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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 30, 1889, Image 11

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REAL estate gossip.
*ew Suburban Railroad and Building
Enterprise*.
tup muM5'i bospital extejtho*?ixcbea*
'*? T*? botei. TAcn.mwm of the citt? ax
"U>-TUI* IOCU?OTHEB MATTES* or IJTII
E*T.
The pleisant *pring-like weather of the past
few dajri bw given an impetus to building op
erations Throughout the city men and carta
are at work preparing for the foundation* of
now building*. The brick walla will soon arise
and then will be new honae* and new place* of
busineee for the growing population of the
city. The activity ia not confined to the city,
but may be *een in moet any direction in the
suburbs. Along the line of the railroad* and
the (uburban roada the cheerful sound of the
trowel and the hammer may be heard. Some
idea of the extent of suburban building can be
obtained by a visit to the railroad yarda, where
may be found great cars loaded with
brick, lumber, and other building supplies, and
marked for some point in the suburbs. While
houses built in the country about this city are
generally frame, yet brick is used for the foun
dations. The brick dealers And that the sub
urban trade forms a Terr considerable item in
their business. Some very handsome houaes
?re being built in the country and the suburban
population ia increasing each year. The rail
roads leading into the city appreciate as well
as corporations can the growing popular inter
ests along their lines, and do something to fa
cilitate the movement. The settlements along
the Metropolitan Brsnch and the Washington
Branch of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad,
along the Baltimore and Potomac and the
Washington and Ohio are growing rapidly and
becoaa ng more numerous. Such is the growth
tnat increased facilities for reaching the city
are demanded, and Congress has recognized
this demand by chartering five railroad*,
namely: The Sandv Springs railroad, the Eck
ington. Bnghtwood. the Woodley Lane road
und the Tenleytown road. The charter of the
tirst-named road was granted only at the last
session of Conpre**. but a preliminary organiza
tion ha* already been formed. The secretary
und treasurer. Henry M. Baker, told a Stab
reporter that the incorporation would, as soon
as possible, open subscription books and take
the other steps necessary to carry out the pur
pose* of their charter. ??The route of the road,"
ne *aid. "is not definitely fixed. The depot
will be on Boundary, some where between the
Metropolitan branch and the Brentwood road.
The line will then extend for * mile parallel
with the track* of the Metropolitan branch, and
then turning to the right will cross the District
line at the Biggs road. The road will then fol
low the Sligo road to some point where it can
croa* the Northwest brancn. and from thence
continue to Sandy Springs, Md. The distance
will be about 25 miles."
The kind of motive power to be used is left
for the company to determine. The Eckington
electric road is already in successful operation
from New York avenue and 7th street to 4th
and T streets northeast. This road has beeu
carrying passengers since last October, and
President Truesdell says that last Sunday about
7.000 passengers rode over the line. The Dis
trict Commissioners are now engaged in open
ing up 4th street to the Bunker Hill road, just
opposite to the entrance to the grounds of the
new Catholic university. As soon as this work
is completed the electric road will be con
tinued out tth street. This is the northern
terminus of the road as provided in the
charter. In addition to the university at the
terminus of the road a town is gradually spring
ing up at Brook's station. The laud has been
subdivided, streets laid out. trees
planted. board walks pnt down,
and several pretty and attractive
cottages erected. During the coming season it
is expected that other houses will be built.
OTHEB Bo ADS.
m A* showing the progress of suburban devel
opment. on some of the streets in the sub-divi
sion of Eckington. which is at the head of
New York avenue, asphalt pavement is being
laid. A station of the Baltimore and Ohio
railroad has been recently erected at this point,
and suburban passengers can leave the trains
and take the electric road into the city. An
other suburban street railway which will be in
operation in the early part of the summer is
the road which will run out the 7th-street road
froai Boundary to Brightwood. The presi
dent of the road. Mr. A. A. Thomas,
states that the electric storage bat
tery will probably be adopted as the motive
power. The Woodlev Lane railroad company,
which was authorized to run from Boundary
out the road known by that name to the Ten
leytown road, is engaged in determining the
precise line to be followed by the road. The
company which has the authority to build a
road from Georgetown out the Tenleytown
r'>a<J failed at the last session of Congress to
obtain some amendments to the charter. It
ha* also a right of way to secure.
AS >>LI> TIKE HOCSE.
One cf the landmarks on Capitol Hill ia the
o'.d-fasluoned brick house at the northwest cor
ner of 6th street and North Carolina avenue.
It was a double brick house, two stories high,
with a hipped roof: but recently the present
owner. Mr. Washington Duiienbower. lias re
modeled this house for his own occupancy. He
has changed the exterior and entirely refitted
the interior. He says th?t the house was
erected by Mr. Stuart at the begiuning of the
present century. Mr. Stuart, he thinks, was
The ni.iu who was appointed oue of the comrais
MOu-rs to lay out the city. He was a great
Mason, and as at that earlv day there were no
Masonic lodge room* in the city, he fitted up
the parlor of his bouse for that purpose. Mr.
Daneuhower says that the old maiitel is orna
mented with masonic emblems carved in the
wood, and then there was an arch in the room
aud other evidence* that it had once been used
a lodge-room. He believes that here the
nrst Masonic lodge in the capital city held its
meetings. The house subsequently became the
residence of Mr. Carberry, who was at one time
luayor of th* city.
TBE CBILDBXSS HOSPITAL EXTESSIO*.
Mention was made in Wednesday's Stab that
the directors of the Children'* hospital were
considering the enlargement of that institu
tion by the extension, on the west of the main
I 'Hiding, of a wing similar to the east wing.
At a later meeting of the full board it was de
cid. d that it would be more practicable to still
further enlarge the building by continuing the
eitetuion to 13th street, aud providing at once
lor the future growth of the institution and the
much-needed operating-rooms, dispeusary, Ac.
The addition will consist of a building fronting
on 13th street, three stories high, with a base
nient. and will be about the size of the original
niain building It wdl connect with the main
l>u?lding by a new wing 112 feet long,
two stunes and a basement in height, con
taining two wards, each about 25x75 feet,
having all the requisite conveniences of a
modern hospitaL The old building will also
W overhauled, aud the plumbing work will all
1-e plat ed in a tower projection on the south, to
!?? built for the purpose, snd thoroughly ven
tilate d. The old heating apparatus will 'be re
plac. d by more modern appliances, and will
t.c placed in a boiler house outside of the build
lug. Minor necessary changes in the old
building will be made to make it more com
fortable. such as ventilating Ac. The entire
lrontsge of the building, when these additions
ure made, will be 306 feet, extending within
*3 feet of the whole length of th* square. Mr.
T. F. Schneider, the architect, has been
selected to prepare the plans and take charge
of the work, the cost of which is not to exceed
?Sj.oijo. and without doubt that amount will
readily be raised when needed for *o worthy an
institution.
r. w. ra.lino's mm besidescr..
A handsome house is being erected on R
?treat, between 15th and 16th streets, by Mr. F.
W. Filling for hi* own use. Mr. Filling is his
own architect and builder, and the arrange
ment of the houae and it* construction will re
ceive the benefit of his long experience in these
directions. The hoas* will be built of brick,
with stone trimmings to set it off the architec
tural appearance of the front A circular bay
window w.U be finished in the third story wiih
? boggla. The twenty-foot alley on the side
will be utUiaed by having window* open upon
it. and an attractive feature In some of the
rooms ia the upper floors will be oriel
windows. The entrance will be approached by
a piatform stone porch. There will be a
spacious entrance hall, and back of this will be
the staircase hall. the two halls being sepal a ted
by an arch filled in with Moorish fret work.
1 he entire parlor floor will be finished in hard
wuo?L The dining-room will be wainscoted in
oak snd the oeiliug will be finished in embossed
panel* of Junuear steel sheets. Th* upper
floor* will be finished in natural wood, and
there will be a bath-room in each story.
HEW BOTBL rBOJBCT*.
