OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 01, 1889, Image 5

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1889-04-01/ed-1/seq-5/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 5

Jlo FotiLY Safe
TRthon: ? prompt and convenient remedy for Pronp,
V&ocptng Couch. Bronchltia, ud other Throat sod
Eeng troublge. A bottle of Ayer"s Cherry Pectoral
(m saved many a life Mr*. J Gregg, lit street. Low
ML mum . write* My children have taken Ayer's
Cbarry Pectoral, for Croup It give* Immediate re
Bet. invariably followed by cure "
"I bin found Ayer's Cherry Pectoral a perfect curs
for Cronp, in all cases. 1 have known the wont cases
jtlievf .1 in a very short time by its use; and I advise
AL fam.Ues to keep it in the houaa."?& IL Latlxik.
U. D.. Mt Vernon. Ga.
AYER'S CHERRT PECTORAL,
Prepare 1 by Dr. 1. C. Ayer A Co., Lowell. Mass. Bold
bf all Druggist*. Price 91. sit bottle* $3. h2?
?J?HF. WONDERFUL CARLSBAD SPRINGS.
At the Ninth International Medical Congres*. Dr. A.
I A. Toboldt. of the University of Pennsylvania, read
A paper statin* that ont of thirty cases treated with the
fern tune imported Powdered Carlsbad Sprndel Salt for
cArcnic constipation, hyiochondria, disease of the liv
?r and kidneys, Jaundice, adiposis, diabetes, dropsy
from valvular b?art disease, dyspepsia, catarrhal in
flammation of the stonisfh, ulcer of the stomach or
?I l?*en, rhildren with marasmus, rout, rheumatism of
the Joints, gravel, etc., twenty-eix were entirely cured,
three much improved, and one not treated long eno ugh.
Average time of treatment, four weeks.
The Carlsbad Mprudel Salt (powder form), is an ex
cellent Aperient Laxatii" and iHur'tie. It clean the
toftpitn n, imtyirt thr Blood. It is easily soluble,
pleasant to take and permanent in action. The genuine
product of the Carlsbad Springs is exported in round
kettles. Each bottle comes in a light blue paper rar
te*.n. and has the signature "EISNER A MENDLE
h* >N Co.," sole sgeuta, tl Barclay street. New Verk,
on every bottle. One bottle mailed npon receipt of
ee Dollar. Dr. Toboldt's lectures mailed free upon
>UcatioB. aul-m.wAf
Catarrhal Dangers.
To be freed from the dangers of mffocation while
lying down; to breathe freely, sleep soundly and un
disturbed. to rise refreshed. head clear, brain active
And tree from pain or ache. to know that no poisonous,
putrid matter defiles the breath and rots away the
delicate machinery of smell, taste and hearing; to feel
that the system d- ?e not. thrush its veins and arter
ies, sock up the poison that is nure to undermine and
destroy, is indeed a blessing beyond all other human
en> yrnents To purvhase immunity from such a fate
Should he the object of all afflicted. But those who
liave tried many remedies and physicians despair of
relief or cure.
SAN KURD'S RADIC AL cure meet* every phase of
Catarrh, from a sum le head cold to the moat loath
some and destructive stages. It is local and constitu
tional. Inatant in relieving, permanent in curing,
kale, economical and never-failing.
BAN ford'S RADICAL cure consist* of one bot
tleof the RADICAL CURE, one box of CATARRHAL
SOLVENT, and one IMPROVED INHALER, all wrap
ped in one package. with treatise and directions, and
?old by all druggists for tl.
POTTER DRCG A CHEMICAL CO, Boston.
HOW MT SIDE ACHES!
Aching Sides and Back. Hip. Kidney and Uterine
Pains. Rheumatic. Sciatic, Neuralgic. *harpandShoot
kr rains relieved in < ?.N E MINUTE by theCl TICI RA
ANTI-PAIN PLASTER. The ttrst and only pain-kill
ing plaster ?."> <enu. ap'.'.4
ScOTTS lliM' LSION OF C/OD LlVER Oil.
WITH HYPOPUOSPHITES.
SCOTTS EMULSION.
scorrs palatable. emulsion.
SCOTTS EASILY digested. EMULSION.
SCOT I S
SCOTT'S THREE TIMES AS EMULSION.
SCOTTS EFFECTUAL EMULSION.
SCOTTS AS THE l'LAIN OIL. EMULSION.
SCOTT'S EMULSION.
SCOTTS THE BEST REMEDY EMULSION.
BCOTTS FOR EMULSION.
BCOTTS EMULSION.
BCoTTS COUGHS. COLDS, EMULSION.
BCOTTS bronchitis, EMULSION.
SCOTTS EMUL810N.
BCOTT S WASTING DISEASES, EMULSION.
SCOTT'S EMACIATION. EMULSION.
BCOTTS EMULSION.
SCoTTS SCROFULA. EMULSION.
?WIN RICKETS, EMULSION.
BCOTTS EMULSION.
SCOTT'S CONSUMPTION. emulsion,
oc'JS
\~-or CANT Hi LP I.I KING THEM. THEY ARE SO
% r> "tuall and their action is so t>erfect Only one
pill a dose. Carter's Little Liver Pills. Try them.
S? 'DEN MINERAL PASTILLES,
which were awarded (Ac hickr*t duttinetvm by a medical
jury at the International Exhibition at Brussels, have
proved to be a fir?t-clas* remedial agent in all Catarrh*
(if the organs of respiration and digestion.
SGDEN MINERAL PASTILLES are prescribed by
physicians in disease* of the lung* and cheat and
Mthma. The benefit derived from their use Is unsur
passed. and even in the most chronic case* they soothe,
?ase. and stimulate.
SuDEN MINERAL PASTILLES are preferable to
all similar preparations, because they are a natural
remedy, an unadulterated product of the springs, con
taining in an undiminished degree all the sanative
principles of these springs.
SODEN MINERAL PASTILLES are prepared ex
clusively under the personal supervision and control
?f W. bTui-LTZlNG. 1L D? K. K. Sanitary Coun
cillor.
SODEN MINERAL PASTILLES are nnequaled as
? ?.lvent in cough* and catarrhs, even in the most
Chronic cases. Their success is unsurpassed.
SODEN MINERAL PASTILLES are a superior
remedy in whooping cough and diphtheria; in the
former they lessen the paroxysm of the attack, while
(revesting the latter disease, which cannot take bold
Id a throat not affected by catarrh.
SoDEN MINERAL PASTILLES derive increased
value from the tact of having a very favorable influ
ence upon the organ* of digestion.
SODLN MINERAL PASTILLES ought to be kept
In every home. All mother* are recommended to
Brge their children 4>rn.x the cold seaaou to allow a
pastille slowly to melt in their mouths while out on
errands or going to schooL
SODEN MINERAL PASTILLES are for sale at
nearly all druggists at 6UC. a box. Should your
Aruggirt not keep them, kindly address the
fcODEN MINERAL SPRINGS CO. (LIMITED),
15 CEDAR STREET, NEW YORK.
Sole agency f. .r the U. 8. nlO-thAm5m
/-CONSTIPATION. WHICH GIVES RISE TO MANY
JL eraver troubles, is cured and prevented by Carter's
|jttle Liver Piils. Try tnem and you will be convinced.
GRATEFUL?comforting,
APP S'S COCOA
breakfast.
"By a thorough knowledge of the natural laws which
irvrrti the operations of digestion snd nutrition, and
ry s caret ul application of the line properties of well
lelei ted Cocoa, Mr Epts hss provided our breakfast
tahle* with a delicate!) flavored beverage which may
Save us many heavy doctors' bills. It is by the Judl- j
tV'iisuseof such arti. les of diet that a constitution I
t ay be gradually built up until strong enough to re- I
*>t every tendencj to disease. Hundred of subtle :
zr.aiaAiee are sting around ua reedy to attack wher
ever there i* a weak point, Me may escape many a
fat?i shaft by keeping ourselves well lortifled with
jure bind snd a properly nourished frame."?I'msl
hn * ice (rtUetfs.
