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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 01, 1889, Image 7

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THE DEADLY TYPHOON*.
It Struck the Fleets at Samoa Early
lu the Morning.
THT. WAMHIpl ABWOITTELT Hn.FJ.ESS IS THE
rrmr o* the o ale?to oesman vessels
first to sciter?how capt. schoonmakeb
siis.
The typhoon of March 16, which caused the
dreadful disaster in the harbor of Apia, struck
the fleet of war vessel* before 6 o'clock in the
morning. The German ship Eber dragged her
anchor first, and was driven helplessly on the
reef which ran* around the harbor. She struck,
broadside on, at 6 o'clock. The shock caused
her to larch and stagger back, and she sank in
a moment in deep wavr. Most of her men
were under hatches, and scarcely a soul es
caped. Tha Adler was lifted bodily by a
gigantic wave, and cast on her beam ends on
the reef. A terrible struggle for life ensued
among the officers and sailors. Many plunged
Into the ragiag surf and struck out. some
reaching shore in safety. Others clung to
the rigging nntil the roasts fell. Of those
in the rigging only two gained the shore. The
captain of the Adler and several other officers
were saved.
HOW THE NIPSIC WAS SAVED.
Meantime the United States steamer Nipsic
had been dragging her anchors and drifting
toward the shore. The captain, however, man
aged to keep control, and ran her on a sand
bank. Boats were immediately lowered, and
the whole company were saved with the excep
tion of six men. These were drowned by the
capsizing of a boat.
The Vandalia was carried before the gale
right npon the reef. She struck with a terrible
shock, hurling Capt. Schoonmaker against a
gatliug gun and ho felled stunned. Before he
could recover a great wave swept the deck and
he was washed awuv with others into the sea.
Thf vessel sank 50 yards from the Nipsic. Sev
eral of the officers and men were washed over
board and drowned. Others perished while
making desperate efforts to swim to the shore.
Some remained for hours in the rigging, but
heavy and swift succeeding waves dashing over
them carried them off one by one.
THE NATIVES OFFER ASSISTANCE.
By this time night had set in. Many natives
and Europeans had gathered on the shore, all
anxious to render aai^ptance to the unfortunate
crews, bnt, owing to the darkness, they were
wholly unable to be of service. Soon after the
Vandalia had sunk the American war ship Tren
ton broke from her anchorage and was driven
upon the wreck of the Vandalia. whence she
drifted to the shore. The bottom of the Tren
tou was completely stove and her hold was half
full of water.
As morning broke the German man-of-war
Olga, which had hitherto withstood the gale,
although milch battered by the heavy seas that
constantly b-oke upon her. became unmanage
able. and she was driven njion the beach, where
?he lay in a tolerably fair position.
Mataafa sent a number of men to the assist
ance of the ships. They rendered splendid aid
iu trying to float the Olga.
BRITAIN CLAIMS SCPERIOR SEAMANSHIP.
A London special to the Philadelphia Press
?ays: The terrible news from Samoa caused a
profound sensation here, and much sympathy
is felt and expressed for the gallant men who
lost their lives. At the admiralty the officials
were very jabilant at the escape of the Calli
ope. which they unhesitatingly attributed to
tlie superior quality of British seamanship.
Admiral Howell, formerly of the United
States navy, who has been for some time stav
ing at Bournemouth for the benefit of his
health, is ju?t now in London, lie is sore at
heart at the loss of the ships he knew so well
and of the officers who were once his comrades.
He was sure no fault attached to any of the
American officers, least of all to Admiral Kim
berly, whom he knew well as a splendid officer.
Farquhar, too. was one of the best men in the
United States navy, and SchooDmaker was a
capital sailor and good fellow.
SVBVIVOB.H COMINO HOME.
The Auckland agent of the Oceanic steam
ship liue, whose steamships ply between San
Francisco and Australia, cabled John D. Spreck
les. president of the company, that Lieutenant
Wilson desires to secure accommodations on
the steamship Mariposa, which touches at
Auckland on her return trip from Sydney the
latter part of April, for three hundred of the
wrecked sailors at Samoa, to be taken to San
Francisco. The Mariposa is only entitled to
carry two hundred and fifty passengers, but an
appeal having been made to the government
authorities here the Treasury department re
plied that the naval office would impose no re
striction on the Mariposa carrying more than
the usual number of passengers, providing
they were shipwrecked sailors. The steamship
Alameda left Auckland some days ago. It issup
fK.sed that she touched at Samoa Saturday, and
t is thought she will bring a large number of
the shipwrecked sailors to San Fransisco with
out waiting for the Mariposa to receive orders.
Ihe Alameda is due at San Francisco April 13.
THE STORM OFTEN COMES WITHOUT WARNINO.
A storm similar to the one of March 16 oc
curred at Apia in February, and at that time
the English warship Calliope and the German
?hip Eber had a narrow escape from being
wr>-vked.
Capt. Holland, of the schooner Bonanzo, at
Ban Francisco, said yesterday that March was
always a bad month for hurricanes in the South
Pacific. No harbor is safe in these storms; the
only course is to put to sea. While there is
?ometimes warning beforehand, as much as
twenty-four hours, of the approach of a gale of
this kind, at other times it comes entirely with
out warning. Capt. Holland did not consider
for a moment that the escape of the Calliope
w?* due to superior seamanship on the part of
her officers. She probably had steam up at the
time.
Captain Leary, of the United States steamer
Adam*, whieh recently returned to San Fr?
cisro from Samoa, said on Saturday: "There
is hardly anv anchorage in Apia harbor, and it
is a very difficult matter to keep a vessel off
the shore in ordinary weather. The anchors
keep dragging, and when I was there with my
vessel 1 found it necessary to carry mv anchors
out every morning to keep the vessels from
going ashore."
Other San Francisco advices say that the
Monongahela, which left there February 21,
lor Samoa, has probably reached her destina
tion.
1 he seven naval cadets on board the Tren
ton and the three on the Vandalia were saved.
Ihe llerlin dispatch says Emperor William
Wa?> deeply moved by the news of the Samoan
disaster. He immediately telephoned l'rince
Henry and afterward conferred with Count Von
Muitke, Prince Bismarck and others.
SYMPATHY FROM THE QUEEN.
Expressions of sympathy were yesterday re
ceived from Queen Victoria, cabled by Lord
Salisbury to the British legation. Her majesty
directed her prime minister to express to the
President her sorrow and commiseration on
the u-rrible naval misfortune at Samoa. The
message was delivered yesterday afternoon bv
Secretary Edwardes, the British charge d'af
faires, who was accompanied by Secretary
Blaine. In replv the President expresse d his
warm appreciation, and that of jhe whole
people of this country, of the queen s consider
ate sympathy with tile United States over tne
calamity which had overwhelmed its naval
lorces at Nimoa. The President said that a
more formal reply would be made to her
majesty through the Secretary of State.
THE president'S VIEWS.
President Harrison was interviewed Saturday
In reference to the disaster, and is quoted as
laying;
"It is a very sad occurrence. Loss of ships
is nothing, but the lives of the men lost is a
public calamity. Sometimes I have thought
that possession of our imitations of war vesaels
is a misfortune, as it has prevented our getting
Letter ones, and we are continually sending
them into places and on missions which ha/ard
valuable lives. 1 think there will be no delay
when Congress meets again in our haviug a
complement of new substantial ships. There
%iil oe no extra session of the cabinet, as re
ported. to take action on this misfortune,
fiotbiug can be done further than to render as
sistance m recovering the bodies of the dead.
The ahips are understood to be a Vital loss, and
lio effort will be made in all probability to save
them."
President Harrison intends to recommend
iu hw message next fall that a large appropria
tion be made for the construction of new
cruisers and men-of-war.
