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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 09, 1889, Image 1

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Vol 74?No. 12,019.
WASHINGTON, D. C., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1889.
TWO CENTS.
THE EVENING STAR
PUBLISHED DAILY, Except Sunday,
AT THE STAR BUILDINGS,
SortkvMt Corner Pennijlriaia Ave. and 11th 8U by
The Evening Star Newspaper Company,
S. H. KAIFFMA.VN. Pret'L
Tn Ermrrne 8t*? la served to TOhwrlber* In the
rtty by camera, on their own *<-connt, at lOc-'nU i>er
week, or 44c. per month. Copies at the counter, 2
rent* each. By mail?postage prepaid?50 casta a
D onth. on* year, #>>, uls month*.
[Enteral at tha Post Office at Wash.agtou. D. C? aa
?eruud-cl?* mail matter )
Tm wtciLT Braa? published on Fridsy?$1 ?
year, postage prepaid. Six month*. 50 cent*
fWAIl mail aotmcriptiona must be paid in advance:
Do paper aent tonioT than i* paid for.
Ratoa of advertialng made known on application.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
_ FAPF.RHASr.EMr~ '
_ Ton are notified to attend the meeting L. A.
-No. ;i59u, THIRsDAY, JAM AEV 10. at 7 P.m.
a harp. IJaH-'Jf) QEO E. CORN ELI* M. W.
A LITTLE NOTE TO MEN.
r^
Look to j
Loot to yonr Trousers' Should yon happen to need
anew pair here ia your chance I have Jn*t received
two excellent line* of Trou*ertuga, I* mirht und<>r price?
one line of Fin* Striped Wonted* at #7, which usually
*ell at 410. and ?. line of Imported Till 11*11 lim ? at $ 10,
which usually *>11 at #12 and $13. I believe it will be
to your interest to see these
O. WARF1ELD SIMPSON. Expert In Trotnxra,
_ J8-."lt t < r lith and O ata. n.w.
NOTICE I HKRF.BY NOTIFY AND
warn the public and merchants in particular,
that nencefortli 1 cease to be responaible for Mrs. W.
J. Bcall's acts or any debt* she may incur.
_>7 :f _ W. J. BKALL. 929 E at. n w.
WASHINGTON MARKET COMPANY.
DIVIDEND NOTICE
A dividend 'No. 24) of 30 cent* a ?hare declared to
stiskbolders of record December 31, 1888, will be
paid ut the office of thiaconipan) in Center Market on
and after Monday. January 7,1S8X.
8AML. W. CURRIDEN, Treas
Wasbi ngtnn. D. C? Jan. 3, 188i?. Ji4-.">t
j Bl'Y YOUR COAL, COKE AND WOOD
from
JOHNSON BROTHERS,
the leading firm in the District. ja5-3m
. RFCEPTIONS ! RECEPTIONS !
GEN r'S DRllSS SUITS for Hire, at
HORN, THE TAILOR'S.
jl-lm 613Fat, n.w.
BOOKS AND STATIONERY.
1889.
BLANK BOOKS OF AI.L KINDS,
COUNTING-HOUSE STATIONERY.
DIARIES, A1X SIZES. FOB 1889,
PHYSICIANS' VISIT. NO LISTS,
AIDS TO THE 8CNDAY SCHOOL LESSONS.
AT
TO BALLANTYNEk SON,
Ja3 428 7TH STREET.
IARIF.S CALENDARS
ALMANACS. NEW YEAR CARDS.
BI.ANK BOOKS. COM.MLKt.lAL STATIONERY.
All the Help* and Requisite* for the 1889 Inter
national Sunday School Leaaoha.
C. C. PURSEI L,
d28 418 Mb at
&ISTER SoFTSNAP
Ia gone on
BROTHER BIX)WHARD.
Hi* nnadnltented check aelli hla adulterated foods,
and the Softanap family are his victims.
LETZHEEfWENT I
The Hardsense family and Hardcaah familyTar* our j
customers. Do you wrnt
CHEAP CHECK OB CHUMP CHEEK?
We provide the former. Cheap Chuck, and Blowhard
theJChump Cheek. Take your choice between the
CHUCKLING CHUMP
or the
CHO: CEJCHUCK.
If our wonla don't have weight our foods do. You'll
get more Goods than Gas at
VICTOR E. ADLER'3
10 PER CENT CLOTHING HOUSE. 10
927 and 928 7th at. n.w.. corner Massachusetts ave.
Strictly One Price.
Open Saturdays till 11 p. m. Ja7
DO NOT FAIL TO ATTEND THE FIRST GRAND |
Remnant Sale, bemmitnir Friday. Jan. 11.1889.
KAUFMAN'S DOUBLE COMBINATION,
>9-2t 11th at. a.e.
An Exciting Time.
SATURDAY. AT 9 O'CLOCK, COMMENCED
THE GREAT WINDING-UP SALE
OF THE
BANKRUPT STOCK OF CLOTHING
AT 912 F STREET NORTHWEST.
There was such a large crowd that the sidewalk was
completely blocked. At one time it looked aa if there
would be a panic on account of the immense crowd.
But the good Judgment of the managers averted such
a catastrophe. The canae of this extraordinary rush
ia the line f20 Chinchilla Overcoats that are being j
sold for (4. (S3, and ?18 Overcoats for *3.87. Chil
dren's Suits, 41.28 and $1.48. Men'a fine Print*
Albert Suita. (12.62. formerly |'.'8; and Men's Suita.
?2.85, $3.62, $4.70. Boy'a Overcoats and Suita at j
any price you offer. The balance of the stock at 20
centa on the dollar previous to sending it to auction.
Remember, only THREE DAYS MORE.
Children's Knee Pats, 21c., 28c., 33c., 37c.
BAKBUPT CLOTHING SALE,
912 F STREET N.W,
SIX DOORS FROM 9TH ST.
no28-3m
DO NOT FAIL TO ATTEND THE FIRST GR^ND
Remnaut Sale, beginning Friday, Jan. 11, 188U.
, _ KAUFMAN'S DOUBLE COitBINAtflON,
_^-2t 11th at. a.e.
I ja dies' Furs And Garments In
SEAL SKIN^AND FINE PLUSH.
Notwithstanding the great ruahSwethave had our
stock ia being repleniahed, and from this date bargains
may be obtained at greatly reduced prices ia
SEAL WRAPS,
FLUSH WRAPS,
FUR LINED CIRCULARS,
MUFFS,
BOAS. AND
TRIMMINGS.
& H. 8TINEMETZ k SONS.
HATTERS AND FURRER&
623 1237 Penna. ave.. through to 13th at.
J* W* Botkler & Son
ARK OFFERING GREAT INDUCEMENTS
TO PURCHA8ER8 OF
DEENRR AND TEA SETS.
GAME AND FISH SETS.
RICH. HEAVY. AND ENGRAVED GLA88
TABLE CUTLERY AND PLATED WARE.
PIANO AND BANQUET LAMPS.
W BRIC-A-BRAC AT REDUCED PRICES.
J. W. BOTELEB k SON.
923 Pa. ave.
Mu M. J* Hunt.