The increase in the hotel faeillti** of the city
during th* paat two year* has been on* of th*
feature* ia it* development The progress in
this direetioa has been noted from time to
Is In Stab, and it ha* been pointed out that
the new hotel buildings snd the enlargement of
existing buildings ha* not been confined to any
oas section of tb* city. It wa* stated in yes
terday'* Stab that plan* had been prepared foe
th* exliseos of th* Arlington hotel which
would about doable the preeeat capacity of
that building. All th* vaoaat ground from th*
hotel building to I street, including that now
srsFErussr srSshssa
by Harvev L. Page, architect, provide that the
pew portion will be built of brown gtoao
to correspond with the present building, and it
will be of the same height The need of ad
ditional hotel accommodation* in this locality
has been generally recognized, and the late Mr.
Corcoran, whose executor* will make this im
provement. had the matter under consideration
a short time before his death. During the past
winter negotiations were in progress for the
purchase of the property at the northwest
corner of I and 15th streets. It was
the intention to erect there a large
hotel building, but for some reason the
negotiations fell through. It is stated thst Mr.
John R. McLean. who owns about
half of the square opposite the
Arlington, ii considering the advisability of
erecting a great hotel building there. It is said
that if such a project iscarriea out that a build
ing to cost over half a million will be built.
Mr. McLean is a young msn with plenty of
push and enterprise, and his extensive invest
ments in VV'Hshington property shows that he
has confidence in the bright future of the city.
A FJXB NEW RESIDENCE.
Dr. J. C. McGuire. eon of the late J. C. Mc
Ouire, of this city, who has recently removed
to this city frorn Louisville, has commenced
t the erection of a residence at No. 1732 Massa
chusetts avenue. It is designed by and the
construction will be nnder the supervision of
Glenn Brown, architect. The general arrange
i ment is known as an English basement house,
j a cellar being provided for the heating appa
ratus and fuel storage. The basement is de
I voted to a large, square entrance hall, finished
in oak, and two well'lighted and pleasant office
rooms. The offices and dwelling have separate
entrance*. The back building is
arranged for kitchen and laundry,
two distinct rooms being planned.
The first story has a large central hall. The
parlor extends across the front of the house,
with swell oriole window. The stairway is di
vided from the hall by an oak screen, the col
umns having carved and pannelled bases and
carved caps, the top being finished with three
arched spandrels. The arches are to be filled
with Moorish fret work. Tho dining-room and
hall are finished in oak. On this floor
there will be a large pantry and a
separate store-room, with p back stair
way, and hall running to the kitchen.
The second and third stories will be divided into
bed-rooms, all well-lighted. The style of the
front is quiet and dignified. The basement
front consists of two large scmi-circular arches,
one opening directly into a large open vesti
bule. on which the front doors open; the other
forms the window to the doctor's reception
room Each opening has pilasters, with
carved caps and moulded bases. Between
the arches a detached column is
placed with carved cap; from this
springs a projecting fluted spandrel forming
the corbel on which the oriole of the first and
second story is built. The first and second
stories are brick with stone trimmings All the j
stone work will be of Connecticut brown stone,
and the brickwork an even toned press-brick '
laid in black mortar. The roof will be finished |
with slate, having a central gable and two
copper dormers. The cornice, gables, Ac., will
be of cold rolled copper.
KIT CARSON POST.
A Grand Army Organization that Num
bers Many Distinguished .Men.
Kit Carson Post. No. 2. G. A. R. which cele
brated its twenty-second anniversary on Thurs
day evening last, has a history and a member
ship that is. perhaps, unequaled bv any post in
this department. It was chartered March 10,
18CT, by order of the then district commander,
Win. L. Bramhall. and on the 27th of that
month was organized in the basement of the
old capitol prison, with Richard Middleton, L.
B. Cutler, 8. A. Bovden, Richard Morgan, Nat.
Burnham. J. H. Jennings, G. W. Lithgow, Geo.
Peck, Win. Low and Richard F. Rea, as charter
members.
Although, like all posts. Kit Carson has had
its ups and downs duruig its long career, it
has initiated about a thousand members, of
whom only about seventy-five have died, and it
now has upon its rolls in good standing nearlv
five hundred men. It also has the record of
the largest yearly gain in membership, havinc.
in 1*82. added 112 members.
While the Grand Army recognizes among its
comrades no rank save that of the regular offi
cers of its organization. Kit Carson post takes
pride in having on its roster rnanv names dis
tinguished among the nation's defenders on
hind and sea. One of its members. Gen. 8. 8.
Burdett. has been commander-in-chief of the
order: another, Harrison H. Din^man, has
been junior vice-commander-in-chief; another
the late Timothy Lubv, was quartermaster
general. and still another. John Cameron, was
sdjutant-generaL It has furnished five depart
ment commanders, viz.: B. F. Hawkes. Wm
Gibson. Harrison H. Dingman, 8. 8
Burdett and C. P. Lincoln. Among
its members may be named: Mai. Gen. John C.
Fremont, Maj. Gen. Stewart Van Vleit Maj'
I Gen. A Baird. Maj. Gen. B. F. Kellev, Rear
Admiral Daniel Ammen. Brig. Gen. Kichard C
, Drum, adj gen. U. 8. A.: Brig. Gen. Juo. C.
Starkweather. Pay Director Thos. H. Looker,
I 1'?. .Chief Engineer Chas. H. Loring, U.
8. N.; Brig.-Gen. R. D. Mussev. Brig.-Gen \1
bert Ordway. Brig.-Gen. Halbert E. l'aiiie,
Lieut.-CoL Michael V. 8heridau. Major Jno. W
Clous, judge-advocate IT. 8. A.; Col. G. s!
Lieber, assistant judge-advocate-general U 8
A.; Brig.-Gen. Geo. C. llogers. Col. R. E. WhitI
man. Capt. R W. Tyler. Brig.-Gen. Christopher
Carson, Major Juo. M. Carson, and Major Mar
cus 8. Hopkins. Christopher or - Kit" Carson,
the noted scout, was also a member, and after
his death the poet was named in his honor
Thu post has a superb picture gallerv and an
exteuslve library, and its lodge room bears all
i ? ?>*l"ence of the prosperity and success
which has ^iven Kit Careon pout such an envia
ble reputation not only in this department, but
throughout the entire order.
Mr?. Taylor Convicted.
TH* ACCOMAC POISONING CASE ?FIVE TEARS IN
THE PENITENTIABT.
An Accomac special to the Baltimore Sun
says: The jury in the case of Mrs. Virginia
Taylor, whoss trial for the murder of her hus
band has been going on in the countv
court since last Monday, rendered a verdict
?bout 1 o'clock to-day. fining the prisoner
puiltv and fixing her punishment at five vears
in the penitentiary. When the court reas
sembled this moruing the Jury retired, and
f'mal?,nK out some time returned and
asked that the charge to the jurv bo read again
for their instruction. The charge as rend bv
the clerk stated that the jury might find the
prisoner guilty of murder in the first or second
degree, of manslaughter, or might acquit her.
lhe Jury then retired and returned with their
verdict. In response to the direction of the
clerk. Mrs. Taylor raised her right hand when
the verdict was pronounced, and she listened
sure rea(^* ?r ** with comparative coinpo
_As soon as the verdict had been rendered
Ihomas W. Russell. of counsel for the accused,
moved an arrest of judgment, and stated that
the defense would ask for a new trial, and re
quested the Judge to set Mondav for hearing
argument on the motion, which was done. Mrs.
iayior, after a brief consultation with her
counsel, was taken back to Jail. It has been as
certained that the jury on the first ballot stood
eleven in favor of conviction, with from five to
"i J*Y* m ,the Penitentiary, and one for
acquittal. A number of ballots were taken and
Jtl if-ft WUS rearht(1 l)y compromise. The
verdict meets with general approval among
fT.?*' .1ure conversant with all the facts
of this celebrated case. There were but a few
^"rendered* coart"room when the verdict
Mr*. Cleveland to Drive Them First.
th? York Tribune.
