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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 15, 1889, Image 8

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LOC\A? MENTION.
The Weather.
For the Dwtrict of Columbia. Xi w Jturner.
Delaware. Maryland. ViigiuM. an<l West Vir
ginia. rain; northeasterly ninth; no decided
change in temperature.
.
21 Damaged Babt l iiiHituw.
R. (joumuvid. I0?l7-1IAK? F st. n. w.
21 Damaged Bab; Carriage will be sold at the
II, K_ ('o.'s low.
\\? have just received 21 fine Baby Carriages
which were slightly damaged ami soiled in
tamsit. As the H. K. Co. has settled damages
with the liun iu New York we have been in
?tructed by the factory to sell the carriages at
a sacriii t "rather than to return them.
Therefore we will offer the entire lot at snch
price* that will clear thein ont at once. The
lot consist* of 7 diff? rent style*, all handsomelv
upholstered, with patent wueels and fancy Rat
taii bodies.
We have no old stock.
We have no iVom for damaged or soiled
good*.
Don't fail to examine this lot of Carriages; it
will pay you.
Ii. Goldhchmid. 1007-1009 F st. n. w.
Strictly one price store.
Ovr BoTs' and Children's Clothing de
serves the popularity which it has attained.
W hy? Because they .ire perfect in tit and fin
ish. and <*>rrect iu style, and the prices are
always the lowest.
Eisexan Bros.. 7th and E.
Manufacturing Clothiers and Tailors.
Read The Fair's ad. in City Items.
We Wish to Call Attention to the follow
lag special prices for this week:
Our #1 rocking chair.
Our #2.50 rocking chair.
Our r2K 10 i>cs. oak suit furniture.
Our ?2.50 mattress.
Our material* for loose covers for furniture.
Our 27x8:1 window screen, 45c.
our window screen. 55c.
Yoa should see our line of adjustable wire
window screAis for 10c. to #1 each.
Screen frames. 15c. to 30c., according to
?ue)
Je. straw matting "you should see."
]pc. straw matting you should buy.
22c. straw matting, a good quality.
25c. straw matting. used to sell at 40c.
35c. straw matting, good enough for ail.
MK. straw matting, fancy brands, and is used
for special colored rooms.
50c. straw malting, very odd and unique.
75c. straw Japanese matting, of highest class.
W. H. HoroHTON Co.,
121* an 1 1220 F street northwest
A Large Invoice of imported insect powder
just received at Meutz's Pharmacy, 101-1 F st.
Dm. Henley's Wondebfcl Tosif.
Thousands of ladies troubled with nervous
ne*s and female troubles have been cured by
using Dr. Henley's Celery, Beef and Iron. The
purest, pleasantest. and most effective tonic the
World ever knew.
Something Entirely'New. ? A decorated
English china dinner set only *9.98, for to
morrow only. At The Fair. tfl2 7tli st. n.w.
The Great BaxkripT SaLe at Windsor A
C<Vs, 14J:! New York avenue, is now drawing to
a close. If you .o secure the greatest
bargains ever offered in strictly fine shoes, call
now. ere it is too late.
Strictly Pure Powdered Drugs in popular
use at low prices. Refined borax. 15c. lb. Per
sian insect powder. 75c. lb. Cream tartar
i pure ). 50c. lb. Bicarb, or baking soda. 10c. lb.
Rocheile salts. 50c. Kolb's l'UAKMU Y. 7th and
E streets northwest.
Moth Balls! Moth Bulls! The beat thing to
destroy mothe. Mertz's Ohi o Stoke,
_ 1014 F street.
Read The Fair's ad. in City Items.
Don't Fail to Read the special list of bar
gains on the 4tli page which will be offered to
morrow at R. Goldschtuld's. 1007-11W9 F st. n.w.
Highly Satisfactory.? Trousers made to
order. ~5; Suits made to order. Guaran
teed perfect lit tit and finish, and the latest
style fabrics. Eiseman Bros.. 7th und E.
Tailoring Department.
I.aroe*r Assortment of russet and canvas
shoes and slippers, for men.womeiiandchildrcn.
to be found in this city, at prices to suit all |
pockets, at Z. Stsasburger's. '."IMi 7th st. n.w. |
Read The Fair's ad. in City Items.
The Best Siring Mmdicine. l'age's sarsa
parilla. Price 75c. for a targe bottle.
Mertz's Drug Store. 1014 F st.
"Baker's Norwegian Cod Liver Oil"
Has done more to relieve and cure consump
tion. weak lungs and general weakness than
aAy known remedy. Jno. C. Baker A Co., Phil.
The BalaNvE of the etf? i ts of the late Malthv
House are now on safe at Juliuh Lankbugh'.h.
315 7th street. The following remarkable low
prices will prevail: Oak Bed Room Suites, -?24
and *22. Parlor Suits ill Silk Plush. *00 each,
sol;! to the Maltby ?or 5100: 40-lb. Hair Mat
tresses *'.? catch: Wire springs. 43 ?.toil: Mar
sillies Spread*. Towels. Napkins. Table l.inens. I
F*atht% Pillows. Oak Rockers, Tables. In fact '
Vou can select enough goods to furnish your
Louse for one-half regular prices.
I.vy Your Coal. Coke and Wood from Joiin
n > pRolUElia, the leading firm in the Dis
trict
ll YoC want to see all the newest styles of
baby carriages don't uii*s to inspect Wash. B.
Wilajax*' st'* R. 317 7th st. ii.w.. as he makes a !
speciality in that line.
Whitney s pure crab applecidei. 471 Pa. uv. n.w.
Mertz's Drug Store.
Diamond Dyes. tic.
Bird Seed per lb.. Cc.
Bird Gravel, large. 0c.
Hood's Sarsaparilla. 67c.
Mertz's Drug Store.
1014 F street.
I'M I'.ex Furniture Polish Sold by P. Han- !
?on Hiss M'f'g Co.. ?15 15th n.w.. also druggists, j
Woven Wire Mattress only *2.50. former
price *5.011.
Hair mattress at *5. *7.50. *10 and *12.
Straw matting fr?Jln 10c. a yard up.
Baldwin dry air refrigerators from *5 up to
(75. Visa. B. Wh liaks.
7th and D sts. u.w.
I or Spring Lamb go to Jno. 15. Kellt.Center
Market. Corned be'-f a spec laity.
Fis* Bvtter. Fin*: Be iter.
J as. F. Oyster.
Vth st. Wing. Center Market,
cor Pa. avo. and tfth st. u.w.
Do SoT fall to call at Jl LlUS LaniAU'Rgh's.
315 7th street, d lrmg the coming week and buy
some of the effects of the late Maltby Hotel.
The Great Atlantic and Pacikh Tea Ct>?
ka>Y h-n published a beautiful Easter offering.
It represents a little girl of tender years ui
iu early morning garb, who is evidently In the
best of humor, for her face l* wreathed with
smiles, and she anticipates the festival with
uuuttom ot pleasure. A slip is her only ward
robe. while her shoes lie upon the carpet, and
stockings are ui her hands. The words "Easter
Moruiug" under the picture tells the joyous oc
casion represe nted, and all the surroundings
blend Ino-t harniouioii.ly and suggestively.