Mule aim pi v with boiling water or milk. Sold only
in ha^f pound tins by grocsra, labeled thus:
JAMES LPPS A CO., Homcsopathic Chemist*,
Jy'41-m.tu.s London. England.
Get The Bkst
XUE CONCORD HARNES&
LUTZ A BRQ.
Pern, an, adjoining National Hotel
Bene BlankeU and Lap Robes la great variety at
??ry tow prices. oc3
%F TOU ARE TIRED TAKING THE LARGE OLD
J fsahl' lied gnping pills, try Carter's IJttle Liver Pills
fciul tu? ?> uf cuRaiort. A in*n can't aUod ???nrtiuiirf
Ouk pill m (iom. Try tb?i. ____^_
T11S WASHINGTON architectural iron
AND BRIDGE WORKS.
EDWARD E DENT. M E.. Proprietor.
The beet Is. llitiea in the city for all kinds of Iron
?| >k. St?ei lxsius. Angles. Ac . always in slock.
Fine ornamental Cast and Wrought Iron work a l
necialty. hepalrs and general machine work done in
Ute beet manner and at snort notice.
Sole In ensees in the District ot Columbia for the
"Uoetx-Mitchell" system of Beam Anchors and Pne
lectora. Works. Cor M.V1 and Water si*. Tel.
Uty Oftce. 141.1 G at. n w. Tel 4XS-2.
fS3 Washington. D^0
BEST REGULATOR OF DIGISTIVE OR- [
1 gans and tAs bMt sppstuer known la ANGOSTU
RA BITTER*. Try It, but l*ware of imltatloiiH. Get
the geuaine article, manufactured by Dr. t. G. B SI K
GERTASONS. m','M
]Powd-8 Extract
IB U8KD IK THE UOCBB
kOLD OF
PRESIDENT CLEVELAND.
SUBDUES INFLAMMA
TION CONTROLS HEM
ORRHAGES. INVALUA
BLE FOB BURNS.
VOCIDI. BRUISES,
ETC. PAIN DISAP
fM
2d EDITION.
Latest wwii! to flu Star.
A PLACE FOR MR- CLEVELAND.
Judge Patterson Appoints Him to Office
in New York City.
Xiw York, April 1.?In the matter of High
bridge park, Judge Patterson has appointed as
commissioners: Messrs. Grover Cleveland,
Charles Coudert, and Leicester P. Holme.
FINANCIAL AND COMMERCIAL.
Ui^ownfn00^ Market.
i'ork Stock V?K2i^r*n<? closing prices nf
" 10gg!^gjPd_Ma<^rti1ey^ " ,t>ecl*? j
ICamsi
O.
It
Kama.
C. B. ft Q
Can. Pmc
Cen. Pmc
C. * O
Con. Um ,
D..L. ? W ... 136H
D * H Canal 131
91X
49'?
a:H
lo
82*
D. ft KioOr...
Do., prei
Erie
BocUnfVil..
111. Ceu 10.H;
16*
44
27*
Kan ft Tex...I 12^
I.&k? Shore... 101
Louis. ? Na?h t>lj?
Manhattan.... !?."?
Mo. Pac 66*
Mich. Cen.... h.~?K
N. Y. Cen 10<ik
N. Y. ft N.K.. 42*
A tcli 41
bell Tel.
91 J*
4?S
33*
1?
8254
137
131
16*
44-.
Hah
>saj
101
62S
95
66*
85*
106H
41H
39;.
Can. South...
N. i. Can
N. ft W , pref
Northwest...
N or. P*c
Do., pref...
Ore. R. W. ft N
Ore. Trans...
P&c. Mail
Peo., D. ft ?v.
Heading
Kich. Tor?
Kock Inland.
St. Paul.
O.
<Sl
52*
04V
5s'<H
95%
32*
35*
23
43H
?-'4;,
90 .
62*
52*
94'-*
49*
nffl}
tioTJ
Do., pref ... ,101
St. P., M. A M
Tex. A Pac....
Union Pac
W ahasll
Do., pref
Weal. Union..
98
1HM
59'?
12*
2.*>v
84
i
44
24*
90*
fl'-'S
loir
98
IS*
BO
m
?
?3* I
Washington Stock Exchange.
The following changes from Saturday's quota
tions on the Washington Stock Exchange are noted
to-day: lT. S. 4s, registered, 128^ bid. Market
stocks. 7s, 1S<I*_', currency, lOt'H bid. D. C. 50
year fund, .'Mi.*, 1924, currency, 123 bid, 125
asked. D. C. 20-year fund, 6e, 1892, coin, 107y
bid. 30-year fund, 6s, 1902, coin, 1254^ bid.
Washington and Georgetown Kailroad bonds. 107
bid. lu!'* asked. Metropolitan Kailroad stock,
104V bid, 112 asked. Columbia Kailroad stock.
26 bid, 28 asked. Washington Gas, 41 bid, 42
asked. Firemen's Insurance, 44 asked. Arling
ton Insurance, ISO asked. Klggs Insurance, 8
bid, 8J, asked. Washington Market bonds, 1st
mortgage imp. fisj, 115 bid. Washington Brick
Machine Company, 220 bid. Bunk of Washing
ton, 300 bid. National Metropolitan Bank. 230
bid. Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank, George
town, 167 bid. Second National Bank, 150?<
bid, 155 asked. Chesapeake and Potomac
Telephone Company, hl^ bid. 82X asked. IT.
3. Electric Light Company, 69>i bid. Inland
?nd seaboard Company bonds, 6s, 70 asked,
Washington Light Infantry flrst mortgage (is.
101 bid. Washington Light Infantry bonds,
M 7s, 65 bid. Washington Gaslight Com
pany bonds, series B, 122* bid. Hank of
Republic stock. ISO bid. Franklin Insurance
ompany stock, 42 bid. American Grapho
f>hone Company stock, 22 bid, 24 asked. Na
tional Safe Deposit Company stock, 240 bid,
Baltimore Markets.
BALTTMOKE. April 1.?Cotton nominal?tnid
lling, lOSalO*. Flour dull: nominally easier,
ft heat?southern, fairly active and lower; Fultz,
K1&103; Longberry, 95al05; western, steady; No.
J winter red, spot. 8S'4aS9; April, 88\aS9; May,
#i^aS.4*; June, 8?\a90; July, 89fca89*. Corn
-southern, llrm; shade higher; white. 42a43;
fellow, 41a42*: western, tirm: mixed spot. 42
5id; April, 42; May, 4154a4'_'; steamer, 40??a41*.
>ats, steady?western white. 32a;i3*; western
nixed, 29a:il. Kye, nearly nominal. 56a57.
Hay, less firm?prime to choice timothy, 16.00a
17.00. Provisions, flrru and quiet. Butter, steady
-western packed, lSa'.'O; creamery, 25. Eggs
iteady, 10\all. Petroleum, quiet ? refined,
J.'tO. Coflee, quiet?Kio cargoes fair, 18*. Sugar,
ttrong?A soft, 7*; copper, steady; reflned 15
il5*. Whisky, quiet. 111. Freights to Llver
;>ool per steamer, very slow?cotton. 40 centa per
100 pounds: grain, per bushel, 4*d. Cork for
>rder?, 4s.0d., nominal. Keceipts ? flour, 13,000
barrels; wheat, 4,000 bushels; corn, 2S.OOO; oats,
1.000 bushels, shipments?flour. 9.000 barrels;
t. heat, 8.000 bushels; corn. 8.000 bushels. Sales?
wheat, 3,000 bushels; corn. 58,000 bushels.
Keceipts and shipments of grain and flour at
Baltimore for the month of March: Keceipts?
*heat, 92,338 bushels; corn, 1.100,358 bushels;
w?ts. 90,486 bushels; rye. 9.450 bushels; barley 1
?nd malt, 72,502 bushels: flour, 171,804 barrels,
shipments?Wheat, Jt >4.738 bushels; corn, 1,731,
?28 bushels; flour, 1'10,617 barrels: stock flour,
exclusive of city mills, April 1, 1889,1s 03,000 |
parrels; do. March 1, 60,000 barrels; do. April 1,
1888, 65,000 barrels.