The two colts presented to Geo. W. Childs by
| Mrs. Grunt after the death of Gen. Grant are
now at the Wootton farm, Mr. Childs' country
! ?**'? They have been broken to double har
ness, but have never been driven together It
is understood that Mrs. Cleveland will shortly
tU?e W?ott<m guest of
Mrs. Childs. and that she will be the first to
drive the colts as a span.
v CLmtmUL ND FlSHISO in
FuiEiDA. Lx-President Cleveland's party
spent Thursday night at Lake Alfred. Fla. Yes
terday moruing some of the partv went fishing
t^!/. .D? J. ? striugof seventv-five beau
tiful trout for breakfast. The partv reached
on'h^'d'th' Cil0t* P'm" ,ud Were escorted
on board the 8t Lucie, which will convey them
to Jupiter inlet The cabin and state rooms
were fairly lined with flowers, the offering of
the people of Titnsville. They will fish three
flays at Jupiter and then accept the hospitality
of Jacksonville for a day or two.
*"* Tw.? Mnjjo*.-A Judgment
for 92,1M. 131 was entered in the superior court
in New York Fndav, in favor of Cornelius K
Garrison against Clark Robinson Riggs, on the
report of a referee in a suit brought by hiitm
against Garrison to recover about 91.000 Otio
and for aa accounting. The auit grew out of
the construction of the Wheeling and Lake
Erie railroad.
A Care or Mo Pay
is guaranteed to those who use Dr. Pteroe's Gold an
Medlqai Discovery for catarrh la the heaO, or for
hfeachial or throat affections, or consumption
? eslrtrteL Money promptly returned if U does
THK "ZOOS" OF THE WORLD.
The Forty-Ninth to be Established la
Rock Creek Valley.
' OREAT NATURAL ADVANT^OES OF TBI LOCATION?
OTHER AMERICAN fOOLOOIGAL PARKS?THE
OREAT LONDON "coo" AND OTHER SIMILAR
INSTITUTIONS I SI ETROPr..
When the ''Zoo" is established in the Rock
Creek park, north of the city, there will be
forty-nine zoological parks in the world. The
popular demand for such means of instruction
and recreation as are afforded by zoological
gardens has been met in some cases by the
eHtablishment of parks by national govern
ments or municipalities, and in others by the
organization of societies that manage the gar
den*. There are in the United States six zoo
logical gardens?Philadelphia, New York, Cin
cinnati, Chicago, St Louis, and San Francisco.
The national government has nothing to do
with any of these institutions, which
are maintained either by the cities or by
local enterprise. There is scarcely a
nation in Europe that has not
its "zoo" and some of them have several. In
Great Britain, beside* the famous institution in
London, there are (larks of this character in Bris
tol. Manchester, and Dublin. France has two
gardens in Paris, each devoted in part to zoolog
ical collections, and also lias parks in Mar
seilles and Tours. Belgium lias such gardens at
Ghent and Antwerp. In the Netherlands there
are "zoos" in Amsterdam, the Hague, and Rot
terdam. The German cities provided with such
institutions arc Berlin, Hamburg. Frankfort,
Dresden. Dusseldorf. Hanover, Munster, Co
logne, Breslau. and Leipsic. Italy has a garden
at 'i urin, Austria one at Vienna. Hungary one at
Pesth, Russia one in St. Petersburg and one in
Moscow, Portugal one in Lisbon, Spain one in
Madrid, Denmark one in Copenhagen, and
Switzerland one in Basle. India boasts of three,
at Calcutta. Bombay, and Madras. Java has
mch a garden in Batavia; The Straits' settle
ments have one in Singapore; Australians have
zoological gardens in Melbourne, Sydney,
Adelaide, and Brisbane, and Chili maintains
one at St. Jago.
NATURAL ADVANTAGES OF BOOK CREEK.
Mr. Wm. T. Horuaday, in charge of the em
bryo "zoo," at the Smithsouian, who has in his
travels taken much interest in "zoos," ex
pressed himself to a Staii reporter in enthusi
astic terms of the possibilities of the zoological
park, for which ground is to be purchased in
Rock Creek park. The natural advantages of
the location, he thinks, are greater thw those
enjoyed by any other park. "We tnll." he
said, "without any doubt have the best drained,
best watered zoological park in the world.
We will have more of the natural forest
the natural growth both of deciduous and
evergreen trees than any other park of this
character. A million dollars expended on the
Potomac flats," Mr. Hornaday said, '-could not
do for a park there, what nature has done
along the banks of Bock creek." The pro- 1
posed "zoo." if it occupies 150 acres or more, as
it is expected, will be by far the most spacious
in the world. The parks of this character in
Europe are generally located in the cities
where srtace is extremely valuable. There is
some advantages in a "zoo" of small dimen
sions, as a visitor can inspect everv part of it
without being wearied by the length of his
walk.
Mr. Hornaday, discussing this matter with a
Star reporter, expressed the opinion that a
park ought not to be too big. He did not think
liO acres too much for a natural zoological
park. The nalks and buildings, or runways,
wbere collections of animals Tor exhibition are
kept, can be so arranged that thev can all be
inspected without much of a walk. " In an area
jike that proposed annua!? can be kept in herds
in large fields, living nearly in a state
of nature, smaller collections of the same
species being kept in smaller enclosures
for purposes of study and exhibition. The
multiplication of animals, under natural con
ditions, will give the park management a
constant resource for enlargingand extending
their connections abroad. American animals
raised in the breeding grounds there, can be
exchanged for valuable specimens held by
zoological gardens in other countries. Upon
such a system of exchange the park will
| largely depend for the growth of its collec
| tions. The winding of Rock creek through the
park will not only give opportunity for pic
j tureHijne effects, but also afford nnusually tine
facilities for maintaining collections of aquatic
animals. At some points the creek will be ex
panded into small lakes or ponds. In other
i parks of this character provision is made for
j such collections usually bv artificial ponds,
I maintained at considerable cost, and even un
der the best care likely to become stagnant.
AMERICAN "ZOOS."
The Philadelphia "zoo," occupying a part of
the ground originally laid out as Fairmount
park, is the most extensive at present in this
country, so far as the buildings and collections
, go. The enclosure comprises 33 acres. The
park was established and is maintained by the
! Philadelphia zoological society, which was in
: corporated in lxj'.t. The war interrupted the
plans of the society so it did .not achieve its
purpose or opening a park until 1873. For this
I object it was granted a perpetual lease of the
land in what is kuown as the west park by the
Fairmount park commissioners. It is "in a
beautiful place on the river side, and much
money has been expended in beautifying it.
The buildings are ueat in appearance a'nd weli
adapted to the uses of such an institution.
1 he collection is large and is annually grow
ing.
the New York "zoo," for bo it must be
called, did not intend to be a "zoo" when
it started out. It was merely a
menagerie kept in Central park, where" the
children amused themselves. The collections
have so grown that the establishment hr.s
reached the dignity of a "zoo" almost by
accident. There are pending now in the New
York legislature two bills for placing this insti
tution upon a proper footing. Each bill ap
propriates ?300.000 to the purpose. The dif
ference between them is that one proposes to
establish an entirely new park north of 121st
street, while the other proposes to set apart a
suitable area in Central park for the purpose
Objection is raised to the proposition to go
above Harlem, because it is held that it will be
less accessible to the general public. The Cin
cinnati zoological park is maintained bv an
incorporated society, who have 66 acres in the
suburbs. The park was opened in September,
1X75. An admission fee of 25 cents is charged.
There is a "zoo" maintained at St. Louis in
connection with the fair grounds just outside
the city. The fair grounds and park together
comprise 83 acre*. The Chicago "zoo." which
is maintained in Lincoln park, inside the citv,
has grown very much as the collection in Cen
tral park has grown. It now has many inter
esting features. including fine herds or'buffalo
and elk. At San Francisco, too, a "zoo" has
grown up under the fostering care of a society.
THE OREAT LONDON "ZOO."
