OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 10, 1889, Image 1

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1889-01-10/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

fbeniim
tat
Vol. 74?No. 12*020.
WASHINGTON, D. C., THURSDAY. JANUARY 10, 1889.
TWO CENTS.
THE EVENING STAR
PUBLISHED DAILT, Except Sunday,
at the star BUILDINGS,
Northwest Corner Pennsylvania A~e. ud 11th 8t., by
The ereaing Star Newspaper Company,
h. II. KACmm, Pratt.
T*i F.tfnibo Stax la lerml to nuhecriben In the
city by carrier*, on their own account, at 10 cniU per
weak. or 44c. per month. Copiee at the counter, 2
cent* each. By mail p. .stage prepaid ^50 cents a
month. one year. #?J. six months. <3.
(Entered at (ha Poet office at Waahkngtob, D C., aa
?ecoud-class mall matter.)
Tu Wkzklt Stab published an Friday?#1 a
year, poststre prepaid. Six niontha, SO cents.
tW~All mail subacriptions must be paid in advance;
Bo paper sent longer than la paid (or.
Rataa of advertising made known on application.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
A LITTLE NOTE TO MEN.
"ESXtoyoor Trousers' Should you happen to need
anew pair here is your chance. 1 have Just received
tw? excellent lines of T rouse rings, bought under price?
oue line of Fine Striped Worst^Be at #,, wbli'h usually
sell at <10, and a line of Imported Trouserings at <10,
which usually sell at #12 and $15. 1 believe it will be
to your int? rest to see these.
G. WARKIELD SIMPSON. Expert In Trousers.
jS-3t Cor. 8th and O ats. n.w.
PH. SWAN M. BUBNETT HAS BE- i
moved his office and residence to 1770 |
husetts awe. )a3-eol**
CERTIFICATES OF STOCK. CHEQUES,
auil other securities. Commercial litho
graphy anddesigning. A. O OKDNEY.
ja 1 Kith and D street* (Post Building-).
fr- - ^ IH<?. G. HENSEY, REAL ESTATE AND I
w, Insurance Broker, has removed his office* to |
tbe Tin re he Building, 13UO F at. n.w, where lie will
continue his business a* a Beal Estate Manager and
Conveyancer, and Insurance Agent.
Houses sold and rented, estates managed, rents
collected and loans negotiated. Insurance placed in
the best companies, local or fu reign, at tlie lowest rate.
Telephone call 11 w- ti. dl4-lm
__S?TUE INDCSTBIA1.SAVINGS AND LOAN
l* m. Association has removed to the BI'KCHE
fcuilJIng, 1300 F St. n.w. THoS. O. HENSEV,
dl4-lm Secretary.
_ SPECIAL NOTICE.?I WISH TO INFORM
_ tlie publi.- that I have no partners or agents,
aod that I am not responsible for any engagements not
made directly through ine. F. EIBXEB, Leader Elb
nor'a Orcheatra. dll-lm*
GROGAN'S INSTALMENT HOUSE.
738 AND 741 7TH ST. N.W.
Cheapest house in tbe city to buy your Fnrnitnre,
Carpets, Oil Cloths, Hkttii.ce, Baby Carriage*. Refrig
erators. Sfcves, kc. Every tiling in tbe Housefurnlan
n:g lice Mild on credit as < lieap as they can be bought
elsewhere for cash.
WE MAKE AND LAY ALL CARPETS FBEE OF
my21 COW.
j BUY YOUB COAL, COKE AND WOOD
from
JOHNSON BROTHERS,
the leading firm In the District. j.v'i-.'tm
. RFCFPTIONS ' RECEPTIONS'
GENT'S PBESS SI ITS for Hire, at
HOBN. THE TAILOR'S.
Jl-lm ?13Fit. n.w.
blSTER SoFTSNAP
la gone on
BB0THEB blowhard.
His unadulterated cheek sells his adulterated goods,
and the Softanap family are hia victims.
LET HEB WENT*
The Ilardsense family and Harilcash family we our
ens turners. Do you went
CHEAP CHUCK OB CHUMP CHEEK?
We provide the former. Cheap Chuck, and Blow hard
theCChump Cheek. Take your choice between the
chuckling CHUMP
or the
CHOICE CHUCK.
If our words don't have weight our goods do. You'll j
get more Goods than Gas at
VICTOR E. ADLEB'S
10 PER CENT CLOTHING HOUSE. 10
927 and 829 7th at. n.w.. corner Massachusetts ave.
Strictly One Price.
Open Saturday* till 11 p. m. la7
DO NOT FAIL TO ATTEND THF FIBST GRAND
Remnant Sale, beginnirnr Fridsv. Jan. 1L 1S88.
KAUFMAN'S DOUBLE COMBINATION,
jay-'it 11th st. s.e.
An Exciting Time.
KATLBDAY, AT 8 O'CLOCK, COMMENCED
THE GREAT WINDING-UP SALE
OF THE
BAKKRUPT 8T0CK OF clothing
AT 812 F STREET NORTHWEST.
There was such a large crowd that the sidewalk was
completely blocked. At one time it looked as if there
would be a panic on account of the immense crowd.
But tbe good Judgment of the managers averted such j
a catastrophe. Tbe cause of this extraordinary rush
is the fine #20 Chinchilla Overcoats that are being |
sold for $4.63, and #18 Overcoats for #3.87. Chil
dren's Suits, $1.2S and #1.48. Men's fine Prince
Albert Snits. #12.62. formerly #28. and Men's Suit*.
#'..8.">. #3.02, #4.70. Boy's Overcoats andSuitsat
any price you offer. The balance of the stock at 20
cents on tbe dollar previous to sending it to auction.
Remember, only THREE DAYS MORE.
Children's Knee Pata, 21c., 28c.. 33c., 37c.
BAKRUPT clothing SALE,
912 F STREET N.W_
SIX DOORS FBOM 9TH ST.
Ho28-3m
DO NOT FAIL TO ATTKNIi THK FIRST ORAND I
Bemnant Salt, beginmiur Friday, Jan. 1 L 1888.
KAUFMAN'S DOUBLE COMBINATION,
JaM 2t 11th st. s.e.
Ladies- Furs And Garments In
SEAL SKINIAND FINE PLUSH.
Notwithstanding the great rnslijwe'have had our
stock is being replenished, and from this date bargains
may be obtained at greatly reduced prices in
SEAL WRAPS.
PLUSH WRAPS,
FUR LINED CIRCULARS,
MUFFS,
BOAS. AND
TRIMMINGS.
B. H. STINEMETZ k SONS,
HATTERS AND FUBBEBS,
d20 1237 Penua. ave.. through to 13th at
Jt W. Boteleb & S
?ON
ARE 0FFEBING GREAT inducements
TO lURCHASEBS OF
DINNER AND tea SETS,
GAME AND FISH sets,
RICH, HEAVY. AND ENGRAVED GLASS
T ABLE CUTLERY AND PLATED WARE.
PIANO AND BANQUET LAMPS.
C BRIC-A-BRAC AT REDUCED PRICES.
J. W. BOTELER A son,
Mi 923 Pa. ave.
M rs. Ms Ja Hunt.
13U(* F STREET NORTHWEST.
Will exhibit on
thursday. JANUARY 3,
RECEPTION and EVENING BONNETS
OF NEW DESIGNS. d31
DO not FAIL TO ATTEND THE FIRST GRAND
Beainaut Sale. begii.mn*- Friday, Jan. 1 L 1888.