To new Tom via B. A O. R. R.?A complete
?arvice of fast Express Trains is now in full
oparaUou between New York. Philadelphia,
toitunore and Washington via B. A O. K. K.
All the day trains are equipped with Pullman's
Parlor Cars and the night trains with Pullman's
Sleepers. The "Knickerbocker Express," leav
ing Washington at 4:15 p.m., arriving New York
p.m., is composed exclusively of Vestibuled
Coaches and Parlor Cars. No extra fare is
chaned. Passengers are landed at station foot
Of Liberty street. New York, within two blocks
tt Elevated railroad. *
Mr. Bluff (to his traveling acquaintance)?
' Sr.rpnsad M the evidence* of culture you saw
B the woat, ?h? Why, they're raisin' corn in
the %mm (Ivor bottom-lands that's sixteen feet
high. If the east can beat that for culture,
you'd better show up the foods!"?L\ft.
AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY.
Home Words of Advice to Those Inter
ested In the Subject.
When we come to criticise photograph* as
pictures, we find that one great defect is to be
found in their small size. It i* true that the
perfection of detail and fine finish compound
for this in a measure, but it has often been said
that one good print of 11x14 inches, or larger,
is worth dozens of the little scraps made on
5x4 and 4x3 inch plates. It has lately become
too much the fashion to advise the use of small
sizes, and to depend upon some enlarging pro
cess when a print of good size is wanted. The
idea of making small negatives and enlarging
them afterward seems fair enough, and it is
indeed, successfully done in many cases; but if
such a size as 10x12 were settled upon, we
should advise that the negatives be made
direct, and the prints not enlarged from. say.
5x7 or 5x4 incn negatives. All experienced
operators agree that the ranking of negatives
for enlargement requires great skill and cure.
Remembering how greatly the cost of making
photographs has been reduced, and what ex
cellent outfits can now be had for a moderate
sum, we feel justified in advising those who
aim at good artistic results to begin boldly with
plates of a fair size?certainly not less than
Slax6>j, or, better, luxs inches.
SELECTION or OCTFIT.
Now, since the first thing to be considered in
the selection of a photographio outfit is the size
of picture desired, and the next the character
of work to be done, let us here tsay that the
difficulties of obtaining clean, good results in
crease with the increase of size to a certain ex
tent. and the expense of making the picture in
creases very materially. Nevertheless, in
spite of the various processes lor making large
prints frum small negatives?enlarging pro
cesses. as they are technically termed?we re
peat that we should not advise the purchase of
very small cameras, unless mere amusement is
the"only thing to be considered. Plenty of fun
can undoubtedly be had out of the little "de
tective cameras now so commonly used, but
more satisfaction will be felt in a nice collec
tion of views or portraits on plates measuring,
say five inches by eight, or ten inches by eight,
the camera for which would be too large to be
conveniently concealed as the smaller sizes are.
Since the introduction of the gelatine dry plate,
aud the consequent simplifying of the clicm
ical part of the work, large-sized photographs
may be made with fur greater ease than for
me'rlv, and to those of our readers who have de
voted any attention to art matters we will sug
gest one of the larger-sized cameras for plates,
say fourteen inches by eleven, as offering more
scope for the artistic treatment of fine subjects,
particularly landscapes.
THE LESS.
The size of plate and camera being settled
npon, the next thing is to get a suitable lens,
aud this is often no easy matter. In most of
the detective cameras the lens is supplied as a
part of the outfit, but one intending to provide
himself with a regular photographic apparatus
ought to have som.- knowledge of lenses before
purchasing. Without going into too groat de
tail in the matter, we may say that some general
distinctions between the different varieties of
lenses ghonld be borne in mind, as follows: (1)
Lenses including an ordinary angle or amount
of subject, say forty to forty-live degrees on
the base-line of the picture, and of tolerably
long focus; and (2_) w ide-angle lenses including
eighty degrees, or even more, and of very short
focus. It would be natural for the purchaser
to imagine that that lens which included most
subject would be best, but as a general rule the
contrary is true, namely, that the longer-focus
lenses are the more practicallv useful and give
the more pleasing pictures. There is another
distinguishing characteristic between lenses
that are "single" or "doublet." The former
are cheaper, but quite good enough for average
landscape work, while the latter are indispen
sably necessary for architectnal subjects and
the accurate copying of anything like maps,
plans, engravings. Ac. To those who are dis
posed to he very economical, we may say thut
the front lens of an opera-glass will make ex
cellent photographs. It should be unscrewed
from the barrel ami set in a short tube with its
flat si,le facing the view; or, in other words,
it should have its position just reversed from
what it was in the opera-glass. A stop of suit
able size is then set in front of it at a distance
equaling one-fifth of its burning focus. It
should be remembered that the perspective of
the photogr.iph is made by the lens aud cannot
be altered by the operator, except in bo far as
he provides himself with a nuinbet of lenses of
different ftx'UN and angle, so as to he able to
tn at different subjects with lenses suitable to
their peculiarities, using each lens pro re rata,
as the doctors would sav.
KOBE THAU ONE.
It may not be generally known that experi
enced outd'jor operators are pretty well agreed
upon certain proportions between the focus of
the lens and the size of plate, as affording the
most pleasing pictures, and being the most
useful in the long run. We should thus choose
an 11-inch focus lens for the 8>.x6j-j plate, a U
inch for the 8x5. Ac., or. in other words, one
whose equivalent focus was about equul to the
diagonal of the plate. But let us take this oc
casion to sav that we cannot too strongly insist
upon the desirability of the photographer's
having more than one lens irrespective of the
size or style of his pictures. We ourselves have
worked with lenses of 11-inch, 7-inch and 5)$
inch focus on the B]^x6;-h plate, aud succeeded
in a great varietv of subjects. The 11-inch was
probably used five or six times where the 7
inch was once, while the 53^-1 rich was only re
sorted to on rare occasions where the peculiar
ities of the subject required a very wide angle.
We enter into this matter at some length be
cause the artistic qualities in landscape
photographs will be found to depend in
great measure upon the ability of the operator
to include just the desired amount of subject
on his plate from any given point of view; for
the latter cannot always be changed so as to
favor the lens. Then, also, it must not be for
gotten that every change in the position of the
camera will change something in the view; the
whole character of the picture may be altered
by shifting the apparatus a little in one direc
tion or the other. A speaking proof of this is
seen when examining the results obtained by
the member* of photographic clubs and socie
ties after having been out for a fleld-dav; here
we often see two photographs of the same sub
ject, where the men nave stood side by side,
one being complete as a picture, while the
other fails in its effect simply because the lens
has been a few inches or a few feet farther to
the right or left, and has omitted or included
some object which has been the making or
marring of the picture.
ANOTHER PROSIIXEXT DEFECT
in photographs, taken as a whole, is that they
are usually made in fixed sizes in spite of
varieties or peculiarities of subject. How
unpleusunt it is in the case of a flue panoramic
view, where the interest lies in the extended
horizontal sweep rather than in the sky or fore
ground, to see things forced into a nearly
square plate, say 10x9 inches, which gives
entirely too much space above and below, with
insufficient length! On the other hand, how
empty the ends of a long, narrow Hx.Vinch plate
appear if some isolated and rather square
object, such as a villa or group of trees,
occupies the center! Many a picturesque sub
ject. dealing in high ami narrow lines, will be
utterly ruiucd if crowded on a square-shaped
plate?street views in cities, for example
made near to churches with high steeples.
Here we must either have a long, narrow plate,
or use a leus of short enough focus to reduce
the whole scale of the picture so that it cau be
afterwvrd trimmed to suit the subject. Here
we see an additional reason why the plate
should be of a good generous size to start with,
and the outfit of lenses complete. If we hud
only a small plate on which to make the view,
the trimming might make the finished print too
small to be worth anvthiug.
