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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 29, 1889, Image 1

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Vol 74?No. 12.0S7. WASHINGTON, D. C., FRIDAY. MARCH 2#, 1889. TWO CENTS.
THE EVENING STAR
PIBLISHKD DAILY, Fircpt Sunday,
AT THE STAR BUILDINGS,
K<-rthwst Corver Pttciylvinia Aye. and 11th 8U by
The Evening Star ftewgpaper Company,
K H. KAUFFMANS. Pret L
Tvrwntn hraa 1< aervM to aubacrfbers !n Jie
rtty l-y in?T?. on their own account, ?t 10.-eiit? per
we. k. or 44t per month Copies mt the counter. 2
rrti? ??> b Hy mail i??tag? p rjpaid?50 call ?
1. itb ? me year. *? all tuobtbt. (1
[FM-rxl at th? P ?t Office at W aah.ngton. ? G, aa
aec :id cla?? inaU matter 1
Tub s-ran-published on Friday?$1 ?
year p- prepaid Hit months. 50 cetits.
t^All tnai' safcarnptn n? mu>t be ?*id la advances
lit i*i?i sent longer than is paid (or.
Bate* of advertising made known on application.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
? II H. SMITH. ARTIST.
I-vnreat atiKli. m Waamngton. Free-hand
? ray. u |"ijrtriit? fr atlOte|75. nllMllHMl
l i'm. W... *|y or monthly payment* ta?. n if desired,
f" ? 1 i,:t. ,t i Man*, ar. Oven tuitilli p.io. mbl2-18t*
>\LVlIMHI.niLU: -l Ml I'l
r*l I> 11. of theColumbian I u.vt-rsitv. The
Spring Course of Lf turi "ill begin un MONDAY.
April 1st, at i> p.m .. aid c< utitni- 111.til May Hint. For
Particulars s<l>ir**se A. F. A. KING, M. I)., Dean. 7'Jtf
3th it n.w m'J.V'Jw
?- THE ATWAL MEETING OF THE
P?JX> etuckhol'lers of the Cl iLI MBIA FIRE IN
Kl'KtM'r. CO., of the Dietrtct of Columbia. for the
e!c<-ti<>u "i new trustees to serve for the tnsuing year
will be hei.l at the Company's ? fii?-e. in the Kelhsrg
Dui.htig, 141i> F n. w . on MONDAY. April J,
1 ?>*>? 1 he | .11* will be opened at 1 "J o'dack ai ana
cio-, 11 at 'J L> in Tnu?terW>ks<'KMr4l frm Wednes
day. March 27 to Tueaday. April 2. loth days in
elusive. H. E. WILLABD.
ri.L-6-eo.'U* Secretary.
r_ ?, COMMUTATION TICKETS.
iST^ The IIERDK I'll AETOX CO. havenowfor
sa.e at Ita nfTI.es. 10th and C ??? a e. aud 11*12 E at. n.
w . < '? u.n.niatloti i<o> ks. containing 100 tickets. gjod
itialiitali. ' he? iTl.e nih23-lni
GAS FIXTURES NEWEST STYLES.
I HAH. A. MIPDIMAS.
HJoe T STREET, DOORS EK 'M 18TH ST.
oXlDYZEK SILV ER.
STEEL. IBoN. SEW AMIUl'E BP..VS8. Ac.
? FROM
; - ji i
NEW liooDS EfiOM
THE BEST NEW \> >KK MAM FACTORY.
JalT Uui CoMPi 1ITIOXMET. DOW EST PRICES.
I Xc'Ll SIM NOVELTY I.N NECKWEAR
1- Uarr .l buckle Attachment applietl to
IV. k ard Puff !v arfa lb'' irreateat auccraa of the aea
? ? oulj at P. T. HALL'S. ?*)? F ?t. n *. JaJ4-jlui
, HI 1 YOIU COAL. COKE AND WOOD
fun.
JuHN SOX BROTHLRS,
Ibe leadlna firtu in the liiairU't. Ji.V3m
, MEDIC\L DEPARTMENT OF HOW ARD
1'nHeraity - I'i?t-irr*duate rourae will com
tueniT MONDIY. April lot, at tip ui. F? r farther m
{?miation apply to C. li PL'RVIS, S*-cretary. 1118
IHthat. u w. mhlltoapa
FRESH HAVANA AND KEY WEST
SEOAKM.
CHAMPAI.NE WINFS.
All the leaJm^ LramU, at New iork t rie*
lEMBROKi PI liE RYE WHIsfti.
1 HOMAS HVSSELL.
llnl?rur Wines, Bramlieaand .Sefrara,
ns 1213 Petiiiaylvaiiia arenue.
tfr- CEBTIF1CATES OF STOCK. CHEOl'ES,
and other aecnritiea. Con^nierclal litho
arapTy anducanfuinir. A. O. OEDNEY.
jal loth MHl D >tt*? ts 1 Poipt buildin?)._
U K BRIGHT, Ol ICK FIKK AXDCH1 vr,
< I E AN i L LL ni v \N aahn.Ktot^OaK LlKht
i t i'i| ?ny'? Coke. JuflNM'N HKoTHtRh,
*E-9m -i\e
NEW PUBLICATIONS.
Ax Eastlb Cjtame,
THE CASCAKOXI DAXCE.
A f.i j'inatiii^ ?nj irrai >fiil F.a??? r Amnsement, with
o rn?.:e pn tures by Garrett, is a timely feature
of tilti
APRIL Wlllfc AWAKE.
And another, apropos of the W asliiu^ton Centen
nial. is a condensed, yet ample,
CHILD'S ESTIMATE OF WASHINGTON.
Besides th? se are some 30 articles by entertaining
writers. ."?0 pictures by captivating artisu. iuclu.linif
4 T Trowbn.Ufe, .lolin Burroutrha, A. D. E". Randolph,
Cliuton S< iillard, Manraret Sidney. Marian Douglass
Mirv.-I.rt Itlalliwayt. Sandhiiui, Garrett, Taylor,
Hirachberir. llassam, He., tic.
ONLY 20 CENTS.
For aaie at all News Stands or aent by the Publisher*.
D. LOTHBOP COMPANY,
It Boston.
BICYCLES.
? mjths
"DART CYCLES"
For Ladies and itent*.
f>th 5t. n.w. Fii-wry HO? it ?.w.
Established 1844.
ANDREW J. JOYCE.
ccr A RRR RRR n A GGO EEE cS8c
C C AA R RR RIl AA O GE S 3
C A A RRR RRR II A A C. EE sSS<.
C C AAA R RR RII AAA O GG E ? 5
COCA IB KB RIIA A GGO EEE ?SS
TOR SPBING AND SUMMEB USE.
Victcriaa. Cabriolets. Mail Pliaetocs. Ladies'
DriTiiifr Phaetona, Carts, Spiders, Backboards,
Surreys, Road Wa^ona, Family Carnages and
Biisinesa Vehicles.
W> arc making a specialty this season of Vic
torias. W e hare a large stock and a great va
riety of styles.
It will be to your advantage to inspect our
stock before purchasing.
Our prices for the q tality are as low as any
ahcre in the Tutted State*. mhl4-lm
i
Ol'R lilST Of ^ames
?f well known residents usimr the PALACE KINO
11 KNACFS numbers otsr 100. In every case the
titn oat aatiafaction la giveu. There ia no other way to
heat a resilience eo economically aud comfortably.