The great zoological garden of the world is
the London "zoo." That is where Jumbo
came from, a place that every child who gets a
book for Christmas has read about. It is
situated in the Regent's park in the heart of
London. A public street ruus through it,
dividing the park into two sections. Along the
street walls are erected, and visitors go from
one section to the other by means of a tunnel
passing under the street. The grounds com
prise in all about GO acres, and thev are well
filled with buildings, pouds. and small enclos
ures, all intended for mammals or birds of
different kinds. There are monkey houses,
bear pits, beaver ponds, aviaries, elephant
bouses, and abodes intended for all kinds of
strauge and interesting beasts. Altogether
there are sixty-four separate buildings ar
ranged with yards or ruuwavs. The park is
owned aud managed by the Zoological society
of London, aud was opened in 1828. This
society derives a revenue from which ex
penses are paid by charging an admission
fee of a shilling on ordinary days and two and
sixpence on certain other da vs. It gets an in
come, too, from the elephants and camels, for
a small fee is charged tnose who want to in
dulge in such pastimes. During the last five
years the uumber of visitors annually has ave
raged about 700.000. One great point in its
favor is its accessibility. It is, as stated, loca
ted in the middle of the city, and on two sides
is bordered with rows of residences of the most
substantial character. The catalogue of ani
mals received at the park since it was opened
fills a large octavo volume and covers the whole
field ot natural history. In 1886 there were 861
animals presented to the zoo, 236 purchased
232 deposited. 48 received in exchange, and 171
born in the zoo. making 1,538 additions for the
year. The number of those obtained
by gifts or by deposit was nearly
four time* as great as those purchased
Upon this source of growth it is expected the
^national "?oo" to be established here wiU large
I ly depend. There are many who, coming into
possession of valuable specimens, would giadly
depesit them in a place of safe-keeping under
the control of the national government.
The other "?ooe" in Englan^ are well man
aged institutions, but they are greatly over
shadowed by the fame and extent of the Lon
doninstitution. That at Manchester is aitoated
in the suburbs and is managed by a private cor
poration. Among other sources of revenue it
kJlkf*""' ?nd Panorama ex
hibitiona. The Bristol garden waa established
and is maintained br the West of England Zoo
logical society,and the Dublin "soo" ts managed
by the Royal Zooiogioal society of Ireland.
SUIAI ZOOLOGICAL PARKS.
X?tt to toe Iinnrton "soo," naturalists rank
the zoological park of Berlin, managed by ?
society. It has a large collection and it equip
B)d with an array of model buildings. At
amburg there ia a fine *00, leu extensive than
that at Berlin, but which holds a high rank.
The other German toot are all wall arranged.
That at Frankfort is especially attractive. Mr.
Hornaday haa a series of pictures showing
riews in this garden, the deer park, the ele
phant booae adV other points. Large sums
have been expended in beautifying the grounds.
At one point, where the aquaria are located. is a
picturesque combination of tower, rocks. water
fall and grotto. The camel and llama en
closure is adorned in oriental style, and the
yak houses are situated on a rocky hill-side.
THE PARIS OiKDINS.
Paris has two gardens devoted in part to
zoological purposes. Combined together they
would make one as extensive as any in the
world. These places are the famous Jardin des
Planted. on the banks of the Seine, in the heart
of the city, and the garden of the Acclimatisa
tion society, on the Bois de Boulogne, not so
accessible to the general public as the Jardin
des Plantes. In both of these places, as their
names imply, collections of plants are main
tained. The gardens in Marseilles and Tours
are under the direction of the Acclimatization
society. The "zoos" in Amsterdam. The Hague
and Rotterdam are managed by societies.
That at Vienna is under the direction of the
Austrian government. The zoos in India and
the East Indies, mentioned, above. Are small,
and maintained in connection with public
parka.
THE GREAT DELUGE.
Evidence That the Entire Earth Wai
Not Inundated.
John Gmelner in the Catholic World of April.
Geological and paleontological reasons com
bine to prove that geographically the deluge
was not universal. At the time assigned for
the deluge the surface of the earth was sub
stantially as it is now. If, then, some great
portion of the dry land had been submerged,
a proportionate rise of land above the waters
would have been necessary in som3 other part
of the globe. For. as Professor Alexander
Winohell observes, "the terrestrial globe, in
?ome of Its behavior, may be compared to an
India-rnbber ball filled with water. If indented
by pressure in one place there must be a pro
tuberance equal in volume in another place.
Hence, if all Asia had been submerged, a
proportionate amount of dry land would have
been lifted above the waters somewhere else.
That Asia. Africa. Europe, Australia and Amer
ica were all submerged at the saint time seems
geologically impossible, and we have no evi
dence which would justify us to assume that
God wrought so stupendous a wonder.
On the contrary, there are geological and
paleontological facts which evidently prove
that some portions of the earth have not been
inundated by the Koachian deluge. For in
stance, in Auvergne, France; in the Eifel coun
try of the Prussian Rhine province; in New
Zealand and elsewhere, there are extinct vol
canoes. evidently older than Noe, that are
"marked by cones of pumice-stone, ashes, and
such light substances as could not have resisted
the waters of the deluge."
Whereabout was the deluge? Indications
seem to point to western Central Asia. It is
quite probable that the leading descendant* of
Adam, the direct line of the ancestors of God's
chosen people of old, continued to reside near
the former happy home of o lr first parents?the
garden of Paradise. Now, this was undoubtedly
situated iu western Central Asia, as the Book
i of Genesis unmistakably indicates by stating
! that four rivers, the Phison. the Gehon. the
| Tigris and the Euphrates, had their source in
j the region of the Paradise. That really the Ti
! gris and the Euphrates of to-day were meant
cannot be doubted. In the first place, of the
Tigris it is expressly stated that it is the same
th?t passeth along by the Assyrians. 8econdly,
there is no geological reason known why the
present Tigris nud Euphrates should not have
existed in the days of Adam, or even long be
fore.
Thus, for instance, our Missouri. Ohio, and
Mississippi, the latter about as far south as
Tennessee, seem to have been in existence dur
ing the tertiary age, long before the appearance
j of man upon earth.
Morever, it is not likely that the transient
J inundation caused by the deluge has pernia
. nently changed the channels of these rivers,
which it could not have done without changing
j the entire surface of the surrounding territories.
And. finally, thtt Book of Genesis was writteu
at a time when no other rivers were known a*
| the Tigris and Euphrates than the rivers which
I still bear these names.
For these reasons it cannot be doubted that
the Paradise wns located somewhere near or
about the sources of the present Tigris and
Euphrates in Armenia. This is the opinion of
competent authorities.
The Prescription.
From Murray's Mwcszine.
There was some time ago a doctor whose
morning levees were crowded beyond descrip
tion. It was his pride and boast that he could
feel his patient's pulse, look at his tongue,
> probe at him with his stethoscope, write his
prescription, pocket his fee, in a space of time
varying from two to five minutes. One day an
army man was shown into the consulting-room,
and underwent what may be called the instan
taneous process. When it was completed the
patient shook hands heartily with the doctor
and said: "I am especially glad to meet you. as
I have often heard mv father. Col. torester,
j speak of his old friend. Dr. L." "What!" ex
I clttiined the doctor, "are you Dick Forester's
j soil'/" "Most certainly I am." "My dear fel
? low. fling that infernal prescription into the
I fire and sit down quietly and teLl me what's the
I matter with you."
Ancient Babylon.
: From the 8t Louis Globe-Democrat.
Babylon, the great city of the Chaldeans,
! was five times as large as the London of to
1 day. IU walls were as high as lofty church
? steeples?330 feet above the ground. The
I palace of Nebuchadnezzar, the destroyer of
j Jerusalem, was seven miles in circumference.
The bed of the great Euphrates was paved
with bricks. The palaces and temples were
full of wonderful triumphs of painter, sculp
tor and of libraries of history, science and
letters. The Babylonians were astronomers
of great proficiency, considering the age in
which they lived, and tbev watched the move
ments of the heavenly bodies with intense in
terest and recorded them with accuracy. The
moon was the object of their especial'regard,
and her changes were noted with unflagging
assiduity and recorded in calendars. Ihey
called her the father of the sun.