1309 F STREET NORTHWEST,
Will exhibit on
THURSDAY, JANUARY 3. K
RECEPTION AND EVENING BONNETS
OF NEW DE8IGN8. d31
J. C. H
UTCHINSON,
IMPORTER.
FINE MILLINERY.
WBAPS.
JiOKITI,
AT GEEATLT REDUCED PRICES.
MI STYLES RECEIVED TO-DAY AND WILL BE
BOLD AT HALF PRICE.
907 PENNSYLVANIA AVE
(IMPROVED LACING GLOVES FOR
AND EVENING WEAR. Ja&
SPECIAL NOTICES.
ar-Jias THf INDIANA REPUBLICAN CU B
Pv.'i will hold a called meeting \> KDNESDAY
EVE, 9th instant, at 7 o'clock, at '?PnMir Comfort
Rooms." Iiiangural Committee Headquarter*. at the
Atlantic buildii u. ou > st. Col. Bridgiland, of I11
diana|*>Iis, Ind ., desires to meet the club ami confer
(ill matter* |*rtatninif to public comfort of Yi si ting
Indiana jieople who may attend the inaugural cere
ni'Ules March 4. T. H. McKEE,
It President.
HO! FOB THK INAUGURATION. ~~
TheFrank Leslie Publishing Company iB preparing
to issue a quarter milliou copies of a magazine styled
"WASHINGTON ILLUSTRATED" for distribution
test before and during the inauguration of President
Harrison next fourth of March, and will solicit a lim- J
ltid number of advertisements from Waahimrton '
merchants. The book will Ik- a iniiile of Washington,
and profusely illustrated in their characteristic style.
Mr. II T. Doyle is in charge of the Washington de
partment, and will wait upon the merchants during
iha ml i>wday*. It
fifr- . I. O."o. F.-THE (DEGREE STAFF OF
METR01"0LIS IX)DOE. No. 16. will confer
the ltd Degree in their Hall. s.e. cor Oth and D sts.. on I
FRIDAY EVENING, the ?11th inst. Every memlier is
requested to be present. Metuliers of Sister Lodges,
visiting. and resident members of the Order froui
other Jurisdictions, are fraternally invited.
Ja9-2t EDW. BAUSEL, Bee. Sec'y.
TO THE PI BLIC -
liehcvnitf that a well-conducted Riding
Academy is an institution which this community in
?general. and lovers of horse* in particular, have an in
terest in supporting, and being informed that the
"WASHINGTON RIDING ACADEMY,"
established in thia city almut a vear ago, could be con
tinued with increased success on a co-operative basis,
we. the undersigned, have become tlie incorporators of
the
"WASHINGTON RIDINO ACADEMY COMPANY."
and have each agreed to subscribe for at least one
share, the majority of us having taken live shares.
The above states our whole relation to the enterprise
up to thia time, anil, with unabated Interest in the
maintenance of a successful Hiding Academy in Wash
ington, we leave the community in general, and lovers
| of horses in particular, to judge for themselves as to
the propriety of following our example.
Ou the suggestion of Mr. J D. Brown, the proprie
tor of the Washington Riding Academy, and at the re
quest of the incorporators, the National Sato Deposit
Company of Washington h;w consented to act as Trus
tee of the luliils which may be paiu in ou account of
subscriptions to stock.
Subscriptions will lie received on and after January
R. 1881*. at "Till, WASHINGTON 1UDIXG ACAD
EMY." corner of 22d and P sts.. at THE NATION AL,
HATE DEPOSIT COMPANY. 15th St. and New York
ave., and at ROBERTSON & BLACKFORD'S, 1515
H st. n.w.
The shares are one hundred (lOOi dollars each, the
subscription Iteing limited to five (5) shares for each
subscriber, and 25 |>er cent being payable at the date
, of subscription to the Trustee above named, who alone
| is authorized to receive and receipt for payments,
; and to hold the same until the final organization of the
stockholders.
Caldcron Carlisle, H. R. Dtilany,
Anthony Pollok, J. D. Brown,
I T. J. Flack. Albert Ordway,
Robert Nevills, Linden Kent,
Thomas W. symons, Woodbury Blair,
Aulick Palmer, Arthur T. Lnce.
I Jno. F. Wairgaman,
Send for Prospectus. JaO-lm
NOTICE.
THE DRUG STORE
at the corner of Oth and G sts. n.w.,
has been entirely refitted aid rcstocked by the sub
scriber, and he respectfully asks the support and
patronage of tbeneightsirliood, Ins old friends, and the
public. WASHINGTON C. MILBLRN.
Formerly of 1429Penua. ave. and the cor. of R. I.
| aye. and 14th st. n.w. Ja9-4t*
. "fNDER AND BY TDTOI OF A GEN
?? .. eral assignment from James Graham. I v. ill
offer for sale the stock of Books, Stationery, Toys. &c?
in store No. 1925 Pennsylvania ave. n.w. The stock
will be sold iu the ordinary course of business until
further notice.
All persons indebted to James Graham are requested
to settle at once, and all jiersons having c laims against
him are requested to present the same without delay
to Caldcron Carlisle and liotiert W. Mcpherson, l'eti
dall 1-aw Building. .'<44 I> st. n. w? the agents and at
torneys of the assignee, or to
Ja9-10t R. M. HENDERSON", Assignee, Carlisle, Pa.
i NOTICE -CANNON k VINSON HAVE
P^.3, removed their Undertaking Establishment
to 44 Massachusetts ave. li.w., next door to the old
stand, iuurs, CANNON k VINSON,
jaH-tit Undertakers.
BRICKLAYERS. ATTENTION!
All bricklayers wishing to procure their
January card will apply at the hall. ?th and L sts. n.w.,
W ednesday and Thursday from 4 until 8 o'clock p.m.
Ja7-3f MICHAEL J. CONNOR, Fm. Sec.
OFFICE OF THE MUTUAL FIRE IN- I
8URANCF. CO . OF D. C.
Washington, January 4.188!>.
The annual meeting of the MutualF'ire Insurance Co.
of tlie District of Columbia will be held on the
THIRD MONDAY of January. 1889, the 21st instant,
at the office of the company, corner of Pennsylvania '
avenue and Oth st. n.w., commencing at 0 o'clock am.
By the charter of the company, the election ot seven
managers to constitute a l>oard to conduct theaitairs
of the company is required to be held at the above
meeting.
By the sixth article of the By-Laws of the company
it is provided: "At the animal meeting of the company
the first business in order shall be the api>oiutuieiit of
a chairman, who ahall conduct the meeting and elec- .
tion iu accordance with the act of lncori'oration, l?- |
tween the hours of 9 o'clock a.m. and B o'clock p.m."
Amount of premium notes held by the
company $1,931,080.00
Amount of cash on hand 17,040.0:1
Amount of securities 176,254.30
Amount of real estate 74.000.00
Office furniture and fixtures 500.00
Losses by fire fur the year 1888, ad
lusted aud paid 1,085.30
The annual statement will l>e ready for distribution
at the office of the company, by the 14th instant.
By order of the Board of Managers.
Ja5-14t .1. HESLEY B0TILER, Secretary.