Fob Wall Paper ami window shades go to
fc. Henderson s. 1113 1 stieetn.w.
t apital '"ity Mixed Laws Grass. guaranteed
to product a thick, velytv turr. Lawn fertili
?ers. Diamond lawu-inowers. best and cheap
est in u*e. P. Mann A Co., '?
-07 7th st.. opposite Center Market
-i .
O EN VINE Novelties in English plaids and
?hecks tor suits and trousers, to Vour measure,
trousers from *5; suits from ?20. Fit and work
guaranteed. SlKvslLitf.Eh A Son,
1112 F st.
Si-rino Lamb and Gffeti Peas.Spring Chicken
a?i'l Corned Bee? a specialty at New York
Market. 3d and Iml. ave. n. w.
? -
Gas Fixtimw. C. A. Middeman. 121H1F st
All-Wool Trousers to Order.
*3.00.
HaMBUUGUi's.
I'udcr Metropolitan Hotel.
Orand Perch Fishing Boats for hire at Cum
berland's. foot of F st 11. w.
Upholstery at Cost.
UMnch Kamie furniture covering 45c. per yrd.
24-inch worsted plush, colors: crimson, blue
a*id olive. 50c. per yard.
24-inch crushed plush, all colors. *1 per yrd.
Printed madras for curtails 10c. per yard.
Nottingham lace, 54-inches wide. 15c. per
yard.
Dado portieres. 3 yards long, *2 per all
colors. ?
5 feet bamboo easels 41 each.
Palmer's celebrated hammocks 75c., #1. #1.25,
? 1.50. *1.75. #3.50 and *6.
100 Horn hassocks 75c.. former price #1.25.
2.50 pairs lace curtains #1.50. from #2.50
pnir.
3l!0 pairs lace cu.-tains #2.50. from #3.50
pair. Wash. It Williams,
317 7th *t u. w.
Julius Lambubgh is selling the balauce of
tbt effecfl of the late Maltby House, commenc
ing on Monday.
Whitxiy s pure Bussettcider, 471 Pa. ar. o.w.
LOCAL MENTION.
? 0
All-Wool Tboiskhs to Obder,
43.00.
Hambcbokh's.
Under Metropolitan Hotel.
FlbSitL s Cafe. 1425 N.Y. avenue. the clieaj>
est anil nnj-t genteel dining-room in the citv
CITY AND DISTRICT.
AMI'SKJIKXTS TO-XIGHT.
Albacoh'h.???Faust."
National.?"Jim. the Penman."
Will a ax, Halu?"Christ Before Pilate."
Habris".?"The Main Line.-'
Kebnan's.?"Uncle Tom's Cabin."
Globe. ?Variety.
CONDKNSKI) LOCALS.
! At a meeting of the light battery. D. C. S. G.,
the following members were recommended to
the adjutant-general for honorable discharge
Privates 1>. E. Burton. 15. C. Taliaferro. V. U.
Dorsey and Wm. C. Smith, who has removed
from this city to Chicago. The battery is grow
ing steadily and will make a fine showing in
?"camp" in July.
The certificate of the election of Messrs. W.
E. Nallev. Joseph Hollidge and A. L Keene as
trustees of Emory chapel. M. E. church south,
located near Brightwood. has lieen filed. The
trustees holding over are Alfred Bav. J. W
Kay. James E. Hay. A. G. Osborn. W. B. Mc
Chesney and Benj. C. King.
There is a revival in progress at the Mt. Car
mel Baptist church, corner 1th and L streets
northwest. S. Bcriah Lamkins. pastor.
JIi?s Anna A. Shellaimrgcr has been elected
president o! the Young Woman's Christian home,
vice Mrs. Mary G. Wilkinson, resigned.
The classmates of Ered W. Fiske. who was a
student at the Worcester polytechnic institute,
and who died at Worcester on the 6th inst
I have paid a glowing tribute to his memory!
? he deceased, who was a son of the late Arthur
? *>"?e. of th.s city, graduated at the High
school ht.re in 1887 at the head of his class.
lesterday afternoon at Christ Episcopal
church. East Washington. Bishop Paret con
firmed a class of twenty-seven candidates. Be- i
side the rector. Bev. Mr. W'ilAantft. Rev. A. F.
Nteele. of St. Mark's, and Bev. Mr. Phillips, of
M. James, were present.
Saturday night Henry Dunmore fell on ljtli i
street, between K and I, streets, and was I
severely injured about the head. He was taken
to the Emergency hospital. 1
Capt J Jay Camp, assistant clerk of the
court, who has been seriously ill for some weeks,
has fully recovered and returned to his post
this morning, taking his place in Circuit Court,
Division 1.
This morning about 8:30 o'clock, a large por
tion of the ornamented ceiling of the bar-room
in Mr. It. W. Drivers saloon. 605 Pennsylvania
avenue, fell, carrying with it a part of his clian
2*?* ant* ??ing damage to amount of over
?200.
The police during the forty-eight hours end
"IR llt f o clock to-day made 167 arrests, over
fifty being in the first precinct. This morning
there were fifty-four prisoners in the Police
Court.
Hie Butler Eight Infantry will march as a
I) ittaln.il in the emancipation parade to-mor
row. CaM. Young, of company A. command
ing; Lieut. Irvii?g 11. Simins. adjutant; Capt.
Green. quartermaster. Company B will be
commanded by Capt. Alex. Uglesbv, and com
pany C by Capt. F. W. Warreu.
THK AC'ADKMY OK SOIKXCKS.
The Ltody of Distinguished .Men to Meet
Here To-morrow.
H"W THE NATIONAL ACADEMY IS CONSTITUTED
CHANOES IN ITS MKMBEHSHI!'?A I'BEsIDENT
To HE ELEt TED THIS TEAK?WHO ABE MEMBERS
OF THE BODY.
The National Academy of Sciences, which be
gins its annual meeting in this city to-morrow,
comprises in its membership men who have
gained eminence in scientific work. An elec
tion to this body is considered by American
scientists the highest recognition they can gain
for their work. The present meeting is of
more than usual importance, as three of the
most important offices are to be filled. The
six-year terms, for which the president. Prof.
O. C. .Marsh, the vice-president. Prof. Simon
Newcomb. and the home s^retarv, Prof. Asaph
Hall, were elected, expire at this meet
ing. and their successors are to be
chosen. In addition many important scientific
papers are announced. When the National
Auailcmy of Sciences was incorporated bv act
ot ( oi.gr. ss ai.proved M.trfh 3. 1X63. the .'>r.!i
nary membership was limited to 50 In l?w>
this limitation as to the number of ordinary
nit inbers was removed and at [.resent there are
.?6 such members. Ikt* academy was consti
tuted a sort of advisory board or scientific
cabinet of the gov. rnment. The act of incor
poration declared that "the academv shall,
whenever called upon bv any department of
the government, investigate.'examine, experi
ment. and report upon anv subject
of science or art. the actual ex
pense ot such investigations, examinations
experiments and report to be paid from ap
propriations which may be made for the pur
pose. I nder this provision committees of the
a.-ademv have organized ariTl supervised much
of the scientific work of the government. Of
the fifty original members nr.md in the act of
nicorporation all have died except thirteen,
who still remain as members. These are F \
P. Barnard. W. H. C. Brirtlett. John II. C. Cot
nn. James U. Dana. W'olcott Gibbs. Benjamin
A Gould. James Hull. Julius E. llilgurd. J.