HAYW ARD A HITHINSON,
?ihd- lru* 4-4 9th street.
IX ?111VKLY ONE W l EK OXLY!
on an order lor 'JOO \ laitimc Cards at reinilar
r?t'' ?- wiU eugrave (.aid l ists ioue line) f KEE. OF
CUAKGE.
JOHN F. PARET. Engraver,
mh":Hw.lp* 1 *;5 Peuusy lvania ave.
Something ew.
LEATHEROID TRUNKS.
Very light in weight.
STRONGER and MOBE DURABLE than
fiiile Leather, and at HALF THE PRICE
Made and sold only at TOPHAM'S
Trunk Factory, 1231 Pa. ave.
n-h'-'toapl
One W ekk More
FOR LADIES ONLY.
OWINO TO THE INCLEMENT WEATHER
FOR LADIES TO DO SHOPPING. W F. HAVE
DECIDED TO CONTINUE OUB 15 PER
chNl DiaoOCXT s.tl.E ONE WKU
L"JNGFJt. BEGINNING SATrBDAY. MARCH
?~l. ENDING SATURDAY. MARCH :iO. FOB
L.\DILS'. MISSES'. BOYS' AND CHILDREN'S
HIGH CUT SHOES ONLY.
EDMONSTON A CO..
133S? AND 1341 F STREET..
(OPPOSITE EBBITT HOUSE.)
Bih23-6,?.S.W NO BRANCH STORE.
Xe Be XOWNER & SoN.
DBY GOODS DEALEB4
131CTTH ST. N.W,
Surah Silk :n Black and Colors 50 eta.
Heavy Groa (iraln silk, ?1.
Henrietta Cashmere, in all the new shades, 1 yd.
Wide. 23 < u.
Henrietta Cashmere. All-wnoL HH inches wide. 40 Cts.
Henrietta Caehmerv, regular :>?c. ruoda. 45 eta.
New Satinet, French at) lee, 10 aud l .'VscU.
All-Wool Muting. d> ubie width. 25 eta.
9,000 yda. Oreaa Gingham, from New York auction,
cheap at 10 eta. we are selling them for S eta.
l~ight Shirtiug Calico, o eta.
Peroalee, S eta.
Atout ."m? doa. Xapkina. (Job lot) worth turn 50 to
Ibe.. 40e. d. I.
Lsdlea Silk Girdles, in all colors, 40eta.
Fruit of the Loom Hwh Cotton. HH eta.
Best bleached Sheeting. 2H yarda wide. 25 eta.
Unreached Bheetln*. 2 H yarda wide, 18 etc
Gold tipped Uwbreilaa, II
Unn Line of White Gooda. from & eta. up.
Plaited SkiTl fcsajd. 15 eta.
ttaCa Beat bkm braid. 5 eta. >4-0B
SPECIAL NOTICES.
THERE WILL BE A CALLED MEETING
of Bl<?n> ofV'roth 1''iV--. No. 1 litis fl. IT. o.
O. F..held at Odd Fellow*' h:?il. 1 itli st south of Pa.
are.. THIS EVEJIIN'li MARCH at 7:30 o'clock. to
make arrangements lor tue funeral of our deceased
brother, John Minor. THOMAS A GRIFFITH. N.G.
If DAVI I) A. CLARK. P. S.
THE "ENGLISH TOI' COAT" 18 THE
newest and most stylish Spring Overcoat lor
yowmr men. Sold only by E. B. BARN1M & CO. It
Jf- WE"WANT'"every MOrHEll IX wash".
ington toconsider herself i>ersoiially Invited
to our <Jpening of Boy's and Children's Outflittings
commencing MONDAY NEXT?all the week.
mh'.*!* SAKS k COMPANY.
BANJOS.
The Celebrated FAIRBANKS 4 COLE. Finest make.
Highest awards. Large stock just received by
W. G. METZEROTT & CO.,
mhl!Muftf3m lllOFst. n.w.
THE PUBLIC 18 HEREBY cautioned
against the purchase oi two certain note*
lor $100 each; one at .".0 days and one at !?> days from
January L'4 last, made by me :uid payable to the order
of K p. Sawyer, for which I have received uo value,
and which the payee intorius inc be has lost.
THOMAS A. MITCHELL
mh29-2t* WW F St., Room 4.
WE ABE oTviNOSPEOIAL ATTENTION
to filliiiir orders for ANY KIND of HOME
MADE CAKES. Please send in orders t-arly. LAFAY
ETTE MARKET AND GROCERY' (Chas. H. Ranb ft
Co.),cor. 19th and Pennsylvania ave. u.w. in21>-3t#
ISOMIC-THERE WILL BeTsPECIAL
_ nmoiiKut!''ii of LaFayette Lodge. No. lit,
F.AX*..??5y, Mnrch 1SW', at 7:M? o'clock
p.ui Members of sister lodges fraternally Invited.
By order of the W. M , JOHN if. OLCOTT, Secretary.
nih'.!8-:it
?- _.^?A MEETING OF THE BUILDERS' AID
association will he held THURSDAY". April
4. at , .'10 p. in., at the i tEce of Wright and Stockett,
real estate agents, LeDroit Btiildimr, MO F St., for the
election of officers and the transaction of such other
busimss as may be brought before it. F. J. DIEU
DON SE, i'rtsldfiit. W. E. WRIGHT.
mh2M-.it Secretary.
?- ?-i RARE BARGAINS.
{??CS Havinga heavy invoice of (roods en route,
I will sell the must iiu.kliitici'nt specimens of Turkish
and Persian Ru<s and Portieres at the lowest prices
ever oflered. The reader should ^isit my store and
take advantage of this rare opportunity
. _ _ D. K. V A l'.ZH A BEDI AN.
mh"8-3t 61S and fi^'O 14th St. _
flf^rSsDR. IRVING C. ROSSE WILL HEREAFTER
receive patients at his office. ITU'.' H st n.
w? from 10 a.111 to 1 p.m.. and from 4 to p.in.,on
Monday , Wednesday and Friday only. mh'JS-Ut*
^ JKOT MORAX,
Sl'.'G pennsylvania AVE.,
Is now pnttitig on BEST CHARCOAL TIN ROOFING
at #4 per square for spot ca-sh. This roof I will war
rant to be as good in material and workmanship as any
"" * * on in this city. I make this low price in
men employment during dull season.
? 1 can accoiunionate by adding $1
110 da>#iei|iiired.
?estimates on PLl'MBING. nit!8-3t
I'RIXG OVERCOATS.
New and e.egant styles Spring overcoats now
complete, in very extensive variety. lUinging
in price Iroiu #S to i 'JO.
GEORGE SPRAN8Y,
mhS7-.1t 4:.4 7th street.
X B.?THIS IS TO NOTIFY'THE PUl?
lie Ihat 1 huv< bought the stock and fixtures
of 1 ii'is. C.Davidson, comer 2d and Canal sts. s. w.,
and will coutimie to keep a fresh stock of Groceries,
Liquors, dtrars, Tobacc', &c. A. J. SAXFORD.
Washington. D. C . M m l. U>, 1 Suit. in'.'; :it*
\\ ASHINGTl IN. D. C . MARCH 1 JV'.iT
The annual meeting of the stockholders of
the Smith National Cycle xlamiiacturiiiir Company
will be held ill Durango, Colorado, April 37,
A preliminary meeting will be held at St. George's
Hall, 510 11th st. n. w., Washington, D. C? APRIL 5,
1S91<, at 7 HO p. m. mli2S-2t
r_ E F BROOKS,
3? 531 15TH STREET.
