner presented a
memorial to Congress reciting the tacts and ask
ing that suitable action be taken. The document
**f .r*/arred to the Senate committee on the
Mississippi river and tributaries. This fall
Senator Paddock made an informal investiga
tion into the matter while at home, taking a
great mass of expert testimony and the state
ment of the memorialist. Since that *?"?? the
latter has withdrawn hi* complaint,
that the obstructions have been removed. In
5&of th??*c? the committee asked to be
discharged from the farther consideration of
the matter, which was agreed to. w
MORE BUILD HI OS BEEPED.
In a letter to tike Speaker of the 1
fcy the Secretary of the Navy iaclos
' em Commander W. T. I
it of the naval aea<
? to the neosssitj of an i
sfMMWforbaf
... ?
Telegrams to The Star,
GOOD NEWS OF STANLEY.
He Was Safe and Well in August.
A BIO SMUGGLING SYNDICATE.
VAST OPERATIONS OF THE HARRIS CANC
Expecting a Crisis in Serm.
THE TALK OF LONDON.
Who Owns the "Tim**?"?The Con
tempt Law?A Novel Gaa-Meter.
Special Cable Dispatch to Tbi Eratvo Stab.
Londoi^ Dec. 21.?The statements made yes
terday In behalf of the Timet at Edinburgh
are received almost with incredulity. Mr. Wal
ter is known to be a man of immense wealth,
but he declares that he is only proprietor of
about one-tenth part of the Time*. An the
Timet, in difiance of the newspaper libel regis
tration act. has hitherto neglected to register
the full names aud addresses of all its proprie
tors at Somerset house, there is no means of
substantiating the statement. The revelation
that Conybeare, one of the most active enemies
of the unionists in parliament, is one of the
Times proprietors, is considered a stupendous
joke.
Mr. Sexton will introduce at the next session
? measure to reform the law about contempt of
court, which, as it stands. Justice Hawkins
thinks is contrary to the spirit of liberty of the
subject.
The London Gas-light company proposes to
adopt a new automatic prepayment meter for
poor people. The dropping in of a pennv will
ive sufficient gas supply for an ordinary
urner for sii hours.
STANLEY AND EMIN BEY.
Commander Cameron Among; Those
who Refuse to Abandon Hope of Them.
Special Cable DUpatch to The Evening Star.
London, Dec. 21.?Commander Cameron re
fuses to abundon hope of Stanley and Emin's
safety. He is disposed to think the Khalifa
and Osman Digna, whom he describes as shrewd
men. have kept well informed of the state of
the feeliug in England, and have adopted the
I ruse of circulation the report of the capture
of the travelers for political effect. The
Snider cartridges may have been, he thinks, ob
tained from the Khartoum arsenul. and proba
bly Osman possessed the letter given by the
ktiedive to Stanley before Stanley reached the
Congo.
KING MILAN STUBBORN.
He will Not Yield to the Radical# and
Revolution Is Threatened.
Special Cable Dispatch to Thb Evknino Stab.
Londos. Dec. 21.?The sensation created by
the recent elections in Servia continues threat
ening. although the elections were perfectly
orderly. Belgrave is already full of soldiers.
Three more cavalry divisions were drafted
there yesterday. At a conference yesterday,
between the king and the radical lesders. the
former would adopt no compromise. General
Grieves thought he could promise that a new
constitution would be vot-d if the kins would
drop the paragraph establishing $cr%itin de iiMm.
1 he king refused. The situation of affairs is
watched closely and with deep interest at Vi
enna find St. Petersburg.
A Successful Jail Delivery.
FIVE HARD chabactfrs ESCAPE FROM THE
FU1SON" AT POET TOWNSEND. W. T.
Pobt Townsend. W. T.. Dec. 21.?The most
daring and successful jail delivery ever perpe
trated on the sound occurred last night. Tiios.