, THE ANN1'AI. MEETING OF THE
-- sUs khi'liters of the National F'air Associa
tion, of the District of Columbia, for th# election of a
Board of Directors and a Treasurer to serve during
the ensuing year of 1880, and also for the transaction
of such other business as may lie properly brought
before it, will lie held MONDAY, January 14. at 12
M? Rinml, Vemou Row, cor. Pa. ave. and 10th st.
n.w. By order of the Board of Directors.
JOS. C. McKIBBIN, President.
GEO. R. REPF.TT1,
Secretary. >5-7t
Jf THE W EEK OF PRAYEB WIUTbE OB
served by Union Meetii.ga,under the auspices
J ct the Evangelical Alliance, in the Calvary Baptist I
! Church, cor. of 8th and H sts. n.w., during the coming
week The leaders and subjects for the various meet
ings are as follows
Thursday, January-10,12 m.?The Church of Chriat.
Led by Rev. B. N. Seymour.
Friday. January 11,12 m.?Missions, Home and For
, eigu. Led by Rev. W K. Parsou.
satnnlay. January 12. 12 in.?Nations and Social
Reforms. Is*dby Rev. C. A. Hlakley.
There will also be a I'limu Meeting of the women
of the churches at the same place at 11 o'clock of each
day. A. W. P1TZER, Secretary.
Washington, D C? January, 1880. ja.VUt
FOR BRIGHT, OI'ICK FIRE AND CHEAP,
_ . . .. CLEAN FUEL buy Washington <ias Light
Comiany's Coke. JOHNSON BROTHERS,
Ja5-3m Exclusive Agents.
OFFICE RIGGS FIRE INSURANCE (M)M
pany, Washington. D. C., January 1,1880.
A dlTidend of three (3) is-r cent lias lieen declared,
payable at the office of the company, 1331 F street n.
w? on and atter January 10. 1880, to the stockholders
of record, at the dose of business on January 5th inst.
The transfer books will be dosed from January II to
January It), 1881*?both days inclusive?by order of
the board of trustees.
Jal-2w FRANCIS B. MOHUN. Secretary.
THE MUTUAL CO-OPERATIVE BUILD
1NG ASSOCIATION has removed to the
-lURCHE Building. 1300 F st. n.w. Office hours, 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. H. A. HALL, Presideut.
d!4-lm THOS. G. HENSEY. Sec'y.
IN ADDITION TO THE DRESSMAKING
?s^Sr^AND MILLINERY DEPARTMENTS the
Sisters cf 8t. Rose Industrial School have recently
added a dei?rtment of Cookery, at the head of which
is a most experienced and efficient French cook, so
that they are now ready to receive orders for Lunches
az.d Single Dishes, such as Chicken. Puddings, Cro
quetts. Bahaa, Cakes, kc.
F'ull particulars may be learned by making inquiry
at the school.
No. 2023 O Stm t Northwest. dl2-lm
CERTIFICATES OF STOCK. CHEOUE8.
and other securities. Commercial litho
graphy and designing. A. G. GEDNKY.
Jal 10th and D streets t Post BtiUiling).
THOS. G HENSEY, REAL ESTATE AND I
Insurance Broker, has remoTe<l his offices to I
the Burr be Building, 1300 F st n.w., where ho will
rontlnue his business as a Real Estate Manager and
Convcjancer, and Insurance Agent.
Houses sold and rented, estates managed, rents
rollectcdand loans negotiated. Insnram e placed in
the liest comiwuies, lucal or foreign, at the lowest rate.
Telephone call 1185?2. '114-1 m
?^iS>THE IKDU8TKIAL 8AYIN(?S AND LOAN ,
Association lias removed to the BURCUE
building. 1300 F st. n.w. T1IOS. G. HENSEY.
d 14-1 m Secretary.
J*~ SPECIAL NOTICE?I WISH TO INFORM
the public that I have no |?rtuers or agents, I
aud that I am not resix.usible forsny engagements not
Uiaale directly through me. F. ElBNEIt, Leader Etb
ner's orchestra. dll-lm*
GKOGAN'8 INSTALMENT HOUSE
739 AND 741 7TH ST. N.W.
Cheapest house in the city to buy your Fnmltnre,
Ciirets, oil Cloths, Mattir.gs, Baby Carriages. Refrig
erator*. Stoves. Jic. Everything lu the Housefurnith
il g line mid on credit as chesp as they can be bought
elsew here for cash.
WE MAKE AND LAY ALL CARPETS FREE OF
my21 COST.
EQUITABLE
CO-OPERATIVE BUILDING A8SOC1ATTOX
"EQUITABLE BUILDING." 1003 F ST.
ASSETS. ?971,539 04.
^nhopiiptlons for shares in the 10th issue received
daily at the office of the Association, Equitable Build
in*. 1003 F st.
Shares are fi M per month.
? 1,000 advanced on each share.
Pamphlets explaining tl>? objects and sdvantaff* Of
tie Association are furnished u|>un application.
Office boars, from 9 a.in to 4:30 p.m. On the first
f edn< >daj' iu eat h month the office will be open from
b to 8 o'clock P.1U. Advances will be made promptly
at 7 o'clock. ?
THOMAS SOMEBV1LLB. Pres't.
jno. tor xsaoM.
Washington News and Gossip.
Index to Advertisement*.
1 AMUSEMENTS .P*n? 8
; ATTORNEYS Pwre 8
| AUCTION SALES Pw ~
| BOARDING Pure 2
BOOKS AND STATIONERY .. Pmre I
i BUSINESS CHANCES PiMW 2
I CITy jtkMS Paire S
, COUNTRY REAL ESTATE P*tro 2
I DEATHS Patre
DENTISTRY Pa*" 3
EDUCATIONAL. P?Mfo 0
I FAMILY SUPPLIES PWW 8
j FINANCIAL P??re S
FOR RENT ( Halls) Papc 2
FOR RENT ( Rooms) Pa*a
FOR RENT ( Houses) P*F? 3
FOR RENT (Offices) Pajre 3
FOR RENT (STOKES) Pwre 2
FOR RENT (STABLES) P?<re 3
FOR SALE (Houses) P>*e 3
FOR SALE (Lots) P?*e 3
FOR SALE (Miscellaneous) Page 2
GENTLEMEN'S GOODS P??e 6
HOUSEFURNISHINOS P??e ?
LADIES' GOODS P?tfO 3
LOCAL MENTION -Psere 8
LOST AND FOUND P??e ~
MONEY TO LOAN Patre 3
MEDICAL rwi 3
MISCELLANEOUS P?*e 5
NOTARIES PUBLIC P?<ro 9
OCEAN STEAMERS Pwr? 6
POTOMAC RIVER BOATS P?M?e 6
PIANOS AND ORGANS .....P?*e 0
PERSONAL P*f?e ~
PRINTERS P??e 7
PROFESSIONAL. P?#e 0
PROPOSALS P*T? 7
RAILROADS P?*e ((
SPECIAL NOTICES I'*? 7
SPECIALTIES Pure 2
WANTED (Help) P*? ~
WANTED (Situations) Pafe 2
WANTED (Rooms) P?*e 2
WANTED (^su:ellaneous>. P??? 3
WANTED (Houses) Pare 2
WANTED (Lots) Paffe 3
WINTER RESORTS P=M*e 3
WOOD AND COAL P?*e 8
Government Receipts To-Day.?Internal
revenue. $252,043; customs. *902,910.