BALTIMOKE, April 1. ? Virginia ten-forties,
I5\a36 bid; do. threes. 65*a66; Baltimore and
Jhio stock. 93a97; Northern Central sbx-k, 76
isked; Cincinnati, Washington and Baltimore
lrsts. 96a97; do. seconds, 50 asked; do. threes,
t6: consolidated Georgia bonds, 111>?; do. stock,
14Sa45.
?
THE B. AND P. RAILROAD WAR.
The First Warrant Sworn Out?Chargi
ng the Obstruction of Delaware Avenue.
The Sonth Washington delegation composed |
)f Messrs. Dwyer and Parker, together with
Patrick Sullivan, called on Prosecuting Attorney
Shillington this morning for the purpose of I
laving a warrant issued against the Baltimore
ind Potomac railroad company for illegally
>bstructing Delaware avenue. Patrick Sullivan |
iwore ont the warrant which charges:
'?That Daniel P. McKeever, late of the connty
>f Washington and the District of Columbia
iforesaid, on the flrst day of January, 1889. and
Dn divers other days between said day and the
irst day of April in the year 1889, on Del
aware avenue southwest, did then and
there construct, "place and "allow to
remain, and did cause to be constructed,
placed and allowed to remain in, upon and
icross said Delaware avenue at its crossings
?nd intersection with Vlrginia avenue south
west. a certain obstruction to travel, to wit: a
fence without first having obtained a lawful
permit so to do."
This is understood to be but one of a number
jf warrants to be sworn out against the railroad
sompany.
DISTRICT GOVERNMENT.
A PEHMIT FOB USDEIlGBOrSD WIRES.
The Commissioners to-day granted the Pos
tal Telegraph cable company a permit
to construct underground conduits to con
tain conductors for electric wires in the
following-named streets in the city of Wash
ington. commencing on F street, between 14th
ind 15th streets, in front of the main office of
?aid company; running thence to east side of
14th street,"and thence along 14th to T north,
?lso commencing on the north side of Bound- I
?ry and 19th street, thence along 19th to T |
street and along T street to 6th
ind Boundary streets northeast. The same
conditions relative to location, material,
charucter and construction of conduits as were
imposed in the permit recently granted the
United States electric company were incorpo
rated in the permit and accepted by the man- |
ager, Mr. W. H. Allen.
BC1LDINO PERMITS
were issued to-day as follows: O. W. William- |
son. two brick dwellings, lots 23 and 24, Provi
dence street. <4.000; William Mavse, *ne brick
dwelling, 820 10th street southeast, t3,z50:
Philip A. Butler, one brick dwelling, 1117
Pennsylvania avenue southest, $2,350; E. J.
Kittenhouse, one frame dwelling, corner Hart
ford and Duwean streets, #1.475; Geo. Hudson,
one brick dwelling, 402 11th street southeant,
* 1,400.
MISCELLANEOUS.
Commissioner Ilaymond has approved Capt.
Lusk's recommendation that each police pre- |
cinct be directed to make a special report each
morning of all excavation made the previous
day.
Opposrxo a Pabtitios Sale.?In the case of
S. Birber against M. J. Bowden, for partition
by sale of certain real estate, two of the de
fendants have filed answers opposing a decree.
Thev state that the complainant has bought
the Interest of certain parties in the property
at a price below their value, and has endeav
ored to force the defendants to sell their inter
ests, and assert that the object of the bill is to
influence defendants to sell to him.
A Wait ran* Yiroihia.? A small colored boy
named Joseph Harris, was in the Police Court
to-day charged with being a vagrant. He said
he came here from Stafford county, V*., with a
woman who haa since returned to Virginia and
left him here. He said he had no home but
was willing <b work if he could get it. He was
turned over to Mr. Peter B. Sweeney, agent for
the Newsboys' and Children*' Aid society, who
will provide a home for him.
A Fioht with MooitsHisEBa.?Depntv United
States Marshal Russell Wireman and party of
revenue officers were fired on bv moonshiners
from ambnsh in Knott connty. *?., last week,
and Wireman was killed. The revenue officers
returned the fire and retreated, bat claim to
have killed at least one mountaineer.
Bold Bank Kobbebt at Deitteb.?President
Moffat, of the First National bank, of Den
ver. CoL, was held np last Friday in his bank
office and compelled to pay a robber
?21.000. The robber, who escaped with the
cash, threatened that if the monev was not paid
he would kill the preaident ana blow np the
building with nitroglycerine, m bottle of which
he had with him.
Charles B. Smith, republican candidate for
Congrees in the Parkersburg, W. Va., district,
haa served notice of contest on James M. Jack
son, who holds the governor's certificate. ?
THE PRESIDENT'S QUIET DAY.
Not a Great Crowd of Offlre-Seekera
at the White House.
This *m one of the President's quiet dayg,
and it tu also a busy one; none the leM busy
because the entire morning was not spent in
listening to the plaintive appeal of the office
seeker. On Mondays, according to the rnles,
the President sees no visitors, save and except
those who crowd into the east room at 1 o'clock
and walk on each others heels in their eager
ness to shake the hand of a gentleman who
wishes they wonld give his hand a rest.
Secretaries Windom, Blaine and Tracy were
the only members of the cabinet who had busi
ness of importance with the President, but
neither of them occupied much of his time;
they all know how it is to be crowded.
SENATORS SHERMAN AND RANSOM,
of the Senate committee, whose business it was
to find out the earliest possible date at which
the President could dispense with the Senate,
were in the presidential presence for quite a
while, and departed with the assurance that
they could cease sitting at almost any time
without seriously endangering any of the
foundations of the government.
IN BEHALF OF OOV. STONE.
Iowa had an engagement with the President,
so the delegation?which consisted of Senators
Allison and Wilson and Representatives Hen
derson, Conger, Sweeney, and Dolliver?was
admitted to the library as soon as it arrived,
and there it said nice sweet things to the man
who controls the offices and calls those whom
he deems best fitted for the places at his
disposal. The principal weight of the Iowans'
argument were in behalf of ex-Qov. Stone as
commissioner of the general land office.
SENATOR HISCOCK SECURED AN AUDIENCE
without the least apparent trouble, but he was
silent as the sphinx when he came out, and his
countenance had no more life in it than is pos
sessed by the face of a graven image.
Senator Stanford did not have long to wait
when he called. He was not after any office to
day; he simply wanted to introduce Mr. Scott,
the great ban Francisco ship-builder. They
had a pleasant but not lengthy chat with the
President, and came ont smiling.
About 11 o'clock the President wag called
down stairs into the red parlor, and there he
and Mrs. Harrison received the ladies and gen
tlemen of the Japanese embassy. Secretary
Blaine accompanied the diplomats, and they
spent fully fifteen minutes in very pleasant
converse.
PUBLIC HANDSHAKING.
It was after 1 o'clock when the President
went down to the three or four hundred mem
bers of the general public. No one outside of
the family seemed to know why he was late,
but the general belief is that Benjamin Harri
son McKee was responsible for it, for shortly
before the President started to go down stairs
a loud wail of distress went up from the throat
of the aforementioned B. H. McKee. Just
what hurt him can only be surmised, but it
is certain that the fond grandparent laid aside
the cares of office for awhile and busied him
self in soothing the woes and suppressing the
infantile cries. Then he shook hands with
State Senator Irwin, of St Lawrence county,
New York, and went below.
NO TIME TO WASTE.
If any man wants to prejudice his case he
can find no more satisfactory way of doing it
than to attempt to talk to the President at a
public reception. Tho chief executivo has
made up his mind that all he has to do at a
public reception is to shake as
many hands as possible at a regular
rate of speed, and any break in
the regular order meets with his chilly dis
pleasure. Sometimes the talkative visitor is
uot after an office, but that makes no differ
ence; the speed bus to be kept up. There was
a little delegation at the tail-end of tho
crowd In the cast room this afternoon, and
they would havo liked to stop and chat
for a few minutes, but the President would not
have it, and he slid them by in a manner that
sent chills chasing each other up and down the
spinal columns of two or three of them. It
was not even diplomatically done. It was
very abrupt and said plainly, "I have no time
to waste." ?
MAY ADJOURN TO-MORROW.