Let us now consider the shape of the picture,
or plate, together with the proportions existing
between its boundaries or sides, premising that
while here and there a print may be trimmed
square, circular or oval, to suit some particular
subject, the oblong shape will be by far the
most generally useful.
PERSPECTIVE. .
A little study of perspective is most highly to
be recommended to those who desire their pic
tures to be truthful and pleasing. Now, by
this we do not at all mean that oar readers
should wade through ponderous volumes, filled
with mathematical problems and long equa
tions, but that they should, for instance, set
themselves to consultr such facts as the follow
ing; If an empty box be set on the end of a
long table with Its hollow facing the student,
it will be observed that the bottom and the
sides are hi a certain proportion to each
other, aud that the lines of junction between
them appear to recede at a certain angle. If
the box now be moved up to within 12 inches
of the face, these lines of (unction will be seen
to stand at much*more obtuse angles, besides
which the sides will appear broader in propor
tion to their height than when the box was at
a distance. Let him now consider that the
principles here involved would hold true in the
photographing of street views, and many other
subjects where both near and distant objects
were included. For if a wide-angle lens be
employed, all the receding lines in the pictnre,
sucn as eornices of buildings, railroads, curb
stones. etc., etc., will stand at much more ob
tuse angles than when a narrow-angle lens is
used; the terms "wide-angle" or "short-foens,"
on the one hand, and "narrow-angle" or "k>ag
?
focus." on the other, being indiscriminately
used by the photographer.
THIS UREAT OBTTSENE89 Or AXOLE
in the perspective of picture* made with wide
1 angle lenses it sometime* the cauae of moat
unsightly and ridiculous pictorial failures. It
will be seen at once that the objection to using
?err wide-angle lenses is that, owing to this
great obtnseness of angle of the perspective
lines, distant objects will appear unnaturallv
| dwarfed in size, while those near at hand will
come out immensely larger than they ought to.
A few trials on street views with a lens includ
ing. say. eighty decrees of angle, with promi
nent objects close in the foreground, will soon
prove the truth of what we have been saying,
and sometimes well-known localities will be so
changed in the photograph that no one would
recognize them. We are thug met by the par
adox that the perspective of the photograph,
while mathematically correct, is false to the 1
eye.
These ideas of perspective will be fonnd very
useful in photographing architectural subjects,
wide-angle lenses often being indispensable
here. Caution must be observed in using them
on these subjects, however, for if the building
stands in confined positions, where there is no
room to move the camera backward, the pic
ture will have an unnatural effect, and might
1 be compared to the eye of an observer trying
to see something that was too close for con
venience.
IS PORTBMTCB*,
the perspective will suffer very much if the
distance between the sitter and the lens be too
small, and the lens of too wide an angle. In
this case, the cheeks will look too narrow in
proportion to the length of the face, while the
I Lands and feet will be absurdly larger than
thev ought to be if at all obtruded. The head,
and indeed the whole figure, will look more
rotund and more life-like if a fair distance?
sav twice the sitter's height?is kept between
| the lens and tho sitter. If this should give too
small a picture, a lens of longer focus will
have to be used. Objects look broadfr when
| taken near at hand with wide-angle lenses.
Interior views of buildings, halls, Ac., where
there is plenty of room to keep the camera
well bark, will not be found difficult, but the
interiors of small private houses and rooms
will often be very unsatisfactory subjects be
cause there is not room for the" camera to be
set well back and give a life-like, natural effect.
Photographs ol long, narrow objects will be
great failures in the pictorial point of view if
the camera be brought too close, and bo that
the nearer portions are unduly magnified
while the more distant become dwarfed in size.
Here we see one of the principal reasons why
the photographer should have lenses of differ
ent focus, so that if he is compelled to take an
unfavorable point of view he may not be con
fined to one focus and angle.?Ellerslie Wallace,
in Outing.
THE DESERTED VILLAGE.
How Ambition has Depopulated a
Little Paradise in Southeru Ohio.
From the Chic*tro Tribune.
"Gone!"
The word came with a deep groan from the
lips ofjthe desolate man who stood on the
lonely street and looked about hiin.
The beams of the setting sun shone with a
yellow glow on a peaceful village nestling in a
lovely plain. The modest spires of the churches
glittered in an atmosphere free from smoke,
and not a sound came to tho solitary man
whose brain was throbbing and whose heart
was bursting with a senBe of his strange and
unearthly isolation.
"Under a sky of unsurpassed beauty," be ex
claimed, "in a land where even winter in its
most savage mood breathes mildly, in the
favored garden spot of a great state, amid fer
tile valleys and vine-clad hillsides, whose vege
tation is already leaping into life in response
to the creative energy of the vernal sunshine,
can it be possible that I have lived to see such
a scene as this?"
He paused a moment to kick a wandering
and lunesouie-looking dog that was smiling
about him in an abjectly inquisitive and apolo
getic manner, and again lin voice rang plaint
ively out amid the weary solitude:
"Where are they all? Where ,are my friends,
mv neighbors, the companions of my youth?
What mysterious calamity has swept over this
once happy place as with the besom of?you
here again, vou miserable hound? Get out!"
He drew his hand tremblingly across his
pallid brow and once more his voice Binote the
air:
"They are not here! They are gone! Great
snakes! Of course they're gone! Where are
ye, friends of my childhood? O familiar faces
that filled the horizon of hope in my maturer
years, and framed the radiant vision that my
ambition bodied forth, where the Dickens and
Tom Walker do you hang out now?"
With these words he took a fresh chew of
tobacco, pulled his hat down over his eyes,
gave one farewell glance up and down the de
serted and voiceless street, turned his back on
the home of his childhood and departed for
ever.
He was the only human being in that beauti
ful southeru Ohio town that had not gone tb
Washington with a petition for office.
?
Gagging the Press In Germany.
Harold Frederick's London Letter.
Germany is agitated just now by the most
serious domestic dispute which has stirred its
politics in years. The new emperor hateB
newspapers?it must be admitted, not al
together without reason?and the obedient
bundesrath has formulated a new penal code
for journalists which staggers even the Cologne
(iazrlte. When this organ speaks of the pro
posed legislation as "putting a frightful weapon
into the hands of the government for suppres
sing freedom of speech and silencing opposi
tion." you may understand that the bill must
be pretty bad. It is, indeed, the worBt measure
that has been aimed against the liberty of the
press in our generation, and there is a deep
feeling as to its fate when the bundesrath next
month sends it down to the rek-listag. There
will be a fierce debate, and it is expected that
a considerable number of national liberals will
part company with Bismarck on this issue.
?*?? ?
Colored Episcopalians In South Carolina.
THEY WILL HEJECT A PROPOSED COMPROMISE OF
THE COLOR LINE DISPCTE.
The report of the committee appointed by the
South Carolina diocesan convention of the Pro
testant Episcopal church, to try and settle the
color question, recommends a compromise
which proposes to admit colored clergymen to
the convention who have been connected with
the church for a year prior to May 18. 1889,
when the contention meets at Anderson. It
also proposes a separate congregation under
the ministration of the bishop. No provision
is made for the admission of colored lay dele
gates.
A prominent vestryman of St. Marks, the
aristocratic colored church in Charleston, said
last night that the terms wouldnotbe accepted.
"We won't secede from the church." he said.
"We shall simply wait, and if barred out of the
diocesan convention we will carry the case to
the general convention." As to whether St.
Mark's would continue to pay its tribute to dio
cesan conventions he was not prepared to say.
I The question promises to be a burning one at
I the coming convention.
A New White House.
From the Atlanta Constitution.