ULR ENORMOUS STOCK IS COMPLETE
IN EVERY DEPARTMENT.
FROM THE CHEAPEST iO THE FINEST,
the Choicest productions of the
LEADING FACTORIES.
CORCORAN BUILDING, Ol'P. I. S. TREASURY.
m
> " LAUREL REAL ESTATE AGENCY.
iO Address FRANK I. AHERN,
Box 51,
Laurel.
Md.
The best Washington references. mli25-t>t*
PIANOS TUNED AND REPAIRED
. st DROOP'S, K25 Pa. ave.,
n?h-3-6t Stienway Agency.
HAVING SOLD TO MR. THOMAS W.
HFNOERFOkI> one-half Interest in the
real estate MbMi t MB I ; rted by me for seme time, a
cot>artii?Ti?hij? haM been formed under the hrin name of
hUST HUNOIlKIORD.
Mr. Hun^eriord h*> been a??s<?ciated with the house
of 1 homat* ltUAsell, 1*J13 Pennsylvania ave., for the
last twenty-throe years. H. L. HUST,
lo()H F ?t. n. w.
On and after March 1 &H9, our office will be at
6'-.'4 14th st. n.w., bet. t and ii Hts.
RL'ST & Hl'SGERFORD,
mhC.*>-7t Real Kstate Brokers
THOHK IN NKFT> UF GKNI INE SLATE
Mantels wt-uM do well to call and see our
si in a before buyintr eisewhere. New designs finished
in artistic manner at the luwi *t S*nir? *,
C. W. M A< ilLL k CO.,
?h23-0t* 1013 Md. ave. a.w.? Waahinyton, D.C.
TUMffTT HMX*! CREAMhltV COl
Wild- SELL YOU THE BEST MILK, CREAM,
BUTTER, buttermilk AND COTTAGE
CHEESE, &c.
Guaranteed Pure and Unadulterated.
Business Conducted on a Business Basin.
Until our watrous can reraired and repainted,
which will take some time, but is now being* i>ushcd as
rapidly a.-* i*ossible,our whjtous will retain Ward's
name on them.
Bear iii mind the "Ward" watron; for the oreseut we
will deliver OUR OWN i>airy Products, and none can
be better or purer.
The wagons lieariupr our own name will Boon take the
place of the Ward wagons, and in th#? meantime the
citizens may be assured that oul> the very best pro
ducts Will be delivered to them. V> e want to train con
fidence?by out deeds more than by words.
mli*^l-^in
JUDICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE UNI
\XUalT V OF GEORUETOW N.
ir ? : < ?
Wpon ?rwial hranchm will commcncc on
NBoday, AprU li?t. at S ?? vlm k |?. m., at th? College
BWMing. <Tn H >itr?-?-t. In-twtru '.ttti and lUth.
Tlib iArodmtorj addrriwt will i"? given by Prof. I.
W. Black num. Subject: "The Microscope in Mt-di
cine." 1 h* meuical rrofeaaiun and ttie iniblic are In
vited to attend. For further information ai i lj to
G L. MAORI OER. M. D, Dean.
mhlH 'iw hl.*> Vermont ave.
Of m DR. J CURTIS8 KM IT HE HAS RE
moved hi?office troiii 13i:i to 131"> New
York avenue, one door weat of lormer residence.
March 1. lSh!?: mli^-lm
?WILSON WHISKY."
PRODUCT OF THE WILSON distillery,
HIGHSPIRE, DAUPHIN CO.. PA.
Thin celebrated Whiaky, moet carefully and slowly
yeaated. maahed. ferineute<l. and distilled from the in
valuable health-giving Chalybeate waters and choice
small grain Rye, peculiar to the renowned mountain
districts of Pennsylvania and Maryland, and m>eued
in heated warehouses, sea-voyaged and aged in the
warm salt air of Bermuda. The oxides of iron and
their homologous salts found in the waters from which
this Whisky la distilled render this Yt hisky invaluable
and unequalcd as a tonic and rejuvenator tutnosein
need of strength, vitality, and vigor.
See certificate of Prof. Tonry, of the Baltimore Med
ical College:
"IT IS PURE free FROM FUSEL oil, AND can
THEREFORE BE SAFELY RECOMMENDED for
ICIN'AL use its high COLOR IS due TO
. lit. IRON PRESENT.
"WM. P. TONRY, Ph. D.. Chemist"
Ask your Grocer for WILSON WHISKY.
THE ULMAN goldsborough CO..
Distillers.
fe4-3m Baltimore, Md.
REMOVAL.
Ha\ ing leased my property, corner
14TH AND B STS. N.W.,
1 have removed my MAIN OFFICE to
4:ft 10TH ST. N.W.,
above GAS OFFICE, where all orders will be received
and promptly filled from my old RAILROAD YARDat
MARYLAND AVE. AND 12TH ST. 8 W..
where in the future I will carry my entire atock of
LUMBER, LATH, SHINGLES, Ac.
mhO-lm^ JAMES F. BARBOUR.
?i?TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES.?
The Gartield Memorial Hoai>ital has organ
ized a Traimtig School for Nurses anu 1s pn.|?reu to
receive a limited uumber of pupils on probation Cir
culars may be obtained by applying to the Superin
tendent of Sur?n, Garfield Memorial Hosi ital. Wash
ington, D. C. a mhlS-eo4w
EQUITABLX
CO-OPERATIVE BUILDING ASSOCIATION.
"EQUITABLE BUILDING." 1003 I ST.
ASSETS. 99? 1.538.04.
Sobarrtptions for shares in the Kith iaaue received
tally at the office of the Association, Equitable Build
ing. 1003 r st.
Shares are 92.50 per month.
91,000 advanced on each share.
Pamphlets explaining the objects and advantafa of
the A seociation are furnished upon application.
Office hours, from w am. to 4 30 pan. On the flnt
Wednesday in each mcntli the office will be open froca
? to 8 o'clock pju. Advances will be made promptly
at T
THOMAS SOMEEV1LLK, Preat
mo. JCfi ed son. sw? naa
Washington News and Gossip.
Index i* AdrrrtiMncDU,
amusements s
ARCHITECTS Pa^ ?
ATTORNEYS !p?*e 7
AT CTION BALE9 Fifrei 2 and 0
BOARDING pjuje
BOOKS AND STATIONERY . * p., g
BUSINESS CHANCES Pair, ??