The Senate Will Have Nothing to Do
After that D?y.
An adjournment of the Senato is expected to
morrow. The republicans held a caucus this
morning and discussed the important question
of how to provide for tho Senate committee
clerks during the recess. It was agreed that
they could not make these clerks "annuals,"
with pay all the year around, as long as the
House wag not in session to give them an
appropriation. Only such committees as could
be continued could retain their clerks. This
was as near a settlement of the question as they
could get.
When the Senato met Mr. Sherman, for tho
committee appointed to wait on the President,
announced tnat the President would have no
communications to make after to-day. This
was accepted as settling the matter of an ad
journment to-morrow, since there could be
nothing to keep them longer.
The first batch of. nominations was disap
pointing in its brevity, though it disposed of
some important places. It was expected, how
ever. that another lot would be sent in before
to-dav's session closed. The public printer, the
District Commissioners, the civil service com
mission were among those expected that did
not come in the first batch.
THE DISTRICT NOMINATIONS.
It was understood at the White House this
morning that the President was greatly per
plexed over the District Commissionerships,
and was in doubt about being able to decide
upon the names to-day. He did not know at
that hour but that the appointments would
have to go over until after tne adjournment.
The New York Centennial.
PARTICIPATION OF THE NAVT DEPARTMENT IN
THE CEREMONIES.
Major Asa Bird Gardiner, U. S. A., (retired),
who is chairman of the naval committee on
the New York centennial board, waited npon
Secretary Tracy to-day with some of the mem
bers of the committee to talk over the program
of the naval demonstration at the celebration.
As a result of the conference it is probable
that the navy will be represented on equal
terms with the army at the centennial. The
Eresent idea is to invite Admiral Porter, the
ighest officer in rank in the navy, to take
change of the naval forces, or if he should not
be able to undertake the duties of tho place
then Hear Admiral Jouett, or some other high
officer, may be requested to assume charge.
With this change in the program the active co
operation of the Navy department will be as
sured, and every naval vessel within easy reach
will probably be ordered to New York to assist
in carrying out the program.
Marriage Licenses.?Marriage licenses have
been issued by the clerk of tho court to Wm.
Mason and Cordelia Sinims; Thos. O'Neill, of
West Chester, Pa., and Elizabeth Harris, of
England; B. F. Deskins and Mary A. Banister.
A Dynamite Bomb.
rr WRECKS A NON-UNION BOARDINO-HOUSF, BUT
< NO ONE IS INJURED.
Near Holbrook, Mass., at 11:30 last Friday
evening a terrible explosion occurred in a house
in which ten non-union Swedes, employed
at the shoe factory of Edmund White since
the late strike, board with Mr. and Mrs.
E. A. Johnson, who occupied the room di
rectly over the basement dining-room, where
the explosion took place. They were first awak
ened by a sound ofbreaking glass, but they did
not rise. Iu about two minutes a terrific
explosion took place, which completely demol
ished the ceiling and window-glass and blew
the furniture to pieces. No one was injured,
which was wonderful. Everything goes to
prove that a dynamite bomb was thrown
through the cellar window, exploding almost
immediately.
Dn, Helm bole's Sanitt Questioned.?Dr.
Henry T. Helmbold, the well-known patent
medicine man, was yesterday sent to Bellevue
hospital. New York, from the Yorkville police
court to be examined as to his sanity. His wife
and son made the complaint, testifying that he
was so violent that they were afraid of him.
Dr. Field said that Helmbold had probably
been drinking too freely. He was finally left
to the care of his family, who promised to be
responsible for his acts. ?
Promised Legislation worn Ireland.?The
Salisbury cabinet has decided to propose at the
next session of parliament a html-purchase
scheme for Ireland. The measure will be sim
ilar to the plan proposed by Mr. Chamberlain.
The ministry has also resolved to introduce, in
1891, an Irish local government bilL The
measure provides for extensive change* In the
management of internal affairs in Ireland.
? ???
Snow in Nrw You Stat*.?At Lockport,
N. Y., there is a foot of snow on the ground,
the result of an all day's storm yesterday. It
continued snowing last night. It is heavy'and
damp and delays railroad travel
GOV. BOUrWELL'S ARGUMENT.
Presenting Major Lydecker's Side of the
Case to the Court-Martial.
A synopsis of the argument of Mr. Swift,
counsel for Major Lydecker, in defense of
that officer before the court-martial sitting at
the War department, is published in another
column.
At 1 o'clock (after recess) the court recon
vened and Got. Bout we 11 began his address.
The sufficiency of Mr. Swiff* argument, he
said, was such that there was but little need of
more from him. He spoke of the public
sentiment adverse to tho administration of
Major Lydecker, and said that he did not appre
hend the influence of the court by adverse news
paper criticism. He confidently expected that
upon the conclusion of the trial the public will
be reconciled to the truth that under the circum
stances the administration of this work was as
good as could possibly be carried on. He cited
Uen. Duane s testimony about Major Lydecker's
? the o^awon of the discovery of the
tact that the contractors on the New York tun
nel were the sauie as those here.
AS TO MAJOR LYDECKER'S RESPONSIBILITY.
This plan of the dam, tunnel, and reservoir
has received the sanction of engineers, both
military and civil. Major Lydecker was re
sponsible for a reasonable system of supervi
sion, but he was not bound io a personal su
perintendence. There is no controversy as to
the selection of the inspecting agents. Lieut,
iownsend had been placed on duly to relieve
.lajor Lydecker from the performance of those
duties for a failure to perform which the ac
cused is now being tried.
tub inspectors.
The governor dotailed the system of the se
lection of the inspectors and the reports to
Major Lydecker. Can any man say to-day, he
asked, that that was not a perfect, an honest
sj stem, which, if honestly carried out, would
have brought to Major Lydecker day by dav
true reports of progress? Therefore, does i"t
not appear that until suspicion' arose it was as
perfect a system as could bo Revised, and, con
sidering the imperfections of humanity, the
most perfect possible?
THE CHARGES REVIEWED.
The charges, which Gov. Boutwell said he
would not go over in detail, consisted of three
sorts; first, the injudicious payment of money,
the insufficient personal supervision of the tun
nel, and the lack of supervision of the inspec
tors As to the payment, the Governor thought
tliat it was entirely swept out of sight bv
the testimony of General Duane. He re
ferred to the evidence of Lieutenant
J. ownsend that Mai. Lydecker and he had gone
through ilio tunnel for two days to examine the
work before the payment was made. If Mai
Lydecker should be convicted of this specifics
tion the thirteen officers who composed the
I*rt be in constant peril whenever they
undertook to execute any order from a supe
rior officer. In view of the fact that tho con
tractors have made the offer to repair the work
aud that there is *100.000 retained the whole
idea of loss to the government is annihilated.
GOING INTO THE I>IBTY TUNNEL A DEGRADATION.
The governor thought that it is a degradation
of public office and duty to consider that Major
Lydecker should go into tho tunnel to see
whether the men under his direction were
doing their duty As well might an admiral of
a fleet doscend from the quarter-deck of his
flagship to the engine room to see that the
stokers were properly firing the furnaces.
me public does not appreciate the situation,
he said. Here is a tunnel underneath the
ground; dark, smoky, with men working in
narrow recesses with their backs to the inspec
tors, and vet it is to be expected that Major
Lydecker should know that that man was dome
his duty. The world is ruled by confidence,
and there must of necessity be a confidence
between an officer and his subordinates
Ihe governor thought that the order of '82
placing the mayor in c harge of the work dis
posed of the whole case; it was utterly devoid
oi instructions and orders relating to personal
inspection and supervision. A descreticn was
left to him as to when he should go into the
S!2ne7- ,1L(? governor did not think that the
UJd article of war touches the case at all.
WASHINGTON NEWS AND GOSSIP.
Presidential Reception. ? The President
will hold a special reception to-morrow evening
in honor of the Prince and Princese Takehito,
of Japan. Tho diplomatic corps has been in
vited as well as the officers of the army and
navy. Officers of the navy and marine corps
are expected to be in full dress. The recep
tion will last from 9 to 11 o'clock.