It is said that Mrs. President Harrison's re
cent sickness was due to the condition of the
White House, the sanitary arrangements ol
which are reported to be in bad order.
This has revived the talk about the building
of a new house for the President, and almost
without exception the proposition has received
the hearty indorsement of all of the newspa
pers of importance which have spoken of the
matter.
The White House was bnilt in 1792, and was
rebuilt in 1818, practically as it stands to-dav,
after having been burned by the British in
1811. It was built for the chief executive of a
nation numbering less than 4.000.000 people,
which, in less than a century, has increased to
over 60,000.000.
It is not in keeping with the other great and
substantial buildings of the government, and,
aside from architectural considerations, it does
not appear to be. to sav the least of it, a
healthy resort for those who have to live in it.
The house is pinched and its accommoda
tions are inadequate. Its construction is of old
design, which is not so bad as its decaying ma
terial. It is said that Arthur's last illness wai
brought on by its impure atmosphere.
Let us have a new White House, and as the
residence for centuries to come of our presi
dents, let it be a building of such magnificent
apportionment that it will be a structure of na
tional pride.
Ero*rr Bounds Between Feather Weights.
?The world's festher-weight championship
battle, for 91.600 and the Fox belt, was fought
at Konts, Iu?L. Sunday morning between Weir,
the "Belfast Spider," and Murphy, the "Brum
magen Boy." Weir got first blood by cutting
a great gash below Murphy's left eye. The
flgnt was a long and well-contested one.
Murphy had a rib broken and Weir got a slight
fracture of the Jaw. After the eightieth round
the light was postponed until some time before
to-morrow. Parson Davies said last night he
would prevent a second meetiug if possible.
For a good siring medicine we confidently
recommend Hood's Sareaparilla. By Its tine the
blood is pnri fled, enriched and vitalized, that
tired feeling la entirely overcome and the whole
body given strength and vigor. The appetite la
restored and sharpened, the digestive organs are j
toned, and the kidney* and liver invigorated.
N. B. Be a are to get Hood's Sarsaparllla.
HOOD'S SAD
Sold by all dmgglirtg. tl; *1* for #5. Prepared1
only by C. I HOOD ft CO., Apothecaries, Lowell,
Max s.
100 doses ONE DOLLAR.
eitema5?"
? w ? i
PHILADELPHIA.
EDUCATIONAL.
Edward C. TOWNSEND,
Teacher of Elocution.
Correct (deer) breathing Voice Culture, Oratorical and
Dramatic Action, at 1317 13th st. n.w. d31-6m
UNIVERSITY?TKAINED TEACHERS" HAVE
classes in Mathematics, Langunre* and English
Brunches day or evening. Also private lessons. Trial
lesson tree. FRANK E. HALL, 221 Est.n.w. apl-tit*
QPENCKRIAN BUSINESS COLLEGE, COR. 7TH
i??nd H ?u. n.w. Founded 18(!4. More than 50,000
young men and women have been trained in the Spen
eertau Colleges. Day and night sessions. Six course*:
business Course; Shorthand, Typewriting and Graph
oplioue, Practical English; Telegraphy; Spencer*'
Rapid Writing, Heading and Oratory. Delsarte method.
Business men furnished with trained employ;*. Illus
trated catalogue* free. SARA A. SPI ncER, Vice
Priiicipal; HENRY C. SPENCER, LL. B.. Principal.
mli20
A HARVARD ORADCATE DESIRES PUPILS,
singly or in small classes. Apply to
WM. H PITNAM, AM.,
mhl9 At Sanders ft .Stayman's, 934 F st. n.w.
Drawing and paintino-i*8cbuctio* i*
every branchaml lor all aires.private or in classes, at
nil: NATIONAL ACADEMY <IF FINE AUT>.804E
st. Call snd see the wonderful progres* of students.
nihltl-4w*
IVKENCH, LATIN, grv 1 K. MATHEMATICS A
specialty. Prof. H. LARI'.OQUE, A. M.,ofSor
borme I'nlv., Pans. Private tutor in Sciences, classical
and modem languages. 1(03 itith st. n.w. mlil4-lui*
WASHINGTON CONSERVATORY OF Mt SIC. ST
" Cloud Building. I>th and F su. Twentieth year.
Piano. Organ, Voice, Violin. Flute. Cornet. Ac. t ree
advantages. O. B. Bl'LLARD, I>1 rector, ink 1'Mm*
PARENTS DMIRINGTO senddaUGHTE K8 TO
first-class School in Germany are requested to ad
dress FRAULEIN NEEF. High School, city, for par
ticulars. Escort for European trip provided in
June. fO-2m*
MARTYVS COMMERCIAL COLLEGE 313 CTH
at., near City Post-Office. Colored students uot
admitted. Call or st ud for catalogue. nihtl
SHELDON'S DANCING ACADEMY, 1004 F ST
n. w . MONDAY, WEDNESDAY' and SATURDAY.
Now is the time to join tor participation in the May
Bull. Scud for circular. au23-Sm
MISS BALCH'S CIVIL SERVICE IN8TITUE. 1207
10th st. n.w. Person* prepared most success
fully for all examinations. Elocution taught and com
positions carefully revised, highest references. f+-3ui
T. JOHN'S COLLEGE, ANNAPOLIS, MD
Eight departments and four courses of study.
Preparatory school at la, tied.
- ATTEST
SPECIAL ATTENTION (ilVEN TO,
THE PREPARATION OF CANDIDATE^ FOB
THE NAVAL ACADEMY
For catalogues, address President,
d28-3m THOMAS FELL, A. M.
rjlHE BERLITZ SCHOOL OF LANGUAGES,
lenua begin now.
anSS 723 14th ?t. n.w.
BOOKS AND STATIONERY.
I1 ORTY 'A' HOUGHTS,
Lent with Jesus. Imitation of Christ and other Books
of Devotional Heading.
A lar*re and elegant stock of Laster Cards, Books,
Booklets and Art Prints.
C. 0. PUKSLLL. Bookseller,
mhao 418 9th st
Lenten And Easter Books.
AIDS AND READINGS FOR LENT.
EASTER CARDS.
BOOKLETS.
NOVELTIE8.
WM. BALLANTYNE ft SON.
mh'22-eo 428 7TH STREET.
FAMILY SUPPLIES.
"I /a CANS SlGAIt CORN 510.
I v 1 Latye Bottle Concord Wine 25c.
4 lbs. Dried Peaches or 5 li s. Prunes 25c.
1 gallon best Sweet Cataw'ja Wine 90c.
That Bouquet Whisky, only $2.50 per gallon.
mhlK-im O'HAKE'S GROCERY, 1245 Ttk st. n.w^
^y. H. COMBS, 024 BTH ST. N. W? IMPORTED
and Domestic Groceries, Fine Winea and Liquors,
ftc. The following well-known brands of Pure Rye
Whlskiea constantly in stock; Old J. B. ThMppeon,
Baker, Upper Ten, Hannia Acme, Takoina. Jackson
and Grand Jury. iuhl6-3m
**^TAR OF THE EAST." FANCY PATENT PRO
O cess Flour, *tt.7f> 1st 1)1)1.; 41.75 per M bbl. sack;
"Old Time" Hour, 45 90 l>er bbl.; $1.50 per ii bhl.
sack. Perfection Tea, acknowledged by all who use it
to be worth double our price, which is 50c. per lb.
Best Sugar Cured Hams, 12Hc. jssr lb.; Shoulders,
t'Hc. i>er lb. 8 lbs. Buckwheat for 25c.; 7 ijts.
lloiulny for 26c. 5 lb. package Breakfast Hominy
forl5c. 3 tits Beans for 25c. 5 lbs. Turkish Prunes
for 2oc. 2 Its*. Dried Peaches 'peeled) for 25c. 4 lbs.