Amono the President's Cai.lf.rh to-day were
Secretary Whitney. Acting Secretary Thomp
son, Solicitor-General Jenks, Representatives
Conger with J. M. Eppstein (Iowa*. Wilkinson
(La.), Hopkins. Townsend, und O'Neill (Pa.),
and Commissioner Miller.
Another Notary.?The President to-day ap
pointed John W. Parsons to bo a notary public
for tho District of Columbia.
The President Has Approved the act grant
ing a pension to Mary E. Johnston; the act to
construct a road from Florence, S. C., to tho
national cemetery adjacent, and the act to au
tliori/.a the Cairo and Tennessee River railroad
company to construct bridges across the Ten
nessee and Cumberland rivers.
Personam.?Mrs. Belva S. Lockwood leaves
thiB evening for Kansas City, where she is en
gaged to deliver two lectures in the exposition
building on "The women of to-day" and "Is
marriage a failure?" W. H. Day of ltapid
City. I)ak.. is at the Arlington. II. Hitch
cock of York, Judge Clias. P. Daly of New York,
and Hon. W. R. Mc Bride of Salt'Lake City are
at the Ebbitt. Representative McMillin, W.
Power of Toronto, lion. Francis W. Rockwell
of Virginia, and A. O. Haddick of New York are
the Riggs. Col. E. L. Price of Newark, Mor
ris S. Smith of Philadelphia, and Tlios. A. Ban
ning of Chicago are at the St. James.
National Guard Officers Commissioned.?
The President has commissioned the following
officers in the national guard of the District of
Columbia: Elbert 8. Benson, captain of com
pany A, third battalion; Frank Boston, inspec
tor of rifle practice, seventh battalion, with
the rank of first lieutenant; Wm. J. Simmons,
second lieutenant company A, second battalion,
and Fielding L. Dodsoii, second lieutenant
company A, sixth battalion.
Bible Tracts in Turkish.?Mr. Oscar S.
Straus, United States minister to Turkey, has
reported to the state department that he has
obtained of the grand vizer the nccessarv
authorization for the Bible house ut Constanti
nople to print 35,000 Bible tracts in Turkish,
consisting of the Psalms, the Proverbs, the
four Gospels and the Acts.
TO SHUT BLAINE OUT.
Capitalists With Foreign Interests Op
pose His Going Into the Cabinet.
It was current rumor around the capitol to
day that a new opposition to Blaine as a cabi
net officer has arisen. It can be found among
the New York importers and among the capi
talists who have foreign interests. These are
the same men who. in 1884, openly voted for
Cleveland because they disapproved of Blaine's
South American policy. They claim that the
presence of Blaine in the cabinet as Secretary
of State would unsettle business to a very con
siderable extent. Gen. Harrison has, it is
said, been informed of this opposition, and
when Senator Hiscock was in Indianapolis they
talked the matter over. Boston and Philadel
phia importers are said to have joined hands
with their New York brethren in the endeavor
to shut Blaine out of President Harrison's
political family.
THE CASE OF GEN. SWAIM.
Efforts to Stcnre His Pardon from the
President.
The friends of Gen. Swaim are more hopeful
of securing bis pardon by the President. His
friends generally contend that his conviction
by court-martial was not warranted. But, lay
ing aside this, the curious state of affairs caused
by his suspension for twelve years, which per
mits of no one being appointed to the judge
advocate generalship of the army and yet
leaves that position unoccupied, requires that
something should be done in the matter. If
Gen. Swaim continues under sentence for the
full term of twelve years the office must be va
cant that long. Several conferences have been
held with the President on the subject. Sat
urday Senator Voorheus. Judge Montgomery
and Representatives Butterworth and Gros
venor had a long talk with the President, and
though he gave them no assurances of any sort
they hope that he will grant the pardon. It is
thought that the pardon will be granted, and
that Gen. Swaim will then be retired and an
appointment be made to the position of judge
advocatc general
Interior Department Changes.
The following official changes have been
made in the Department of the Interior:
General land office?appointments: Henry J.
Philpot, of Iowa, special agent, 91.500; Her
man J. Schulteis, of Wisconsin, copyist, #900.
Patent office?appointment: Mrs. Sarah L.
Wolfe, of Massachusetts, skilled laborer, $730.
Pension office?appointment: Wm. K. Cherry
holmes,of Ohio, clerk, ??1.000.
Two Men Escape the Gallows.
Til DBATH SENTENCE IX TWO CASKS COMMUTED
BT THE PRESIDENT.
The President to-day commuted the sentences
in the case of Louis Burrow, convicted in the
western district of Arkansas of murder, and
sentenced to be hanged January 25, 1889, and
in the case of Wm. G. Sorter, convicted in the
same district of murder, and sentenced to be
hanged on the same day. The President in his
endorsement in the former cuse says: "It is
conceded by both the judge and district-attor
ney who officiated upon the trial of this convict
that his punishment should be commuted from
death to imprisonment for life. ? ? ? I
think, considering all the circumstances and the
fact that the prisoner has already suffered
quite a long confinement in jail, that his sen
tence should be commuted to imprisonment for
the term of ten years. Let this t>e done."
In the case of Sorter, the endorsement is as
follows: "The sentence in this ease is commuted
to imprisonment for life in accordance with the
upparent view of the district-attorney and the
recommendation of the attorney-general and
the jury who found the verdict of guilty of
murder. I am of the opinion that this com
mutation is the utmost clemency which should
be extended in this case in any event or at any
time."
AT THE CAPITOL TO-DAY. |
THE STRUGGLE IN THE HOUSE j
Another Day Wasted in Fillibustering.
THE TARIFF BILL IN THE SENATE.
The Senate.
The House amendment* to the Nicaragua
canal bill were, on motion of Mr. Sherman,
non-concurred in. nud a conference was asked.
Senator* Sherman, Edmunds, and Morgan
were appointed conferee# on the part of the
Senate.
House bill for the relief of the Albemarle ;
and Chesapeake canal company was reported :
b?ck favorably from the committee on naval
affairs and was placed on the calendar.
THE TARIFF BILL TAKEN UP.
The Senate at 12:20 resumed consideration of
the tariff bill, the pending question being on
Mr. Vance's amendment that the duty on 110
article in schedule J (flax. hemp, and jute)
shall exceed 50 per cent ad valorem.
The amendment was rejected?yeas 18. nays
25?Mr. Brown voting with the democrats 111
the affirmative.
THE SILK CLAUSE.
Schedule K (wool and the manufactures of
wool) was, at the request of Mr. Allison, passed
over informally and schedule L (silk and silk
goods) was taken up.
MR. WANAMAKF.R'H SUIT.
Mr. Vest interrupted the reading at para
graph 375, in relation to velvets and plushes
(including ribbons), and asked whether that
was the item involved in the suit between Mr.
John Wanamaker, of Philadelphia, and the
government. He said that Mr. Wanamaker'*
contention was that ribbons canio in under an
other clause in regard to trimmings for bon
nets, which paid a less duty. He saw by to
day's papers that the suit had been decided in
favor of Mr. Wanamaker. and that an appeal
had been taken to the Supreme Court. He nad
also seen it stated that Mr. Wanamaker was
manufacturing such goods in Berlin, although
he was one of the most distinguished advocates
of American labor and American workingmen,
Mr. Aldrich stated that the suit referred to
was in reference to the proper construction of
paragraph 448 in Schedule N of ( xistiug law.