Huller, jailer, was in one of the cells where
i five prisoners were eonfinod. when they snd
! denly overpowered and gagged him. relieving
! him of his keys and pistols before be could
| raise an alarm." Within a few minutes the five
| criminals had opened the other doors ai d were
fleeing for liberty, after locking the jailer and
one trusty prisoner in the cell. The prisoner
had been tied, and as soon as he coula release
himself he unbound the jailer. The escsped
are: Davenport, of Whatcom, charged with
attempt to murder; McDonald. Williams. Con
nor. and one other, charged with gr>tnd larceny
and highway robbery. The criminals are old
characters and well known. Posses were at
once organized for pursuit aud the neighbor
ing ports notified of the delivery.
From Wall Street To-Day.
New Yobs. Dec. 21. 11 a.m.?The stock
market was quite dull at the opening this morn
ing and rather heavy, first prices generally
showing slight declines from last night's figures,
while Lackawanna and Delaware and Hudson
were exceptional, with advances of H per cent
each. Further small fractions were lost in the
eHrlv trading, but animation was developed in
the Grangers, Coalers. New England, and Ten
nessee Coal, and the increased business was
accompanied by decided strength. Tennessee
Coal led off with a sharp upward turn of 1^
per cent, followed by Lackawanna, with IK;
Rock Island. l>tf; New England and Richmond
and West Point preferred. 1 per cent, and
others fractional amounts. Prices reacted
slightly late in the hour, but at 11 o'clock the
market was activo and steady at close to the
best figures. Lackawanna. Heading. New En
gland. and St Paul were the specially active
stocks, with Northwestern, Tennessee Coal,
Jersey Central. Rock Isli.nd. Jtnd Missouri Pa
cific following, but the generaTUst was intensely
dull throughout.
Carlton Sentenced to Death.
New York. Dec. 21.?Henrr Carlton, alias
"Handsome Harry," convicted of the murder
of Policeman Br on nan. was to-day sentenced
by Judge Martine in the court of general ses
sions to be hung on Wednesday, February 13.
Russia aud the Persian Markets.
the czar's GOVERNMENT asked to build a
RAILWAY FBOM ."ETROVSE TO VlADI-KAVXAS.
St. Petersburg, Dec. 2L?The Industrial
and Commercial Co-operative society, of which
Gen. Ignatieff is president, has appealed to
'the government to begin immediately the con
struction of a railway from Petrovsk to Yiadi
Kavkas, in order to prevent the exclusion of
Russian merchandise from the Persian mar
kets. The societv estimates the cost of snch a
railway at 5.000.000 roubles and the time neces
sary for completing it at two years.
General Foreign News.
to be opexbd bt the emperor.
Berlin. Dec. 21.?The emperor will open the
Prussian landtag on January It.
DAMAGED AT SKA.
London. Dec. 21.?The British bark Sill
Water, from Philadelphia, November U, for
Havre, has arrived at Falmouth with her rad
der-head broken and her fore topmast gone.
AS ANGLO-AMERICAN BREWING COMPANY.
London, Dec. 41.?Hill's Newark onion brew
ing company has issued ?75.000 share oapttal
and ?40.000 debenture. The American dlrecv
of the company an Robert Bewail and
Tonkins.
Shot Dead for Resisting Aunt.
two norasBs kjlled in a texas town after
fatally wockdino ax omen.
Honey Gbots, Tex., Dee. 2L?A desperate
shooting affray, which resnhed In the death of
two mb, took place at Monktown yesterday.
Two brothers, named Floyd and Lawson Todd,
became drank and boisterooa. Jack Choato, a
deputy constable, tried to afreet them and was
?hot m the side. He eatled a citizen naaed
Hobbs to his assists yen, and both opened Are
oatheTodds. The latter were klUed.Chos*s
was Main shot, and is tksagkt to be fatally
wounded.
millions behind it.
mt
Ik*
Cnoioo, Dm. ti
printed this moraine of
opium-em aggtinc gang. one of
Capt Durant so narrowly eecaned
customs officers at Hand Beach Mich
?to. The correspondent, writing trim Saraia.