Poison in Respired Air.
From the Boston Journal.
Prof. Browu-Sequard is reported to have
lately informed the French Academy of
Sciences that by condensing the watery vapor
coming from the human lungs he obtained a
poisonous liquid capable of producing almost
/jimediate death. The poison is an alkaloid
(organic), and not a microbe or series of
microbes. He injected this liquid under the
skin of a rabbit and the effect was speedily
mortal without convulsions. Dr. Sequard said
it was fullv proved that respired air contains a
volatile element tar more dangerous than the
carbonio acid which is one of its constitutents.
and that the human breath contains a highly
Coisonous agent. This startling fact should be
orne in mind by the occupants of crowded
horse-cart and ill-ventilated apartments.
Coloring in Furnishing.
From Peterson's Maicmzine.
In furnishing, the matter of coloring is a
point that should be carefully studied. A con
fusion of colors will spoil any room, and this
holds good even to the smallest appointment
and docoration. A chair covering or even a
cushion can prove almost as complete a disfig
urement as a carpet which does not accord with
the paper, curtains or wood-work.
Colors possess character, and that of the
most divers sorts. Home hues suggest warmth
and cheer, while others breathe of coolness and
repose. Blue, gray, drab and fawn are the
proper colers for sunny chambers, while red,
pink and buff belong to north rooms or any into
which the light comes in a stinted way. Even
gloomy places can be made cheerful by em
ploying right colors, especially when there can
be added an open fire with a bright brass fender.
There is one rule in furnishing which people
of moderate means ought always to obey, yet
they are usually the least inclined to carry it
into practice. This rnle is, not to be hampered
by tne fashion of the moment or afraid of
making one's rooms look unlike those of one's
friends.
The fact that several ladies ia one's narrow
visiting circle possess a certain style of ear
pets, chairs, tables, etc., ought to prove a good
reason for buying articles entirely different in
shape or color. Furniture not so pretty is far
Sreferable to having one's house so like that of
ae right and left-hand neighbor that a new
acquaintance can scarcely tell whioh of the
three domiciles he has entered.
1. ? 1
Prince Bismarck said in the reichstag yester
day that those who think he is dying make a
Father McFadden fainted daring hie trial for
violating the crimes act in Dublin yesterday.
The court at onoe adjourned.
POWDER
Absolutely Pure.
This powder never varies. A marvel of pnrity.
etrenjrtn, and wholeftoineue??. More economical than
the ordinary kiud*. and cannot nold in competition
with the multitude of low teat, short weijrbt, Rlutn or
phosphate powder*. Bold o?i gmn rant. Hutu. BAkmo
Powder Co., 106 Wall *t.. S I. "
mhl6 wk*
best&co
jpUTIAN
" Hi
THE OPENING OF MESSRS. SAKS AND
COMPANY'S BOYS' AST) CHILDRES S DE
PARTMENT NEXT WFEK, THEY WILL
DISPLAY A FULL AND COMPLETE LINE
OF OCR LATE8T AND MOST ORIGINAL
NOVELTIES. THEY ARE OCR SOLE REP
RESENTATIVES IN THE DISTRICT.
It BEST.AND COMPANY^
BLOCKERS
DUTCH
COCOA.
MADE INSTANTLY
with boiling water or milk.
NO COOKING REQUIRED !
Prof. R. OQDEX DO RE MVS
{Bellettie Hotpital Medical College), tcrilet:?
" No choicer, purer or letter cocoa
can be made."
Solilbv N W. Btlr-hell, J. H. Mntrruder, Shirley k
Schofleld. and all leadintr arrucera and druggiata at (I
per lb. tin: 55c. per H lb. tin.
U. S. DEPOT, 35 MERCER ST. NEW YORK. m6
THE
Perfection
[TRADE-MARKi
CANDLES
For Parties, Balls, Parlors,
Dining and Reading Rooms.
Perforated and Sclf
Waste Consnminf/
THEJ3EST!
No More Greaajr Candelabrum*.
No More MoIIIiik Table Cover*.
No Mure Dripping on Carpets.
No OffViiHtve t><!or.
Have Kxtra Quality Prepared Wick.
Will 'Uml Heat himI Draught.
Are Pure Wbilc Color.
Give Beat Light.
AND AP.E
25 PerCent. Cheaper
THAN THE BEST SPERM.
Three sizes. 1 lb. Packages.
ENDORSED BY LEADERS OF SOCIETY
everywhere, and
Sold ?y all first-claes
Grocers.
BOYCE BROTHERS, Philada.,
SOLE AGENTS FOR C. 9.
?9" Rfgtitrrtd Trilde-if irk on trfry l.ribfl.'St
Ask Your G
ROCER
'OR
196^a
ItL SUf?RUr'VE
1 PATENT 1
^CAGAMBRILL.MFG.Cq,
THE PREMIER FLOl'R OF AMERICA.
feHMu.th,??t3w
GALLERIES,
No. 816 CHESTNUT STREET,
PHILADELPHIA.
MR. LINFORD'S PAINTINGS
Now on exhibition for the week only.
Work, of VON UHDE, PLOCKHORST and other
renowned painter* of
RELIGIOUS SUBJECTS
reproduced in the best
PHOTOGRAPHS.
"A TRUSTING SAVIOUR," Plockhorst,
"COME JESUS, BF. OI K GUEST," Von I hJe:
-CHRISTMAS MORNING." A. D. (iolz.
? MARY MAGDA1.EN." Franz Ruse;
"BEHOLD, I AM WITH YOU ALWAYS," Kaille:
"THE RAISING OF JAIRUS' DAUGHTF.ft,"
Raui'hlniper:
"THE INFANT CHRIST AND THE UOCTORS,"
Hoflmun,
and many others, in ENGRAVINGS, PHOTO
GRAVURES. ETCHINGS. Etc.
NEW WATER COLOR PAINTINGS.
Superb iuimenae photograph of
"THE SEA," 3x4 feet.
PAINTINGS, MIRRORS,
the beat aud handaomest.
PICTURE FRAMES. mh21-*o
Grand National Award of 16,600 francs.
QUINA-LAROCHE
AN INVIGORATING T0NI0,
CONTAINING
PERUVIAN BARK, IRON, and
PURE CATALAN WINE.
For the PREVENTION aad CURE of
Malaria, Indigestion, Fever & Ague. Loss of
appetite, Poorness of Blood, Neuralgia, &e.
22 Rae Droaot, Parle.
E, FOUGEEA & GO., Agents for the U. S?,
SO NORTH M I I.LI AM ST., N. Y.
Alexander's^ Tonic Pills,
. _ 1H' GREAT INVIGORATOk.
*pBE CELLULOID TKtTSs
'SS7lkakl.il
? to lbs wants s(
EDUCATIONAL.
^pencebian BTHT>rw8 COLLEGE. COH TTH
0?nd u >u. n w. Founded 1MS4. mi r? than mt.000
youtif awn and viauac bar* bwo trained in Use span
,?nu cuunm dsy and nlirht session*. mi cour??e
h?iu:m('.>urw. sh> rthand. typewntinsaud oraia
orboue: ttn uial fiflm; Tel??rrw|hy. hivtwn'
Rapid wriuu*. Readmit and Oratory. delaarte method
ineu funiisbed with trained ?ui iojea. ilus
tested ir<*. SABA A. si li(th, \ ice
Principal; HENRY C. kftx lh. LL. r. Principal.
?mt
AHAKVAKD gk AD i'ATI DESIRES PUPLLA
sm?rl> or ui stuaii rlas-rr All.} to
VIM. H pcfnam. A M,
mhls At fender* k sujwu. a. w34 F ?t n.w.