The defect in existing law was radically cured
by the substitute.
On motion of Mr. Aldrich, paragraph 375
was amended by striking out the words ??weigh
ing not less titan one ounce nor more than
eight ounces per square yard."
IN THE INTEREST OF THE POOR.
Mr. Vest said he had not thought proper to
object to the paragraphs increasing the exist
ing rates on silk goods, because they were
luxuries, and his sympathies in the entire
matter were with the poorer classes. He be
lieved that the burdens of taxation should fa'l
as lightly as possible on the poorer people and
should be imposed on those who are able and
willing to bear them.
Mr. Allison?That is the general purpose and
idea of the Senate bill.
Mr. Vest?I do not accept that statement at
all. I believe that the bill is in the interest of
the manufacturers, without regard to the inter
est of the consumer*. Mr. Vest sent to the
clerk's desk and had read a newspaper inter
view with one of the largest corset manufac
turers in New York to show
HOW THE TARIFF PINCHED.
He said that an approximate estimate of the
changes proposed in the substitute showed an
increase of revenue to the amount of a million
dollars; and that that was in the interest cjf
manufacturers alone.
Mr. Aldrich stated that the silk schedule had
been prepared at the Treasury Deparnieut bv
Treasury experts, and was intended to be (ex
cept in regard to silk corsets) simply a trans
lation of the existing ad valorem rates into
specific or compound rates.
House of Representatives.
DILATORY PROCEEDINGS RENEWED TO-DAY.
That Mr. Weaver (Iowa.) is earnest in his in
tention to do all in his power to prevent the
House from accomplishing any business until
it has finally acted upon the Oklahoma bill was
demonstrated this morning. Immediately after
the chaplain's prayer. Mr. Weaver called the
Speaker's attention to the first rule of the
House, which directs that officer, after calling
the House toorder,"to cause, upon the appear
ance of a quorum, the journal of the last day's
sitting to be read " He raised the point of
order that the journal could not be read until
it was apparent that a quorum was in attend
ance.
The Speaker sustained the point, and di
rected the clerk to call the roll.
HALF AN HOUR WAS FRITTERED AWAY
before a quorum could be secured to vote down
this motion, which Mr. Weaver instantly sup
plemented with a motion for a recess until
2:30.
Messrs. Crisp (Ga.). and Weaver (Iowa), were
appointed tellers and stood opposite each other
as the members lazily passed between them.
Mr. Keed (Me.). sarcastically asked (having
in mind the speech made by >fr. Crisp against
the proposition of the committee on rules to
change the rules) whether the gentleman from
Georgia knew of anything else that could be
done to protect the rights of the minority?
Mr. Crisp pleasantly responded that the gen
tleman from Georgia had said nothing to indi
cate that he was at all objecting to the present
procedure.
'?How does the minority feel about it?"
queried Mr. Payson (Ills.), addressing himself
to Mr. Weaver.
Mr. Weaver?This is
A FIOHT FOR THE RIOHTS OF THE MAJORITY.
It took the House a quarter of an hour to de
termine that it did not desire a recess until
2:30, and then Mr. Weaver presented it with an
opportunity to express its will relative to a re
cess till 1:30.
Messrs. Crisp and Weaver resumed their
places as tellers, the former gentleman provid
ing himself with a chair, in which he reclined
as he proceeded with the count.
At 1:40 it was evident that a quorum could
not be secured to decide the question of taking
a recess until 1:30 and a call of the House was
ordered.
GEN. WEAVER IS MASTER.
He will Allow the House to do Noth
ing Until a Quorum Is Present.
Gen. Weaver has the House in his power, at
least for the present. He stopped the reading
of the journal immediately after prayer this
morning until a quorum should be found pres
ent, and not one step of progress has been
made since. When, at 1:30 o'olock, Mr. Crisp
and Gen. Weaver were standing as tellers look
ing for a quorum, the House having got no
further than "Amen" to the chaplain's prayer,
Mr. Beed got up very seriously and asked Mr.
Crisp for information as to the rights of a
minority. Mr. Crisp opjtosed the change of
rules proposed the otherf day, because of its
encroachment upon the rights of the minority.
The change was defeated, and to-day a minor
ity of one man is holding Mr. Crisp, with all
the rest of the House behind him, so fast that
thev cannot move.
Mr. Anderson, of Kansas, who was the filibus
ter against Oklahoma, and who led the ob
structionists against the change of rules, is now
violently opposed to filibustering. He was ex
pressing his indignation to-day at the action of
one man is obstructing the will of the House.
"But," said a fellow member, "vou were
doing the same thing but yesterday.
"Yes," Mr. Anderson replied, his brow dark
ening a little, "Yes, but fm afraid it has got
into bad hands this time."
Gen. Weaver says that not a thing shall be
done until he gets what he considers pair play.
Th^aj^Vopriation bills, he says, shall not psss
Mr. Randall says that when the appropria
tion bills come along the Ohlahoma folks will
hare to dear the traek, _
THE HOUSE FILIBUSTERS.
If They Persist They Will Make an
Extra Session Inevitable.
ACTIVE FRIENDS OK TIIE OKLAHOMA BILL?DE
TERMINED TO PUSH THE MEASURE EVEN IF
REGULAR APPROPRIATION BILLS ark DE
FEATED?THE REPUBLICANS SERENE.
It looks na if recommitting the resolution to
prevent filibustering on suspension Monday*
has not relieved the House from its embarrass
ment. The friends of the Oklahoma bill have
made up their minds that no business shall be
transacted until this bill is voted on or until a
day for the vote is set. Yesterday afternoon
the Smalls-Elliott contested election cose was
called up, but it was at once antagonized by
the Oklahoma bill, and the rest of the day to
the hour of adjournment was wasted in fili
bustering. Having tailed to secure a change in
the rules so as to place some restrictions on the
power of obstructionists the Oklahoma folks
are going to try giving the House an exhibi
tion of the
PRACTICAL WORKINGS OF THE PRESENT RULES.
They declare that they might as well use up
the time of the House lighting against the
abuse of minority power, as to let it be con
sumed in the ordinary way under the rules, in
doing nothing. They intend to take advantage
of every opportunity the rules offer for ob
structing legislation until they can have their
will. If this plan is carried to its utmost, as
Gen. \\ eaver proposes it shall, it will make
AN EXTRA SESSION OF THE FIFTY-FIRST CONGRESS
UNAVOIDABLE,
and fix the responsibility for it on this House.
It is the purpose of Gen. Weaver to antagonize
appropriation bills as well as all others, and such
a course, if in any measure successful, would be
apt to result in the failure of one or more of
these bills. The House appropriations com
mittee has completed all of its regular annual
appropriation bills, and passed three of them
through the House. None of the appropria
tion buls^ irom the other committees have
passed The military, the navy, the post-of
fice, and Indian bills have not yet been re
ported to the House. The navy bill has not
even been reported to the full committee.
FATE or THE APPROPRIATION BILLS.