?V Durant and Li* lieutenant. Chaa. WsltselL
arsliving in style at the beat hotel in garni*.
cwJT l" ,n'"<a "?"*?"?? <* ?k** littla
Canadian towa. Tbs correspondent had a lout
talk with them yeeterday. ThsT Ere t*?J
smurgling opium for two yean, and have ran
cessfully Landed hundred* of thousauds of
law Worth of the costly drag on this aid* with
out being detected. Bat the laat consignment
they brought oaer was discovered and seised
by government detective*, and it cane near
costing Capt. Darant his Ufa. Four detectives
war laid him in the woods at night, look *?*?* at
!.&*!? d1^d.?lt,l?e- *ri?<J thair best ta
end his life b? standing * few feet away and
firing twenty ahota at him in rapid snoceaaioa.
Drasjrr Has a ciuibd lot,
and he made his escape without injury.
Durant at first rigorously denied that be
had ever enraged in smuggling Finailv ha
qualified his denial br earing that he hadnever
seen an ounce of opium in his life, and if ha
nad erer had anything to do with transporting
large quantities of the drug across the border
it was his own personal business. One tfci^
he was sure of and that was that, although he
had once been arrested for smuggling and ae?
Quitted for lack of evidence, he could openly
defv the government officers to prow him
guilty. But every one around Sarnie knows
him to be one of the most daring unuttitrf
who ever exchanged shots with custom-house
officers. They know also that he is one of the
trusted agents of
a bich sifroouKo srxDicsra
that was organized several years ago for tha
express purpose of smuggling opium into tha
United States from the manufactories at Vi?.
tons. B. C. The svndioete has *6.000 000 be
hind. " and u large fv controlled by C. J. Joslva
of Victoria. JohFth. among the smugglers' to
known as -W Harris" He is imSewe"
tl at ?lnf. J*??* no. effort *? ?>nce?l the fact
that he is the biggest smuggler in the dominion.
He always has a large bank account here, and
hlnk*"*! ! ? fTtt? of on' of l,>e leading
banks that he and his associates had made
millions out of opium. As an illustrntion of tha
big money to be made out of the business, bo
?aid he brought down a consignment of opium
from Victoria to Sarnia and employed two
men to carry it across the river to fort Huron
whence it was shipped to California. The men
carried the drug, which was packed in tin "*"?
in their coat pocket* and rode aoroea the river
on the regular passenger ferry boeta. Al
though customs officers are constantly stationed
on the ferries, the men who transported tha
drug were not detected, and the entire coo.
Kgnment was carried over in less than a week
W ithin four weeks from the time the drug left
j 'ctoria by this circuitous route it was safeLf
delivered at San Francisco. The United Statee
government was
DEFaarDED or over *100.000 DrrtEs.
and "Boss" Harris pocketed 530.000 for hit
share of the profits. Outside of a money risk,
he takes no chances. That is. while he is will
ing to risk the danger of having his valuable
consignments confiscated, he never ventures
across the border, for he knows that a big
price has been put upon his hesd. People here
like him very much, for he spends his moner
freely among them. Almost any of them are
ready and willing at all times to render him as
sistance in secreting contraband goods ao as to
throw the detectives off the track, and he pays
well for their aervices.
Another active member of the "Harris gang."
as Sir. Joslyn's syndicate of expert opium
smugglers is generally called, operated under
the assumed name of Spencer. He attends to
shipping the goods from Victoria. A nch San
Francisco merchant is said to be prominently
identified with the syndicate. A man for
TESM I* the EMPLOY or THE C. a. OOVEKXMHT
as an interpreter is another member. A To
ronto Chinaman and " Opium Pete." of Saa
Francisco comprise the rest of the smdicata
Besides these there are a large number of
agents whose duty it is to look after the con
signments after they leave Victoria, ahovinc
them from one point to another in the domin
ion. transporting them over the border, and
then reshipping across the states to California,
covering up their tracks in such a clerar ~-"'
ner as to successfully elude the vigilance of
the customs officers. Chief among the agente
are Captain Durant and the Weitzell brothers.