RAWING anltpainting-INSTRUCTION I*
rtf r> branch ud for til *irr*.i-n vate or in cimi-i at
the NATIONAL ACADEMY OF unr aht-.d^ S
at Call and ms uia wonderful prorreas of atudenta.
mhl6
I^bem'u. LATIN, orefe. MATHEMATICS A
*J>?rlalty. Prof. H. LARKO^le A M..?f sor
bonne i hit.. Pari*. Private tutor in Sciences. > la**n?l
and modern lamruasee ?*>;i ltttb ?t n.w mbl4 ltn*
washington oootsatatubt opln sic. ?t
" Cloud Buil>lnir. l?th an<l F sta. taautieth ynar.
llano. orirau. \otce. v ndm. Hut*. Cornet. A' Free
advantages. O. B. hcllard. Director. iuhl2-lm*
PARENTS~DESIRING TO SEND daughtfks in
? brati ia*? School lu 1 are reuueeu-d to ad
dree* fraule1n NEEF, Hiirh School. city, for |?r
lu-ularm. Escort for Eun>i-eau trip provided in
J une. tv-'-'m*
E. SCHEEL TEACHER OF pianotorgan
? and giut'iii* at aivbt particular attention to be
ginners aa well wtinw wiahiujf to be mw j aa
lurmers. 734 u.'th at. n jal- sAw3m'
Martyn'b COMMERCIAL COLLEGE 313 oth
st., near City hat-oltkv. (< iurtil atudeuta not
ediuitted. Call or send for catalogue. mm
cbkuhis s DANCING ACADEMY. 1004 F ht
?? n. w . MONDAY. WEDNESDAY an l SA1 i RI>\Y
Now la the time to Join for t?rtu.ij?uul in tlx May
Ball, Scud lor circular. au'-m-sui
1^8 BALCH'SCIVIL SERVICE in8titce. 1207
lllth at. n.w. Persona l re|>ared moat surreee
? illy (or all eximlcatiuua. Elocution tauirhtand com
positions care:ully remanl; highest references. 1+ Sill
?^DWARDC. towrhi ni>,
A Teacher of Elocution.
t orrect (deep) breatuintr v ok* Culture. Oratorical and
Dramatic Action, at 131? l.'ith *l u.?. d.?l-3m
ST. JOHN'scollet.f.. annainu is. md
eikhtdaoartiii.nl* and four o urwaof study.
vn paratory m bool attached.
bpetlal ATTENTION GIVEN TO
THE frefaratiok OF CA.nchla1e4 Y0k
1ue NAVAL ACADEMY
For i-atalogiitta, adtirsm Pre* i< lent,
dvm-3ui THOMAS FELL, A. M.
rjau* uall11z BCHOOL OF lan'ul aukd.
laruj l?nflii uow.
?nt!> 723 14th ??.? w.
LADIES' GOODS.
3i ME. T. ba 11 akrimjn.
btulS\j OPENING
or
l0nd0s AND pakit? BONNFTS AND HATS.
wiojnesday and Till u^day.
ai l.11. a and 4.
fit ljcli i *t. oj p. the Fblntt.
f|>u.. mlbm.s CLNNlNtiHAM, fl kkilkn ke
x ctive on btdhri
i ur? and Woolen Gooda.
liilu wtli at. n ?' bet. N and 0 ata.
Mus kt A a Donovan,
tkh F ST1.EET.
OPENING MONDAY AND TtESDAY, APRIL 1ST
AND 2D.
OF CHOICE FRENCH PATTERN HATS AND
BONNETS
From th? leadins Houaea of Pan* and Loudon.
Aiao Our Own
EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS.
The Ladiaa of waahinirton are ReapectXully Invited
No Carda. mh"2h-1 w
A LADY, FORMERLY CARRY i nli ON DKF.ks v A k
iijif itj new York, w ould lik* tha pat i .1 *ur of ^ a-u
ilktoii laiuta niiaii rate i ricea and i*rtect tit. 1 ui lii.*
ai d Uaatu.tr a ?i?cialty. 7 c ?t. i.f. iublb-2w*
I RASTER EGGS. :<c.. CHli km. itahblth. *<?.. 5c7
J carda, 4tie ( <-r lot) . batin boxi-lllt*.'1 oya ?...i; ?>.
.siudiea, Favora. Gold Paint. Hi. s-raj' ll.tun-m
i t it t ardi>, lii'tliday Cards Nlaw riala lor tuakiiiv pa
per Flowers iltaaotia fre?.) J. JAY taolld, 4~1 btb.
inb"u-liu*
\~7on bramdis. its pf.nn ave.
i ailor-iuade(>owua, 1 ldihk haliita, Evenlnr and
Street cimtuinea, eu , made at aliort notice. pertecl
fit aiid work, one fittuik required. iteaaouuble pncea
loruierl) with Loid & Taylor. N w yi.ra, aud wm
B:trr & Co., St. louia ButU uholea mada. inbls-lln'
I* oh taVENING EAR.
ULLE. M jtprandi.
131h F si. u.w , at mt?. ilarriaon'*,
H*e Just received a French imjvrtatiou in FANCI
ORNAMENTS EOR ihfc HAIR
GILT PINS, SIDE COMBti,
in Silver, Gold, and tortoiae shell.
Also.
NEW DESIGNS IN sheix AND AMBER PINS.
FINE ll.ENCil ha lit GOOD*.
HAIR deehsed. uanub shingled
lubl-lm shampooing.
ItHE FEDORA DRESS SHIELDS ARE PRO
tiotinceil by meaara wo<)D\? *kd A LOTHROI
aa tlie brat lu their slock. the) have uo equal fo
aale everywhere. jalli-eo
London and paris styles received
FOB
SPRING AND SI MMER
special! I t k
Ladies' Riding Habit*. 1 ravelin# Coatumea. walkim
Gowns, Clatera. ja< kcta drieinir Coata, lie.
All lauiev work ia under tbe sujerwaion of Mr. jua
fttrtni.#. late witb Creed, ol loliuoii and 1 aria.
batiblaitioli iruaraiileed.
O w E n,
MERCHANT 1 AILOR,
mh4-3tn Cor. New York ave. And 1 oth st.
]\.leinert's Dress {Shields.
ABSOLFTELY THE
BEST AND MOST RELIABLE.
Elrtnert a FEATHER-WEIGHT iwsahable.)
kleineut'S SEAMLESS stockinet*.
kleinebl'S SEAMLESS l'l BE rl'BREB ANI
VARIOUS OTHER dress SHIELDS.
EVERY PA1U warranted.
NONE GENUINE WITHOUT OUR TRADE MARI
and iiainr irlelnert) on every |>air.
mhl-3m BEWARE OF imitation.
1,-RENCH DYEING. scourikg AND DRY CLEAN
i 1NG ESTABLISH MEN!. 12?5 New York ave
1 irsi-clasa La?lil?' and Genta' woik of every di-arnp
hon. Flush, Velvet and EvemnK dreaata. AMUJ
AND caroline LERCH. ioiiueriy witii A fiarhe
and Mai son Yneae, Parte. ja'.'l
Anton fischers dry cleaning estab
L1SHMENT AND DYE WORKS ihjoGet. n w.
Ladiee' and Genu' garmenta ot all kinds cleaned all'
1 }td without beiny ripped. Ladn-s' eieninif dn-w?
a specialty, 'lhirty-hve years' exprrienoe. Prna
u.oclerate. Gooda called lor aud delivered. sl4
All-wool garments, made up or ripped
uj eti a wood iuwuriiiii* blu-k.
A. fischer.
e!4 bt ogat n w.
WOOD AND COAL
J?
forrest DODGE
COAL uerchant,
W hole sale and Retail.
Anthracite Coal of all klnda n^nstantly on hand.
GEORGE'S CREEK cumberland COAL.
j FINEST GRADES of SPLINT and caknelcoal
Sawed and Split Wood to Order.