Evaporated Apples tor 25c. Rumford Yeast Powder,
large bottles, 10c. U lbs. starch for 25c. 9 cakes
Torn, Dick, and Harry Soap ior 25c. 7 cake* Aro
matic Soap for 25c, 0 cokes Plymouth Rock Soap for
J. T. D. PYLES,
Ja29-3m ' 412 4th st. s. a.
For choicest imported wines, LIQUORS,
Cordials and Italian general Produce.
Lachrima Christi, Macaroni, Sj>agketti, Ver
Barbera, mecelli,
Birolo, Pure Olive Oil, Far in Man.
Brachetto, Roquefort Cheese,
Marsula, ftc, Mushrooms.
Call on G. PESSAGNU ft SONS,
mhtt-lm* 808 9th st. n. w.
WOOD AND COAL.
h
FORREST DODGE.
COAL MERCHANT.
Wholesale and Retail.
Anthracite Coal of all kinds constantly on hand,
GEORGE'S CREEK cumberland COAL.
FINEST GRADES of SPLINT AND CANNEL COAL.
Sawed and Split Wood to Order.
Yard and Office, 3008 Water street; Branch Office,
1214 31st street (opposite Post-office), West Washing
ton, D. C.
Telephone?Yard, 954-2; Branch office, 959-2. tnh20
Hffl RETAIL PRICES FOR COAL AND WOOD,
I'J. until changed, are as lollows:
White Ash Stove, per ton of 2.240 lbs........$5.40
fe = -
Shaman sS^T - - JS
Red Ash Stove,' " " Un
Lyken* Vafley Store, " "
" *
S. ft S. Pine Wood, per oord.
*4 C^akL Wood ^
Special price* for large orders.' JOHN Wix^r.
Pa. av.n.w.. 1020 14thst.n.w. 8. Cap, and I st..
Coal i Com AVoodi
JOHNSON BBOTI1II,
Wharves and Bail yards, 12 th * Water sta. Southwest
1202 F st. n. w. 1518 7th *t n. w.
3d and K st. n. w. 1740 Pa. ave. n. w.
1112 9th stn.w. 41310th st. n. w.
Exclusive agents in the District for the aale of a?mt
of the beet coal mined. Supply more Jamilieatlian any
retail yard in the United States.
HONEST MEASURE. FAIR DEALING. PROMPT
DELIVERIES AND REASONABLE PRICES have
Bade oar baainees a success, agj
PRINTERS.
1108-1110 ? it. n.w.? south sida.
FINE WORE A SPECIALTY. 419
' 'For yean at irregular intervals in all sea
sons, I suffered the intolerable burning and
itching of blood poisoning by ivy. It would
break out on my lea*. in my throat and eyes.
Last srrin* I took Hood'* Sarsaparilla, ? a blood
purifier, with no thought of It a* a apecial remedy
for ivy poisoning, but it has effected a permanent
and thorough curt." CALVIN T. SHL'TE,
Wentwprth, N. H.
SAPARILLA
Sold by all drupoHsts, #1; six for OS. Prei?red
only by C. I. HOOD & CO., Apothecariea, Lowell,
Maaa.
100 DOSES ONE DOLLAR
Brand National Award of 16.600 francs.
QUINA'-tAROCHE
AN INVIGORATING T0NI0,
CONTAINING
PERUVIAN BARK, IRON, m
PURE CATALAN WINE.
For the PREVENTION and Cl'RE of
Malaria, Indigestion, Fever & Ague, Loss of
appetite, Poorness of Blood, Neuralgia, &c.
22 Run Dronot, Part*.
E. FOUGERA 4 00., Agents for the U. S.,
80 NORTH W ILLIAM ST., N. Y.
I AM
HAPPY 1
The aecret of my happinsss is, I have thrown Away
my old Clacking Brush, and have
BOOTS
WITHOUT LABOR.
Wolff'sACMEBIacking
Produce a polish without the old hraeh, ?nd thi? Vm
*ill last a ufek on anil Ihret tm voiitfn'a ahoes.
Why stick to old ways in these days of progress f
Sold by Shoe Store*. Orocer*, Druggists, etc.
WOLFF & RAMP0LPH. PHILADELPHIA.
VIGOR
FOR MEN bad practices, may ha
perfect!/ reeained by the new
DE8LON - DUPRt Method.
S?Ti(J for our new illustrated ~Guidr to
HMith." Absolute tecrcrv. VariCO"
8616 cured without pain or operation. Addreaa
>eston*Dupre Clinique, Tmnont m., Boston.
LADIES' GOODS.
WaMSLEY & JJedWELL,
323 N. CHARLES STREET,
BALTIMORE, MD.,
Will open at Willard's Hotel, Private Parlor*, April 9
to 13, The latest Paris Novelties in Costumes for
Spring and Summer wear. Directoire Garments,
Visites and Jackets, Carriage and Vlsltinir Dre*se?,
Costumes for the Springs and Summer Resorts.
Orders taken. Fits guaranteed. apl-l!Jt
A LADY, FORMERLY CARRYING ON DRESSMAK
ing in New Vork, would like the patronage of Well
ington ladies, moderate prices and perfect lit. cutting
and busting-a specialty. 7 C st. n.e. mhlH-3w*
Mme. t. b. h
ARRISON,
SPRING OPENING
Of
LONDON AND PARIS BONNETS AND HATS,
WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY,
APRIL 3 and 4,
_m30Ct 1329 F ?t? opp. the Ebbitt._
1MIE MI8SES CUNNINGHAM, FURRIERS, RE
. ceive on Storage
Furs and Woolen Goods.
j*4-3m 1310 ?th st. n.w., bet. N. and O its.
Mas. K. A* Do>
ONOVAN,
904 F STREET.
OPENING MONDAY AND TUESDAY, APRIL 1ST
AND 3D.
OF CHOICE FRENCH PATTERN HATS AND
BONNETS
From the Leading House* of Paris and London.
Also Our Own
EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS.
The Ladies of Washington are Respectfully Invited
No Cards. mh28-lw
E~A8TER EGGS. 3c.: CHICKS, RABBITS. &c\, 5c.;
cards, 40c. l>cr 100; Satin novelties. Toys. Games,
Btudies, Favors, Gold Paint, lOc. Scrap Pictures,
?I *****'*rds, Birthday Cards, Materials lor making Pa
per Mowers (Lessons iree.) J. JAY GOULD. 4-il 9th.
_ mh^U-lm*
YON BRANDTS. 1229 PEXN. AVE. '
Tailor-made Gowns, hiding Habits, Evening and ,
Street Costumes, etc., made at *hort notice. Perfect !
lit and work, one fitting required. Reasonable prices.
formerly with Lord & Taylor. New York, and Wm.
Barr k Co., St. Louis. Buttonholes made. inhl8-lm*
toa Evening AYear
MLLE. m 77 PBANDL
1JV9 F st. n.w., at Mrs. Harrison's,
Has Just received a French Imjortation in FANCY
ORNAMENTS 10R THE HAIR.
GILT PINS, SIDE COMBS,
In Silver, Gold, and Tortoise Shell.
NEW DESIGNS IN SHELL AND AMBEB PIN&
FINE FRENCH HAIR GOODS.
HAIB DRESSED. BANGS SHINGLED
uiUl-lui SHAMPOOING.
London and paris htyles~received
roK
SPRING AND 8UMMER
SPECIALTIES.
Ladies' Riding
Gowns, Ul?.
All ladies' work
Ptlegiug, late with Creed,
Satisfaction guaranteed.