It ter Lesley. J. S. Newberry. H. A. Newton!
tairmau Bogers and Lewis M. Kutherford.
there but three honorary members? Alexan
' " Agassiz. Messrs. F. Longstreth ami Theo.
Lyman. The list of for. igu associates com
prises twenty-five nam. s of men distinguished
as scientists. Below will be found brief sketches
of the ninety-six active members.
MEMBERS OF THE ACADEMY.
I rof. Cleveland Abbe, of this city, who be
came a member of the academy in IHC'J. is well
known as the meteorologist of the weather bu
reau and a mathematician and astronomer
lie organized there, under the patronage of the
< wicinnati chamber of commerce, a weather
bureau, whose work attracted wide attention
and led to the establishment of the govern
ment s weather bureau and to liis appointment
| as meteorologist.
Brevet Brig.-<Jen. Henry L. Abbot, elected a
[ member in 1H7J. is a distinguished engineer
officer, who during many veafs service has had
j charge of some of the important government
I works, and has published a number of volumes
| and papers having reference chiefly to eugi
[ neering science.
Joel Asaph Allen, distinguished as a natural
ist. was chosen as a member of the academy in
I lx.6. He is at present curator of tlw depart
ment of ma mala and birds in tin American
museum of natural history. New York. He was
[ a student under and an associate of Agassiz.
I Prof. George F. Barken professor of phvsics
at the university of Pennsylvania, lias been a
member of the academv since 1?76 He was
associated with Prof. Silliman at Yale, un.l won
such recognition as a physicist that he has on
several occasions been selected by the govern
ment for important scientific missions.
Fred, rick A. P. Barnard, the distinguished
educator. know n best perhaps as president of
? olumbia college. New Yocfc, was one of the
original incorporators of the academv. He is
distinguished both as a teacher and a writer on
educational topics, and as a physicist has en
gaged in important scit ntific rcsearcltes.
Hie venerable Col. William II. C. Bartlett
. one of the original members, after serving in
the' field as an engineer officer, spent many
useful years as a professor at W est Point, and
: for his work while there, both as a teacher, as
an author and as an original investigator re
; cem d honors from several universities and
l scientific bodies.
Prof. Alexander Graham Bell, of this citv
( who became a member of the body in 1883. "is
i ! f?A / . Wpularly as the inventor
I ?t ' '? 11 he has carried on manv
abstruse investigations in physics, which have
' men' iW?' pUi;? anumK scientific
men. Muili of his time of late years has been
r !,,!.VU*tl*"tl0n' r''lRt"'g <o deaf-mutism
anil heredity, as instanced in the cases of fami
lies an? communities amoug whom many deaf
mutes have appeared.
Dr. John 8 fallings, U. 8. A., another distin
, guislied resident of Washington, became a
j nu mber of the academy in 1883. Dr Billings
I after active service during the war as a sur
I geon. became in 1864 connected with the sur
| geon-gcneral's office in this citv, and since
then lias won distinction by his work there
His neatest achievement. perluDs, has been
the "Index-Catalogue of the LiOrarv of the
Surgeon-Generals Office." which contains the
bibliography of every medical subject as far as
it is contained in fkv great medical library
under L>r. Billing* care.
Dr. Henry P. Bowditch, a professor at Cam
bridge. a grandson of Nathaniel Bowditch be
came a member of the academy in 1887. having
won eminence in science by his investigations
as a physiologist.
Prof. W'rn. H. Brewer, of Yale college, owed his
election to membership in the academy in 1880,
to *his researches in chemistry His scientific
papers are devoted principally^) chemical ag
riculture. 8
Prof. William K. Brooks, of Johns Hopkins
university, made a member in 1884, is widely
known as a naturalist, having contributed manv
valuable papers and reports to periodicals, and
having organized the Chesapeake zoological
laboratory of Johns Hopkins university.
I>r. Cliarle* Eilouard Brown-Sequard. of Paris,
tfie Ufctinguished physiologist, became a mem
ber in 1H6N. while holding a professorship at
Harvard university. He has pursued investiga
tions relating to the nervous system with most
important results, and is widely known as a
i teacher and writer, ah well as n most successful
practitioner.
I'rof. George J. Brush, of Sew Haven, to
whose energy and judgment the Sheffield
scientific school largely owes its eminence,
has been a member since 18*?8. He is distin
guished as a mineralogist, and wag an associate
of Benjamin Silliman. jr.
Prof. dins. F. Chandler, of Sew York, who
for many years has held a professorship in the
Columbia college, w;is chosen to a seat in the
academy in 1874. His most important work,
perhaps, has been in the sanitary reforms he
has brought about in Sew York through his
connection with the board of health.
Prof. Seth C. Chandler, of Harvard, is one of
the newest members of the academy, having
been elected last year on account of his scien
tific work.
Pror. John H. C. Coffin. C. 8. S.. of this city,
was one of the incorporators of the academy.
He is eminent as a mathematician, and as a
, professor of mathematics in the navy had
charge at different times of the naval observa
tory and of the nautical almanac. He was
I placed on the retired list in 1877.
Brevet Brig.-Gen. Cyrus B. Comstock. whose
membership dates from 1884, is one of the most
distinguished engineer officers of the army.
He served efficiently during the war, and since
has had the direction of surveys, and has been
a member of important boards.
Prof. Geo. H. Cook, of New Brunswick. S. J.,
who was made a member in 1887. well known
as a geologist, has done much service to science
as a professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Insti
tute, as state geologist of New Jersey, and as
director of the Sew Jersey agricultural-experi
ment station.
Prof. Josiah P. Cooke, who has been a mem
ber since 1872, has. as director of the famous
chemical laboratory of Harvard, which was
established through his efforts, conducted sue- <
ceftsfullv some of the most important investiga
tions ever undertaken in this country.
Prof. Edward I>. Cope, of Philadelphia, was
by reason of his eminence as a naturalist, made
a member of the academy in 1872. As a college
professor, as palaeontologist to the U. S. geo
logical survey, as member of the scientific staff
of the Smithsonian Institution, and in other
positions Prof. Cope has pursued investigations
in many fields with much energy and made
many important contributions to scientific
literature.
l)r. Elliott Cones, of this city, who was
elected a nu mber of the academy in 1877. is
well known as a naturalist, and especially for
his extensive researches in ornithology. He
has held several positions in connection with
the scientific bureaux of the government.