But the appropriation bills 011 the calendar
now could easily occupy the House until the
others are ready, and if acted on as prouiptlv
as were those that have already been consid
ered, there would be 110 difficulty in passing all
in season to give the Senate plenty of time on
them. 1 hese threatened delays by tilibuster
i.^er' Hake it look extremely doubt
'! V'i'f , is much can be accomplished. If
the Oklahoma folks are its strong and deter
mined as Gen. Weaver and Mr. Springer think
they are, all the appropriation bills will be
blocked until Oklahoma in recognized.
ATTITUDE OF THE REPUBLICANS.
The extra session sentiment is very strong
among the republicans, as has alreadv been
made apparent. They expect the Fifty-first
Congress to be called together in April or May
anyhow, but if they could charge the responsi
bility upon this House it would be made more
easy for them. This fact, together with the
general feeling of disgust on the part of Mr
Heed and his associates at the failure of the
committee on rules' resolution, will be calcu
lated to make them anything but anxious to
help the democ-i-tic party out of the ditticultv.
If that party suffer* from the minoritv power
thev have decided to uphold. Mr. Reed will not
feel it his duty to come to their relief. If an
extra session is made necessary bv filibustering
it will cause him no concern.
CAPITOL*" TOPICS.
ARCTIC EXPLORERS.
A favorable report was made to-day by Sena
tor Chandler, front the committee on naval af
fairs, on the bill authorizing the President to
advance Chief Engineer George Wallace Mel
ville, L. S. N., one grade. The act also appro
priates money to defray the expense of strik
ing memorial medals, which are to be bestowed
upon all the survivors of the Jeannette expedi
tion. -
Senator Chandler, from the committee on
naval affairs, to-day reported without amend
ment the House bill authorizing the readjust
ment of the accounts of Wm. F. C. Nindemann.
who served on the Arctic exploring steamer
Jeannette.
THE LEGION OF HONOR.
Senator Saulsbury, from the committee on
foreign relations, reported favorably a joint
resolution authorizing Capt. George 8. Ander
son, sixth cavalry, to accept from the president
of the ireiu h republic a diploma conferring
the decoration of chevalier of the National
Order of the Legion of Honor.
IRRIGATION OF ARID LAND IN NEW MEXICO.
The Joseph bill * to promote the interests of
agriculture by irrigation and to encourage the
settlement of the arid land in New Mexico."
was mede a special order for next Wednesday
at the meeting of the committee on agriculture
this morning. This bill w as introduced in the
last session of Copgress. and creates the Jor
nada and El Paso Reservoir and <'anal com
pany. a corporation whose object is to con
struct and maintain a series of storage reser
voirs, together with a canal and laterals, for
the irrigation of arid or desert lands on the
"Jornada Del Nuerto."and in the Messilla and
Bio Grande valleys of southern New Mexico
and lexas, for the promotion of agriculture,
horticulture, stock raising. Ac. The stock of
the company is not to exceed *10.000.000 The
bill appropriates *25.000 todefrav the expenses
of the survey, location, and maps of the reser
voir and laterals.
REPORTS FROM THE COMMITTEE ON NAVAL AFFAIRS.
Senator Cameron, from the committee on
naval affairs, reported to-day, without amend
ment, the bill authorizing the President to ap
P0'"* Frederick N. Kress, an ensign in the
United States navy, on the retired list; also the
House bill for the relief of the Albemarle and
Chesapeake canal company.
Land Grant Forfeiture.
COMPROMISE LIKELY TO BE AGREED OX BY THX
CONFERENCE COMMITTEE.
The conference committee of the House and
Senate on the general land grant forfeiture bill
expect to reach an agreement at their next
meeting to-day or to-morrow. They have, in
fact, practically agreed upon a compromise
now. Thev held a long session last night, the
result of which was an informal understanding
that a compromise would be agreed upon the
terms of which would be that all lands claimed
by any railroad on account of grant from the
government should be declared forfeited which
had not been np to this time earned by the
construction of the roads. This would give to
the roads all their claimed lands adjacent to
the parts of the roads that have been con
structed and take from them only those lands
through which they have failed* to build the
roads.
SCHOOL-SITE PURCHASES.
Comptroller Durham Is Not Making any
Investigation In regard to them.
A paragraph appeared in a morning paper to
the effect that Controller Durham is m.iH-g
a quiet investigation into the matter of the
real estate transactions of the District that have
received considerable public attention of late.
When asked as to the truth of this paragraph
this morning by ? Stab reporter the controller
replied that he was neither conducting an in
quiry nor making an investigation into the
methods of the District CommiMioners
in purchasing school-sites or any other
real estate. So long as the accounts
earn to him, he added, with a
certificate from the attornev for the District
that the title to the property in question is
good, he has nothing to do but to approve
them, unless there is some outrageous exhor
bitance of price that is plainlv apparent The
District's attorney is their authoritv for the
validity of the title, and he (the controller) is
not responsible for any error that the former
may make.
"There was some inquiry made of the Com
missioners as to the validity of a certain title
that did not seem clear," the Judge went on,
but I have never had any idea of
into the legality of the methods adopted in the
transactions. I hav# enough to do in my
tUt
Telegrams to The Star.
A BLACK EE FOR THE SUGAR TRUST
Important Decision Rendered Against It.
PRAISE FOE MBS. CHAMBERLAIN.
HARRINGTON LOSES HIS MUSTACHE.
A Chicago Society Man'"? Downfall.
THK TALK OK LONDON.
How Clement Scott, the Critic, Propone*
to Get Kven with \V. S. tillbcrt.
Special Cable Uaptlch to THK Evexinu Stir
London. Jan. 9.?The Tinw*' list of proprie- !
tors, as supplied to Paruell's counsel by order '
of the Scotch court, comprises ninety-nine
names.
The crown prince of Austria is coming to
England next June on a visit to the l*rince of
Wales.
Clement Scott intend* to publish a pamphlet
of letters from W.S. Gilbert about his criticism
in the Tekyra\Ji of Gilbert's new play, ?'llrant
inghame Hall." Gilbert accuses him of truck
ling to him, and then turning around and
abusing him because Scott formerly praised
'?The Wicked World." Gilbert persists, in spite
of much ridicnle. in an action for libel against
Scott for saying he had written to the editor of
the Telegraph demanding Scott's dismissal,
w hereas he only wrote saying Scott was unfit
for his post.
Wheatley, the eminent antiquarian, is eu
gaged on a book describing the most remark
able bookbindings in the British museum,
many of which are reproduced iu photo
gravure. It will be publish'-d in New York
and Paris, but the author believes so little in
terest is felt in the subject in Loudon that lie
will not publish it here.
Duchaillu will shortly publish an important
work on northern antiquities, with 1,200 illus
tration*.
j MRS. CHAMBERLAIN'S MANNER.
The English Find Her Self-Possessed,
Clever and Agreeable.
Special Cable LHspaU-h to Thk Evkmino Stab
London, Jan. y.?The welcome to Mr. Cham
berlain and his wife at Birmingham yesterday
was purely a party demonstration. It does not
appear that a single Gladstonian was present
Mrs. Chamberlain is well received in English
society, and is considered clever and agreeable.