? _ OWEN,
MERCHANT TXlLOB,
mh t-3m Cor. New York av?. and 10th St.
fVi.KTNEB'PB Dress Shields,
ABSOLUTELY THE
BEST AND MOST RELIABLE.
Kleinert's FEATHER-WEIGHT fwashable )
KLEINERT'S SEAMLESS 8TOCEINETT
EVEBY PAIR WARRANTED.
NONE GENUINE WITHOUT OUB TBADE nang
and name (KLEINEBT) on every pair.
mhl-3m BEWARE OF IMITATION.
..... class Ladles' and Genu- work of every dewrip
tion. Plush, Velvet *ud Evening 1 Tissue AN TO J
AND CAROLINE LERCH, formerly with A-Ftochei
and Maison Yrie.% Paris. jtHl
MTAB
' tits' Garments of all k
Ladles' J
Dyed without being ripped. Ladles' Evening 1
- -jsr .ii
CP oa RIPPED
?a *
RAILROADS.
Baltimore And Ohio Raelsoad
Schedule In effect March 10.18S0 "
"??e Waahinirton from nation comer of \ ? w Jeraev
irpnae ?d?J C etreet. *ereey
ForCktetfojmd Northwwet. V?ubul?l Limited e?
PIW R 3J i. m . rinrw 9 05 r m
For Cincinnati. St Loma. ?ud ludianaDolla ,
lailv. :1 iwl .> m li in- ~T " i^'
dally. S O0 and 11 10 p. m.
For Pitutxiiy and Cle*. land. Veetibnled Limited ?!.
PW" h ->J ? in. an J cxpreae 9 05 p.tu.
For Lexington and Local station, ? 10 10 am
_ For Baltimore. week dara, .*> 00, 6 .30. 0 40 7 TO.
2 m ?^0, (45 minuW). 1M5. 11 25. <45 nunnt^
4,- A0.? 2 30, (4> minute*), H 15, <45 niln
m J#, a KA?i#s a
r Stations between *uli!mr;..q and Raitl<
*:30*- ni- 12 10, ?*26. 4 35.6 41
8 30 * "-11&-3
a ??"!? '.St? P?'ttmoT* foe Waahlnrton. week daya.
um'flii'X in i'^1, A 15, " 20800 (45 minute,-,
0 :J5' ? ?"?' 1 ,J-' (46 nnnuteei a m,; 12.15, 145.
N rtA1 i atL\ an^ -5 0a*W.? M, 7 5o,
'o.^iVlcf^d^ vL5 ?*>?7 ^
For Atitiai* It,. t? 40 ana 8 30 a.m.. IS 10 and 4 35
P.m. On Sundai?, (i .30a.m.j 4 3Kp.m. Leave An
i ',n ' i m - 1- Oo. 4 10 p in. Sunday*.
* ?>< a.ni>, 4:10p.m.
1 lfl?irnS.!f.;K'nA Sn- ,h* *'"*r"TvllJt*n Branch. t? 35.
" o-ftiS:. tfJ ii SErf^E1"1 ,l*lK,u'^
{lOOO1"?1* al'J tatermedlate ?tattona. t7 00 p. m.,
Churcli train !?itm Wasfcingion on Sunday at 1 15
p. m.. ?topl'itur at all atatlous on Metropolitan Branch
;1010 ^ ???t4 ;tA *ud "STi
lorftxreMuwn, MO lOa. m. and *5:30 p m
Train* arrive from Chicago dailv x 35 a. in. and
. ?'? ; t">in Cincinnati and St I.oui* dally e "o
t7:20SSd4;35^; IruIU tllUbur? *b i5
SEW YOHK fc PHILADELPHIA DIVISION.
J ftsSa S'lT'VStt *??*??>.*
tlbnled limited . and ?lo 30 p m.' Buffet I'arlor C*n
S^at^K^. - the 10 3o p
10:3dp. ui. For Atlantk' city *11 V5 a. in.
tAyjsr-iS:
;STi ^
? Eicert 8unday. ?Dally. {Stmdar otilr
batr^re called for and checked at hoteli and real
djoceaouordera left at ticket oflicea. ?1?
W. -U C'LEMEXTS. CHAS. O. SCflA,
mh!?c ?en' M;u""rer- Geu. I-mn.Aft.
?PHE GREAT"
TO TRF ^sssrss**1* RorTE
Iinl l t ^ WE*T, AND SOt THWrST
K l ll-riiM .. HI-LESWD H< v\y ry
and Harnaburir U. bt. Lom? ilajlv n. A t
bleeping< ars Waiii'twrt.InV ChlS^anddSt^xl^
; !??& ^aaaisftl
ilAl.J I M( >iih AN'D POTOMAC RAILROAD
'?* J-rle. ^auandalfiia, and Rochester, dally for Uttf
nV w?th ^!'wr*r*" ?' Sa t urday,' 10:00 m.
Forw'll ha n, i" to Kocheater.
l? m. 4ml E1,Ur?- "
u'IoVmI' 9 11 00, and
1 j .40 a.m., ? : 10, 4 10. J 0:00. and 1 ] :20 l> ui <?n
i uuday, J .00. 11.40 a.m., it !0, 4 10 10 00 anil
elr* WHlV ^*1' n4 tliTtM ot Hillmmn P*rU>r
, ^V wnu 3Ua,U'- 41111
fS ?ZLUX ""i"?.' ' h?"K<- 2:10 p.m. every day
IS4 ^ '??,?
For Philadelphia, T '.'O, h l.?, m,?0. 11 00 and 11 40
?JJ1-2ilM nt # 00.K 10.1 <^00. aud 11 20p ra
1 V i o n VtA i1 -\,4" * mr * io.4 iu. liroa
x. ii V' lK'*u?, J J -0 |mu. Limited Lxi>re*M. all
Sri A?Ll?"''' "i, U- H'"l 11-40 a.m. meek day,
I SMh 7 B: 10,9:00. 9 40, 9 50.
i ?' a*j?. L1 <0_a m.. 12:Oo,2. CI, .1 4.i, 4 I0L
4 -0. 4 4(1. U 00, , 40, * 10. 10:00, and 1I 26 u
ff in -ih.U-UJfyJ y u oi- W 11 40. ant
II "0 Pm i0-8 00- 7:40, b;?- ^
^53^^ 7:20 ^ aad4 40 p nL d??r.
For AnuM '.lia, T : ?0 and f> 00 a.m? 12 05 and 4 40
4 10 P'uf eXCeP Buildaya, a .UU ? ???
rREDERICKSBTUO RAn,
RWllh*!aD. ANlj * AHHlNl.XOS
For Alexandria.' 4 30. 0.35. T :2ft, R 40. 0:4ft 10 a.
To 05 and riU ;t- ,u >' a 4,J:4 :5J3?f> W. O Ol.h O^
1X7^ M1JC* * ? ni- ^ buuday at 4 .'{0 y 4i
1 ( .04 a. iu., ^ ?<0, 0;0ifh lUii. and 10 05 d rii
AfrmtiC * flL ftTkM
f ".ssv^r,23,^-,; ,su???? - M,.
ft 10 (i 30. T 05.9 32. 10 42aiid U o". m
wlittuidU>:42^1 07 *? - 5 4'0k 7 03,
TicketH and inlormation at tbeofBce. northeantrvve.
a?ati<? <1'| K,r" tittl,<il',-l"",>'lv?L'iaavt ?u,.. and al tU?
Matu ?I.wh, order* rat: 1* l. ft for the ?:hA"nir2!