KAUFMANS DOUBLE combination.
_Ja9-'-t 11th st. a.e.
f TNDER and BY VIKTURF. OF A GENERAL AS
L> 8I?iNMENT. I W1IX OFFEB FOR SALE THE
feTo< K OF GOODS in trroHF. NO. 484 8TH
Street northwekt,consistingof
SToVES. RAN..KS AND FURNACES.
GBA TE!? and tiles.
HABD WOOD MANTELS.
BRASS FIRE GOODS.
RICH PORCKI.AINS.
PIANO AND TABLE LAI' <*?.
NOVELT1EM IN BRASS AND PORCELAIN,
AND A GENEBAI. ASSORTMENT OF SMALLER
ARTICLES PSttALLT FOUND IN SUCH A STORF
BE1NG THE idrTIUE STOCK OF
HAYWAJUiJ hutchinson
TBE STOCK WIIJ. BF. SOLD AT PRfVATE SAM
FOR A FEW DAYS. AND MUST lJECLOSEDoW
WITHOUT DELAY.
The sOention of tbe trade is specially invited to th?
All persona indabted to ELI AS 8. hutchinson,
trading as H.At W ARD k HUTCHINSON, are re
ipvsted to call aixl arttle at ustce, and aU penooa hav
?an* wtttdstSfM* ^u->n requested to present tbe
I nontba to
SPECIAL NOTICES.
TENDERS.
COLO XT OF NEWFOUNDLAND.
TO BAIL WAT CONTRACTORS.
THE GOVERNMENT of Newfoundland invite tend
ers for tic construction and operation of a nne off rail
way in the Colony off about
250 MILES IN LENGTH.
Hocta tenders, addressed to the Colonial Secretary,
St. John's. Newfoundland will be received up to the
18TH MARCH. 1889.
Full particular* and other information as to condi
tions of proposed contract can be obtained on appuca
tion to
MESSRS. O'CONNOR * HOGG.
Barristers.
OTTAWA. ONTARIO. JalO-tf
.NOTICE-- ALL MEMBERS OF SOCIAL
"Lo.lge No. 1, Free A. A Masons, are hereby
ordered to convene at Masonic Hall, Georgetown, D.
C , FRIDAY, the 11th in*t, st 12 o'clock ni. "harp, to
attend the funeral of Bro. Francis Coger. AllMaeter
Masons are invited to attend. Remains to be taken
toMt. ZiouM E. choreh at 2o^^k. Interments'
Alt Ziou cemetery- H. M. AKMlHThAD, W. M.
GKO. M. WEBSTER, S^ retary. 1*
QUARTERLY MEETING, FREE METH
Church, at 2154* at. n. w. Hrea. h ug
by t?e chairman. Rev. A. ti. Miller, on FRIDAY, lltn
lnst.?7::t0pm.;SATURDAY, 12th in?t 7 :i0 pan.;
KisbAV, Litli inst., 11 a m , .1 p.m., 7:JO p.m.: love
feast, Ma.m.; sicrmnient after 11 aan. service, come.
Jal0-3t^
SPECIAL NOTICE. ,
Washington Ciller Co.. removed from Oth and
1) streets to 814 Fstreet northwest. Fresh apple cider
and peach cider, also old cider vinegar. Arsiit for pure
Lucca olive oil. Fernet Branca Italian Bitters. Tele
phone rtott 2. JalO-Bt*
f. . ^ THE PARTNERSHIP HERETO FORE
v *. existing between Thomas H. Laugley and
alter Baker, as grocers and provision dealers, lias
been dissolved. The business will be carried on by
Tllos. H LANGLEY,at SOI Pst. p.w^ JalO-.it
^ISssALASKA.-LECTV KE BY REV.C. w. BAUI
win. with a large number of views, at Wes
ITylSpel, FRIDAY. JASUARY 11, at 7:30 Admis
sion by voluntary silver offering. JalO-,-t
THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE STOCK
M, holder* of "The Foreet Glen Improvement
Co., of Montgomery County," will be held Monday,
Jan. 14. 188&. at 1 o'clock p. m., at the Forest Inn,
Forest Ulen Park. Montgomery Co., Md. JalO-.tt
TO THE PUBLIC
Believing that a
WELL-CONDUCTED RIDING ACADEMY
is an institution which this community in general,
and lovers of horses in particular. have an interest in
supporting, and being informed that the
"WASHINGTON RIDING ACADEMY,"
established in this city about a vcar ago, could be con
tinued with increased success on a co-operative basis,
we, the undersigned, have become the incorporators of
the
"WASHINGTON RIDING ACADEMY COMPANY."
and have each agreed to subscribe for at least one
share, the majority of us having taken Ave shares.
The above states our whole relation to the enterprise
up to this time. and. with unabated interest in the
maintenance of a successful Riding Academy in Wash
ington. we leave the community in general, and lovers
of horaes in particular, to Judge for themselves as to
the propriety of following our example.
Oil the suggestion of Mr. J. D. Brown, the proprie
tor of the Washington Riding Academy awl at the re
quest of the incorporator*, the National Safe Deposit
Company of Washington has consented to act as Trus
tee of the funds which may be paid in on account of
?ubscrlptions to stock.
Subscriptions will he received on and after January
8, 1881*. at "THE WASHINGTON RIDING ACAD
H st. n.w.
The shares are one hundred <100) dollars each, the
subscription bein^ limited to live (5) shares for each
subscriber, and 2o per cent being payable at the date
of subscription to the Trustee above named, who alone
la authorized to receive an i receipt for payments,
and to hold the same until the final organization of the
stockholders.
CALDKRON CARLISLE, H R- DTLANY,
ANTHONY POLLOK, J. D. BROWN.
T J. FLACK/ ALBERT ORDWAY,
ROBERT NEVILLS, LINDEN KENT,
THOMAS W SYMON8, WOODBURY BLAIR,
AULICK PALMER, ARTHUR T. BRICE.
JNO F. WAGGAMAN,
Send for Prospectus. JaO-lm
1. 0. O. F -THE 'DEGREE STAFF OF
?*, METROPOLIS LODGE, No 16, will confer
the rSTDegree in their Hall. s.e. cor. Uth and D ata., on
FRIDAY EVENING, thetf 1th inst. Every mernberta
requested to be present. Members of SUMT WH
visiting. and resident member* of the Order from
other jurisdictions, are fraternally invited.
EDW. BAC8EL. Rec. Sec'y.
' the DRUG 8TORE
st the corner of 6th and G sts. n.w.,
ha* been entirely refitted snd restocked by the mib
m rlber. sod he resentfully asks the purport and
i?atrona<re of thtwijfnborhowi, hi? old friends, and the
},uhh. WASHINGTON C. MILBuAn.
Formerly of 1 4'->9 Penna. aTe. and the cor. of B. I.
ave. and 14th at. n.w. Ja0-4t
AND BY VIRTUE OF A OEN
oral a*?Hi^nn?ent from James Graham, I *ill
??fler for sale th<- stock of Books, Stationery, Toys, Ice.,
in store No. 19?ft Pennsylvania sve. n.w. The stock
will lie sold in the ordinary course of business until
further notfc-e. . ^ . . .
All i-erw ns indebted to Jsmes Graham are requested
to settle at once, and all persons bavin* claims strains!
him are requested to present the same without delay
to Calderon Carlisle and Robert W. M?*Vherson, Fen
dall Law Buildmjr, :t44 D st. n. w., the stents and at
torneys of the assirnee. or to
jstMOt li M. HEM>EB8uN. Assign?, Carlisle, Fs.