BICYCLES pin 1
CITY ITEMS p? s
COUNTRY REAL ESTATE J..".."""' pie H
DE ATHS ? ; 5
DENTISTRY 7
DRY GOODS Paire 8
EDUCATIONAL ...." pa*?7
FAMILY SUPPLIES Pwre 0
FINANCIAL. "p^re 7
FOR RENT (Rooms) Page 2
FOR RENT (Houses) Paire :j
FOR RENT (Officii) Pure 2
FOR RENT (Stables) Psire 2
FOR RENT (Stokes) Paire 2
FOR SALE (Houses) page 3
FOB SALE (Lots) Pajje 3
FOR SALE (Miscellaneous) Pvre 2
GENTLEMEN'S GOODS Pure 7
HOUKEFURNI8HINGS Page 6
LADIES' GOODS p^e 0
LOCAL MENTION " p?*e 8
LOST AND FOUND Pa^e 2
MARRIAGES Pt^e 5
MEDICAL Pure 7
MISCELLANEOUS ! . Pi? 5
MONEY TO LOAN 1>1<re g
NOTARIES PUBLIC Piure 7
NEW PUBLICATIONS P?Ke 1
OCEAN STEAMERS p^a 7
rOTOMAC RIVER BOATS Patfe 7
PIANOS AND ORGANS.... " pwf|
PERSONAL ""'iWo 3
I'RINTKRS Pau.? u
.... _ l W o
PROFESSIONAL Pa? 6
PROPOSALS Pmre 2
RAILROADS ......... . Piuro 7
SPECIAL NOTICES .."."ii Pt^e 1
SPECIALTIES Pure 2
SUBURBAN PROPE'RTY.V.V.V".V.'.*'.'.".'.'.!!!'.'."'.P^e 2
WANTED (Help) !!!....Piure 2
WANTED (Houses) Paro ?>
WANTED (Rooms) Pure 2
WANTED (Lots) 2
WANTED (Situations) Pa?fe 2
WANTED (Miscellaneous)... Pa*e 2
WINTER RESORTS " Paire 7
Wood and coal " ."" ...."...V.".1pw 7
Government Receipts To-day.?Internal rev
enue, $380,195; customs. $813,474.
Secretary Noble made the attempt when he
first took charge of the Interior department to
have all letters received by him answered. His
mail, however, has increased to such an extent
that he finds he is unable to carry out his origi
nal intention, and thus many letters of neces
sity remain unanswered.
The Only Bond Offer received by Secretary
Windom this morning was ("50,000 registered
per cents at 108.
Gen. Bacheller, who succeeds Gov. Thomp
son as assistant secretary of the Treasury, has
arrived in Washington and was at the depart
ment to-day. He will assume his new duties
Monday morning.
Resignations.?Mr. Norman T. N. Robinsou,
of \irginia. law clerk in the Attorney-General's
office, has resigned, and will open an office in
this city. Mr. Nicholas M. Bell, the superin
tendent of the foreign mails, has resigned.
Virginia Postmasters Appointed.?Ida Shu
mate has been appointed postmaster at Calver
ton. Farquier county. Va? and A. H. Myers, at
Eagle Rock, Botetourt county, Va.
Appraiser for Portland, Me.?Mr. Eben E.
Rand has been selected for appoilttmatsfM ap
praiser of merchandise in the district of Port
land and Falmouth, Me., vice Mr. Edward A.
Pierce, resigned.
Appointments.?Joseph E. Straub has been
appointed storekeeper and ganger at Bath, Pa.,
and Joseph W. Keedy storekeeper at Kansas
City, Mo.
Time Allowances.?The Treasury depart
ment lias decided that cold weather cannot be
considered rainy or stormy weather within the
meaning of the general regulations relating to
time allowances in the discharge of cargoes of
perishable merchandise.
Private Secretary to Secretary Tracy.?
Henry W. Raymond, editor and proprietor of
the Germantown Telegraph (a son of the late
Henry J. Raymond, founder of the New York
has received the appointment of pri
vate secretary to Secr< tary of the Navy Tracy.
Mr. Raymond will assume"his duties next Moil
day.
The Army Register for the current year has
been received at the War Department.
Hon. Edwin Will its. the new assistant sec
retary of agriculture, arrived in the city this
morning. He took the oath of office in the
room <n Secretary Rusk, the oath being admin
istered by Mr. O. D. LaDow.
Marine Guards for the Paris Exposition.?
Upon the application of Gen. W. B. Franklin,
commissioner-general of the United States to
the Paris exposition of 1889, two marine officers
and thirty- marines will embark from New
York April 15 next, to guard the American ex
hibit.
An Interesting Mileage Case.?In the
Court in General Term of this District to-day
the case of the United States ex rel. R. Mason
Leisle against Fourth Auditor Shelley and Sec
ond Controller Butler was read. This is an
application for a mandamus to compel the al
lowance in petitioner's account of a charge for
?613.40 for mileage from Philadelphia to Mare
Island, California, by way of the Isthmus road
instead of ?324.?0 by the overland route.
Officers Recommended for Promotion.?
Lieut.-Commander R. B. Bradford, Lieut-Com
mander Geo. A. Converse, Lieuts. (junior
grade} Jno. F. Parker, and H. H. Haslev have
passed, satisfactorily, examinations for promo
tion and the records have been sent to the
President for action.
Naval Movements.?The U. S. 8. Omaha ar
rived at Yokahama, Japan, anj the Keursarge
at Barbadoes, yesterday. AU were well.
Sworn In.?Mr. Thayer, the newly appointed
minister to the Netherlands, was at the State
department this morning and took the oath of
office. He will probably depart for his post
within a month.
Personal.?Randolph Stalnacker of West Vir
ginia, A. E. Badger of Boston, Kobt. F. Gen
shaw and Edgar L. St. Ceran of New Orleans,
Henry lfayes of Newark, and A. W. Chamber
lain and J. B. Pond of New York are at Wil
lurd's. Thomas Stokely Wood of Cincinnati
is the guest of Gen. John 8. Mason. V. W.
Bishop of Bridgeport. Conn., Frank W. An
drews and Paul A. Andrews of Boston, Horace
L. Hotchkiss of New York, and E. C. Knight,
jr.. of Philadelphia are at the Normandie.
Hon. W. C. Culburtsou of Girard, Pa., Geo. T.
lielden of Cincinnati. John B. Hereshoff of Cal
ifornia. W. 8. Boyl?of Chicago, and L. C. Hop
kins of New York are at the Ebbitt. Wm. H.
Rude, Wm. N. Riddle, and Stochar Hough of
New York. J. Kean, jr., of New Jersey, and
Cornelius McBride of St. Louis are at Welcker's.
A. P. Ketchum of New York and W. A.
Mercer of the array are at Wormley's. W. A.
Mendell of Boston. W. P. Morgan and J. W.
Carver of Chicago are at the Riggs. D. N.
Freeman of Atlauta, (la., CoL R. C. Shannon
of New York, and Alex. McKenzie of Dakota
are at the St James. 8. D. Hamilton of
Ohio. C. K. Ingersoll of New Haven, and J. W.
Whitbeck of Rochester, N. Y. are at the Arno.
The District Sued for $10,000.
J. B. HERTFORD CLAIMS THAT HU LAND AT HT.
PLEASANT HAS BEEN DAMAGED TO THAT EXTENT.
In Circuit Court. No. 2, Judge Montgomery,
the case of J. R. Hertford against the District
of Columbia was placed on trial to-day, Messrs.
E. A. Newman and A. A. Lipscomb for the
plaintiff and Messrs. A. G. Riddle and E. For
rest for the defendant. The plaintiff snes for
$10,000 damage to his property on 14th street
extended (Mount Pleasant) by reason of enter
ing on his land and digging a trench which
empties on his land, whereby he claims a nui
sance has been crested sad his property dam
aged.
AT THE CAPITOL TO-DAY.
MORE MINISTERS NOMINATED.
Also a First Assistant Secretary of the
Interior.
FOUL AIR IN THE SENATE.
The Subject of Ventilation Discussed.
The Senate.
The Vice-President laid before the Senate
the resolution offered yesterday by Mr. Sher
man for the appointment of a committee of
two Senators to wait on the President and in
quire if he has any other business to lay before
the Senate.