People here compare her manner favorably
with the awkward shyness of most English girls
of the same age. Chamberlain's remarks on
America again direct attention to the vacancy
iu the Washington mission. The Star s*\ s:
" Salisbury's action, we suppose, is what such
a fiery patriot as Ashmeao-liartlett would call
a dignified reply to Cleveland's dismissal of
Sackville. A more contemptible plea could not
be imagined. When Salisbury nas the com
mon courage to say booh to Bismarck we will
talk about liis ability to defend the honor and
interests of England in the United States. Why
our concerns in the states should suffer because
Sackville blundered nobody but our spirited
foreign minister can imagine."
SECRETARY VILAS TO DECIDE.
The Rival Chlcknsnw Chiefs Agree to
Submit Their Clutms to llini.
Chicago, Jan. 9.?A dispatch from Muskegee.
L T.. says: The contending factions for the
governorship of the Chickasaw nation reached
an agreement yesterday. Each chief agreed to
submit his claims to the governorship to Secre
tary Vilas and allow him to decide, both agree
ing to abide by the decision. The content has
been in progress now for three months and has
caused bloodshed and hard feelings through
the nation.
AGAINST THE SUGAR TRUST.
Judge Barrett Renders a Decision in
Favor of the State of New York.
New York. Jan. 9.?Judge Barrett, in the
supreme court circuit to-day. rendered a deci
sion in favor of the attorney-general and
against the sugar trust. The suit was brought
bv the people of the state of New York against
tLe North River sugar refining company by At
torney-General Tabor to forfeit the charter of
the North Hirer company of this city on the
ground that it had virtually passed ontof ex
istence by selling out all its stock to the sugar
trust combinations and closing tip all its works.
The action was brought bv Attorney-General
Tabor for the forfeiture and dissolution of the
charter of the North river sugar refining com
pany because it had exceeded its powers and
franchises in becoming a member of the sugar
trust. Judge Barrett's opinion is a most ex
haustive one, and is probably the most impor
tant that has ever been written upon the sub
ject of trusts and monopolies. Judge liarrett
to-day summoned the counsel on both sides be
fore "him and a juror whose duty it was to
merely formallv render a verdict in accord
ance with the decision of the court. Counsel
for defendants took an exception to the ruling
of the court.
POINTS rxox THE DECISION.
In his decision Judge Barrett says: "It did
not require the astute mind that prepared this
most original instrument to conceive that an
aggregation of partnerships, with the dangers
resulting from death and the exercise of indi
vidual power, would never effect safe and per
manent cohesion. Accordinglv. we find, as one
of the first provisions of the deed and as the
basis of the so-called trust structure, a condi
tion in substance that the partnerships shall
all be turned into corporations. This iu fact
was done, and thus several of these corpora
tions were organized for Die cjrpn** pwrpo* of
creating the rrry shan i of cnjntal itvrl through
irhirh Vw comtnru.tioH i/vi* to be fimmtL Partners
took on oorporation garb, became shareholders,
and as such fitted themselves to enter the
combination within the terms of the deed."
Regarding the profits arising from the busi
ness of each corporation "to be paid over by it
to the board hereby created, and the aggregate
of said profits or such amounts as may be
designated for dividends, shall be proportion
ately distributed by said board, at such time
as it may determine to the holders of the cer
tificates'issued by sai<bboard for capital stock
as hereinbefore provided," Judge Barrett
says: "It will be seen that these dividends are
not to be declared or distributed upon the
aggregate capital stock of the corporations,
which is to be turned over to and held by the
trustees, bat upon what might not inaptly,
in view of these peculiar facts, be termed the
trust boards' capital stock, namely, the trust
certificates. Thus we have a series of corpora
tions existing and transacting business under
the forms of law without real membership or
genuinely qualified direction?mere abstract
fragments of statutory creetion?without life
in the conceit or underlying association. Every
?hare of stook has been practtcally surrendered
and vital membership resigned. With the
transfer to the eleven trustees the shareholders
cease to occupy the position of "ceistius que
trustent, with regard to the directors of the
various corporations."
Speaking of the scop* of the examination the
judge says: "But thy did not stop there.
Provision is made for the gathering in
of every other existing refinery (in
every instance to be incorporated), and in fact
four others have joined the combination
since the deed. was signed by the origi
nal partnerships and corporations and
the evidence shows that in the entire country
but five sugar refineries of the character in
question remain outside of the combination.
Ruined by thi Undaoer Brother*.
St. Pawl. Mow., Jen. I?A Lama, low*,
special to the Oiobt says: Soeae commotion has
been created in this city by creditors seising
the stock of ?. Solomon, clothier, on a chattel
mortgage. Mr. 8olomon's stock ie veined at
?18.000 accounts about *3,000. Liabilities
amount to about $14,008. Be claims his failure
wasbroeght ahent by Lindsner Bra*. & Co., of
INDItiN ITIKS TO H A KKIXiTON.
He Is by Prison Wm4fm m4
Hit Mantarhr Shaved.
Dmra. Jta. l.-HumviaiuN have bMi is
WfJ agam*t Mr. IVnin Kilbrid:, mMnbff of
parliament for South Kwrr, Mr. Jamc* Law
rence Carew. Di tiikr of p*rliaraent for North
Kiiilare. and Mr. Tully. editor of the BoseMa
mon Hrraiii. published at Hoyle. The* are ac
cused of inciting t?-nanta to adopt the plan of
campaign and to adopt Ihiji ntllM The /Vae
ntnn * Journal mvh: "Mr. Edward HarriDftoa,
mt-mlter of parlinment, who vaa sentenced to
fix months' imprisonment for offense* under
the crimen act. i* confined in a hare cell in tho
TuIIhtootc jail. Contrary to practice, Mr. Har
rington ww seired by a n matter of warden*,
who. despite hi* protest* and phrsical
auce, shaved off hi* mustache.
THK SHAH'S (iRAXD TOl'K.
He WUI Vblt Nearly all the Countries
in Kurope F.xcept KngUnd.
Tmr.RiN. Jan. S. ?The shah will viait St
Petersburg in April, where he will remain two
week*. He will afterward visit France. Italy.
Montenegro. Greece, Turkey. Asia Minor and
the Caucasus. _
1*1 turning New Western Kallroada.
Cmcaoo. J.in. 9. A dispatch from Toprkt.
Kan., aava: A charter has been filed with tho
secretary of state for the Nebraska. Kansas A
Colorado railway company. The coni|>auy will
build a tine of railroad from Lcnora. Morton
county, to Allison. l?ecator county; thence
w.-st o"r southwest through the counties of Sberi
dnn. Thomas. login. Wichita and Oreely to
the south line of the state of Kansas; thence to
Trinidad. Colorado. Also a line from Alllaon
northeast through the counties of Norton and
Phillips to the north line af the state of Katiaaa.
Seventy-Nine-Year-tild Sprinter*.
TWO FBISkV OLD |ti? AN* TO ICI 4 HACK Mi
MM a side.
Mason Citt. Iow a. Jan. St. The remarkable
challenge made recently by A. C. Owen, of this
city, to run any niau in the I'nitod States of hia
age (seventv-ninet a forty or 'eighty rod foot
race for from MO? to f1.000 a side is about to
be accepted by John Bolton, former proprietor
of the Bolton hove of Sheffield. Both men
are well preserved, and the match will be out
of the most utiiqtie on record.