NOTICE-CANNON k VINSON HAVE
PcSTrenioYtd their Undertaking Estsblishment
to 44 Masnachasetts sve. n.w.. next door to the old
Jtand. Your*. CANNON k VINSON. ^
j?x-tit Undertaker*. _
OFFICE-ri>- i'HeTmutualfirk in
surance CO.. OF D. C.
Washihoto*,January 4,1880.
The annual meeting of the MutualFire Insurance Co.
?if the District of Columbia will he held on the
THIRD MONDAY of January, 188P, the 2lst instant,
at the office of the coinjiny, corner of Penns) Ivanta
avenue and 9th st. n.w., commencing at ti o'clock a m.
Bv the charter of the company, the election ot seven
managers to constitute a board to coidnct the affairs
of the company is required to be held at the above
meeting.
By the sixth article of the By-Law* of the company
it is providol "At the annual meeting of the company
the fint business in order shall be the amtointment of
a chairman, who shall c onduct the meeting and elec
tion in a4*cor?lan? e with the act of incoriHiration, be
tween the hours of 9 o'clock a.m. and ti o'clock p.m."
Amount of premium notes held by the
company 9 l.wai.otto.ou
Amount of cash on hand 17.O40.tW
Amount of p urities 1 .10
Amount of real estate 14.000.OO
Office furniture and fixture* -? .iOO.OO
Losses by tire for the year 1SSS, ail- .
Justed and paid ??? l,ltS.?..lu
nie animal -Utenient will be reody for diitrlbntion
at the office of the i-oiupanj\ by the 14th instant.
By order ?>f the UoarJ of Manngen.
I Jau>-14t J. WESLEY BOTELER. Secretory.
fc^?ia^THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE
?vjSstoc k holders I?f the National Fair Associa
tion, of the District of Columbia, for the election of a
Board of Directors and a Treasurer to serve during
the enauing year of 1889, and also for the transaction
of such other business aa maybe properly brought
before it. will be held MONDAY. January 14, at 12
M.. Room I. Vernon Row, cor. Pa. ave. and 10th at.
n.w. By order of the Boarii of Directors.
JOS. C. McKIBBIN, Premdent.
GEO. R REPETTL
Secretary. Ja.?-? t
THE WEEK OF PRAYER WILL BE OB
? serv e?l by Uniou Meetlng*.uuder the auspice*
of the Evangelical Alliance, in the Calvary Baptist
Chun-h. cor of 8th and H sta u.w., during the coining
week. The I. ailers and subject* for the various meet
ings are as follows
Friday. January 11.1',* m.?Misaion*, Home and For
eign. Ledbr Rev, W E. Parson.
.-atuntay, January 12. 12 ui.?Nation* and Social
Reforms, Led by Rev. C. A. Stakley.
There will also lie a Union Meeting of the women
of the churches at the aame place at 11 o'clock of each
day. A. W. PITZER, Secretary.
Washington, D. C? January, ISS'.I. _ Ja.i-Ot
aHlH BRIOHT. Ol lt'K FIRE ANDt HEAP.
^?r^CLEAN FUEL buy Washington Qas LU,ht
Comiuny's Coke. ? JOHNSON BROTHERS,
Ja.V:iui Exclusive Agents.
Of ^ OFFICE RIGGS FIRE INSURANCE COM
S- ^ lwnv. Washington. D. C.. January 1. lSSIi.
A dividend of three <3> per cent hM been declared,
payable at the office of the company* 1.M1 F street n.
w., on and alter January 10.18&A, to the stockholders
of record, at the close of business ou January .?th inst.
The transfer Ujokswill be closed from January rt to
January 10, lftXH-both da>? inclusive?by order of
tUJ?L2w,"f lr"""er asCIS B. MOHL'N. Secretary,
THE Ml TUAI. CO-OPERATIVE BUILD
ISO ASStk'IATION has removed to the
BURCHF. Building. KtOO Fat. n.w Office hour*. 9
a m to.* p.m. H A. H ALI^l^eaident.
dl4 1m THOS ?. nfeNSEY. Hec'r.
IM ADDITION TO THE DRESSMAKING
\XD MILLINERY DEPARTMENTS the
Ksi?s<f St Rose ln.'uetrUl ScLoOl have recently
ailded a department of C<skeQ. at thehead ot which
is a n <?t experienced and efficienti finrk ctxik. so
that they are now ready to receive ordei^fur I.unche*
?lid single Dtshe*. such as chicken. Puddings, Cro
quette. Babae, Cakea^fcc.
Full particular* may be learned by making inquiry
st the school.
No. 2023 G Street Northw**t. dlt-lm
* EQUITABLE
COOPERATIVE BUILDING ASSOCIATION.
-EQUITABLE BUILDING." 1003 * ST.
ASSETS. ?9TL&a?.04.
(tnbacrlptiona for share* in the 16th t?ne wertved
daily at the < ffice of the Aseociattoa, Equitable Build
ing. 1003 Fat.
shares are ?2 50 par month.
?1.000adv*oc*dao**chshar*.
tltJ M^i^nlli KM rtijn 1i and idvmttc* of
?be A **?1at!0? ?? o?oa app?fc*tto^
OfBcrtionr*. ?oiii 9a.m. to 4:30 pjn. On the *f*t
We<hM?day In each mouth the office will be open from
C to 8 o'clock pjL Advance* Witt be made promptly
at 7 o'clock.
THOMAS 80MKHVTLLK. PreTt
?A Ml MD**. Sa^K
Washington News and Qossip.
Index to Advertisements.
AMCSEMFNTB . 8
ATTORNEYS pill i;
AUCTION HALES p.?, 7
BOARDING. 'pi,
book* and stationery.;:;;;;;;;;;;;:;;;;;;!^ 7
Bl SIN ESS CHANCES p,,* a
CITY ITEMS p!!L g
COUNTRY REAL E8TATE t?l 2
DEATHS i
DENTISTRY r3 2
EDL'C ATION AJk p?! n
FAMILY 8UPPTJ?8 . q
FINANCIAL. vw!
for rent (hall?;.;;;...;;;;*" ??
FOR RENT (Rook.) o
FOR RENT (Houses) J
FOR RENT (Orncn) p^* 2
FOR RENT (stohes) Z
FOR RENT (Stable*) Pair? 5
FOR SALE (Houses) ;.. pj! Z
FOR SALE (Lots) pTl! f,
FOR SALE (miscellaneous) Voire *>
GENTLEMEN'S GOODS t3, Z
housefurnishings.... ? Pu-el
LADIES'GOODS
LOCAL MENTION ^
LOST AND FOUND ???! o
MARRIAGES , p!** ?
money to loam.........;;;;;;. pje h
medical ?
MISCELLANEOUS iwo *
NOTARIES PUBLIC p^e ?
OCEAN STEAMERS Pwre C
POTOMAC RIVER BOATS pa4r0 ?
PIANOS AND ORGANS .... fl
PERSONAL .' yZrl m
PRINTERS
professional pajre 7
PROPOSALS 1
RAILROADS p*!,
special notices....;;;;; ??! 2
specialties ::?tS?,7
w anted (Help) ."j??1 /,
WANTED (Situ\Tlosg) " p?k-e ?>
WANTED (Rooms) p.,?