Mr. Sherman?I think that the resolution
may lie on the table subject to call.
It wag so ordered.
VENTILATION OF THE SENATE CHAMBER.
The Vice-President also laid before the
Senate the resolution offered yesterday by Mr.
Manderson, instructing the committee on con
tingent expenses (in connection with the arehi- I
tect of the Capitol) to take such steps as may
be necessary to help the ventilation of the
Senate chamber and wing.
The resolution was briefly discussed, Mr. j
Manderson remarking that the ill-ventilation I
of the Senate chamber was aa evil under which
| Senators had suffered for a long time; Mr.
Hawley expressing the opinion that the venti
lation of the Senate chamber was better than
any Senator supposed;
MB. BLAIR SNEERING AT EXPERTS
as a class of people; Mr. Dawes expressing a
like contempt for experts, and praying not to
be subjected to the final conclusions of experts
on ventilation.
Mr. Dawes added that the fatal mistake was
committed when the air of the chamber was
shut up in an iron box. There never had been
anything so preposterous as the shutting of
Senators in such a collin. and there never would !
be any great improvement in the ventilation of i
the two halls until the walls were extended
back so as to let the air of heaven come in.
SENATOR BUTLEIl's SCOGESTION.
Mr. Butler favored the resolution, and sug
r '"ted that as the two Senators (Blair and |
*.>. wes) seemed to know so much about the j
si.bject they ought to be added to the commit- |
tee to inquire into it.
ir. Morrill moved to amend the resolution '
st as to merely authorize the inquiry to be j
made. If Senators would inform themselves
they would find that there was no parliament- i
arv hall in any country that whs not con- j
structed on the same principle as the Senate !
chamber. Not one of them had its halls ex
tended to the outer air.
IF THE SENATE CHAMBER WERE EXTENDED,
so as to have open windows on one side, the
tier of Senators sitting next those windows
would probably bo attacked by pneumonia
every week or two. As to the complaint that
the atmosphere was worse when the Senate was
in executive session than at other times, he
suggested that perhaps that would not be the
case if Senators did not avail themselves of the
opportunity in order to smoke cigars. He sub
sequently. however (on a suggestion from Mr.
Hoar), withdrew the latter remark.
THE RESOLUTION AGREED TO.
** Finally th? resolution was agreed to. modi
fied so as to give the committee on contingeut
expenses the right to consult other experts (as
well as the architect of the cnpitol), but not to
have any plan executed; requiring a report to
bejmade at the next session, and extending the
inquiry to the lighting as well as to the venti
lating of the Senate chamber and wing.
I . THE LANG FORD CLAIM.
Mr. Dawes offered a resolution (which was
laid over) calling on the Secretary of the In
terior for information as to the Langford claim
to certain lands in the Lapwai Indian reserva
tion in Idaho territory.
SOLDIERS AND THE CIVIL SERVICE.
The Vice-President presented a memorial
from a committee appointed at a meeting of
Union soldiers held at Washington a week ago
; for exemption of honorably discharged soldiers.
Ac., from civil-service examinations. Laid on
j the table.
COMMITTEE TO ATTEND THE SEW YORK CENTEN
NIAL.
The Vice-President announced the appoint
ment of Senators Sherman, Dawes. Allison,
Cullom. Hampton. Eustis aud Colquitt, as the
committee to attend the New York centennial
celebration, and. on motion of Mr. Evarts, the
President pro tempore (Mr. Ingails) was added
to the committee.
EXECUTIVE SESSION. '
The Senate, at 1:55 p.m., on motion of Mr.
Sherman, proceeded to the consideration of
executive business.
I
IM PORT ANT NOMINATIONS TO- DAY.
Ministers to Brazil, Central America,
Ycuezuela and Corea, Ktc.
The President to-day sent the following nomi
nations to the Senate:
Robert Adams, jr., of Pennsylvania, to be en
voy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary
of the United States to Brazil.
Lanzing B. Mizner, of California, to be envoy
extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of
the United States to the Central American
states.
Wm. L. Scruggs, of Georgia, to be envoy ex
traordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the
United States to Venezuela.
Wm. O. Bradley, of Kentucky, to be minister
resident and consul-general of the United
States to Corea.
George B. Ferguson, of Maine, to be collec
tor of customs for the district of Belfast,
Maine.
Charles Henry Tilghman Lowndes, of Mary
land, to be an assistant surgeon in the navy.*
George Chandler, of Kansas, to be first assist
ant secretary of the Interior.
George L. Shoup, of Idaho, to be governor
of Idaho.
Edward J. Curtis, of Idaho, to be secretarv
of Idaho.
Jacob V. Admire, of Kansas, to be receiver of
{ulilic moneys at Kingfisher Stage station,
ndian Territory.
Jacob C. Robberts. of Nebraska, to be
register of the land office at Kingfisher Stage
station, Indian Territorv.
Second Lieut. Chas. B. Vogdes, first infantry,
to be first lieutenant.
Sion A. Donnell. of Georgia, to be U. 8. at
torney for the northern district of Georgia.
Wm. 8. Tipton, of Teunefbee. to be U. 8.
marshal for the eastern district of Tennessee.
The Jury Fail to A free.
THE 8UIT OF THORNTON LEWIS AOAIN8T THE WASH
INOTON AND GEORGETOWN RAILROAD COMPANY.
The jury in the case of Thornton Lewis
against the Washington and Georgetown rail
road company were this morning discharged on
announcing to Chief Justice Bingham that there
were no prospect of agreeing on a verdict.
This was an action for damages claimed by rea
son of complainatt falling off a summer car by
reason of tne sudden start of the car, injury
Ing his hip and otherwise. The defense was
contributory negligence.
Buffalo Bill's Gift to the Zoological
Pabk.?Hon. Wm F. Cody, or "Buffalo Bill,"
as he is popularlv known, some months ago de
posited three elks in the "zoo" at the Smith
sonian. Mr. Wm. T. Hornaday, who is in charge
of the zoo, to-day received a letter from Mr.
Cody through Chief Bell, of the Treasury secret
service, in which Mr. Cody donated the elks to
the national zoological garden, and expressed
his determination to make further contribu
tions to advance the enterprise, which he speaks
of as a most laudable one.
The Illinois state senate yesterday, by a ris
ing rote, passed a joint resolution indorsing
the action of President Harrison in nominating
the Hon. Robert T. Lincola to be minister to
England.
TRIAL OP MAJOR LYDRCKER.
Testimony Before the Court-Martial
To-Day.
THE PROSECUTION RECALLS SOME WITNESSES AND
EXAMINES ONE OR TWO NEW ONES, AND THEN
CLOSES ITS CASE?BRIO.-OEN NEWTON. OF THE
ENGINEER CORPS. CALLED TO THE STAND.
The examination of Subcontractor rainier
continued after The Star's report of the Ly
deeker court-martial closed yesterday after
noon. On cross-examination Mr. Swift spent
some time in an effort to straighten out the re
lationship between Kirlin and the witness. He
seemed to have a clue to some financial transac
tions between the two. for ho repeatedly asked
Palmer if Kirlin bad ever borrowed money
from Lim or his father, or if either of them
had borrowed from Kirlin. To all questions of
this character, however, Palmer's answers were
steadily in the negative.
palmer's payments to o'briex.