Horribly Mangled In an F.xploslon.
Spokane. W. T.. Jan. 9.?About 1 o'clock
yesterday afternoon an explosion of giant pow
der occurred at a place on Washington street
which is being graded. Just :is .lames Collins
was preparing a cap for the blast. There were
three or four pounds of the powder in a box
near w here Collin* was preparing the blast.
This exploded, horribly mangling t'ollius. but
not killiug hint outright. One leg was splin
l tered by flying ris ks and a large hole torn iu
j the flesh; four ribs were broken and his face
! and eye* blown full of sand. He died shortly
afterward. The cause of the explosion u un
| known.
T?h? Fond of "Society" and Fine Out he*.
AND A* HIS HAI.AKY OiIIM'T WTTOiT HIM I*
THE KTVLE HE LIKED HE STOLE $14,000.
CmcAOo. Jan. K. The .Yetr* say* that Harry
P. Scliall. assistant ehiishier ill the paymaster'#
office of the Chicago and Northwestern rail
road company. has left the city with Ml.M of
the ciinij>anv'* funds and yi. 'snt belonging to the
Clerk* and Mechanics' building and loan asso
ciation. of which he was the treasurer. Nchall
] i* about twenty-live years of age. and is aaid to
i have l>een a nan of g.iod habit*, but with a
i taste for society life nnd fine clothe*, and It ia
| thought hia expense* exceeded his salary.
Hotli Shot at the S*me lime,
ANI) IN THE gl'AKKF.L OVEU THE FINE Bl'CK THAT
FELL ONE OF THK Ht'KTEXa I* KILLED.
Chicaoo, Jan. 9.?A disi>atch from Spring
i field. Mo., savs; "E. A. Matthew*, a wealthy
I general merchant of Walnut Shade. Ark.. was
instantly kill*, d m the W hiteriver bottom*, near
the Missouri line. ye*terday afternoon. Mat
j thews was hunting deer, and he and a man
I named Strong fired at a large buck almost si
multaneously. In the dispute which aroae
' over the- p'm*"-*?ioti of the animal Matthews
whs brained by Strong, who struck him with
I the butt end of hi* rifle. Strong escaped to
1 the woods.but ? being pursued by a sheriff and
| posse.
Cleary to lie Tried Next.
New Yoke. Jan. M.? District Attorney Fellows
this morniug announced ofiiciallv that ex-Al
derman ('leary would be the fir*t of the boodlem
to be tried in the special oyer and terminer
court ou the 21*t inst. John Dollard, Cleary'#
bondsman, has been notified.
Sunk In the >ler*ey.
London. Jan. 9.?The steamer Leveringtoa,
while lving at anchor in the Meraey. was run
into an<l sunk by the British steamer Lualaba,
from the west coa*t of Africa. Nobody was
killed. The Lualaba was badly damaged and
was beached to prevent her from milking.
A *30,0<H> Fire at MilledgevUle.
Atlanta. Ga.. Jan. 9. -A Milledgeville special
to the (\m*Uhmtion say* fire yesterday in the
store of Havgood k Carakcr damaged property
to the amouut of r'30.(NXi.
Fire In the Manhattan Club House.
New YoBK. Jan. 9.?A tire broke out early
this morning on the top floor of the Manhattan
club. No. 05 5tli avenue. It raged nearlv half
an hour before all danger was over and all tho
woodwork of the floor wa* ripped out. Furni
ture of the club wa* damaged to the exteut of
?10,000. Damage to the btnlding. *2.000.
Western Passenger-Kate Cutting.
IT PBOMIKEH TO PHODtVE WIDESI'BKAI) ltM KAl^
IZATIOX.
Chicago. Jan. 9.?A local paper sayi: Tho
report yesterday of the dial between tho
ticket brokers and the Kansas City line* caused
a great deal of talk in railroad circles, aud it is
not improbable that a general reduction in raUe
to Missouri river poiuts will be the result.
General Traffic Manager Wickes, of the
Chicago aud Northwestern road, hits notified
the managers of the Kansas City line* that the
Colorado i^nd Pacific coa*t business of hi* road
ia being seriously affected by the cut, aud that
he does not propose to auhere to the t li.50
! rate to Council Bluffs while scalper*are selling
| tickets to Kansas City from to til. This
action will place thr five Ka n*a* City lines in a
predicament. It Ts certain that either the
tickets now in the hand* of the scalpers will
have to be redeemed or the western passenger
business will be demoralised until April 1 or
longer. The only way to com)>el scalper* to
give up the tickets in their |>osseasion ia to
make the rates as low as they are made by
scalpers.
Gov. Fleming's Inaugural.
HE THINKS OF CALLING THK LEGISLATURE TO 00?
S1DEB TELLOW FEVEK PBEVEXTIOK.
Tallahahsee. Jan. 9.?The inauguration of
Gov. Frank I'. Fleming yesterday was one of
the grandest demon*tratioiis ever witnessed ia
Honda. The entire nulitia of the state was in
attendance and thousands of people from all
parts of Florida were present. The procession
formed at 11 a.m.. going to the eaat front of
the capitol where the inaugural ceremonies
took place.
In the third diviaion were both union and
confederate veterans. The carnage contain
ing Gov. Fleming. Gov. l'eny (retiring) and
Ceief Justice Maxwell, of the supreme court
was attended by au escort of veterans from the
second Florida* infantry, confederates state*
army, of which the outgoing and incoming
governors were members. At noon precisely
the inaugural ceremonies took place. Gov.
Perry delivered the 1 are well address and in
troduced Governor-elect Fleming. Toward the
close of his address Gov. Fleming said: "I fool
that a sacred duty rests upon me as well as
upon every good citizen that nothing be left
undone which may contribute to guard na
from a visitation of an epidemic diaeaae in tho
future, and especially to prevent it# recar
rence during the year upon which wo
have entered. Being #o impre##ed I ?hall ear*
fully consider the expediency of convening tho
legislature in extra session earlier than WO
time appointed for the regular meeting to pro
vide ?u<-h further legislation for the i
tion of the public health a# to them May
^Chiof Ju#tice Maxwell then adminMeredI tho
oath of office and the ceremonies closed. L#H
night there was a grand bail at Leon hotel, whtoa
waa the mo#t brilliant social event since ante
bellum day*.
A Victory for the
Boston. Jan. 8.?The typewriter
under the auspice# of the Hibbert '
college, who offered a purse of (ISO to tho
winner, waa held thia evening. The contest
waa open to any writing machine. All the
prices were won by Kemington operator*,
Flank McGurrien. of Salt Lake Cite, winning
the first prise of ?100. and Mas Weinake, mk
Now York city, the second of *30.
Altered Bands.
TCK1IED TO TU PASTY WW
I TO TU TMASUBT.
Controller Durham has further ilsnHUd, ia
relation to ths two MOO District boads that
were rooontly presented to the United Mateo
Trooonrer for redemption, with altered nun
ton, that they mnrtb* returned to the parte
who sent them to the Treasury, aad ooa aoL
?s in the case of counterfeit notes, ho

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