WANTED (Miscellaneous Piwe 2
WANTED (Houses) Paire "
WANTED (Lots) p^X! 7,
WINTER RESORTS .. v?o 1
WOOD AND COAL 3
Government Receipts To-Dat. ? Internal
revenue, #454,345; customs, 81.137,226.
To-Dat's Boni> Ofterinos aggregated $55,000
as follows: Registered 4s. 840.000 at 127^
registered 4^8^15,000 at *108'?.
Army Leaves.?First Lieut. John Guest,
eighth cavalry, one month's extension: Capt.
Henry P. Perrine, sixth cavalry, six moiitns'
further extension.
Ahmy Orders.?Capt. Richard N. Johnson,
assistant surgeon, has been granted two weeks'
leave of absence. 2d Lieut. Frederick R. Day,
signal corps, has been ordered to inspect the
signal stations at El Paso, San Antonio, New
Atlanta' Pensacola, Montgomery, and
Interstate Commerce Commissioners Wal
ker and Morrison left Washington yesterday
for New York, presumably to meet the commit
tee appointed at Tuesday's meeting of the
bankers and railway presidents.
Lt. Col. Tiuw. F. bair, judge advocate, and
Capt. Wirt Davis, fourth cavalry, recently
nominated to be major and judge advocate, re
Sorted at the War department yesterday in obe
ience to orders from the Secretary.
Reinstated.?The Secretary of the Treasury
has reinstated Mr. Wm. B. Morgan to the posi
tion of disbursing ofiiccr of the coast survey,
from which he was removed in Julv, 1886. for
the purpose of pennitting him to resign. This
is done to clear him of any suspicion of turpi
tude that might have arisen from the fact that
nis dismissal was caused bv an unbalanced
state of his accounts. The ' accounts have at
last been settled satisfactorily by the board
that has been engaged in auditing them.
Bros have been opened at tho Treasury de
partment for a new revenue cutter for the
South Atlantic coast. Three bids were re
ceived. as follows: M. A. Sweenev & Orother,
of Jeffersonville, Ind., #84.800; Pusev 4 Jones
company. Wilmington. DeL. #98.160. knd John
H. Dialogue, of Camden. N. J., #107,000.
What the Drummers Wast.?Mr. M. J. Pick
ering. of Philadelphia, president of the Com
mercial Travelers' National Protective associa
tion has arrived at the Ebbitt house. He is
here for the purpose of urging Congress to so
amentl the interstate-commerce law as to per
mit railroads to give reduced rates of transpor
tation to commercial travelers.
Among the President's Callers To-day
were Senator Vance. ex-Senator McDonald
and Representatives Henderson (North Caro
lina) and family McAdoo, with Col. and Mrs.
Ct 1 w'and TLon,as Brady, of New Jersev,
Webber, Montgomery, Landesand Washington.
Storekeeper and Oacoer. ?W. L. Vander
winter has been appointed storekeeper and
ganger at Longfield, Va.
The White House was closed to visitors to
day, in order to give the workmen from the
government gardens a chance to complete the
decorations of the east room for the cabinet
dinner, which is to be given to-night. The
room is a mass of leaves and colors. The west
mantels nre transformed into great green em
bankments, and those on the east side are cov
ered with flowers. The circular divan in the
center of the room is surmounted by a tall
plant, and on each side is a pyramid of palms
and other plants. Each window is filled with
fraceful leaves, and the room is filled with a
ense tropical odor.
The Interstate Commerce Commission.?
The hearing of the case of Hostetter A Co. vs.
the Pennsylvania and other railroad companies!
before the interstate commerce commission!
was begun this afternoon. The complainant
presents the question of alleged unjust classifi
cation of the patent medicine bearing that
name. The case of the Imperial coal company
of I lttsburg against the Pittsburg and Lake
Erie railroad company and others will be heard
to-morrow.
Personal.?Hon. R. F. Pettigrew of Sioux
Falls, Dak., is in the city. A. 8. Morris of
Pittsburg, is at the * Riggs. Carl Bailey
Hurst, son of Bishop John F. Hurst of this
city, sailed yesterday for Germany, where ho
will pursue his studies in the university at
Leipsig. Hon. J. A. Buckalw of Pennsyl
vania. R. C. Edmonson of Lexington, Ky., and
Cspt. L. O. Shepard of the arniv are at the
Ebbitt. R. W. Bay ley of Pittsburg. H. B
McClellan of New York, A. Alexander of Phil
adelphia and Geo. H. Wallace of Fayette. Mo..
are at Willard's. Frank A. Dean and W. A
Andrews of Pittsburg and 8. Davis of Montreal
are at the Arlington.
INDIAN TIMBKR CONTRACTS.
Commissioner Oberly Before the Senate
Special Committee To-Day.
The special Senate committee, charged with
the investigation of the timber contracts on
the La Pointe reservations, Wisconsin, had
Indian Commissioner Oberly before it to-day.
He was called to testify respecting the revival
of certain contracts suspended last month be
cause they had not been approved as the law
required. He stated that the only ones he had
approved were those upon allotments that had
Jtcen patented. He could, however, give no
W*t* upon the subject, and he was requested to
furnish the exact facts to the committee to
morrow, together with the form of a new con
tract prepared by him.
A statement made by Agent Gregory to the
Indian Commissioner shows that in the year
1887?up to the date of the suspension of the
contracts in March last?there had been cat on
the La Pointe reservations ISO,000,000 feet of
pine, almost 20 per cent of the entire amount
originally standing. This was taken under 7J1
contracts, not one of which had been approved
according to Uw and to the terms of the con
tracts themselves.
mar^b Uamn.-giarriac* licenses have
Jhf ?*erk of the court to F. M.
and kattie ?. Bww?, of Prince
2^8* * county, ?ld.; J. G. Pohndorfand
V*l Pre?m?n; Frank Walton, of
-?nd Emm* Barks; George R. Edelin,
of Prince George's county, Md., and Emma M.
of Howard county, Md.j The. B.
Newman and Mary J. Spidden.
at THE CAPITOL TO-DAY.
THE WHEELS STILL BLOCKED.
OHE-MAH POWER UST TIE HOUSE
A Condition of "Hopeless Helplessness."
THE TARIFF BILL IN THE SENATE.
The Senate.
Among the bills reported from committees
and placed on the calendar was the Senate bill
to authorize the construction of a bridge across
the Missouri river at Leavenworth.
Mr. Cameron offered a resolution, which was
agreed to, directing the Secretary of the
Treasuary to re-examine md audit the claim
of the state of Pennsylvania for moneys ex
pended iu 1864, and to report to Congress the
oalance due.
On motion of Mr. Allison it was ordered that
the Senate meet to-morrow at 11 a.m.
THE TARIFF BILL.
The Senate at 12:30 resumed consideration
of the tariff bill at paragraph 411, taxlVig
leather, not specially enumerated or provided
for. 15 per cent ad valorem. No amendment i
was offered.
Mr. Van'ie moved to nmend paragraph 412,
taxing calf skins. Ac., 25c. per pound, by re
ducing that rate to 20 per cent ad valorem.
Mr. Allison said that in some kinds of skins
25 cents per pound was less than 20 per cent
ad valorem. The finance committee wished to
examine the question, and he asked that para
graphs 412 and 413 be passed over informally.
It was so ordered.
Mr. Vance moved to amend paragraph 414 by
changing the rate on lime from 5 cento per 100
pounds to 10 per cent ad valorem. Rejected?
yeas. 22; nays, 27 (Mr. Brown voting aye).