^ -'j T?r
Oenerai Manaw. (f251 Gen P?a A^tit
PIEDMONT AlirUXE. ~
?tn . Kj of-dule in . ff^ t Ff briiarv 10th. 1RR9
&.M, .tiavi'lle. Clurlott?nvluI,Ly^fn^r?^5tat1^5
leans 1-uhmanAje-^-r W'^ton
Pullman slt^'f^'r New \ork to Atl.nta Pullman i*?rl
car* Atlanta to Montgomery: Pitllu^an Slei-^iSi^Mont'
Koim-o- to New Orlean* and Mann
rffieffi? for M"??
pi "riti" ^ Nl""l Ul? ^ then" toArS^
sLsaar ^ ^ ^ ^ssss
l/ai*.
W atduuirtvn to New Orleans vaUUVuiLdffi
Daily: arrive Bound dill 1^3(1 A M and 7 401> M
Returnliitf leave Round Hill 6:05 A.M Dally and 1 $0
AM wJh'lXdU
JS5atSseMR saajsrw trt
B3? ,j n "v x^s/trrTV'"m'ssisu.
sj? Br?iswses!ff5jft i'a n
fur. linlTi ! eSpi?r r*r and information
furnlehe<l, aud l>a?rf ;>we rheckt*i at office, 1300 Penn.
5 avenue, and fa* l'aween*r? r Statiou- l^nnaviM.
nu lUilroad. OtL and 11 A^L^A??^
Qener^l fawniw Ayant
POTOMAC ]{J VEK BOATST
J?OTOMAC TRANSPOKTAtloK LINE.
For Baltimore and River LandinM st^.rr,., Br,?
Ca,.t Ueofc-hetran. leave* StSgSSoS5, Wdiarf everv
Wlfl 4?,cluc* f- m. For further ln^rouktlaD
mh? nm STEPHENSON fc BRO.
mh?:Cm 7th at. wharf.
M i. VERNON! MT.VkJU.OM
STEAMER W~W. CORCORAN
Leaves <tb-a?reet wharf daHy (except Hunday) for Mt.
it Tn?o'i? Rivar Landinaa aa far do?m aa Oilment,
S^I:3l0Ci?.BL U#UinUn*- r^h- W?GSS
gl<i L L BLAKE. Captain
I^OR POTOMAC RIVER LANDINGS.
NEW IRON STEAMER "WAKEFIELD"
iM-J^SSKLW ?U M2*VDAVfi- THURSDAYS
'4^_^A1LKDA\ h at < a.m. Return in TUESDAYS
tS P and SUNDAYS p. m. touobincrat River
Lantlinire aa far aa Nomiin Creek. \ a. St. Clemeota ha\
and Leonard town, Md. Coenectawitia h and O R. b a t
^'wr^iS.M^1:,.JUHN B ^DOET]ii^t
OCEAN STEAMERS.
gHOBT ROITE TO LONDON.
NORDDEI TSOHER lixJTD g. & 00,
To BouthaiuTton'ii^i^duii'^Ha^re). Bremen.
Trave, Wed., April U, b a.m.; Kulda, bat April ft
10 a. m . Lalm. Wed. April 1U,1 % 'h W
i!'"r, W'ed! A^riU7e,f ?T' ^ 6:30
ward a berth, according to locaUon; 2d cabin. *50^
925 pi2!TariT r*ta*- ^Ply to
Anchor Line.
Atlantic Expreaa Service.
Liverpool via QUEenstown.
WE^^DPaTIJ2.?iF?OMJ" (rom ??? Tort
c-i ' **7 May 29. June 2|L Julr *24.
11 pasaairfef ^t>0 to $100, Second (JIaaa |3u *
GLA8GOW 8EEVICE.
rraielen Circular Letter, of Credit and DrafW
aniouut laaued at lowest current rate*
or ^*?of toura, ticket, or further information
uprMnSD^N b55? ??vort*r
U. VI. MOhh, W21 Pennaylvantaave. n.w..
Waahlntfton. mhaA-y^
f^lDNAHD LINE
Ky CHAS. L. Dubois * 00.. annta. ?W6 7th at JLW
DRY GOODS
New Spring Goods.
Juat received another ahlj
China Silks; alao a full line of ~
U?J? Hoee m great veriety.
teO-tou HOOK BRO. * OO, 132S rV
BICYCLEa
ClOTaTi
O -DABT CTCLXS
r^i^sSo
at a.*.
BUSINESS
n* ttMttoa of ?* tu*lne** rabBr >? Invito*
with oonfldenoe to th* superior advantage* P**
ivnM by Tn wtfaowto* Etbvino ?txb w aa
advertising medium. The nmn statements of tto
daily cln-uUUnn, published from week to waofc.
taken in aonnacuon with th* dsta given bet?w. U
lutfrtw In the most striking mmn?r th* steady
and r?iM growth of the i*|?r tn clrculattoo and
Influence. They also establish. beyoed contro
versy. th* fart that Tub Stub u fV f*?* local aS
rertmmg tnsdtton, n<x only in tV mart ftaUt,
fHU tn rv trfioi? wwM.' This claim is based end
conceded on th* fact that no city In any oountry la
so thoroughly covered by th* regular circulation of
a single paper as Is th<> city of W ashlngton by that
of The Bronx , mt?b. and It doe* not rest on th*
rstr<c alone, but also on lb? of circula
tion. Not only la Ita local circulation th* ic
? and fuilrM of any dally paper printed. tn proper
I Hon to population, but It Is also Uif sx*r. *ino* th*
paper do** not merely into the hand* of tb*
people ol the District of Columbia an a body, but
into (Artr hfHe*,?Into the families of all condi
tions, and Into those of the ntoncv-fyaentfing a*
wall a* th* ?non/*ii*ear?ii?4<7 portion of th* com
munity,?In a art larger ratio than anj dally
Journal that can be named. Hy rea*?n of th*
fullness, freshnee* and reliability of it* news,
local, domestic and foreign, it* independent and
fair treatment of all public question*. and espe
cially because of It* iuiWiig>-nt and f9?tlv? de
votion to local Interest*. aud it* clua* attention to
matters with which the household, aud particu
larly It* iauy member*, are i>>ti?-emed, Tub s?t*?
Is everywhere recognised and admitted to be. la
every quality, the leading and favorite newspaper
of the National Capital, alike tn the couuliug
room, the work-ehop, aud the family ctr-le.
More conclusive evidence on Uii'm |*>luts no
pereou can ask Uian that aflorded by the tabl*
beU.w, The growth of circulation therein Indi
cated, with the analysis following, dearly shows th*
esteem In which the paper Is held by the com
munity to whose interest* It I* so steadfastly de
Toted. It will be seeu that, in the number of
copies Issued, every month In the year INK* show*
a haud-ome tncreaae over the correepoudlnc
month in each year given: and. as a further Illus
tration on that ]>oint, it may be stated here that
there ha* been a corresponding advance in the
number of hew advertisement* printed during th*
year. The comparative llguru* lor the lour year*
last past are a* follows:
Paily CIBCCLATIO* I* '87- 88.
IMS4. 1NN4I IWT. ISSN.
Jam-art -2U.4-M *3.4 7 <?
KMR. UT.. ?,?-W 'ik,iWI Y7.IDI
Ma Hi u U.MI 'M.INN* tM.IW
**,?7* i?,IM
*2,474 i4,JM ?i,YM JH.7+J
Jcxm itl,h;m ti. ii? -47.4M
JVLT Vil.lIM, !I1,INI -44,M? M.W1
Arorsr. 41.442 -tam>4 u,mi
bKrTKMBKK...i||,?U iftMM .M.tHlj 'M,:M4
OlTUBI.K 1,4*7 ill,70l V1.H07 *i.M4?
Nov km ska.. X4,?4V 1KM?1 7 *<*.?*! 4
Ksc*M?aa..23,U?? to.4*S M.7H
Dally av'ge. a.T.Hsj j.\.4*4 !t7.?s?