Mr. Swift gave him an opportunity?which
tho judge-advocate had not cared to present?
to tell the story of his payments to O'Brien.
This, he said, was not like the Jpayments to the
other sub-inspectors, the result of a custom or
precedent in the tunnel. Before O'Brien went
to work he heard him say that he did not like
the idea of going down in the tunnel for ?75 a
month. Witness told O'Brien that he thought
that he would like it Detter after he had been
down there a while. Then, after a few days, he
told O'Brien that if Lieut. Towusend and Kir
lin had no objection he would pay him the dif
ference between ?75 and ?90 a month for keep
ing the time of the men. He denied, however,
that he handed him the money personally.
NEVER SAW THE SPECIFICATIONS OF THE WORK HE
CONTRACTED TO DO.
Lieut.-Col. Flagler asked the witness if he
had ever been shown a copy of the specifica
tions.
''No, sir."
''On what, then, did you base your estimate
of the price of your sub-contract?"
'T depended on Mr. Brennan's judgment for
that, as he had been on the work before."
"What was your idea of doing the work, if
you had no specifications to go from?"
"I don't know, except I knew that I was to do
the work well. I thought that the work was to
be done as 1 would have it done if 1 was an in
spector myself."
MORE TESTIMONY AS TO BAD WORK.
The next witness was Henry Layeock, who
was sworn with his left hand up, his rightbeing
in a sling. Henry stated that his residence was
on 7th street; he did not know the number; it
was six or seven miles out. He was a bricklayer
and worked on the tunnel, and occasionally did
a little packing. His testimony was but cor
roborative of the bad work in the lining. He
had several times heard Emery tell the men to
throw the stones in dry in the hearing of the
sub-inspector, who frequently saw bad work
done. The witness had never seen any pack
ing done in a proper manner. He did not know
either Lieut. Townsend or Major Lydeeker by
sight.
A PHENOMENAL SUB-INSPECTOR.
The court was next treated to a genuine sur
prise in the shape of a sub-inspector, who had
evidently made an honest effort to have good
work done. His name was Samuel Harper,
and he told his story with a directness and an
evident truth that, after he had gone, caused !
the court to shake their heads and sigh. It j
seemed a relief to them. This witness had |
seen Lieut. Towusend in the tunnel about six
times and Major Lydeeker not over twice.
INSPECTOR LUCAS ON THE STAND.
The court probably thought that another
Harper ^iad come to the stand when Inspector
Thomas Lucas' long, white beard was seen, as
its owner entered the room and settled into the
witness chair with an ease bred of long famil
iarity with the court of inquiry. His state
| ments. however, did not carry "out this hope,
for he soon testified that very bad work had |
been found in his sections. But he did not
think that anyone could have detected this bad
work. The men worked while the sub-inspec
tors were not there, but he did not report the
fact. He received !?75 a month from the gov
ernment. and 50 cents an hour from the con
tractors for over time. He had seen Lieut.
Towusend in the tunnel frequently, and Maj.
Lydeeker not so often. He supposed that the
lieutenant told the major everything that was
going on. When the major did come, he added,
he" always gave the work a "most thorough in
spection."
Lucas was still on the stand when the court ]
adjourned.
PROCEEDINGS TO-DAY.
Upon reconvening this morning the judge
advocate went out among the crowd of wit
nesses outside of the door and called in all of
them who had testified yesterday. They filed
in. some of them bringing chairs with them,
and took seats around the court-room, where
they remained with their eyes glued on the
major while he read the voluminous proceed
ings.
(ien. Crook suggested that the witnesses be
warned to make any corrections they wished.
This was communicated to them andthe read
ing went on.
Gov. Boutwell and Mr. Swift did not appear
at first, and for a time Major Lydeeker sat
alone in his uniform at the table in the corner.
WITNESSES RECALLED.
Shortly after 11 o'clock Theodore Harbcck
was recalled to the stand. His name was yes
terday given as Harpy, but this was due to his j
dialect. The judge-advocate asked him for the
court what he meant by his testimony yester- j
day that after September, 1NH7. the" work
changed from bad to good. Theodore replied
that lie heard the Kendall boys had made com
plaints of bad work being done and the in
spectors were more strict after that.
Sub-inspector Boyce was also recalled at the
request or the defense. Gov. Boutwell asked
him several questions about the details of the
work. The witness stilted that he used to set
the profiles ahead of the gang, and for this re
ceived pay from the contractors. The court
asked hliu whose duty it was to take the pro
files. tho United States or the contractors.
Boyce thought that it was the duty of the
United States, but could give no satisfactory
reason for taking pay for it.
There was quite a wait for the arrival of the
stenographer who took the testimony after the
recess vesterday, and when he came, at 11:45,
the judge-advocate began reading again.
LIEUT. T0WN8END RECALLED.
After the recess the judge-advocate stated
that there were two witnesses that the court
desired to recall to ask a few questions, and
that Gens. Newton aud Duane were here and
wished to get through with their testimony as
soon as possible. This caused the court to
postpone the reading of the testimony. Lieut.
Towusend was recalled, and Col. Wliittemore
asked a few questions as to the system of in
spection. To Col. Comstock the witness stated
that he had understood that the packing was
being done by stone-masons according to the
specifications.
To Col. Flagler he said that he thought that
the sub-inspectors understood fuUv the
character of the packing to be put behind
the lining after the change from dry packing
to rubble-masonry.
CoL Piper took some time to write out a ques
tion asking how long the night work continued.
The replv was from June or July. 1888. until a
Siece of bad work was discovered" that had been
one at night under O'Brien, about two
months later.
INSPECTOR OF THE NIGHT WORK.
"What precautions did Major Lydeeker haTe
taken to have the night work inspected?" came
next.
The lieutenant said that the major had asked
to have an especially good man put to watch
the night gangs, and upon Kirlin'* recommen
dation O'Brien was appointed. During 1887
there were pieces of night work done.
CAPT. SEARS, OF THE ENGINEER CORPS, AM A
WITNESS.
Capt. Sears, of the corps of engineers, was
called as a witness. He said that he knew Major
Lydeeker, and then gave some of the details of
the routine in the office of the chief of engi
neers. The judge-advocate then presented aa
evidence a letter from Major Lydeeker to the
chief ?f engineers, and also one which the de
fense %as anxious to file, fie postponed their
reading for the present. Since March 14, 1887,
Major Lydeeker had made an application for
[OgsMiwd onjt/th pofff-1
to The
Reminiscences of John Bright.
CALLING FOE BOULANGEB'S ARREST
A NEGRO SHOT DEAD NEAR LYNCHBURG ,
How to Get Home* in Oklahoma.
SHOT A XKGRO DEAD.
?
Gilbert Mann Claims that the Negro
Attempted to Rob Htm.
8pecial Dt?i>aU'h to The Evexiko Star
^yschbubo, Va.. March 29.?Information
has been received here of a tragedy in Camp
bell county, about six miles below this city.
The dead body of a negro named William Lips
comb. was found on the roadside, with a bullet
hole through the heart. The killing is said to
have l>eeu done by a white man named Gilbert
Mann, who resides at Appomattox depot No
one witnessed the deed, but it is stated that
Mann's version of the affair, is to the effect
that he was waylaid by the negro for the pur
pose of robbery, and that he shot him while
engaged in the attempt. A full investigation
will be made and in the meantime Maun is
said to be in custody.