On motion of Mr. Allison paragraph 415 (tax
ing manufactures of alabaster, amoei. Ac., 25
per cent ad valorem) was amended by omitting
from it the words "cork or cork-bark," and ad
ding to it the words "osier or willow prepared
fo ? basket-makers' use."
Mr. Vance moved to reduce the rate trom 25
to i0 per cent ad valorem. Rejected?yeas. 20;
nays, 25.
Paragraph 416 (taxing manufactures of bone,
Ac., 30 per cent ad valorem) was. on motion of
Mr. Allison, amended by adding to it, "cork or
cork-bark."
RIVERS AND HARBORS.
During a temporary suspension of the tariff
bill a resolution was offered by Mr. Hoar and
referred to the committee on contingent ex
penses. instructing the committee on commerce
when the river ana harbor bill is reported to
report as to each item of public work the facts
that make the appropriation advisable and of
national importance, and the condition of the
work, if begun, with power to appoint an as
sistant clerk at an annual salary.
THE TABIFF BILL AOAIX.
No amendment was offered to paragraph 417,
taxing manufactures of leather, gutta-percha,
Ac.. 35 per cent ad valorem.
Mr. Vest moved to amend paragraph 418. as
to manufactures of ivory, motiier-of-pearl. Ac.,
by reducing the rate from 40 to 35 per cent
ad valorem. Rejected?yeas. 23; nays. 24.
Mr. Brown changed his vote from aye to no,
giving as his reason that these manufactures
of ivory and mother-of-pearl were articles of
luxury.
Mr. Vest moved to amend paragraph 419
("marble of all kinds in block, rough, or
square") by reducing the rate from 65 to 40
cents per cubic foot. Rejected?yeas, 20; nays.
23 (Mr. Brown voting no).
No amendment was offered to paragraphs 420
or 421, relating to veinc*l marble and to manu
factures of marble.
LDCIFEB MATCHES.
Mr. Vance moved to amend paragraph 422
(friction or lucifer matches) by striking out
"ten cents per gross" and inserting (as in ex
isting law) 35 per cent ad valorem.
Mr. Allison said that the rates of dutv were
equivalent, but that it whs desirable to have a
specific, rather than an ad valorem rate.
The amendment was rejected?yeas, 20; nays,
24. (Mr. Brown voting no).
No amendment was offered to paragraph 423.
taxing cocoa matting 10 cents per square yard,
and cocoa mats 5 cents per square foot.
PAINTJWOS AND STATUARY.
Mr. Vest called attention to paragraph 424.
taxing paintings and statuary 30 per cent ad va
lorem. and providing that the term "statuary"
shall only include such as is wrought by hand.
He compared it with a provision which taxes
machinery-produced alabaster figures only 25
per cent.
Mr. Aldrich explained that Hlabaster work
was very insignificant and immaterial, and
that mechanical reproductions of works of
art (except in alabaster) would pay 50 per cent
under the substitute, as under existing law. *
Mr. Hoar expressed the hope that, before the
bill passed to its final consideration the finance
committee would conclude to put all
WORKS OF ABT OS THE FBEE LIST.
He did not believe that any American artist
desired protection for his work against the
competition of all mankind.
Mr. Allison moved to amend paragraph 425
by reducing the duty on pearls from 25 to 10
per cent aa valorem.
1IE. VEST SARCASTIC.
Mr. Vest?I suppose there is no mistake as to
that being a decrease.
Mr. Aldrich?It is the same as under existing
law.
Mr. Vest?But pearls are an article of luxury.
Mr. Allison?Or very delicate luxury.
Mr. Sherman said that all experience showed
that there was a high duty on articles of
jewelry; they were largely smuggled. It was
very popular (and came under the rule of
demagogism) to say that luxuries should pay
high rates of duty. That was true, but the
rates should not be'put so high that they could
not be collected.
THE AMENDMENT ADOPTED.
The amendment was adopted?yeas. 25; nays,
20, as follows: yeas?Messrs. Aldrich, Allison.
Blair, Chace. Chandler, Cullom, Dawes. Dolph,
Edmunds. Eustis. Everts. Frye, Hawley, His
cock, Manderson, Mitchell, Morrill, Paddock,
Palmer, Favne, Piatt. Sawyer, Sherman, Stock
bridge. Wilson of Iowa?25.
Navs?Messrs. Bute, Berry. Blackburn.Brown,
Coke", Colquitt. George. Gibson. Jones (Ark.),
Plumb. Pugh, Saulsbury, Spooner, Teller. Tur
pie, Vance. Vest. Voorhees. Walthall, Wilson
(Md.)?20.
No amendment was offered to paragraphs
426, 427, or 428, (jptncils, pencil-leads, and per
cussion caps).
Mr. Vance moved to amend paragraph 429
(pipes, pipe-bowls and cigar-holders of wood )
by striking out the words "one-half of 1 per
cent ciuJi (in addition to 70 per cent ad
valorem). Rejected?yeas. 20; nays. 23.
No amendment was offered to paragraphs
430. 431. 432 or 433 (smoker's articles, clay to
bacco-pipes, pearl and shell buttons, and hat
ters' plush).
PRECIODB STONES.
Mr. Vance moved to amend paragraph 434
(precious stones of all kinds, cut but not set)
by increaaiug the rate from 10 to 25 per cent
ad valorem.
Mr. Aldrich argued that the amendment
would be solely in the interest of smug
glers, as experience showed that more revenue
was collected from diamonds at 10 per cent
than at 25 per cent.
Mr. Hiseock said there waa donbt that the
ancient policy of the government should- be
hoove it to put uncut diamonds on the free
list, and to put aduty upon those that arc set
and manufactured into article* of Jewelry.
Mr. Jones (Ark.)?The "anuient policy"
which put uncut diamonds on the free list also
pat set diamond! on the free list
House of Representative*.
"Almighty God," said the chaplain in hit
prayer this morning, "as there is not a neigh
borhood in this vide country bnt has its repre
sentative on this floor, and aa here more than
elsewhere the oneness of the country is felt,
we stand before Thee to-day sorrowful and ap
palled by the devastation of the mighty rush
ing wind wrought in some of the cities o{ Pena
?Tirana, and as the sorrow-or welfare of each
i? the welfare or sorrow of all. we coine to vk
Thee to hear our humble supplication in be
half of the homes that have been darkened
and the hearts that have been smitten through
this awful calamity. Cheer and succor the
wounded, console and uphold the bereaved,
and may the whole country be wrought to the
tenderest and most active sympathy in behalf
of the suffering; and may we all feel most pro
foundly and reverently our dependence on (ro<l.
who reigns in heaven and upon earth, and^in
whose hands alone are these mighty forces."
THE C8DAL THING OH THE PART OF MB. WEAVER.
Mr Weaver, of Iowa, raised no objection to
the reading of the journal, but the clerk hav
ing concluded that ta*k. Mr. Weaver brought
forward his two dilatory motions to adjourn,
and that when the House adjourns it be to
meet on Saturday.
Mr. Crisp, of Georgia, and Mr. Weaver were
appointed tellers on the latter motion, and as
no quorum voted a call of the House was
ordered.
Two hundred and fifty-three members hav
ing responded to their names furthevproceed
ings under the call were dispensed with, and
Mr. Springer asked unanimous consent for the
entering of an order providing for a final vote
on the Oklahoma bill, but his request was
answered by loud cries for the "regular order.
Mr. Buchanan, of New Jersey, voicing the
opinion of the objectors by declaring that he
desired to see
WHETHEB OB NOT ONE VAN COULD BCIXDOZE
THE HOUSE.