Increase l,iM l.HO.I l,M>l
Uf this aggregate daily circulation of 1C7.UKI
copies, the book* of the ollice show that an averair*
ol copies Were regulaily dellvared each
lay. by carrier*, al tl* hunt? uj iimrwtteiU nit
witters lu thecry aud suburbs. t?f the remainder,
a daily average of 1,1^1 a ere told at the o01c?, iu
I the hotels and railway stations, etc., aud ou the
Btreew, by newsboys, making a grand total average
within the kismet of vfi,4 ju copin* daily, leaving
I * dally average of l.tix.' to be ?eut to regular *uU>
?enbers residing beyond its law la, by mail, expreaa,
i and railway trains.
In addition to th* 20.0-.Etf copies daily delivered
at the homes of subacrlbera, a iarg*- j >< ;>ortiou of
the i.lil otherwise dis|>o*ed ol lu thecity I* reg
| ularly purchased by peinianent resiUenla, living
iu lodgings, Jtc. viiot householder*;, while th* resi
due goes into the hands ol transient visitor*, from
all part* of th* country, who each year come to
the Nalioual Capital in greater number* and for
longer periods, aud who, furthermore, largely rep
resent the Wfl)-u>-Uo and j>w\ /tujrt r*y portions of
the communities to which they respectively belong.
'I he last-named is a class of reader* alone well
Worth reaching; but It is to the phenomenally
largo permaueut local circulation of the paper,
aud especially to it* unparalleled hold upon the
household aud family circle, that the attention of
advertisers is particularly directed.
A comparison of the home circulation of 2S.4S0
with the Ugure* representing the entire popula
tion of the city will ooucmsively establish the fact
that '1 Uk Mas reaches about every family in (he
lhstriciof Columbia, and is rtud rttryOai/ Uy /nor*
t/uin Uirrt-juurlii* u* jmpuUiln/u tf/ui are a0i4
Uj rradIt follows, therefore, that an advertise
ment inserted In 11* columns will meet the ejt^uf
every person lu the Ulstrict worth reaching, of
whatever race, creed, seA, age, or condition in life.
it only remaius to be said, for the information of
those interested in the subject, that, lu proportion
to it* circulation, the rales of advertising m 1MB
k.\ k.MMi Mak, whether transient or for long
period*, rank with Ure very lowest In th* I nited
a la tea. Indeed, kakiug both the el lent and char
acter of it* circulation into consideration, it may
safely be claimed that so wide and such an excei
lent quality ol publicity can uoalieie else be bought
lor the same money.
"Trial b? IWra."
Tor the Information of thus* not familiar with
1 hie stak, ales extract* from notice* uy it* oon
temporarles, called oul by its recent cnange in
lorm, are appended:
>?> <*'? tlm U <u/i, t^/uiu
Weuon*rstul*i* Imt max on IU great rospsrlty.
t to.rt M uu oeUcr enmity ncwitMijMT miUt I 'tuns
[At i 'hiujuUtplila Lettyti.
Ihk MAhHix.ro> Lvimxu ttTAB hss marked th*
do** ot tw*nty-ou* yesrs under it* preeeni luuai^
ment by permaueut eniarif. m. nt to a double snuet, or
sight i (apet, and mvcnauicai lmpruvcmeni* in*t
Klwlij inciease II* iscmuss lor i*uoiic*U\>ii. ilia
bia* i? no* considerably more loan twic- ss isryt mm
llMtaui ittOi.lurinsiMsiiwii imu* umss as y
lestnng iiisttei.auu almost hve uioss ui* ?
Won inal it tiieu snyoyed. it is, mueed, a "?1 rmrt
papel, "wormy ol any city in Uk lanu."
/Vom Uu ttruuiufn
Vv*smn?tun's best, if not really its only new*
t-a^ei, is a uk biaa, wmch n?* aciiv lusuon ol JO OOVJL
in a 1^1 w?iiUon ol ^oo.bUo, set ved by ?s*uns su3
cariieis IHi biAk ims 1m> i^uuls. Mil 11 | ntnigns*
an tne news, gives bom sides e^usny 'i. j ? ???-) i^at
mint, kud nss alisilieu sn iucuci.1 repuiation Sol tn*
tairnvss m1 its tone and "?-? n-nt.
trutH thr iHMUtnurt -sun.
1 ha n aohikoiok bTAX, one of the most prosperous
newspapers m IM country, lately euiaived, is bow oer
manenuy an eignt-piuct pafer. Ihetcood business It
enjoys wss cresujU oy its 1 'iirns n. aod ? '?* Ueid it oc
cupies u*s been u*id suci*e**iun> tor many ysar* it
is m many lespecW * mods, slier noon !<*,<? r. aud la
extenuma lo it our New luar sareetmas we trust Its
prosperity may never wan*.
^osv Uu fhtbuUipkia TiNwa
lux &tas hii* tu* youmallstic field of th* nation^
capital, aud Ims it admirably aud with (real sun ?
>Vo*> IV -Vic >i/r* cbetflMrcMl J/uUrUn.
'1 h*t?nter| rising journal, 1 hi H ash i>oto* Etuin
UlAa, nss just completed twenty -one years under its
present management, aud cateorst** tn* **?ut by
sooi Un* i*imanendi an el*nt-psae lorm. in wladi it
Is one o> lue largest aud liai.dnme*t alieruoou uaoers
m Uie tmteu biatea,ssit nas ' " if o*enon* uj tn* u?i
-???* "ii tT 111 ?? S1111 '
>rvm the bauinwt t A nvriean.
Iha Vt akui>otok tvin>? stab appeared last mailt
lu new type, wntn the announcement that berealtar it
would at't>ear permanenUy aa an aicnt-twae itrnr
l"t &XAa nas ion* been one ol th* national "ii i iai i
"oojecu ol intereal," aud m it* new lorm It wiu, witn
out uount, go on increasing in circulation woiul
t'rumUu Chester t^l?.> J inter.
Here and there we behold s paper which reward* ths
toil, pel naps lue gum us. ol iu tonlrolung swriu witA
a meaaure ol aucuasa Uial exute* tnewouder ol ail
culilpeuiun. bucli A Jounutl, It |fiv?| u?
PMMteurtr w be to ?*>. i? Lwk*imq biaTw
waamngton City. s-sns? ovaa. m
>Vw? tAc ItmUanaixA* Stum.
ft gives us great plessors to note this evldsaeeaC
prosperity. Iha UiABisoueof Uie best and cieansst
IU liife country, AlMl u | Huisi UWlUUiiA r>l
?eii iauv? ul Umi iisumiAi capital.
>Vem (A* JHaeon (&?.) TtUgruph.
lu LvtMiiQ bTAX u ti4tnt?)iun#r ??"***
th* best uewspsper Msshulgtonsvsr |m2l
/Vo* f*? Philadelphia Uteurd.
lu W AsuixotoM tviiiny Stab kssps an SWT iasd
?bKiiuUK iui ix^iiteiiApuzariiM j'"Kiirlirwl m Um
cikpitaL
>Vv? Or CSmhrrtand (Mi.) 1MHLy Seme.
Tax ttTAB >? already so exoallant that we a
any loom lor improvement.
JYvm IM Sroohit/n Tune*.
TU 81 as Is aa exponent of progressts joaniaim
lu growth and proe|>eriiy ate th* direct rssults at Its
clear perueyUon ol Uie uemanda ol in* tuns and Its
unstinted enterprise and yatient industry tn lulilui*
tnsm. It gives Mssluugtoa a daily m>sr worthy ut
any city m ths laud.
frvm the Btfalo Aetsa.
frtmUt* Jt*)W
Ths prosperity at Turn
jf Wssuington i* * sow

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