Inducted Into Office.?The "new assistant
secretaries of the Treasury, Messrs. Batcheller
and Tichenor, took the oath of office to-day
andbegan at once to discharge their new
duties. The retiring assistant secretaries
Messrs. Thompson and Mavnard, intioduced
their successors to the employes.
The Bond Offerings To-day were as follows
Registered 4Ws $1,000 at 108, 815,800 at 108W
1650,000 at 108^. ' 1U8*'
The Gridiron Club Dinneu.?Tho March
dinner of the Gridiron club was held Saturday
night at Welcker's. The table talk was brilli
ant and the songs and other music capital.
Vice-President Mussev presided and was very
felicitous in his introductions of the speakers
The guests were Secretary Windom, Private
Secretary E. W .Halford, Senator Gorman,
Representative Butterworth, Congressman!
Coleman, of Louisiana; Mr. Walter P
Phillips, manager of tho United Press; M. H*
De ioungr, of the San Francisco Chronicle; J. A
Osborne, of the Los Angeles Erpre?s? Mr A T*
Halford. Mr. Rudolph Kauffm^ and Si r E B
Hay. Vice-President Mussey during the even
ing spoke feelingly of tho late W. F. O'Brien
as did aiso Mr. P. N. DeGraw. '
Naval Promotions.?The sad death of Capt.
Schoonmaker by drowning at Apia will occasion
the following promotions in the line of the
navy; Commander B. G. Cromwell, Lieut. Com
Geo. R. Durand, Lieut. Uriel Sebree, Lieut
(junior grade) Moses L. Wood, and Ensign Jas
H- Glennen.
A Notary Appointed.?The President to-day
appointed Warren C. Tilton to be notary publio
for the District of Columbia.
Mr. Carlisle's Decision.
HE TELLS THE LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR OP TEXAS
WHAT TO DO.
Lieutenant-Governor Wheeler, as president
of the Texas state senate, has submitted to ex
Speaker Carlisle a question on which he de
sires the Kentucky parliamentarian to rule, and
to-day telegraphed him as follows: "The Sen
ate passed a bill classifying railroad freight
into ten classes. In one class the maximum
rate was fixed on cotton. The House defeated
Ir J * The House has passed and sent to
the Senate a bill fixing the maximum rate only
on cotton. ''After a bill has been considered
and defeated by either house of the legislature
no bill containing the same substance shall be
passed into a law during the same session."
(State Constitution). The point of order has
been raised that the Senate cannot pass into a
law the cotton bill of the House. How would
you hold?
The Speaker replied that under the state eon
stitution the house bill could not become a law.
District Cases In the Supreme Court.
DISMISSED FOB WANT O? JURISDICTION.
The Supreme Court of the United States to
day dismissed three District cases for want of
Jurisdiction, the amount involved beins leu
than 95.000.
The first was that of the Baltimore and Poto
mac railroad vs. Hopkins. The latter got judge
ment in the lower courts for 91.828 for damages
10 ?r.nPurty on Maryl?nd avenue, between 9th
and 10th streets.
The other two cases were those of the Dis
trict vs. Lawrence E. Gannon, and the District
?a. C. H. Emmerson, each case being for
personal injury sustained br accidents
caused by defective pavements. In the lower
courts each was awarded $5,000 damages. The
dismissal by the Supreme Court sustains the
decision of the lower courts in all these cases.
The Columbia Brick Company Sale.
The property of the Columbia brick com
pany, located at Waterloo, Alexandria county,
Va., including the yard, machinery, horses'
carts, building, and about 95 acres of land wis
public auction. The purchaser
**? c- Morrison, the well-known builder of
this city, whose bid was 993,000.
Bishop's Latest Matrimonial Phase.?A
Minneapolis special to the New Xork World
IfTing tt^on i* arranging to
f prew,!t w,fe' He has come to this
HeuTo Ri^n th*t hU *?*
co^Wersd h&Ju ? *? ?? hTSS?1.^
, _ ? ?? rn mm mm m w AAA cm 11, MXff UlWll mawa
I* PLACE OF THE WRECKS.
' Th? Richmond, Alert, and Adams Or
dered to Go to Samoa.
NONE OF THE* CAN OET THERE rN LEW! THAN A
MONT*?STMPATHT FROM 1X0LISH NATAL OFFI
CERS?MRS. C ALLAN'* CONDITION CRITICAL?
tii icititom to coin to sax ruxcnco.
The Navy department it making every effort
to socore an adequate representation at Samoa.
Orders were sent out to-day to have the Rich
mond, Alert, and Adams sent to Apia at the
earliest practicable moment. The Alert is at
Honolulu, all ready to sail when she coals and
provisions, and can reach Samoa in a month or
forty days.
The Richmond is not in mch a favorable
place, being at present in the River Rio del la
Plata, on the east coast of South America, and
must go around Cape Horn.
The Adams is under repair at the Mare Isl
and navy-yard. Ten days or two weeks will
serve to complete the repairs, and after a few
days additional consumed in taking in stores
and coal she may sail on her vovage, whice will
take about a month.
The Ynntic, now at Brooklyn, will be ready
to sail on the 10th inst. probablv to relieve the
Richmond.
SOT EQUAL TO THE WRECKED VESSELS.
While the vessels ordered to Samoa to-day
are fair vessels of their kind, yet they are by
no means equal to the" three" vessels
which were wrecked, and are of antique
type compared with the vessels of the
German East African fleet which have
been ordered to Apia. The old Richmond
is by far the largest of the vessels that will go
down. She was Duilt in Norfolk in 185H, and is
of 2,700 tons burden, 225 feet long, 4'2 '? a feet
broad, and 17.4 draft. Her speed is set down
at 9>? knots when in trim, but she is doubtless
foul, and consequently much reduced in speed,
by her stay in South" Atlantic waters. She is
commanded by Capt. Q. V. Reed, with
Lieut. Commander Louis Lingsley. Lieute. W
H. Everett, S. H. C. Caffin, F. H. Crosby, J. M.
Robinson, and J. O. Nicholson. Her compli
ment is 29 officers and 321 men. The battery
is headed by 12 9-inch smooth bores, 1 8-inch
muzzle-loading rifle, 1 60-pound breech-load
ing rifle, 2 20-pound breech loaders, and some
smaller secondary guns.
The Alert is a 1.000 ton vessel, built by John
Roach in 1875. She carries 21 officers and 127
men. She is rated at 10 knots, is 175 long by
32 feet beam, draws 12JX feet of water, and car
ries a battery made up of 1-xi in. and 2-ix in.
smooth bores, 160 pound ritile, and 4 small
guns in the secondary battery. Her officers
are Commander Jas. D. Grallam and Lieuts.
Jno. Garoin. F. E. Greene. C. T. Moore, J. P.
Parker. C. D. Bastick and Wo. G. Hannum.
The Adams is rated at 1.375 tons. She was
built in 1876 at Boston by Donald McKay. Her
length is |185 feet, by 35 feet beam and 14.3 j
draft. Sne is set down as a 9.8 knot ship, with
with a battery of 4.9 in. smooth bores, 1.8 in.
muzzle-loadiiig rifle, 160 pounder muzzle
loading rifle, and 5 guns in the
second battery. Her detail of officers
is not yet made up. but she was lost under com
mand of Capt. Mullan. who has already achieved
fame by his firm stand in exciting times at Sa
moa. She carries twenty officers and one hun
dred men.
SYMPATHY FROM ENGLISH NAVAL OFFICERS.
A graceful tribute from the English naval
officers was contained in the following cable
gram received by Secretary Tracy when he re
turned to Washington this morning:
"Gibraltar. March 31.
"To the Secretary of 0w Savy. Washington:
"The officers of the English channel fleet
sympathize with the American navy on the
terrible loss of life from wrecks at Samoa."
To this message the following reply was
| made:
"Washington, April L
"A'lmiral Commanding Her Majesty's Channel
Fleet, Gibraltar:
"Accept for yourself and the officers of your
command my grateful acknowledgment on be
half of the U. S. navy for your message of
sympathy and good will, occasioned by the re
cent disaster at Samoa. Tracy,
"Secretary of the Navy."
THE 8URVIVORS TO COME HOME THROT*On SAN
FRANCISCO.