Yard end Office, 3008 Water street; Br.inrh Office
1 'J 14 31st etruet >op|>oaite Post-oflk-e), West Washuiy
j ton, D. C.
i Telephone?Yard. H54-2; Branch office. mh2(
My retail prices for coal and wood
until chaijtfd, aie aa ioilowa:
i White Ash Stove, per ton of Kit40 ihe ?5 4<
lw. " " 5.m
Nut. " " bM
- Broken. , " 6.31
suamokin Store. * &.(k
F*f, ? - ft. 41
Bed Aah Stove. ^ ; 6M
lykeiu y^ley rtove, ^ * i...'.." s.S
S. a S. Pine Woo![f'per cord f .ft)
** Oak Wood, " , ..... o 5c
Special prices tor lsrws orders JOHN miller, ttix
Pa. av.n. w_ 1020 14uiatui.w . S. Oav. aud I at. jks-jia
Coal i Cokei Woods
JOHNSON BROTHERS.
Wharrae and Bail yards. 12th a Water eta. Southwest
Office#
1202 F st b. v. l.mi 7th st b. v.
3d and Eel a *. i 1740 Pa are. n. w.
1112 oui st n w. 413'0th st ?. w.
Exclusive agents in the tmetnct for toe eale of enm<
of the best coal mined. Supply more families than an]
retail yard in the United btstea.
HONEST MEASURE FAIR dealing. PRO MP!
DELIVERIES AND REASONABLE PAalCES ham
mads our business a suoossa.
DRY GOODS.
New Spring Goods.
s* received another alni .toent of New snrlasgoodi
cotnprialny Wool and Silk Henrietta*. Frenrtt satteeus
ScoU h gimrharna, Wool combination Sultinn anc
{ hiua bilks also a full line of Linen hhe*-tlu*a7mllos
jliiteiis, dwiimk Table Cloths ?ud nt^kioa to
TaWe dwn-ks all tfradaa. hematiuled linm Sheet
and piuow Cmw, jl>aiua?k aud huck Towel*, tkik mm
li?1? hme ui ^rmi tertetir.
r^o-am HOPE bbo. k CO., 1328 f ?t
PRINTERS.
~rf ogUEER * WALLACE,
jl , BOOE AND JOB PRINTERS,
110m-1110 E st li. south side,
n?E WORK A SPECIALTY- *19
BICYCLES.
cmiti1
h . f^liS^Srta
601oy^ i*. m.w. Factory *oe
ARCHITECTS.
FINANCIAL.
6?M? T I I K INT MOmTGAUCS ?>; 1>?.
BF*TVBr.S-PRIXCU>AL AMD INTEREST
ulAhANTELD l>T Soj.-itor* Truet On. PWUa. aat
Cooiiuuiivivltb 1.m ki >1 Tm*t Co. MlM
ctu4rw Muiik )|?1 and Corporate Bond* for
?1*11 Fur aair bi
? n A ol.TH fe it. .Eell.?w ftmldlas. _
Moti*? to Loan wlthrwt ctnuiiaaion ?LaO ?Aw.tajW*
~ ewis Johnson * co?
A
DOMESTIC ANiyORKlOX
UOIKIH,
IVubqIvuIi in. and 10th M.
Exchange, Uttari of Oadi t. CWble Truman am hl?
ni?l Cui? in Furor*.
?OTrrcmetit and Investment Knit. Tilsgiapkle
(Ywnmtini.wttcna with N< w l'urk. I'Llladeiplda. BalU
more and Boston.
LOANS MADE AND XNOT1AT0I OF.N'ERkfc
BtNhlNG BIMNES8 TBAXSACTED.
mhVC -."m
?John S. Blaxkman.
iAXUI AND BROKER
1403 F ST. X. w.
mm INVESTED IS SAFE SKCI'RITIES.
5, tt, 7. AM) 8 PLR CENT INTEREST PAID OX
TIME DEPOSITS OF * ?. S. AND
1? MONTH*.
mli 14-lm
17>?lAiUJNHll) 1814 CAPITAL. I300.0U*.
fj SI MUD ll'xn, iVa^VUIL
NATIONAL METROPOLITAN blNKOFTASH
INUTON, 1.1.1 15th at., uwwih' L*. ? Treasury.
J. ?. THOMPSON. OI.ObGi. H B ?HTT?,
iTmilrut. (MMr.
P.rr.1 ifa piacoiint* Paper. Sella Pilla >?<
Eb'haiifr, Makea CuUai l.uB*. aliddoeea General Hank
ll.( BlhllHW. fW-.ini
'?'Hi. luLl M Id t NATIONAL B%NK.
1. *.? W ASHINO IVN. D O.
(?11 F at. n. w.,
tbrelres dejoMla. I4*va Money. lsatM* Prafts Tret*.
a. ii. a Unwral lisnkimc I'uv.nsss. L>?-atiou central
and convenient 1 iUwl i ar? and herdu a ruti in (runt
I<t our door . i?th auwl c?ra run a tew M hIh eaet uf niir
builainir; 7ib aiml and I till rtiwl car* uul} t?w
Ui?ka>sway . II -?uvet and I < nu?) i\ante eve uaraulur
Ultra Uoik* aaay.
B H W ARNER. President
A T. BHITION. \ h-e Preeldeot.
t b 1'tl.kl.lt. i 'ashler
Pirorlon rhan. B. lltil<y, *'bi F. Barker. Al*x f.
t-\ I'Utu HinH'U. John Joy 1'Wun. kllarl
i lot. John K. Herrlll. 1?. nj 1 Ix-urfatuii. lliish Mc
culloch, t S SuiHt, M. M Park. r. o. I*. siaplss
o<< . irttradcH. Hrtir) k. W niani. b 11 w ?
j*:?l :lm
.1
NO. W. CORSON. JNO w macartxet.
Member X. V. Muck Km.
PORSOS * MACABTNET.
OLOVFK BULDIXO. 141UF 8T. X
Baukvra ai.d Danlrra in Uuvaraiiinut Bouda.
IVp<?ita F.*< hanr?. t/?na OnTWrtlnna
Ballriwd Klix-ka and Botida. and all iwrarMki llata*
on Hi. 1 ?. "I N? * ^?rk. Pli'.ladrlt'Lia. K?uia
ai. J Bultsn i'r. i? nrht and add
A ?I'rcialty mad. ?f lurMtmrrt avrnrltl?a I>1atrMt
K U<1? and all l> >'al Kailruad. Oa?. InlunL't and 1 ?!
t vi'liout! stiK'k ilwtlt in.
AjuanuUi Bell lrUt lioca Stuck buurht and aoldJylS
WINTER HKSOHTS.
W INl'tUMl KE-TKN NFssF.E AVFXVU
Ail AMIt till, N J?
N?ar tli* oc?an. open all year. telephone 105
nil.'JS-1 n. Mils C. L. Ilol'ttTOX.
Hotel nt. vfbxox.
Al l.AN TIC CITY. X. J
.**an rorna. Near th? liaaili. 1 '..mnelilr h?at?d
Blh-JO-1 m jAMI.b 8 MOON
Hot FX CMIliKuX." ATLANTIC CIT*. N i..
t'aix liiia ave.. u?-?t the beach. Nut ui? n lur Uic
apnuar and aumiuer aaaaun*
?idiltt-.-Ui bAM'L J. TOCM. Pru|i
a>Ht HESOVU. ATI ANTIC I ITV
Teiine**? av?-., mar tli> b.?ch.
No? oub; tborvutfhl) h?M.
tiihl l-:iiu V E. rurFSF.MAU
^AKAlOOA bPBIX04, N V.
DR. BIBOXO'B SAMTARICM.
OPFX ALL THE TF.AR For the treattucnt uf
feiaale. uervons. respiratory, malarial and other
chniuic dinraem. Foiupp*-d mtth all tlie tie?t leuediat
a| pliance* -an-uir tltetu linw irr. \ acuuui treatuiaut,
M?tdiah oir>r.n.ruus Unlmii). Turkish, luiaalan.
li' inao. Me. tr> thernial. 1 rmch doui he and all tsUaa.