The tellers having resumed their places on
Mr. Weaver's motion for an adjournment until
Saturday, Mr. E. B. Taylor, of Ohio, rose and
stated that he desired to offer a privileged res
olution.
The Speaker replied that the House was
dividing, but that the resolution might be read
in order to enable him to decide whether it
involved a matter of such high privilege that
its consideration could suspend the present
proceedings.
A SHARP SATIRE UPON THE BULE8.
Thereupon Mr. Taylor sent up the following
preamble and resolution:
Whereas, one member of the House has,
under its rules, assumed and taken complete
control of the legislation, and refuses to per
mit this body to proceed in the performance of
its legislative duties, except on such terms and
conditions and subject to such limitations as ho
mav prescribe and impose; and. whereas, under
the" rules of the House it is within the power of
the said member to stop legislation until it
shall please him to otherwise order; and.
whereas, he has for several davs exercised and
continues to exercise that high privilege; and,
whereas, it is essential to the well-being of the
country that some legislation be had. and more
especially that the appropriation bills
be passed; and, whereas, this seems to
be possible only in case terms are made with
a?u satisfactory to the said member,
Ht solvni. That a committee of five members
be appointed by the Speaker to meet and con
fer with the member aforesaid, at as early a
day as will suit his pleasure and convenience,
and, if possible, ascertain from him upon wjhat
terms and conditions, and subject to what limi
tations, he will permit the House of Represen
tatives to resume its proper functions and pro
ceed to the discharge of the duties devolved on
it; and said committee is hereby authorized
to report to thin House such measure of reliei
an it may deem needful and proper; and said
committee shall report to the House its doing
herein with all proper dispatch.
MB. BEED WANTS THE BKSOLUTION MOBE COM
PREHENSIVE.
The reading of this satire upon the rules was
greatly enjoyed by the members: but Mr. Reed,
of Maine, found fault with the resolution in
that it did not provide that the committee
should be a permanent one to treat with each
member as he made his appearance. The gen
tleman from Iowa was only exercising a right
which belonged to him (Mr. Reed (and to every
member of the House.
The Speaker ruled that the resolution did not
present a question of privilege.
A BBFLECTION. ^
Mr. Taulbee (Ky.), in pretended seriousness,
thought that the words of the resolution
should be taken down at the clerk s desk as
thev reflected upon some member who was not
named. He inquired whether the resolution
would be printed in the Record.
The Speaker replied that it would not.
Mr. Taulbee?Then I ask to withhold my re
mnrks for revision. (Laughter.]
The count was then proceeded with.
THEY OIVE IT CP?"HOPELESS HELPLESSNESS."
The tellers remained at their posts until
1:40. when, on motion of Mr. Sowden(Pa-), the
House.recognizing its - hopeless helplessness."
as one member expressed it, adjourned.
CAPITOL TOPICS.
Dt'TY on GILL-NETTING.
Secretary Fairchild to-day sent to the Sen
ate a reply to the resolution of inquiry as to
the classification of gill-nets made by machine
in Scotland and imported into this country for
use principally in the salmon fisheries on the
Pacific coast. The Secretary says that no de
cision 011 gill-nets has been rendered during
the pnst year, but be encloses a ruling of the
department declaring gill-netting in the piece
dutiable as a manufacture of flax.
THE INDIAN DEPREDATION BILL.
The Senate committee on Indian affairs to
day secured a quorum and took up the bill to
organize a court or commission for the ascer
tainment und settlement of claims on account
of Indian depredations for consideration. They
are not able to complete, it. however, and it
is probable that no further progress will be
made until after the tariff bill is disposed of.
MI88 CABBOLL'B CLAIM.
A bill, introduced to-day by Senator Mander
son. proposes to pay $10,000 in full settlement
of the claim of Miss Annie Ella Carroll against
the United States for services in furnishing
valuable information to the War department
during the rebellion and preparing certain
publications in aid of the Union cause during
the same period, under an understanding with
the War department. Miss Carroll is the
daughter of Gov. Carroll, of Maryland, and it
is said in her behalf that a nnmber of literary
articles prepared by her under agreement
with the War department had great influence
in holding the people of Maryland true to the
Union. It is also asserted that she prepared
the plan under which a fleet of gunboats sailed
up the Tennessee river, for the purpose of
dividing the confederacy in two.
seamen's savings.
Senator Hale, yesterday, from the committee
on naval affairs, reported favorably a bill which
provides that any enlisted man or petty officer
of the navy mav deposit his savings, in sums of
not less than *5. with any naval paymaster. 1*
case of desertion the savings are to be forfeited,
but if the sailor continues in the service until
he iB discharged he will be paid the amount of
his deposits, with the addition of interest at the
rate of 4 per cent per annum.
testimonials of mebit fbom ABROAD.
Senator Dolph, from the committee on
foreign relations, reported, without amend
ment, the Senate joint resolution authorizing
Dr. W. J. Hoffman, from the bureau of
ethnology, to accept a decoration of the "Order
of St. J tones," conferred upon him by the king
of Portugal, and also that of the "Order of the
Bust of the Liberator," conferred upon him by
the president of Venezuela, as a testimonial of
distinguished scientific and artistic merit.
THE BUT SCOAB INDUSTRY.
Clans Spreckles, the sugar king of the Pacific
slope, made a statement before the Senate
committee on finance yesterday concerning
his experiments in the manufacture of beet su
gar in California from American material, in
tended as an argument against the proposed
reduction of the duty on sugar and the substi
tution therefor of a bounty of a cent a pound.
He gave an elaborate history of his investiga
tions and experiments in Md sugar-making,
and explained how the industry was likely to
grow and afford employment to fsi and'
many classes ot American mechanic
? SAMOA? AFFAIRS.
1 Senator Frys's sub committee on foreign re
lations will meet to-morrow morning to hear
what Consul-General Bewail has to say about
Samoan affairs. Mr. SewaQ's examination will
be no longer than Is actually neoesearr because
his prssenoe in Samoa is regarded as being im
portant at this particular period. .It is proba
ble that the committee meeting will be public.
Setter lxj% favors ope* dooraj
Telegrams to The Star.
READING'S APPALLING DISASTER.
At Least a Hundred Lost Their Lires.
As Many More Were Badly Injured.
Wait Virginia's Political Puule.
at
FILLY A HUNDRED DEAD.
The Killed, Injured and Missing
Keadinj; Number Two Hundred.
THE MAYOR I Her EH AN A1TEAL FOB AID STOBT
or A WOMAN WHO SAW THE MILL GO DOWN
REPORTS OF DAMAGE BY THE STOBM IS OTHER
yl'ARTERH.
Heading. Jan. 10.?There is mourning and
sorrow in many household* in Heading to-day.
Over one hundred spirit* are hushed forever
in death as the result of the wreck and ruin
wrought in this city by the storm of laat night.
The cyclone left the entire city in darkness,
which was only relieved by the electric lights
and huge bonfires which shed their lurid glare
on the scene of death. All night long brave
and willing hands assisted in the work of the
rescue of the dead. The disaster is fully as
bad as reported in these dispatches last night.
OVER A HUNDRED PEB1SHED.