The Secretary of the Navy has cabled to
Auckland that the men of the wreckcd vessels
sent home are to come to San Francisco.
never in command of the ashuelot.
An erroneous statement has found its way
into some papers that Commander D. W. Mul
I lan, of the Nipsic, was in command of the
I Ashuelot when that ill-fated vessel was lost.
| This officer was never on the Ashuelot, nor has
he been off duty for any length of time since
1861. His last command before being ordered
to the Nipsic was that of the iron-clad fleet in
the James river, Virginia.
SCARCITY OF FUEL THE CAUSE OF THE DISASTER.
Naval officers unite in saying that the Apia
disaster would not have been as great if there
had been a plentiful supply of coal at Pago
Pago. There appears to have been ample time
in which to prepare to meet the storm, but the
scarcity of fuel made a speedy movement sea
ward an impossibility. One of the results of
the catastrophe will oe the erection of suitable
buildings at Pago-Pago where a superabund
ance of coal may be stored and the naval
authorities will see that the supply is kept up.
AN UNHAPPY MOTHER.
The condition of Mrs. James N. Callan, the
mother of George W. Callan, the sailor of the
Nipsic who was lost in the Apia disaster, still
remains critical, and serious results are feared.
Yesterday morning her condition slightly im
proved, and she sank away into a quiet sleep
which lasted until about 5:30 o'clock, when she
awoke and came down stairs. She asked for
the Sunday papers, but it was thought best she
should not see them and she had a tit of crying,
which ended in a delirium. All last night she
remained in a comatose state, perfectly obliv
ious to everything. Last night Mrs" Capt.
McCoy, Mrs. Callan's sister, was with her, but
nothing could be done to allay the mother's
agony. All last night she lay as still as death,
save for an occasional moan or a stifled sob.
Mrs. Capt. McCoy told a Star reporter this
morning that while her condition was about the
same, they thought she would recover. Geo. Cal
an, the lost son. served his apprenticeship as a
seaman aboard the Saratoga. His father, Jas,
N. Callan, was a well-known lawyer in this city,
j and died about a year age.
PENSIONS TO RELATIVES OF THE LOST.
The pensions which will be paid to dependent
relatives of those American seamen who were
drowned at Samoa in the great hurricane are
not very munificent. The monthly pension for
the widow of a captain is t:>0. and that for a
paymaster's relict is *28, while the widow of
the paymasters' clerk gets only $12. If Jaeut
Sutton had any surviving dependednt relatives
they would get a monthly stipend of $17. The
widows of seamen will be paid $12. Wherever
there are children left fatherless the sum of $2
per mouth additional will be allowed for each
child. Congress will probably pass a special
act appropriating a sufficient" sum to pay for
the baggage which was lost, and this compen
sation with the residue of the pay owing to
each of the lost ones will be paid to the nearest
surviving relative.
The Spring Races.
THE WEIGHTS FOR THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS OF THE
NATIONAL JOCKEY CLCR.
The following are the weights for the Con
gressional and National Handicap and the Sen
ate Steeplechase, to be run at the coming spring
meeting of the National Jockey club, commenc
ing the 24th instant:
THE CONGRESSIONAL HANDICAP,
for three-year-olds and upward; $25 each, or
?10 if declared, with $800 added, of which #200
to second. Weights to be announced April 1,
and declarations to be made by April 15. One
mile. Sam Harper, jr., 124; Telie Doe, 118; De
faulter, 118; Swift. 116;Bucch. 116; Young Duke,
114; Panama, 112; Bess. 112; Bronzomarte, 112;
Bob Fisher, 110; Biggonet, 110; Boaz, 110;
Patrocles; 108; King Idle, 107; Borde
laise, 106; Belle d'Or, 105; Longdate, 105:
Buddhist, 105; Blessed, 104; Sjuvini. 103;
Troy, 102; Grev Dawn, 102; Firefly. 102; St.
Swithin. 100; Maidenhair, 100; The 'Don, 100;
Servia, 95; Little Jake. 95; Sparling. 95; Du
plicity, 95; Iago, 95; Cortex, 93; Louise, 92.
THE NATIONAL HANDICAP.
for three-year-olds and upward; $50 each, h.
ft, or $10 if declared; with $1,000 added, of
which $200 to second and $100 to third. Weights
to be announced Aprils, and declarations to be
made by April 16. Winner of congressional
handicap to carry 5 lbs. extra. One mile and an
eighth. Judge Murray,120:Favor.ll8-.Teli? Doe.
115; Defaulter. 115; Swift, 114; Burch, 114;
Oriflamme. 112; Bronzomarte, 110; Boas, 107;
Bob Fisher, 107; Frank Ward. 107; King Ide,
105; Tosburg. 104; Bordelaise. 104; Barrister,
104; Buddhist, 103; Troy. 100; Salvini, 100;
Gre^Davra, 100; St. Swithin, 98; The Don, 98;
THK SENATE STEEPLECHASE,
a handicap sweepstakes of $25 each, or only 910
If declared; with $600 added, of which $150 to
second. Weights to be announced April 1 and
declarations to be made by April 15. Should
less than five horses owned in different inter
ests start the added money may be reduced at
the option of the committee. The steeplechase
course. Jim MoGowan, 100; Bob Miles, 15$;
Hercules, 15$; Klphin, 148, Will Davis, 142;
Jake Shipeey, 140: Mentmore, 140; Brynwood,
11$, KiUaraey, 136; Epicure, 1CL
CHIEF GRAVIES RESIGN.
The Oflloe Will Bf Vacant M?y 1 and
Upt. Mfrrdlth May He Appointed.
Mr. Edward 0. Graves. chief of the bureau
of engraving and printing, ha* resigned to take
effect May 1, and haa gone west on a l?ave of
al>aence. It is understood that Capt. Meredith,
of Chicago. who was a candidate for
the office of pnblic printer, haa withdrawn hi*
papers filed in that connection, and that he haa
been promised the appointment to the place
made vacant by Mr. Graves' resignation.
TO-DAY'S NOMINATIONS.
Sketches of Some of the Appointee?.
Mr. Huston. of Indiana, who haa be?n nomi
nated United State* treasurer, to succeed Mr.
Hyatt, is a banker and business man of stand
| ing, as well as a good political manager.
At present he is chairman of the
Indiana state central committee, and in
that position did good service during the late
, campaign. He i* about forty-live years old
and is possessed of a considerable fortune.
part of which he inherited. His first ap
pearance in political life was in l!*^4. when he
was elected to tke state senate for four years.
I In 1HS6 he was chosen a member of the state
| central committtee and in connection with
General Harrison managed the campaign for
' the state legislature. This work was so well
I done that they reduced the democratic ma
| jority in the legislature from something about
tiO to but 2. His political work as well as his
business has been very successful.
Ellis H. Roberts. ju*t appointed assistant
treasurer at Sew York, is the editor of the
Utica Herald. He is about sixty-five years of
age. He is a strong Blaine man, and was work
ing hard for him at Chicago last June. After
Mr. Harrison's election he wa* prominently
spoken of for Postmaster General. He 1* the
author of several protection works.
Mr. Wharton, who is nominated for assistant
secretary of state in place of Schuyler, w ho de
clined, is a cousin of the late Francis Wharton,
and his appointment is looked upon as a recog
nition of the young republicans of Massachu
setts. He is about forty year* old, and
occupies a distinguished position before the
Massachusetts bar. He has served four term*
in the state house of representative*, and is the
author of the "Stories of the Law of Contract*."
I His appointment is accredited to Mr. Lodge,
but his appointment meets with general ap
proval among the Massachusetts folks.
L. Bradford Prince, who i* nominated as
governor of New Mexico, was chief Justice of
that territory and resigned that position on ac
count of some misunderstanding during Mr.
Arthur'* term. There was considerable of a
contest over this appointment and Mr. Prince
came in as a compromise candidate.
ANACOSTIA.
A New Militabt Company.?'The young men
here are organizing a military company to be
connected with the District national guard.
The movement is led by Lieut. Jas. A. Watson,
Second Lieut. J. E. Minnix, and First Sergeant
T. M. Cawood. of the late Anacostia Hides,
known in militia circles a6 Co. C. D. S. G.