Within h few years he has become permanently
identified with the theosopliist movement in
this country.
Prof. James M. Crafts, whose researches in
chemistry won for him the honor of election to i
the academy in 1*72. lias conducted for many |
years important chemical investigations largely |
in connection with Prof. Charles Friedel in
Paris. I
The election of Dr. John C. Dalton. of Sew
York, to the academy in 18t'>4 was mainly due
to the extended reputation he has made as a
physiologist, lie is the author of a number of
works on this subject, and is u recognizi d au
thority.
l'rof. Jaiues Dwiglit Dalia. of New Haven, i
was one of the original members of the academy.
His record is full of achievements m the line of j
mineralogy, and he is to-day the senior editor
of the American Journal of Science and Arts, i
Edward Salisbury Dana, his son. is associated
with him in the publication. He follows his
father's line of research, and was elected a J
member of the academy in 1N84.
Geo. Davidson, astronomer, is a native of
England, but now a resident of San Francisco.
Hi was limde a member of the Academy of
Sciences in 1*74.
Clarence Edward Duttou is officially known
as a ??soldier." being a captain in the regular \
army of the Unit, d States. He i* at present as- \
sistant to the director of the geological survey, j
In 1MH4 he was elected to the academy in rccog- i
liition of his valuable researches and writings |
in the field of geology, lie is. if not the orig-^a
inn tor. one of the planners of the scheme to re-n
claim vast quantities of the arid lauds of the j
southwest.
Win. G. Fariow, of Cambridge, received an
election to the academy in 187'J oh account of
his botanical investigations. At present he oc- J
iupies the chair of cryptogamic botany at Har- ,
vard.
Wm. Ferrel. of Kansas City, has been a mem- i
ber of the academy since 1W8. lie was for four i
years professor m the signal service. His sci- ,
entitle contributions have been mainly in the ,
line of mi teorolo-{y.
Frederick Augustus Geiitli. a native of (1< r
many, is now professor of chemistry and min
eralogy in the university of Pennsylvania. He
has achieved the reputation of being in the
front rank of analytical chemists in this coun- ?
try. He was elected a member of the academy
in 1872.
Prof. Josiah Willard Gibbs was made a mem- |
ber of the academy in 187'J on account of his i
researches in the subject of thermodynamics, i
lie has occupied the chair of mathematical
phvsics at Yale since 1871.
Prof. Oliver Wolcott Gibbs. of Newport, an j
original member of the Academy of Sciences, j
is now its foreign secretary. He has pub
lished no book, but is an indefatigable original J
investigator in the domain of chemistry and
phsyics. |
Grove Karl Gilbert is a Washingtonian, aud j
is one of the younger scientists, but is rapidly
making a name as a leader in geology. He was
elected to membership in the academy in 188:1.
lb- is at present geologist to the U. S. geologi
cal survey.
Dr. Theodore Nicholas Gill is a naturalist, ]
and has been an assistant ill the Smithsonian,
senior assistant librarian of Congress and pro
fessor of zoology in the Columbian university,
lie received his certificate of membership m
the academy of sciences in 1873. He has de
voted considerable attention of late to the
study of mollusks.
l)r. (i. Brown (Joode, the assistant secretary
of the Smithsonian, in charge of the National
museum, is a young member of the academy,
having been e'lectid last year, but his work as a
naturalist has won him distinction. Hi. especial
line is ichthyology. From 1874 to 18M7 he was
chief of the division of fisheries in the Smith
sonian. and on the organization of the National
museum became its assistant director. Upon
the death of Prof, liaird. at the request of
President Cleveland, he filled the office of
United States commissioner of fisheries until
I Congress provided for the establishment of
' that office on an independent footing.
Benjamin Aptliorp Gould, the distinguished
\ astronomer, of Cambridge, was un original
j member of the academy. He is also a member
I of the Boval astronomical society of London,
I and of the "French, llussian, Prussian and Aus
| triau academies of sciences.
l'rof. Arnold Hague, of the geological survey,
owes his election to the academy of science to
his extensive and valuable work on geology.
His writings on this subject have given him a
deserved reputation m the scientific world. He
has been government geologist for Guatemala
and China. He was elected to the Academy of
Science four years ago.
Prof. Asaph Hall, of the national observa
tory at Washington, has been a member of the
Academy of Science since 187,'j aud for the
past six years lias been home secretary. He
has loug enjoyed an international reputation
as an astronomer. He has been connected
with all the important astronomical expedi
tions sent out by the United States. In 1877 he
discovered the moons of Mars. The Loyal
Astronomical Society of London awarded him
a gold medal for his discoveries.
Prof. James Hail, of Albany, won a member
ship of the Academy of Science by his work as a
paleontologist. lu*1837 he was state geologist
for the fourth district of New York, and six
years later, still retaining that title, he was
placed in charge of paleontological work. In
later years he extended his work into broader
fields, contributing to science some valuable
work in the Kocky mountain regions and in
Canada. He was one of the original members
of the Academy of Science.
Eugene W. llilgard, professor of agricultural
chemistry and botany at the university of Cali
fornia. was formerly chemist of the Smithson
ian laboratory anil professor of chemistry at
the National Medical college here. His exten
sive work in the fields of chemistry and geology
? secured his election to the National Academy of
Science in 18J2.
Julius E. Hilgnrd, of Washington, was one of
' the original members of the Academy of
! Science. He is a well-known mathametician and
for many years was superintendent of the coast
i and geodetic survey.
George W Hill, of this city, has been a mem
1 ber since 1874. His*work lias been chiefly in
matlaematical astronomy. His researches on
lunar theory attracted attention and secured
him a gold medal from the Royal Society, of
i London.
l'rof. Henry B. Hill, of Cambridge, was
' chosen a member on ac'count of his learning
aud research in the field of chemistry. He has
been a member since 1883.
Prof. Edward 8. Holdi.n is president of the
University of California and director of the
famous Lick observatory. Mt. Hamilton. He
was a graduate of the military acadtfmy and
resigned from the army to devote himself to
scientific research. He has been a member of
the academy since 1885.
l'rof. T. Sterry Hunt, of Montreal, has been
a member of the academy for sixteen years.
He is a native of Norwich, Conn. His chief
service to science has been in his chemical re
? searches, which have lead to valuable result*.
j Prof. Alpheus Hyatt, of Boston, is a native of
! Washington. He if a well-known naturalist,
and ha* been a member of the act de uy since
1875. He originated the American society of
naturalists, and wan its first president. He has
devoted special attention to the lower forms of
auimal life.
Prof. Charles L. Jackson, of Cambridge, be
came a member of the Academy of Science in
1883. as a recognition of his work in the field of
chemistry. He has made several valuable dis
coveries in chemistry.
Samuel W. Johnson, of Sew Haven, is an au
thority on the application of chemistry to agri
culture. He hr.s been a member of the acad
emy since 1866.