An old neerro woman named Ann Wllev was
run over and killed bv a shifting engine, in the
yard of the Virginia Midland railroad, in this
city, last night
TIIE AXTI-CORX LAW TRIO.
Vllllers, the Last Survivor of It, Talks
Interestingly of John liriglit.
Special Cable Digfat- h to The Evekixo Suk
London, March 29.?I have interviewed Chas.
Villiers, the only survivor of the anti-corn law
trio, on reminiscences of John Bright. He is
eighty-seven, has been a member of parlia
ment for lifty-four years, and is easily father of
house of commons. He very seldom goes
there and latterly has been ill. but the old man.
who received me with the kindly courtesy of
the old school, talked with keen interest and vi
vacity. He was clad in a quaint, long dressing
gown and wore an odd-fashioned frill shirt |
front, with tumbled locks of gray hair above a
face whose fresh, clear color seems to defy
years. He said: "I tirst saw John Bright tifty
years ago. Cobden took me to hear him speak,
saying. 'We have already all the great writers |
and learned economists. What we wsnt is to
bring the truth down to the minds of the com
mon people.' I agreed with Cobden after hear- j
iug Bright speak that Bright was exactly able
to do this, llis style was simple, clear, direct,
his words right good Saxop, his delivery the
emphasis, force, and pathos of simplicity.
His arguments appealed to common principles
and broad ideas, 'If not born a Quaker
HE WOULD HAVE BIEN A PRIZE FIGHTER,
said Cobden, and I preferred his extempore
thrust in debate to hi* set orations. He always i
spoke with a roll of notei and never without
signs of long previous thought My personal
feeling for him amounted to affection, yet he
failed to mHt my ideal of an old, many-sided
statesman like Chatham.
"His work in polities was strongly grasping a
few great ideas and pursuing them without
turning right or left His separation from
Gladstone on home rule caused him great pain.
1 well remember his utter bewilderment at
Gladstone's new departure. His unionism has
caused fashionable society to make peac4 with
him and insured his memorv the all-round
homage due to it." I asked, in parting, if he
would hear Gladstone's speech to-day. "I
should dearly like to," he said, "but I dare not
venture to the house now: it has grown noisy.
1 aui afraid I should soon follow my old friend
if I went there nowadays."
TIME IS MONEY.
The Stockholders of the Walt liaiu Watch
Company Certainly Find It so.
Boston, March 29.?At the annual meeting of
the stockholders of the American Waltliam
watch company yesterday it was voted to in
crease the capital stock ?1.000.000, Slaking it
63.000.000. A dividend of 50 per cent was de
clared. Royal E. Bobbins, treasurer of the
company, said with regard to the dividend
that it had been declared ou the advice of the
late Sidney Bartlett shortly before his death.
It was, he said, a cash dividend. The company
had a surplus of ?-.000.000 above its capital,
for which the stockholders had nothing to
show, and this course had been taken that they
might have some evidence of their property.
The capital stock had been increased to the ex
tent of the cash dividend, and those of the
stockholders who wished could take the cash
thov received in dividends and purchase new
stock at par in pro rata proportion to what
they already held. It was not a stock dividend.
The other $1,000,000 surplus would be used in
carrying on the business of tbe company. There
would be no additions to the works ou the heud
of the increase in stock. In 1865 when the cap
ital stock was ijSOO.OOO a dividend of 150 per
cent w as made and the stock increased to ?750.
000. In 1880 a dividend of 100 per cent was
made and the capital increased to ?^500.000. I
and in 1885 the stock was increased^500.000.
for which the stockholders paid. Mr. Bobbins
wanted it understood that the dividend was
legal and that the stockholders understood the
matter. 1
Hl'STLED OUT OF CHURCH.
A Row at a Prayer Meeting Caused by '
a Peculiar Sect.
CniCAOO, March 29.?A dispatch from Rock
ford. Ills., savs: There was a riot Wednesday
night in the Westminster Presbyterian church.
Some members of the church of the Redeemed
or Beekmanites, who believe that the Rev.
"Geo. G. Schweinfurth is the Christ returned to
earth, took possession of the prayer meeting.
Mrs. M. M. Kinnehan. who is a member of
Westminister church, but has recently been
converted to faith in Scweinfurth, replied to
remarks by the pastor. Dr. Conde. insisting
that he had better investigate, and like her he
would be convinccd that Schweinfurth was the
perfect one.
Dr. Conde rated her soundly for running
after false prophets, and insisted that Schwein
furth meant devil's hog-schwein, hog and furth.
the sea?and that he was an imposter like one
of the swine into which Christ cast the devils.
This caused a great outbreak from the half i
dozen male Beekmanites.
Disciple Whitney made some remarks offen
sive to the members of the church, and called j
them "Scribes and Pharisees." Deacon Wal
lace seized Whitney any another disciple by
the collar and threw them headlong from the
room. The other Beekmanites ned. They
held a meeting last night and vowed they
would yet force the Westminster people to re
ceive them and accept the truth of their
doctrine.
Curious Adventures of a Schooner.
DRIFT ISO AROU5D THE NORTH PACIFIC FOR MONTHS,
HER OXLY ABLE 8 EAX AX HAVIXO BEEN DROWNED.
Seattle, W. T., March 29.?The schooner !
Adventure left Seattle last March on a trading
expedition to Alaska. She had not been heard
from since September, when she sailed from
Port Dick, Kent Peninsula, for Juneau. That
day while tacking the fore boom swung over
and knocked overboard J. C. Reed, one of the
owners, well known in Seattle. The others on
board were not sailors, and knowing nothing
about the management and seamanship could
render him no assistance, and he was drowned.
The schooner then drifted around the ocean
for two months and finally drove ashore near
Port Etches, Alaska. Aleut Indians went to
the assistance of those on board and she was
Ktten off shore and sailed for Port Etches.
ie schooner at present lies there in charge of
one of the crew.
A Business Block Burned.
Xatsvillz, Mien., March St.?At midnight
last night a fire which originated in the Kniglits
of Maocabees* lodge-room, destroyed s block of
five stores. Loss#li,B00; insured.
HOMKS IN'OKLAHOMA.
They Cm be Procurrd by Simple Pro*
cm under Ike llomr?U?d Act.
Witbti, Kan., March 29.--CoL Dyer. who
bu for rear* been u official of the United
State* land office here. said regarding the Okla
homa settlement. that the question of entry ia
not *0 complicated aa 1* nasally the eaae in re
gard to tmluic lands. It i* a'plain case. and
there 1* bat one course to pursue. The seeker
of a homestead must simply go on to hi* claim
under the homestead act and stM-k to it in or
der to gsiti a title. The former customs will
hare but little to do in tin* caae. aa the law M
;>lain and will l>e enforced on ita menu aa to
the question of priority.
moarnrnvK dutk-clties anorr Trruta.
One of the greatest difficulties that will aria*
in connection ?ith the uuuia, will be the ad
Justing of mHtter* with those who are now
U|>on the land*, or may take possession con
trary to law. The partie* who are in organ
lr.ed bodies or colome*. will not likely be dis
turl>ed in their possession* at present. but in
the cour*e of titue it* their "coiuhinee." which
have been formed to protect their *o-called
righto, have become extinct, trouble will l?e
gin in regard to the solidity of those title*,
and the lawyer* mil reap rich harvests from
the contest*' that will follow.
TOWS-SITE SPECt' L. ATOM AT WORE.