The list of fatal cases will fully reach one
hundred and may be more. The hospitals and
undertakers' establishments are filled with the
victims. The phvsicians are all busy and many
private houses have been opened for the ac
commodation of the injured. The ruined silk
mill presents a scene of desolation. The Polish
church disaster, several months ago. was one
of the most horrible accidents that nad startled
the community, but it sinks into comparative
insignificance when placed in parallel with the
awful visitation of last evening. Mayor Kenney
at 2 o'clock this morning issued the following
proclamation:
"I earnestly appeal to the professional
business, and other citizens who may be
able to favorably respond, to meet at the
court house this afternoon at 1 JO to devise
ways and means to aid the injured and assist
the families of those who perished last night
in the fall of the silk mill and at the Philadel
phia and Heading railroad paint shop. The
fearful cyclone that struck this city at 5:30 last
evening has brought sorrow and want to many
of our people who are in such circumstances as
to be unable to meet the emergency, and the
occason calls loudly for immediate action.
Quick to respond to others in distress, let us
not fail to do speedy justice to our own grief
stricken people."
THE WORK OF RESCUE RETARDED.
The work of rescue was greatly retarded
from the singular manner in which the silk
mill collapsed. It did not blow over, as might
have been expected from the terrible force of
the wind, but was bodily crushed down, falling
in upon itself in one mass, not a vestige of the
walls remaining standing above the stone
fouudation. The rafters and timbers of the
flooring projected in all directions. As the
building was steam-heated, fortunately the
ruins did not take fire, otherwise not one of
the unfortunates could possibly have escaped
death in its most appalling form.
THE ONLT ETE-WITNESS TO THE DISASTER.
so far as is known, was a Mrs. Gemmil. resid
ing at 1150 Mulberry street "At about twenty
minutes of 6 o'clock." said she to a reporter. "I
heard an awful crash, and thinking it was a
new house which is being put up alongside of
us. ran to the front door. A great cloud of
dust hung over the silk mill, and I could hear
the crashing of timbers and the roar of the
falling walls. The next moment I saw the
whole mill a great heap of ruins, from the1
midst of which came such awful moaning and
groaning and terrible cries as I never want to
hear again. Not a soul did 1 see come out of
the mill, and it seemed many minutes to me
before anybody came to the spot. I stood
there in the door like one struck dumb, until
my husband came running from his work."
Teams of every description, omnibuses, fu
neral coaches, fire-wagons, hospital vans and
private vehicles were pressed into service, and
were running rapidly to and from the scene of
the disaster r.ll night long, bearing the bodies
of the wounded, dying and dead to their homes
or to the different hospitals.
DOWN TO DEATH WITHOUT WARNING.
From the statements of some of those who
escaped from the building it appears to have
gone dowu in an instant. There was a loud
crash of breaking timber, and the persons in
the mill all rushed toward the main doors. A
good many of them succeeded in getting out.
while four girls saved themselves by jumping
from the second-story windows. The first
rumbling noise was followed instantly by the
falling of the building, the upper stories going
first with their human load. Had it not been
for the fact that but few of the hands were on
the third and fourth floors at the time scarcely
a life would have been saved. Mr. Geo. Grim
shmv. one of the proprietors of the mill, who
was in the office at the time and barely escaped
with his life, having received several severe
wounds on the head, stated that there were, to
the best of his knowledge, about 275 persons,
principally girls and bovs, in the establish
ment at the time of the occurrence. Cp to 8
o'clock this morning the large majority of the
victims were still in the ruins.
TWO HUNDRED KILLED. WOUNDED AND MISSINO.
Geo. Grimsbaw just before daylight gave
out the following list of kiUed. injured and
missing reported to him up to a few hours be
fore. The list accounts for about two hundred
of the employee:
Killed?Eva Leeds. Harry Krocker, Win.
Bnvder. Sophie Winkleman. Carrie Kershner.
Injured?Annie Leeds. Annie Frv, Augustus
Roscup. John Kebers. Annie Loveland, Sadie
Shade. Florence Hhoads. Lizzie Haws. Becky
Hover, Harry Bricker. Osman Staab, Becky
Pounds, Mary Evans, Kallie Savage, Sarah
Evans. Ella Kress. Ella Pflum. Agnes Savage,
Mora Savior, Annie Bricker. Ella Reitenour,
Mary Fitzpatriek. Lettie Saylor, Katie Fitz
patrick. Katie Bowman. Sallie Ebright, Laura
Wright, Ida Schaefer. Amanda Schaeffer. Ella
Kirk. Ella Carl, Bertha Taylor, Clara Noll,
Katie Hartman.
k Missing?Katie Alspach, Celia Hitner. Clara
Alspach, Mildred Langer, Lizzie Rowland.
Katie Yaeger. Lizzie Owne, Sallie Baum. Sallie
O'Neill, Ella Bucher, Laure Gaehrit,
Carrie Hartman. Barbara Seilheimer,
Emma Deemer. Sallie Bickle, Lizzie
Marten. Mary Wooten, Irene Dickinson,
Emma Pressor. Dolly Humes. Laura Hoffman.
Marv Hartman; Sallie Hanson. Amelia Christ
man, Ida Miller. Annie Saylor, Harry Hoff
master. Charles Hover. Hiester Snyder, Well
ington Lengle. James Salmon, Jas. Finn, Chaa.
Dapler. Frederick Re iff, Edward Broakway,
James Nevin. Charles Finn. Harry Fisher,
Howard Sfcader. Harry Templin, Amelia Boss
ier, Lena Snyder. Maggie Howe, Gerty Bhick.
Emma Pflum. Sophia Freeae, John Nevis,
Philip Siedel, Clayton Ludwig, Frank Mohn,
George Herman. Wm. Grow, Harry Fiddler,
Jacob Seidel. Benton Fiddler, Carrie Mover,
Annie Rowe. Mary Fay, Charles Reider, How
ard Lee, Samuel nek. Emma Eichner, Katie
Coxen. Annie Shade. Gerty Bickel, Mary Alt,
Alice Long, Clara Fox, Katie Link. Laura
Kercber, Mary Sheifle, Mamie Hedley.
Katie Guinther, Celia Hecker. Annie Dreibel
biss, Mary Reiser. Daisy Hecker, Sallie Young.
Pauline Alt. Ida Rollmann. Ella Lamb, Minnie
Merkle, Annie Kline. Clara Stoadt, Maggie
Nangle, Lydia Presaer, Minnie Deturk. Emma
Coxen, Abbie RiasmiUer, H. Leaber. Minerva
Gift, Jennie Hartman. Nellie gammon. TiUie
sis Barrett, Alice Eisenhower, Cliff Ffareetete,
Dora Deteh, Sallie Faoat, Katie Hipler, Aflrte
Hoverter, Annie Smea, Mary Beratfar, Bertha
Knser, H-""*1 Cleaver, Sallie Berstler, Emma
Nestor, Mame Kineey. Kate Leba. Eliaa Latoh
ford, Minnie Hayea, Fannie
nie VofeL
Some of thoee
at home, bat it haa not yet
at borne, bat it haa not yei neea aeum ?"-?
-ill and tea feet of the western wall rial da
, all that ia left of the
said to a reporter
"I bad (am op for puller* and ?M looklnc
out of the window, when all at a raMn I heard
? loud noise. and wan almost paralysed to M
the building fall la. 1 don't know how 1 gut
down from the tower."
the uiuou) aaor iimA?TTt
Following is a correct list of the killed and
injured at ths Philadelphia and Reading pain*
?hop. which wu struck b? the cyclone and tb?
men enveloped in flame* by the explosion ef
the gas chambers in nine passenger* cart:
Killed Allen Landenberger. head, leg* and
arm* missing. John Foreman, crushed to deeth|
John C. Kshler, carpenter, head cruahedf
Sheridan Jonea. horned to death. George A.