Prof. Clarence King, of New York, the well
known geologist, and first director of the gov- I
ernment geological survey, became a mem- ]
ber of the academy in 1876. In 1863 he |
crossed the continent from the Missouri river
to California on horseback. He joined the
geological survey of California and since then
has done distinguished service to science. It
was due to his personal efforts that the govern
ment surveys were consolidated into the geo
logical survey.
I'rof. Samuel P. Langlev. of this city, secre
tary of the Smithsonian, has been a member of
the academy since 1876. He is an astronomer
of wide reputation. He was assistant at the
Harvard observatory, and then held the chair
of mathematics at the U. S. naval academy,
and is director of the Alleghany observatory.
His scientific papers have been numerous and
valuable. To his researches is largely due the
progress made in recent years in physical as
tronomy. For a more delicate measurement of
the heat than could be made by any existing
instrument he invented the bolometer. He was
chosen secretary of the Smithsonian in 1887.
In 1884 Prof. Joseph Leidy, of Philadelphia,
was chosen a member of the academy on ac
count of his distinguished services to science
as a naturalist. In 1852 he took the chair of
anatomy at the university of Pennsylvania, and
he still holds this position and that of natural
history in 8warthmore college. He has pub
lished 800 scientific papers.
J. Peter Lesley, of Philadelphia, was one of
the original members of the academy. His
scientific researches has been chiefly in
geology, lie was one of the ti n commissioners
sent by the United States to visit the World's
fair in Paris, in 1867.
John Le Conte. of Berkeley, Cal., who be
came a member of the academy in 1*78, is a
; distinguished physicist, whose scientific work
| has extended over nearly fifty years. He at
I one time occupied the chair of natural philoso- !
I phy and chemistry at Franklin college. Georgia, j
Later he held a similar position in the South
Carolina college at Columbia, and in 1869 was
appointed professor of physics at the Univer
sity of California. He was also president of
that university.
Joseph Le Conte, of Uerkelv. Cal.. has been
a member of the academy since 1875. He was
for several years a practicing surgeon and phy
sical! at Macon. Ga., then, ill 1850, lie studied
natural science and geology under Prof. Louis i
Agassiz. II?' is now professor of geology and !
natural history at the University of California. I
having tilled similar positions in other colleges j
and universities formerly, lie has made nu- i
, merous original investigations in geology and ;
physiological optics.
Leo Lesquercnx. of Columbus. Ohio, is a !
native of Switzerland. In recognition of liis j
' work as a paleontologist he was chosen a mem- |
I ber of the academy in 1864. His most valuable I
researches have been in the coal formations in
Ohio. Pennsylvania. Illinois, Kentucky and j
Arkansas, which began in 1850. He is a mem- i
ber of more than twenty scientific societies
EliasLooiuis. of New ilaven.Conn.,waselected ;
' a member of the academy in 187:! as a recogni- j
t'.on of his valuable scrvii? s in the study of as- !
tronomy. meteorology and analytical geometry. |
He is the author of a series of text books on j
mathematical subjects, natural philosophy and .
astronomy used in all the high schools and i
colleges in the United States and in many of ?
the more prominent in England.
Joseph I.overing. of Cambridge. Mass.. is I
Hollis professor ot mathematics and natural i
philosophy at Harvard and director of the |
Jefferson physical laboratory. He is a popular
lecturer on astronomy and physics and lias con
tributed largely to scientific magazines. He
became a member of the academy in is";).
Othniel Charles Marsh, of New Haven, is the
president of the National academy, of which
he has been a member since 1H74. Previous to i
1 that he was president of the American associa- i
tion for the advancement of science. He is a !
I fellow of the Geological society of London,
! from which, in 1877. he received the liigsbv ?
medal for important discoveries in paleou- '?
toiogy. He is also a member of many other
European and American scientific societies. |
l'rof. Marsh's explorations in the west have re- {
suited in the discovery of more than 1.000 new i
species of extinct vertebrates, many of them I
of great value.
Alfred Marshall Mayer w.:s elected a member
of the academy in 1*7-. His earlier work in
| physics was done ill the Univer. ity of Mary
land. Since then he has tilled, successively,
chairs in other colleges, and is now professor j
of physics in the Stevens institute of tech- <
t liologv. Hoboken, N. J.
(ien. Montgomery C. Meigs became a member
of the National academy in 1*65. having then a
vid --spread reputation as superintending
! engineer. In 1853 he designed anil constructed !
the Potomac aqueduct, and superintended the
building of the new wings and the iron dome of ;
the capilol. He is a regent of the Smith oniau .
Institution and a member of a number of j
scientific societies.
Thoiu.i:; Corwin Mendenhall is an eminent !
physicist, and became celebrated as a pro- I
' fessor of physics in the imperial university at I
Tokio. Japan. He was one of the founders of 1
the Sei .mological society of Tokio. In 1884 he I
! connected himself with the United States sig- |
nal office. He was elected to the academy in i
; 1**7.
Albert Abraham Miclielson, of Cleveland, was ]
elected to membership in the academy in IMS. !
His reputation depends largely upon his series
of investigations on the velocity of light, lie is
a member of various scientific societies.
Henry Mitchell, the hyilrographer. has been
connected with the United States coast survey
during the greater portion of his life and has
been a member of the academy since 1*85. His I
attention has been almost entirely given to I
physical hydrology as relating to rivers and
i harbors. j
I?r. Silas Weir Mitchell, of Philadelphia. 1ms ;
i attained a high reputation by his physiological i
' researches and their voluminous publication. !
His papers treat chiefly of physiology, toxi- j
J cology. and nervous diseases, on which subjects
he is nu acknowledged authority. He became
i a member of the academy in 1*65.
Edward S. Morse, of Salem, Mass., was one of
the founders of the Peaboily academy of
sciences, and was associated in establishing the
American Xatiiraiixt. Much of his work as a
naturalist w as done in Japan. In 1S76 he was
elected a member of the academy.
Henry Morton, of Hoboken. N. J., is president
of the Steven's institute of technology, a posi
tion which he has held from the organization
of the school. He is an expert in physics and
chemistry, and was elected to membership in
the academy in 1874.
John Strong Newberry, the geologist,was one
of the original me'.ibers of the academy. He
was prominently connected with the United
States sanitary commission during the war. and
was afterward appointed professor of geology
and paleontology at the Columbia school of
mines. He is president of the New York acad
emy of sciences.
Prof. Simon Newcoiub. the astronomer, was
| elected to membership in the academy in 1869,
, and since 1*83 has been its vice-president, he
| is in charge of the office of the "American
, Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac." His dis
I eoveries and calculations have been published
? in more than 100 various books and pamphlets.
| He is the author also of a widely circulated pop
! ul ir work on astronomy.
j Among the original members was Prof. H. A.
| Newton, of New Haven, who enjoys a distin
i guished reputation as u mathematician and as
[ tronomer. His most valuable investigations
' have been with relation to meteors and like
j bodies. He is a member of some of the liigh
' est scientific societies in this country and in
Europe He is executive officer of the board |
j of managers of Yale university and an associate
I editor of the American Journal of Science.
j Urig.-Gen. John Newtou, of the engineer
j corps, has been a member since 1876. His
i great engineering achievements have given him
a wide reputation. These include the success
ful removal of the ??Hell Gate" rocks, between
Long Island sound and East river.