TorcKa. Ka\.. March 29.?Simultaneous with
the proclamation declaring Oklahoma open to
settlement, was the formation in the city of an
Oklahoma town-site and improv? n#? nt com
pany. coniposi d of prominent residendt capi
talists, The charter sets fortn the purposes of
the corporation to be to lease and plat, im
prove anil sell town-sites and lot* thereon and
additions in the public domain and elaewhere;
also to open, build Mid operate road*, tram
way*. ferries and brnlgci. 111 Oklahoma, and
promote, by lawful ni< tliods. the rapsd settle
ment and peaceful government of the Indian
territory and adjacent public laud atrip.
NOT LIEl~T. HATEMAN.
More Myatery About the l>ead Man
Found on an Indliuia Railroad.
MrNoiE. Ind.. March 27.?The man who waa
killed here yesterday proves not to have been
Lieut. Harry F. Bateman. of the Teuth United
States infantry, though the papers found on
the man belonged to Bateman. The man had
evidently been murdered. Itateman, who waa
a deserter, is said to have been *een in cani
pany ?ith the murdered man a few day* a|o.
I'll E KIDNAPPED CHICAOO UOY.
Reported to Have Ik-en Seen on a Cat
tic Train In An Ohio Town.
Chicaoo. March 29.?Arthur Kruschenski. the
fourteen-year-old lad. said to be heir to a for
tune of ?80.1100 in the old country, and who
was said to have been abducted aeveral day*
ago, has been heard from. Hi* mother last
night received a dispatch from ( restline, Ohio,
reading:
"Your young son has just passed through
here. He waa on a stock train. He tried to
get off the cars. Two men. who wore rowbov
liuts. held In 111 uutil tue train left the city, ft
may be that you can head him off at Pitts
burg." Telegrams were ?ent to the chief of
]>olice at Pittsburg, bat no reply has yet been
received iroui him.
WANTS UOlL.AMif-.lt AKKKSTKD.
CIcmbohmi Said to Crgr liold Actios
by the Oorcrnmrnt.
Pabis. March 29.?The Presse states that MM.
Cletnenceau and Bovier-Lapierre, both of whom
are member* of the chamber of deputies, ham
requested M.t'onstans. minister of the interior,
to arrest Gen. Loulai ger.
HIS AM EX DM EVJ DEFEATED.
Only 13 Vote* for it and 17."? Against It.
Ottawa, Ont., March 29.? A division was
reached in the house of common* at 145
o'clock this morning on CoL O'Rrien'a
amendment in the Jesuit*' estate*
act, and it waa voted down?13 vea*
to 175 nay*. The yea* were: Messrs.
McCarthy, Wallace. Deuiwon, McNeill. (Jock
burn. O'Brien. Charltou. Scriver. Sutherland,
McDonald (.Huron), Baron^Tyrwhett. and Bell,
six being liberal* and seven conservatives.
The singing of "God Save the Queen" termi
nated the proceedings.
Russia and Afghanistan.
St. Petersburg. Starch 29.?The Journal de
rue* the reports circulated on the European
bourses thai Russia is massing troop* on llit
frontier of Afghanistan.
Election* in Australia.
Melbourne. Victoria. March 29.?The elec
tions for members of the legislative assem
bly have resulted in the return of fi3 supporters
of the ministry and 32 members of the opposi
tion.
From Wall Street To-Day.
New Ions. March 29. 11a. m.?There wan no
change in the general character of the stock
market this morning, but the interest in the
transactions was centered in au unusually small
number of stock, tne dullness in the remainder
being extreme. First prices were quite irregu
lar. iiud the changes from last evening's figures
ranged up to }, per cent either a ay. Lake
Shore showing the largest advance, and Jersey
Central the largest decline. The irregularity
continued into the early dealings, but Union
Pacitic was selected as the principal object of
the bear preasnre. and on a large business it
steadily declined 1Vi per cent to Oil7-,'. Atch
ison was also again active, and after au ad
vance to 43 from lpst evening, it retired to
42. but again recover) d to the opening price.
Missouri Pacitic was the weakest stock next to
Union Pacitic. but lost only a fraction. Most of
the list showed an advancing tendency in the
early trading, but were carried down in sympa
thy. There wan a slight recovery toward the
end of the- hour, but the weakness was renewed
r.ud each of the three weak stocks was carried
down still further, and at 11 o'clock the market
was {airly active and weak, but generally at
elose to the opening price*.
Shot at a Colored Conference.
PBOBA&LE MURDER IS A CHfKc'H ORoWINO OCT
OF A DISPUTE ABOCT A PEW.
Pabis. Kv.. March 29.?The colored Methodist
conference of Lexington distriet closed its first
day's session Wednesday night with a probable
murder. The church was crowded, 1.200 peo
ple being present. Bishop Andrews was in the
pulpit, lit n Kellis, who rents a pew in the
church, left his scat for a few moments, and
during his absence John Page *at down in it.
When Kellis returned he ordered Page ont
and a quarrel ensued. At last Kellis. who was
the larger of the two. grubbed Page bv the
collar and hauled him out of the pew. Page
started down the aisle, but had not reached the
door when he turned, and pulling a revolver,
tired two shots at Kellis. one taking effect ia
the groin, producing a fatal wouud. The other
bullet lodged in the wall back of Bishop
Andrews. There was quite a panic.
No Detail* of the Fight.
San Dieoo. Cal. March 29.?No detail* of tho
reported trouble between Mexicans and Ameri
cans at the mines in Lower California having
been received the story is discredited her*.
Edinburgh's Proposed Honor to Parnell.
London. March 29.?A proposition baa been
made to confer the freedom of the city of Ed
inburgh on Mr. Pio-nell. A majority of the
municipal autboritios of that city are'in favor
of the proposition.
Tenant* Evicted and the Houaea Burned.
DtTBLlN, March 29.?Thirteen tenant* have
been evicted from their holdings at Clongorey.
After the tenants had been driven from the
house* twelve of the building* were *et on fire
by the agent and emergency men. Tb* beat
house was not deatroyed. being (pared fur uae
aa quarters for the police.
Regulation of Sleeping Car Traffic.
AX ORDER OF THE MINNESOTA CoMMMHlOK OTKM"
RULED BT THE COURT*.
Chicaoo, March 29.?A dispatch from Mia
neapolia. Minn.. *ay*: A decision ha* been
filed bv Judge Young which ha* an important
bearing on the ruling* of the state railroad
commission. The caae waa that of
the apt>eal of the St. Louis road from
an order of the commission requiring
the upper bertha of sleeping car* to be cloeed
when not in use. and the court decided in favor
of the road, and the order was rescinded. In
December. 1?<7. the commission made au order
requiring all upper berths to be made up, then
closed, and not to be lowered nnieas the berth
should be needed for a passenger.
In reviewing the caae. the Judge says: "A
person mav purchase a berth or a whole aection
[n k car ana oecupv the same, but if he pur
chaaea but one berth he is not entitled to the
whole aection. and it is evident that the lower
ing of the upper btrth, even if not occupied,
wfll not cause the occupant of the lower berth
any more discomfort than if it is ooenpied."
the court even goes so far aa to state that if
railroad companies provide comfortable day
the commission would have no por
ta compel them to place aleeping ear* oa f
road*. The oommiaaion certainly haa pow
enforce the order in question It would ha Mil
to ted a limit to i* power.

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