Twenty-four young men have signified their In
tention of joining the new company, and a
meeting to consummate a permanent organiza
tion and elect officers will be held Wednesday
evening.
Confined to His Boom.?Mr. H. A. Grig
wold, who was throwu from his horse last
Thursday, the animal rearing and falling upon
him as he and Mrs. Griswold were starting out
for a ride, is still confined to his home as a re
sult of the injury. A slight rheumatic affec
tion adds to his trouble.
Street Improvement.?The appropriation
for the improvement of Harrison street is be
ing expended in the extension of that highway
to the east, a number of laborers being now
engaged removing the elevation and filling
the low places in front of Fred Douglass' house.
Notes ?A lodge of Knights of Pvthia* is in
process of organization in Anacostia. Two
mules attached to the feed wagon of Thomas
Gray A Son ran away last Thursday in Hills
dale and badly damaged the buggy of Dr. Stu
art Harrison. Dr. J. C. Simpson, of the phy
sicians' staff at the insane asylum, has been
called home bv the severe illness of his father.
Mr. Henry Hardy and Mr. Thos. M. Tyson
have just'moved their families into Mr. Arnold'*
new double cottage on Pleasant street.
Our Maryland Neighbor*.
IMPORTANT legal DECISION?ARBOR DAT?beal
ESTATE MATTERS, ETC.
Bladensbubo, March 31.
Correspondence of The Evening Stab.
A general tax is collected throughout Prince
George'* county for public road purposes, which
is distributed, at the discretion of the county
commissioners, to the several district*. Laurel
appealed to the legislature at its last session
for an act directing the county commissioners
to pay to its town commissioners whatever
amount might be paid into the road fund from
that town, the same, aggregating about $3,000.
to be applied to the improvement of the street*
and roads within the corporate limit*, and it
was so enacted. The county commissioner* de
clined to pay over the funds a* directed, and
the Laurel town commissioners brought suit
against the county in the circuit court. The
court decided that Laurel was entitled to the
money, whereupon the case was carried to the
court' of appeals. That court now reverse*
the decision of the lower court, and declares
the act of the legislature unconstitutional, and
Laurel consequently fails to establish it* claim.
Acts of about the same tenor are in force in
Bladensburg and Marlboro', and it is not im
probable now that the county authorities,
strengthened in their position by the above de
cision. will close their purse strings against
these towns.
The governor of Maryland, pursnant to a
recent act of the legislature, has appointed the
10th of April to be observed as Arbor day
throughout the state, and the state board of
education has directed Superintendent Stone,
of Prince George's to omit the usual school ex
ercises and to see that the county public
schools spend the day in tre<>-planting. Ac.
Mr. A. Gottschalk. of Baltimore, has pur
chased several valuable lots on Montgomery
street. Laurel, on which he will build, at once,
four dwellings, at a cost of f'2.000 each.
The county commissioner* have fixed the
rate of the county tax for the ensuing year at
95 cents on the $100. an increase of 5 cent*
over the rate of last year.
The contract for the Prince George'* county
printing has been awarded to F. Sasscer, of
the Prince George'* Enquirer, for the ensuing
year.
"Fairview," the Laurel residence of Senator
Gorman, is to be improved bv the addition of
another story, a spacious pavillion. Ac.
Mr. Geo. Holmes, of Washington, is building
a handsome store and hall at Landover station,
Baltimore and Potomac railroad. Several resi
dences are also in proces* of erection at the
same point.
Among the criminal cases to be tried by the
Prince George's circuit court, which convene*
to-morrow, are the following: Levi Simmc. for
homicide of Lewis Beckett: John Lewis, assault
with intent to kill: Randolph Carer, arson;
Chas. Galloway, Henry Field and Albert
Htreeter, larceny; L. Morrison and Ed. Vaughn,
assault and battery; Geo. Young, burglary and
larceny. Altogether, there are thirteen crimi
nals in the county jail, with perhap* a half a
dozen on bail.
The circuit court of Baltimore city yesterday,
after hearing the evidence in the habeascorpu*
case against the sheriff of Prince George'*
countv, in the matter of the arrest and deten
tion of John Blunden, for complicity in the
burglary of Mr. Calvert'* house at College
Station," ordered the discharge of the prisoner.
Charles 8. Brown has been appointed con
stable for Bowie district. F.
School Riots In Ohio.
TBOCBI.E OVER TBI OOLOB QUESTION CLOSES ALL
THE NEW RICHMOND SCHOOLS.
New Richmond, Ohio, with 3,000 population,
is in the flood-tide of an excitement which many
fear will end in a storm, resulting from the
state law abolishing separate schools for blacks.
The court dockets of that and Adams counties
are crowded with suit* for damage and crimi
nal prosecution* growing out of school rows.
At Felicity recently one man waashot,a number
injured and one house demolished in An effort
to eject forcibly colored children from the
schoolhouse, which wa* almost wrecked. There
are 200 black snd 700 white school children in
New Richmond. All the blacks consented to
remain in separate rooms except the children
of James llingold. They were made miserable
in every way. Ringold carried the matter into
the court*, cuing the superintendent of the
school* and thirteen prominent citizens for
f&.OOO damages. Last Thursday the circuit
court gave him 1 cent damages and costs. All
the blacks then rushed for the schools aad a
rough and tumble ensued, which ended Satur
day in the school board closing the schools
until September, though three months of the
present term remain. Many whites and not a
few blacas are indignant that their children
shall be deprived of three months' schooling,
and the feeling runs high. Yesterday was an
exciting Sunday. All other topics vers for
gotten. Ministers counseled forbearance, sad
wiser heads attempted to calm the laspetaooa.
Both sides profess to fear violence from the
other. All the teachers will sae for their
salaries for the remainder of the tsrs^ aad
costly litigation. If nothing else, Is sore to
follow. There is prospect that
will be ssked for to-day to
based to raopaa the r " '~
THK (XH RTS.
F.?jrTTT Oorax?Kift Cm.
To-d?v. V KfMfj agt V. kcniiev aale rsw
fled an A reference to suditor. Dnlany agt.
DuUnr; sale decreed.
Pour* C"ou?T?JyrUff JtftQ*r.
To-dav, Joun Taylor, profanity; fS or IB
d*y*. Grant Thomas and Benedict ? ampbell,
colored, disorderly conduct and assault. com
tinned. Thomas 'E. Mct'suley, diaorderlv cos
duct; personal bond*. John Snow, prof unit*;
??5 or IS day*. Chaa. Kanford. liM itsrly con
duct; collate ral forfeited. Henry t arter, do.;
peraonsl bonds. Loam GatU. violating polio*
regulations; J2 or 3 daya. Maria Johnaon.
colored. vagrancy; personal bond*. Joaeph
Harrta. colored, do.; suspended. Herbert Aa
drew*, do.; bond* or 60 day*. Jame* Brown,
colored, carrying a pistol! f50 or HO daya.
Annie Foley and Rebecca Tait. vagrancv; bond*
or BO day* each. Patrick Casey, io.; do.
Kichard Kollins. disorderly conduct; *5 or It
day*. Thornton llurrill. John Bumll and Joha
Frarier. colored, disorderlv conduct in connty;
?5 or 15 day*. Frederick kicliardson. do.; col
lateral forfeited. Charles Allen, disordely
conduct; (k"> or 15 days. Janie* H. Johnson,
do.; do. Albert Beamer. colored, do.; do.
George Swansl.ury. vagrancy, l>onds or 30
day*. James Hsyncs, disorderly conduct. 15
or 15 days. Edward Tolson, do.; do. Kato
Doyle, do.; do. Jackson i'odrick, violating
police regulation*; t2 or 7 day*.
Snle of* Valuable Residence.
Senator Janie* McMillan, of Michigan, has
purchased, through Fitch, Fox A Brows, in
connection with CoL James A. Bates, the hand
some rcsidcnce of the late Wm. M. Gait, So.