Prof. Jas. E. Oliver, of Ithaca, N. Y., won his
reputation in the field of mathematics, and was
chosen a member of the academy in 1872. He
is professor of mathematics at Cornell.
Prof. A. 8. Packard, of Providence, R. I., is a
naturalist of reputation. He his made some
valuable geological collections, has held posi
tions of distinction in educational institutions,
and has been connected with the United States
geological survey and the flsh commission. He
became a member in 1872.
Charles 8. Peirce was chosen a member in
1877. Most of his work has been done in the
service of the coast survey. He has made some
importaut investigations in meteorology,
measurement of wave lengths of light, sensation
of color, and conducted a series of pendulum
experiments to determine the density of the
earth. Ac.
C. H. F. Peters, of Clinton, New York, made
a survey of Mount Etna in 1843. He won his
election to the academy in '76 by his work in
astronomy. He led the government expedition
to New Zealand iu '69 to observe the transit of
Venus. His work has been largely observation*
as to comets and the solar spots.
In studying the sky for mapping the stars he
discovered forty-seveu asteroids.
Prof. Edward C. Pickering, the distinguished
astronomer in charge of the observatory at
Harvard, became a member of the academy in
1873. and in 1887 he wag honored by that body
with the award of the Henry Draper medal for
his work on astronomical physics. His study
of the stars, by means of photography, hsa
been carried on to an extent never before at
tempted.
Maj. John W. Powell, the geologist. who is
well known in this citv as the director of the
geological survev. was admitted to the academy
in 1880. His worV in connection with American
ethnology is an important contribution, not
only to the history, but the proper study of the
aboriginal tribes of the North American conti
nent
Raphael Pumpelly, of Newport. R. I., geolo
gist. was made a member of the academy in
1872. He has madt; a geologic journey around
the world, and has made numerous surveys and
investigations of mining industries. He is tho
author of the special report of the 10th censm
on miuing industries, and is now connected
with the geological survey as geologist of the
archaeau division.
Prof. Frederick W. Putman, anthropologist,
is professor of American arcbieologv and eth
nology in Harvard. He became a member of
the academy in 1885. His acquaintance with
the subject of American archaeology is proba
bly unexcelled by that of any other stude nt m
this country.
Prof. Ira Remsen. of Johns Hopkins univer
sity, Baltimore, the distinguished chemist, has
been a member of the academy since 1882. His
original researches in chemistry have attracted
marked attention, and his services as an expert
have been utilized by the United States govern
ment and by city governments.
Prof. Fairman Rogers, of Philadelphia, civil
engineer, one of the original members of the
academy, has rendered eftioent service to
science as a teacher and writer. He was an
engineer officer during the war. and under the
auspices of the coast survey completed the
survey of the Potomac river northward from
Blackiston Island.
Prof. William A. Rogers, who became a mem
ber of the academy in 1885. had distinguished
himself as an astronomer, having worked for
many years at the Harvard university. Astrono
mers are indebted to him for many improve
ments in apparatus.
Prof. Ogden N. Rood, who has since 18C3 j
been a lecturer on physic* in Columbia college,
has pursued special studies in mechanics, op- (
tics, acoustics, and electricity with valuable i
results. He was elected to the academy in j
18C5. |
Prof. Henrv A. Rowland, who has charge of j
the physical laboratory at Johns Hopkins uui- |
versity, has engaged extensively in original
work, and under liis direction important re- !
starches have been carried on at Johns lloj>- |
kins. He was elected a number of the academy :
in 1881.
Lewis M. Rutherford, of New York, one of j
the original members, began life as a lawyer,
but abandoned that profession and devoted j
his leisure to science principally ill the direc- \
tion of astronomical photography and spectral j
analysis. To his worl; is chiefly due the per- i
fection of the photographic telescope, which
has made the great work of star charting by
photography possible.
Charles A. Nchott. of this city, a civil en
gineer. distinguished for his researches in
physics, was made a liiembt r of the academy
in 1M72. He is connected with the United
States coast survey.
Prof. S:n.<uel H. Scudder. of Harvard, a dis
tinguished u 'turalist an 1 all associate of Louis
Agasiz. was made a member in 1877. His j
specialty is entomology, and he has cliietly
studied butterflies and fossil insects.
William Sellers, of l'hi'adelphia. eminent as ,
a mechanical engineer, was admitted to the (
academy in 1873. He became president of the
Franklin institute in 1864, and of the Midvale
Steel works in 1873. His inventions have won j
for him many medals and honors.
Prof. Sidney I. Smith, of Vale, has been en- j
gaged for many years iu biological researches, |
and since 1871 lias been connected with the hi- ,
ological work of the United States fi-h com
mission on the New England coast. He was j
elected to the academy m 1884.
Prof. John Trowbridge founded the Jeft'er- j
son physical laboratory at Harvard. His sci- ?
entitle work has consisted largelv of original
investigations conducted under his direction. |
lie was admitted to the academy in 1878.
Prof. Win. P. Trowbridge, who has the direc- )
tion of the school of mines at Columbia college, i
New York, became a member of the academy j
in 1872. Prior to that day as an engineer oth- j
cer of the army, as an assistant in the coast
survey, and in other positions he had accom
plished a great deal of hard work for science.
Prof. James H. Trumbull, of Hartford, the
philologist, who was elected a member in 1872.
lias devoted special attention to tlie subject of
the Indian languages of North America, and
has been a large contributor of articles to the
proceedings oi societies and to periodicals.
Prof. Addison E. Verrill. of Yale, the natu
ralist. had. ill 1872. so distinguished himself as
::n indefatigable collector and careful investi
gator as to win a ser.t in the academy. The j
fami;us zoological collection in the l'cabody !
museum was created by him.
(ien. Francis A. Walker, distinguished as a |
soldier, statesman, teacher and author of many ]
works on political economy became a member
in 1878. He was formerly chief of the bureau ,
statistics. Treasury department, and organized
and directed the ninth and tenth censuses.
Dr. Horatio I'. Wood, of Philadelphia, who
wu:. elected a member in 1S7U. is distinguished I
both as a practitioner, an original investigator,
and a teacher of medical science at the univer
sity of Pennsylvania and an author.
i'rof. Arthur \V. Wright, of Yale, has been a i
member of the academy since 1881. having I
made many discoveries in physics. For several ,
years he v. as consulting specialist to the United ]
States signal service.
Prof. ( harles A. Yonng. the astronomer, be- J
came a member in 187^. He has been engaged ;
litany years both in the practical work of as- j
trcnomy and in elaborating the theory of the
science. Under his direction the observatory ]
;.t Princeton has taken a leading place among !
the great observatories of the world.
A Boy >Iaiif?le<l by a I'Ir.