Schaefer. leg* burned off.
Injured -Geo. Knabb. seriously; Aaron Ito
wald. arm broken. The remain* of Nheridaa
Jonea. crushed and terriblj burned, almost be
yond recognition, were recovered from the
ruin# of the ruunt-shop at midnight. Earlier
the bodies of Foreman and Kahler were take*
out. Kahler had his head crushed. Foreman
was caught by the sill of the paint-ahop door.
Neither body was much burned.
The loaa to the Philadelphia and Reading
railroad company by the burning of its i<aint
shop and passenger car* is probably M&.OOO,
ana to the silk mill and its machinery about
#110.000. The Associated Preaa reporter waa
at the silk mill ruins all night, and witneeerd
some of the most heartrending acene* it prol>
ably ever befell a human being to witness Rel
atives and friends were running about ui their
frenzy and grief, seeking for lost ones, and
almost deranged. f
crowds roraixo i*w the cm.
The incoming trains this morning continue
pouring into the city their crowds of strangers,
and at noon it was estimated that 10.000 people
surrounded the scene of the silk-mill disaster.
These greatly interfered with the work of re
moving the debris aud taking out the dead,
and finally the Reading Artillerist*, the city's
only military organization, were called out and
ordered to the ruins to keep back the crowds.
This morning eight more bodies were take*
from the ruins. The confusion is great, and *
full list of tin- dead and injured is uot yet in
the bands o^pnvone. Exactly how many more
bodies are in the ruins is a matter of conjec
ture. Considerable money has been con
tributed for the relief of the sufferer*, bene
fits are also being arranged. The latest esti
mate of the killed has oeeu reduced to fifty,
but this is uncertain, aa no one knows how
manv human beings lie buried beneath the
mountain of bricks, mortar, and timber.
IX GREAT PAXOER OX A BRIDOE.
East*in. Pa.. Jan. 10. -Twenty-five men were
on the suspension bridge here last night dur
ing the storm when a heavy wire guy rope waa
broken, causing the bridge to swav and shake
heavily. One of the men, Oscar Vt'aliram. was
blown from the bridge to the canal below, a
distance of about HO feet. He swam to the
shore and is now confim-d to his bed. Twro
other meu caught the railing while going down
and held on until the storm had passed. The
others lay down on the bridge and had their
hands and knees badly bruised and blistered ia
holding on to the railing. None of them, how
ever. were seriously injured aiiji left the bridge
in safety after the storm had passed.
MtOH DAMAUE SCAR LANCASTER.
Lasoastek. Pa.. Jan. 10.- Last evening'!
storm was very violent in Earl and Manbcim
townships, in this county. Ranch's United
Brethren church, near New Holland, was al
most completely wrecked. Many houses and
bridges were unroofed, fences and outbuild
ings were blown away. aud. in some cases,
whole orchards were uprooted. No persona
are reported injured. *
A CHURCH SPIRE TWISTED OfT.
Lima. Ohio. Jan. 10. ?Great damage was don*
here yesterday by a heavy wind storm which
blew hundreds of derricks aud pumping-hous?e
down in the oil fields, and twisted off the suire
of the Reformed German church and other
wise damaged the building. The court-house
was damaged, and also many private resi
dences.
VERY BADLY COMPLICATED.
Curious Condition of Affair* In the West
Virginia Legislature.
8pecial Dispatch to The Eves rue Stab
Charleston. W. Ya.. Jan. 10.?The legisla
ture which was to convene at noon yesterday
was not called to order for some time after
ward. owing to the desultory arrival of the
members, resulting doubtless from the strained
situation of affairs. Organization was effected,
however, with the advantage somewhat in favor
of the democrats, though the republicans ap
pear to be confident.
*In the house it was smooth sailing, and ^i*
caucus nominees were chosen: Hon. J. J.
Woods, of Ohio county, was elected speaker)
John Hamilton, of Calhoun, clerk; W. H. Gibbs,
of Roane, sergeant-at-arms, and A. W. Knott,
of Marion, doorkeeper.
The house then took a recess until 2 JO this
afternoon.
Upon reassembling Secretary of State Walker
delivered the election returns to the house,
with the exception of Kauawah county's vote on
governor, together with a copy of an in
junction from Judge Campbell, of the tenth
judicial circuit, enjoining from laying the eer
tifi cate of that vote before the legialature.
In the senate matters were very different.
Each party seemed afraid of the other, and tha
formality of a caucus was dispensed with so far
as president of the senate was concerned. Tha
republicans made nominations for the other
offices, and the democrats held no caucus at all.
The republicans approached both Senator*
Carr. of Kanawha, and Minear, of Tucker, but
both declined to go into caucus. an<] when they
found that Senator Woodyard. of Roane, was
somewhat disaffected, their consternation waa
supreme for the moment. The republican
leaders set to work at once with zeal to
straighten out matters, for it was evident that
a combination had been effected between Carr
and Minear and that everything depended upon
the action of these two gentlemen.
A XEW ELEMENT OF CXCERTAIXTT.
Matters are further complicated by the af>
pearance of a new element in the situation.
The Knights of Labor have just held their an
nual state convention, and. Tuesday, passed
unanimously a resolution requesting the labor
men in the iegiglature not to caucus with or be
governed by either partv. In the senate. Carr.
of Kanawha; Kirk, of l'utnam: Corcoran, of
Ohio, aud Harr. of Marion, are labor men. tha
two former republicans and the two latter dem
ocrata. Corcoran was chairman of the Knighto
of Labor legislative committee. One suggee
tion is that the knights expect by this action to
bring about the election of one of their owa
men to the United States Senate. If the re
publicans aud democrats stick solidly to their
men and the labor element hold aloof there ia
no telling when or how the mattei will end.
Thus far the labor meu refuse to expreas their
opinions, and only say their coarse will be
known in time.
The situation was still further mystified ia
the organization of the senate yesterday by
the nomination of Senator Carr for president
by Senator Minear and the nomination of Sen
ator Minear by Senator Can-. Though Cair
waa elected as a republican he received tha
votes of twelve democrats and Minear. Minear
received eleven republican votes and that of
Carr. One went to Senator Maxwell, of Har
rison.
As it was a tie no election occurred, and a
second, third and fourth ballot were taken. A
motion for a recess waa offered and voted
upon thirteen tunes before adjoining till S IM
p. m. At 4 o'olock a further reoess was takra
and the matter left in that condition until to
day when the fight will be renewed this after*
THE RLI'CM.ItAN FROOSAa.
The republicans now propose to bring up t^
day the contest cases and unseat Dr. Yeator. at
the second district This and the Sweeny case,
an account of which appeared recently in Taa
Star, are the only contests before the senate,
and if theae can be 'unseated and republicans
put ia the election of a republican Senator
would be assured. This course m suggested by
a telegram from Sietoravilie stating that Hllae
Smith, delegate from Tyler eoanty. is seriously
ill at his home and will not be able to be pres
ent for some time. It is rtunored he has re
signed, bat that lacks confirmation. He will
not resign unless it Is found neceesary to re
elect some oae ia his stsed before the etoetioa
of Uaited States Senator. Ha ia few a en nag
republican eoanty.
Senator O. K. Price, the oldest member, to
prodding, having called the haaes to order
, Jan. M.?Two
of 00?yirsty have
O'Brten, ?embsr at
will take

xml | txt