'1 able al lvUltllielilM lllvt-clttH. A i heertul rt*irt for
treatawut. re?t or re* i-.nl t. ii. outdoor and mdovr
opoita. Inadry and i i.K . lunate, atth apei ial ad
Vai,m?re? ot the M'hlN'J M A'l LBS. Winter and Hprtwr
ratrnloa. Send lor ein nlar 111UV-Jin
\V 1XL>KUMtKt?ll NNKMSKK AVLXVt.
11 ATLANTIC tl'lV. X J .
N" ear the uwi; open al i y ear. telephone 105
_fW-lui MhJv C. L. Hoi STOV
^ h . i.i i 1 N I il.llll (M I AN. Kl.NircBV AVL.
0 ATLANTIC CUT. X J.
lopnlar loratl. >u oi^iia Mareb 1
f>'t>-:iui Ml.b M. T i? >1 1H ALL of R aahlturton. DU
OX lUL UT-ACH.
UADDOX BALL
fl.Vlm rpwixUPPIXCOTT.
'| Hk. At ME.
X ATLANTIC CITT, X.
hLA LND Ut hi N 11 CIL Y AVF.
_n.V2m __MRb O. W jWToDDARD.
A TLAXTIC CITY. X. J.-HOTELS, HoaRDIXO
l\ Hoiieea. tultur. *, lyola and baiLi lli uaea lu lei ur
li r Hale l>) I. U. Al> AM ?> k to , real e*Ui? atrenta. Haal
1 >u>e aijtl U? bunaiiiins Aliauii. l ity. N J fl4-dHt
CI MMl'R B" "AKD-AT ST AHIkurt ~ HALU
near Baltun.'re, ou M M l< R . near etatioti un
euriaaa.*! lu kiiuaticu. kc. Ternm n>oderaie No ma
laria. J C. K1NE AK. M. ?i<x>nre'a, Md. n.a;t-?oil?r*
ra Hi. Oct AN Htil M, ATLANTIC CITY, X J..
X NOW OH X
Vnder Old Uau(uuat,
f*21-eo3m I. A HFID.
X;LW WINTER RE80BT.
THE miy i.NB AXNE.
VUMHNIA blach. ta.
Thin Dew, artiatlr and comi>letely-ai>i>>>lnted hotel la
Dom~open. Situated on the ATLANTIC OCEAN, IH
mile* eaetof NORFOLK, VA, acenaailile by NORFOLK
AND VIRGINIA Bl.ACH K K . and on direct Una
la tween the North and south. A primeval pine toreaa
ol about 1,000 acres, with heautitiil drive* and aaika
A* a health raeort it Uaa uo auperior. Addreaa
H E. CRITTENDEN. Mauaver.
iLate of Hyeeia Hotel, old Point Cuiufort, Ya.), or
44 Broad a ay. New York I Ruom 4.1 fe'.'Vrtteo
1'Ht LEHMAN, Ot KAN I ND OF PKXNSYXVA
lu ale., Atlantic City. N. J l.nlaiYed and newly
luruiehed. Sun |<arlur, e.t\ Vri< bella, ki-.
JaUO-e.tu.tb-.'im MKs. I. Vt. LEIIMAX.
1HE VICTORIA. OCEAN END. ? C. AVE.. AT^
iantli City T horoiiirhiy renovated, heatvd. fa^
ki.. hot and cold aea aater. open all the year.
jaln-ytu?ith.:nii M. KlU.IAMk.
T
>Ut CHALFoNTK.
ATLANTIC CITT. X. J.
Moved to the beatU.
EN'I.AiUlF.P AND IMPRot ED.
? _ I NSI Rl ASSED OCEAN VIEW.
Salt Water Beth* In tnehouxe Fievatur.
letf-tiu E. BOBEBTb ft a?oNk
UOTEL LL'RAY,
ATLANTIC CITY. N. J,
On the beach. Ken tuck)' are..
Will open February lii, I J. WHliC. 111-Va
PENNHlKbT,
ATLANTIC CITY. N.J.
Near the beacn. open a rale-. youd tiralnatfe.
lel-:im JAMES HOOD.
*?f|^HK WAVERLY
X , ATLANTIC CITT, X.J.
Open all the year, hot and i"l?l aee-water bathe M
houae, aun parlora. Yti>. J. L. Bui ANT. lei-4a
l| UK lNLEtiWORTH. ATLANTIC CITY7~N. J..
X Uu ihe bea. li. aea end of V irmnia ave.,
WILL UPtN FLBbl ARY *. 1SMH
>14-6m Hi CK k \i. ? i.ri.t.av
WINTER AND HPRINQ RF.HOkT. KaTON OOT
11 tatre Hotel. Olo point ixudort, Ya Terme M
per (lay ; alu per ?e?-k and upward
Ja5-aui' ??K< mut BOOK F.K, Pn>|Tletor
FAMIIjY supplies.
1 A CAN8 SruAK COBN 6lc.
}.y * "VtU? O'ncord Wine
4 Ilia Drieu peachea nr6 lt?. Hrunee ?5?k
1 andlon Heat Sweet fata* .m W ine |ST
1 hat BoUiiiiet W huky, only (V 60 per vailoa
mhlw-lm U'UAkka uMCk-HV. 1V45 . th at. B.w.
4*
Bridal A
Fit"
bPRIXO WHEAT PATENT FLOCR
la the Premier Floor of the W arid.
The only Minnesota latent uow nuale from all okt
wheat. Fur eale by the foUoauiK aall-kitowwimicant
JOHN H. MAUBlTiER, 1417 New York are
CHAR. L KELLOOU, Ntaaotiic Temple. tHkat
GEO. L KENNEDY k HON, I'M F at
W. E. ABBOTT, 1781 Pennaylrauia are
It. A. WALKER. 1U00 7th at.
E. M. BLBCHARD k BBO. Peun are. and 4'e*t.
aW.kH. W. OF'FT'TT.OaoryctowB.
A. O. WRIGHT. 1?:? 14th at.
V. T. BACtlN, I'enn*) lrauuan.
^y. H. COMBs, K-.'l HIU ST. X. W, IMiUBTES
and XVnueatic Otw<Ti?. Tine Wlnee and Liquor^
kc. Th* folk win* well know n brer-ia e4 Pore tj*
Whlskica constantly In stock Old J. B. Thmupao^
Baker, I'pier Ten, Banni* Acme. 1 ikoaaa. Jackaoa
and Grand Jury.
44^-tab of the eaut." fancy PAikXT no
S CM*a Flour, *S.?fi l*-r ntiL; *1.73 per la bhl sack;
?Vld luue" Flour, ?,>.wo per hUfjlUbO par B
aack. perlectioti lea. ?-knowledred by allwhii ?aa>t
to be Wortk auuble >ur price, which, la Mk. per It.
Beat Bwar Cured Baa?a. 1 -V par lb ? ?kn^ldata.
HWc. l*r lb. S lla buck a heat for l?a .'7a
Bou-lny for 26c. & lb Iwkatfr Breakfaet H
lor 15<-. :t (Ita Beana lor Em-.. - Iha. 1 urkiah 1
for 23c. V! lba. Dned l eachee < |weledi k>MUc.
Evaporated Applea lor v5c- Kumtord Yeaat Po<
larva buMlea. lOe. ? I toe blank for Jfjc W
Tom, Dick, and Harry Hoap tor *4e. cakaa
niauc Swap lur Xk. S'cakae' 1.}mouth Bock IhmvUtt
24c.
_^3m_ ^VlgfaA
?^UB|l CHoll KXT_JMf( 'STEDJiriXES. LIQCOB^
chrmia*t^Jl?u!'"yin '^Ma^wiviaf'a^^stB. Var
Barbera.
Krala.
Bracketto.
_ . JveOtl. :
k.Mjuelort Ch
iaknaaa
Call on O I KnjAO n o k HONS,
mhO-lrn* SWS Wth at a
SPECIALTIES.
E*jjgpignr?p*^al>
uienn. iroubUa. parwlnSa, tuaun. MM
wl^T^huCt^a f red -.:'^3S?1rJty*S
' -.tuva^wji, ?v? IMbaLl

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