Yesterday afternoon Thomas Coleman, a i
colored boy of fourteen years, was liadly
lacerated by a pig. in Anacostia. He had been
throwing stones at some pigs in a pen, when
onw of theui broke out, knocking liini down,
and at once seized him by the fleshy part of the
thigh, and commenced feeding upon it. His j
cries brought help, and he was taken to his j
father's house, l'r. I'yles attended him, and
found that the taking up of an artery was
necessary, and that the wounds were very
serious.
Baltimore and Ohio Baooaoe Service.?
Arrangements have been perfected by the
Baltimore and Ohio railroad company with the
New York transfer company in New York, and
the Union transfer company in Philadelphia.
Atlantic City. Baltimore and Washington, by
which parties can send their baggage iu ad
vance. if necessary, from any locality in one
city to any locality in the other city, obviating i
the necessity for any attention on the part of
the owner after the order has once been given
for such special delivery to the transfer com
pany at starting point. The transfer company
receiving the baggage will give a r?|'eipt there
for. and attach a special check containing the
address to which the baggage is to be sent by
tirst train after the order is taken, aud arrange
tor its prompt delivery on arrival in the city to
which it is forwarded. Tlve charge for this
special stTCice Kill >k $1, fifty cents for transfer I
ill each city, and is to be prepaid. Orders may i
be left at the Baltimore and Ohio ticket offices, j
and the agents of the transfer companies will j
call for and deliver baggage to its fiual address.* j
Attention" is Called to the trustee's sale by I
auction of a desirable alley lot between R and i
S and 19th and 20th streets northwest, to take I
place to-morrow (Tuesday, 16tli April.), at 5 j
o'clock p. m. See advertisement.
The Bisciioff Oboan Recitals on Tuesday [
and Wednesday evenings will close the season.
Sprino Medicine
Is a necessity with nearly everybody. The run down,
tlrtsl condition at this sea?ou is due to impurities iu
the blood which have accumulated during the winter
and which must be expelled if you wish to feel well.
Hood's Sarsaparilla thoroughly purities and vitalizes
the blood, creates a good appetite, cures biliousness
aud headache, givea healthy action to the kidneys and
liver, aud imparts to the whole body a feeling of health
aud strength. This spriug try
HOOD'S SARSAPARILLA
-I take Hood's Sarsai>arilla every year as a spring
tonic, with moat satisfactory reaults."?C. PARME
LEE, 349 Bridge street, Brooklyn, N. V.
"Hood's Sarsaparilla purified my blood, gave me
strength, and overcame the headache and diuiness so
that 1 am able to work again. I recommend Hood's
S?r*aparilla to others whose blood is thin or impure,
and who feel worn out or rim down.9*?LUTHER NA
SON. Lowell, Mass.
CREATES AN APPETITE.
"With the first bottle of Hood's Sarsaparilla my
headache entirely disappeared, and where before I
could not muster up an appetite for my nieala, I can
not now get enough meals to satisfy my appetite. I
am at present taking my aecond bottle, and feel like a
different person."-WILLIAM LaNSINU, Post 4U.O.
A. It, Neenah, Wis.
N. B.-If you decide to take Hood's Sarsaparilla do
not be Induced to buy any other.
HOOD'S 8AR8APARILLA
Hold by all druggists. 91; six for $5. Prepared only
by C. L HOOD * CO., Lowell. Mass.
4 100 DOSES ONE DOLLAB.
RRK
K R
RRR
R R
K K
?1 V A I
5 6 Y AAA L
UO Y A A LUX
RBB A K K IT XX 1* OOO
R R AA K K II XX W O O
RRB A A KK II X X X G
H B AAA K K II X XX U CO
BBB A A K K U X XX OOO
PPP OO WWW DDP KMC RRR
ppoowwwwddb rb
PPP O O wwww D D RK RRR
i> O O W* WW DDK R R _
V OO W w DDD KKK R H -
absolutely pukr.
Thl? powder nwr rsrW A marvel of rnrltv.
?treii(rth, anil w holesnnwDes* Mnrs economic*! than
the ordinary kinds. and cannot be sold tn comi?titlon
with the multitude of k?w l*st, short-weight alum or
phosphate powder. <*??* '? fcoXAl. Bak
uio I'ovuu Co.. llK) >*aii atraau X X.
jaalJ-iu.tu.thiU
CITY ITEMS.
By a Large Majority.
The Star Bents its Comi>etitors.
We now have on wile 1,000 pairs Boy* and
Youths' Shoes, button or lace, solid leather
throughout; always sold for s? 1.50. The Stur
price 90c. Special lot of Misses'School Shoes,
worth si.25; the Star price 75c. Serviceable
Shoes for Children, sizes 6 to 11. tine Kid or
Pebble Goat, with tips, The Star price 65c.,
worth $1.
Special bargain in Ladies' Kid or Pebble
Slippers, opera or broad toe. at 40c.. worth 75c.
Ladies' due Kid Shoe* for early spring wear, in
all styles, very cheap at $1.25. Ladies' Kid
Oxford Ties. 05c.
Bargains in Men's Shoes of all kinds. A
special line of Button. Lace or Congress, at
>1.20, worth fully fl.
lax St ah Shoe House.
It 726 7th at.
Harry's Trieophcrous gives the hair a pe
culiarly rich gloss, preventing baldness. It
Prices Slashed.
Goods Lower Than Ever
For To-morrow (Tuesday),
at The Faiu, 812 7th st. u. w.:
A 25c. Parlor Broom tor l^c.
A 10c. bottle of Ammonia far Sc.
15c. decorated Fruit Plates for Sc.
15c. decorated Bone Dishes tor Sc.
1(K". kitehiu Towel Hollers for 7c.
5c. bottle of Mucilage for 2c.
A good 9c. Whisk broom fur 4c.
A 15c. bronxe Candle Stick for Sc.
A 6 oz. cake of mammoth Toilet Soap. 4c.
6 square white China Ind. butters for 11c.
f> square decorated Fruit Saucers for 39c.
6 white China Dinner Plates for 24c.
C ribbed crystal glass Tumblers for 13c.
fi quart sheet iron round Pan for 6c.
$?1 Ostrich-feather I>ust? rs for 49e.
75c. mottled Hugs for 49c.
A :M>c. decorate ! Meat 1 >lsh for lCc.
A 40c. decorated Meat Dish for lSe.
A 35c. decorated Salad Bowl for 18c.
Owing to Saturday's inclement weather the
Great Baby Carriage sale advertised for that
day will be continued at reduced prices on
Tuesday and Wednesday.
It The Fair. 812 7th st. n. w.
We will continue to give bargains at
730 Seventh st. northwest, between G and H.
?1.50 llogers teaspoons for 95c. ; i do/..
?2.50 llogers tablespoons for ?1.90 l.? Uoz.
?2.50 Bogers table forks lor $1.90 doz.
?2.50 Hogers table knives for ?1.90 doz.
?3.00 knives and forks for ?1.98 doz.
?7.98 China Tea Sets for ?6.00.
Decorated Chamber Sets, with Jar, ?4.25.
Another lot of Slop Jars for 65e.