1114 Vermont avenue. The house is one of the
finest and most complete in the District, and
the property ha* a total frontage on Vermont
avenue of about H feet. It is understood that
the price paid is in the neighborhood of
?lOO.OUO. _
Sai> Case of Srrt>r.s Death.?The friend*
of Mr. and Mrs. Madison Davis will sympathize
with them iti the death of their son. which oc
curred very unexpectedly yesterday. He was
a promising boy of nineteen years of age, and
had been confined to the house by a long sick
ness. Yesterday it was decided that he waa
strong enough to come down stairs, and the
event was to be made the occasion of a family
celebration. Mrs. Davis had been in the inva
lid's room and went down stairs for a few mo
menta. When ahe returned she was over
whelmed by discovering that her son waa dead.
The Lmwio Coxcert of Irish music at the
Grand opera house last evening was a success,
the house being well-filled with a very enthusi
astic audience. The program comprised most
of Ireland's inspiriting patriotic and revolu
tionary sougs. Mr. I.udwig'a company is a
good one. The concert will I* repeated on
next Sunday evening, when a choice program
of sacred songs. Irish ballads, and American
national music will be given. There will be a
chorus of 200 voi.-es. composed of the Catholio
choirs of Washington. an<l a band.
IXK'AL NOTES.
Mr. Thomas Wilson, of the United State* Na
tional museum, is delivering a course of lecture*
on "Prehistoric Anthropology" at the medical
and dental <L partiueiit* of the National univer
sity of this city.
From Chapman A Taylor.and also from John C.
Parker we have the Centurv magazine for April.
William Houre and Herman Ilochstein,
bakers from Richmond, Va., were disorderly in
South Washington yesterday and wen arrested
by Sergeknt lJarry and Officer Howell after
some trouble. Houre was lined $10 bv Judge
Miller to-day, and liochstein forfeited his col
lateral.
Frank Scott, the little boy who disappeared
from his home in Fast Wxr-hington. was lirought
home from liichuioud Saturday night by hi*
father.
Toucax CrHE a *okH Takoat with the help ot
I>r. Jayne's l.xpectorant, a gi??l remedy foe
Coughs and all ihroat and Lung disea
MAUKII.D.
rillCE?KINGSLEV. At Nt Vincent'* ???
Baltimore, on December VS. 1S*S, 1- Al.l'Hl. t
Pltlt ? sua BLANCHE A. MSUsLKY. both u( Mas
intfton, D.C. *
Din.
, BAXTER. On Sunday. Matvh 31, 1*89. at 7o'clock
p U1 , H A mi. beluved wile u( Sain'l Baxter, sired
thirty-niue >ear?.
liinessl private. Interment at Winchester, Va, on
We.lnt-sday, April 3. ?
BBOOks. At 1:15 o'clock p. m., Sunday, March 31
lHM', I.I.I. A 1,A\ IMl, ti.? >,U1 . lull > 1 Sam usl
and I.lieu Bris ks, a*-e.l 111u?- > "ar? and tour months
Funeral will take place ir.m I ureal C. M. L church
Tuesiluy. April st ?? o'clock p ui. Friends arc re
specllully invited to attend. *
cumberland. tm Sundsy, March 31,1889, st ?
o'cloc k a in., alter s loh*. and pan.fill illness, AL1 C'E
A , beliv.-d wlie of John c umburland, in the thirtieth
year ot her sirs.
Thrush all rains at times she'd smile,
A suule ot H-aveuly Urth.
And when tlie auip-ls i-ali.il her borne.
She sunltil farewell to earib.
Heaven retaiiK-tb uow oui treasure.
Earth tlie lonely casket ke. |?,
And the sunbeams love to linmr
M be re Ui) dear Inend "Alloa sleeps "
" 1 rsm.s
Funeral will take place (mm her late resilience, No,
81d lwiut)-tbird street, on lueada), April U, at 3
o'clock p. ni., tbence to bt. Stepbeli's cburch. llt'ls
Uvea and Irienda luvtted to attend. *
DAVI8. suddenly, at 11 30 a.in , March 31, 1HH9,
PAUKI B.. sou lit tladlsouand Mrriiua Kufl L*a\ia,
airedeiKbteen years.
1 be tuneral will take place from the residence of his
pan-iits, 310 A street southeast, Tuesday, April 14,
lhNH. at 3 p.m. Btrictly private. *
DIhTfclUCH. In New lork city, on March 31st.
1S?U, at 7 M a.in., PU1LXI C. DlElUtlCll. In bia
tbirt) -seventh year. ?
GAKkETT. Suddenly, on March 31. 1S89, ELLtS
P. uAKUi. 1 T, in the tweuty-ei*btb year ot bar ^a,
We miss tbee from our bouje, sister,
?f ?"*? Htae !rum tb> place,
A sbwios froui our life is east,
\Ae miss tbe sunshine ot lb) face.
VCe miss thy kind and wiiiinv hand,
Th> l>>ud and earnest <wrv,
Our home is dark without thee,
!A e miss tbee everywhere.
Bt be* Stavm
B .1. P.
Funeral Wednesday at 10 a. m? 1V!37 32d street.
West Haabimrtou. 1 unersl private. ?
Ol'TTtXWJN On Monday nioruimr. April 1.18KB,
t 2.1KI a.m? MABoAKKl, beloved wite of John U.
uutteiwin.
> uneral will take place from her late resideni-e. 2130
Peuh?ylvaiiia avensa, Wednesday, Apni It. at ;ti ].? k
p.m. UelaUvesand triendsare res)sx;Uuil) invited to
attend. X*
MAJOR. In New York. March 31.1SH8, JOHN i.
MA JOB.
itequiem mass at Trinity church, Georgetown, at
10:3t# a.m.. April 2.
McPHEBSoN. Monday morning. April 1. lSbH. at
7:30 am.. Mr* tUZABLT U A. Mci'HLBttO>, atred
flit) -two years.
Funeral from her lsts residence, on No. 11S Four
and a Hal! street northwtwl, Wednesday. April 3.
Be^uiem mass st St. Patrick s church at W.30 a.m. X*
0 MILL, on Monday, Apnl 1,1SHM, at :i o'clock
a. m., NLLLII, infant dau?(litero( Bobert and IMw
rah o'Neili, aired six mouths and three weeks.
Funeral from her parc-nu' residence. 4?V T street
southwest, iueetlay, April 2, at 3 o'clock p. m. *
Put. On March oO, IsSW, at lMtrolt, Mich., in the
thirteenth year ol his usk. okLANlMJ w _ son at Gad.
O. M. and Eleanor Carroll Pue. *
BAINS, On Saturday nurht. March 30, 1889. at 10
p.m., suddenly.ot heart failure. MILLIE KAl.Vh. the
ciotber of Carter patten, and tbs laU James Patten, in
the seventy-sixth year of her aire
Fuu? ral lrom tbe .second Bapust church. 3d street,
between B end I streets northwest, st 2 p m , on 1 uee
da), April 'i. Be la Uvea and friends are respsctXuUy
Invited to attend. ?
TOBIN. Ou Sunday. March 31,1889, at 8 15o'clock
a. m . MABY, relict of tbe late w HI lam Tobln, after a
lliiKenntr lLneaa. which shs bore with Christian forti
tude.
1 unersl from her lste residence. No. 40 Jarkaon st.
Dortbeset. on Wednesday, April 3. at V o'clock a la,
w itb mass at St. Aloysius church. Friends of tbs fam
ily respectfully invited to attend. 2*
WILSON. In Philadelphia, on Friday. March 22,
1HK?. l?r. JoHN WILSON, of Pltubutw, formerly
Medical Inspector, t inted States Army, ana fur many
year* Consul ol the United States at BrtMaala, Bel
81 um
Hoksfobd-8 Acid I'hospbatx.
the BEST TONIC
Known, fnrniahlair sustenance to both brain *ai kefly.
-
Fuv Soap.
P eab8' Soap.
Peaks' Soap.
Paib W HIT1 Him
Qkioht Qua (^OMPLKXIOK
soft hialufct. gcK.
?The Great Eaclisa Ooa.plexioo lm
SOAP" SOLD
PmUH
Buchuti Ptris
Bkicbay-i P:
ClIMBKI Ck*
mb ntatib*!
O&KOBU,

xml | txt