.Charles and George. Both of the WaitaaU
| brothers are now in Sam is. and. together
r?,pt P?,?10*- "T "waitine instructions f
Uoss Harris. who has been informed br tela
graph of the seizure of bis goods last week.
The value of the combined product of tha
factonetj ir. BritiHh Columbia, toe head quarters
of the Harris gang, is estimated at (5.000 000
per annum, and of this more than 90 per cent
goes to the United States. It is believed that
less than 10 per cent of it passes through tha
customs nouses. The gang operates not only at
Sarnia. but all along the northern border of
the United States as well.
Capt Durant told the correspondent tha
story of his meeting and fi?bt with the cue
,0?? officers in the Michigan woods. It did
not differ materially from that alreadv reli.ted
i bv the officers. He claims the ambush was a
i plot to murder him. and said he Is not through
| with the men concerned in it yet. He tK.wln.
however, that he will be more comfortable oa
j the Canadian side of the river than in the
states for i?ome time to come.
NEWS OF SIANLEYAND EMIN.
The Former and Hla Expedition Safe
at liouyala on August 17.
Lojtdox. Dec. 21.?A Zanzibar dispatch saw?
Letters dated Stanley Falls. August 29. have
been delivered here by Tippoo Tib'e men.
Ihev state thst a letter was received at Stan
ley Falls from Henrv If Stanlev on Angus' 98.
| Stanley was then at Bouyala. on'the Aruwhimi
where he had arrived on August 17. He hai
It ft Etnin Pasha eigbtv-two days before in per
fect health and provided with plentv of food.
Stanley had returned to Bony sis for the loads
of stores in charge of his rear guard, and la
tended to leave ten days later to rejoin Em in.
; He reported all the whites in the expedition aa
healthy and said the expedition wanteA
| nothing.
A SLUMP IN OIL.
Over 5,000,000 Barrels Chance Haafe
on the Pittsburg Exchange To-day.
PinsBrio. Dec. 21.?There was great excite
ment and almost a panic at the oil exchange
this morning caused by an unexpected break
in prices The market opened firm at 92k and
advanced to 93, when general selling began at
all points. A rush to unload then followed
and. in a short time, 6.000.000 barrels had
clienged hands, and values had dropped to
8c -4. A reaction then set in, and. at noon, WW
was bid.
One Killed and Four Mortally Wounded
Colchbps, Ihd.. Dec. 21.?The Urge boiler
ui the spoke factory of Enimett A Sons, Mount
Vernon. Ind.. exploded reeterdav, instantly
, killing Jas. Lett, of this city. J a*. Lee, Joshua
I E Low. Andy Jones and Ckaa. Beed ware fa
tally wounded. Several other employes ware
I injured. 7
I Tragedy at Fort Grant.
! ooaroaaL wiluxoto* moots seeoeajtt '?~r?r
VST. 5??' ,ort ?rMt Cor
poral Wm. ellington, of troop O, tenth U. &
Sergean WamesLo^?' ax^rtaily * *
Rates Wert from St. Paal.
too cu how ao raon cuoaoo to
Chicaoo. Dee. 2L?A local paper says: A war
on passenger rates between the lines waat froa
St. Paal has just broken oat, and la bums
quence rates from Chicago to Portland, Ore
gon. and all points west of St Paal, are I
oasly out Ihe Northern Pacific notified <
netting lines yesterday that It will aoeaat oa
second-class tickets to Portland a proportion of
?30 from St Paul. Thia makes the throach
rate from Chicago *36, while the i
rate is KIM. The Manitoba ai
Pacific applies Its ti differential on fee eat
rate, making the through rate by that line only
$31 from Chicago. First-claas tickets hava alee
beea correspondingly reduced, also tha ratee to
Helena, Butte, and other northwes
The break in ratee is said to hare I
by the cutting of the lines 1
river, and the latter, it is

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