Water Tumblers 2 for 5c.
At The American Variety Store.
It S. Horowitz. 730 7th st n.w.
This Week, This Week,
At the Boston Shoe House.
912 7th Street Northwest, between I and K.
Great Bargain Counter Sale.
This counter is in the center of the store
filled w ith the finest grades of foot-wear in all
shapes. The regular prices of these shoes are
?2 to *5 a pair, and will be sold off this counter
at half prices. These shoes are warranted in
every particular to be perfect, but if they were
damaged by ??fire" they could not be sold tor
the prices they are now being sold for. For
ladies, misses and children only. First couie
first served. Call early and avoid the rush.
Boston Shoe House.
H. Golkhtein.
912 7th st. n.w.. between 1 and K.
(P. S.)?No shoes off this counter exchanged.
upl5-3t 11. O.
9oO for ?25. Narrow and wide wale diago
nel Worsted Suits that other tailors a>k ^50 for.
we art making to your measure for ?25. First
class "linings and work.
upl3-6i Htrasiiueoer A Sox, 1112 F st.
Kaster Cards J.Jay Goclu.421 9th. apl3-7t*
Kaster tireeting.
Don't Miss it!
Special Notice to the Public:
Don't fail to call at the stores of the great
Atlantic and Pacific Tea company, from April
15. and all during next week, and secure one of
our handsome souvenir panel cards, entitled
? Easter Morning. ' size 14x29, haudsomely
mounted and ready for lnaiging up. We will
not attempt to describe it. but we will say that
it is a fine piece of lithographic work, and a
subject that appeals to every heart. This is an
original subject. It is taken from life, and has
only to be seen to be appreciated. Given away
with one pound of tea. two pounds of coffee, or
one pound of baking powder. Hemember. we
are still giving out glassware, crockery. Ac., to
every purchaser of tea. coffee, and baking pow
der. Checks given with every purchaser of 25
cents' worth of tea. coffee, and baking powder.
503 7th st. n. w.. 1620 14th st n. w.. and 3104 M
st., Georgetown; 58, 59. and 60 Center Market;
92 Western Market: 8 and 9 O street Market,
and 101 Northern Liberty Murket N. H. Bow
man, Manager. apl2-3t
Adjustable Skirt Draping Forms $2
at Domestic Sewing Machine office, 7th and U.
apl2-3t
The (ireat
Atlantic and Pacific
Tea Company.
225 Branch Stores in the United States.
Housekeepers, Attention!
Look to your interest and beware of imita
tors. We are the pioneers in the business, and
the only importers dealing direct with the con
sumer. Buy your
Teas and Coffees
direct from us.
Now is the time to buy. Do not forget the
stores and branches. Head this advertisement
carefully: there is money in it for every house
keeper in Washington and suburbs.
We make a specialty of Tea and Coffee, and
guarantee to furnish you with better Coffee and
Teas than can be obtained elsewhere for the
same money.
We have just received a large cargo of new
crop selected Teas and Coffees, and would par
ticularly recommend our Java und Mocha
Coffee at 30c. per pound; also our fine Teas, at
40c.. 50c.. 60c.. 80c., and ?1 per pouud.
Our coffee at 25c. per lb. will make a delight
ful drink. Splendid mixed tea at 50c. per lb.
Our own brand of Thea-Nectar tea at 60c. per
lb. will equal any ?1 per lb. tea to be had else
where.
Dining-rooms. cafes, and others using coffee
and tea in quantities can get fine goods at low
prices from us.
We have concluded, in order to introduce
and. at the value time, push our excellent
Baking; Powders and Thea-Nectar Teas, to
give either a handsome Plate or a beautiful
Cup and Saucer. We will also give an elegant
pitcher, a useful whisk-broom holder, knife
box. wash-basin, handsome combination comb
and brush-holder, with mirror, and different
articles, too numerous to mention, to every pur
chaser who buys a pound of either our Infal
lible Baking Powders or Thea-Nectar Teas.
Remember our stores: 503 7th street north
west. 1620 14th street, or Georgetown branch.
3104 M street We have also branches in all
principal markets, where customers will be
given the strictest attention.
Give us a call and be convinced.
apl2-3t Nxwtqk H. Bo whan, Manager.
Peerleas Dye*
Are the best Sold by druggists. m20-Sm
For Bright, Quick Fire and cheap,
clean fuel buy Washington Gas Light Company*
si Baorai
Coke. Jobjwox
ja5-6m Exclusive Agents.
INFANTS' 8WTO# RIBBED VKBT8^ 8c; JLADIiar
ttwiaa ribbsd vesta 17&; latest elect*iln ladf.'
ABSfcgfC-'
746-7471
AMUSEMENTS.
ERN VN S m WArfHlNGTOX THEATER.
L Utkniwt.??tki4 hMqlnulatTNM
?oJrTiNTflEALR.
In tbe ik-* and only true nnioo of
I'MlJt TolTS c AblN
Matn.ee. Mon . lur> Thar ud Hat.
Cheap Prfc-ea, 10c, 15> au.i l?ie. \ jrtiU (Inml id
* apl5-?t
AKKis' BIJOU THKA 1UL
Week of VlTll 15.
Matineee Itw.. Tteur. aud Sal
Tbe Xew York Comedy
"THE MAIN LINE;" or, RAWMOVft T
Replete with rawniilWi.t niuiiounila.
Stroll* < aat Of it week.
TRUE IRISH HEARTS aplS
H
Globe theater.
IVnua ?ve . near 11 th at.
Matium Tu-ikli)-, (r?U? and SaturuaT,
FIRST-CLASS TAHirTttl.
Afternoon at Nurht at S o'clock.
AdmUakiu, Id, '.'ttud.Kk' at'lj-ttt
UkANl) OPMtt BOI SE.
GUAM* OPERA IX ENGLISH
Hv thf new
AMERICAN OPERA COMPANY.
OC8TAVE HINR1CHS IV i net. r and Dn
THIS , MONDAt > EVENING.
Ouuikal'ii Urilid l>|x-ra IU Five Acta.
FFF A V IT ?SSs
aa r r 5 T
FF A A CO "SK
r AAA IT IT - s 1 ?
F A A ITU "as" T
With the Iwlloarlmr artiata Lu?>ar> Natali, liriM
Ma. Nichol. Cliarlea Baaaett, A1 nt* ? Stoldard. E N.
kniirht. and Fraur. Vetta.
T?n4|[, MARITANA. Wmltiodav. THE MASKKD
BAIJ. Thuradar. II. TR<?VATOKI Frdaj. LIV1A
I>I I.AM\IEKMO(>K Satunlai \latiuee. FAUST. Sat
urday Evening, BOHEMIAN OIUL
REGULAR PRICES
Xftt twk.Kkf * l>iiei"? Comic Opera.
111) PEAKL OF PI KIN. a| 1
VEW NATIONAL THEATER.
Every Evening. Maliueee Wr<L and SnE
TO-NIGHT,
Mr A M Palmer'. Company from tlie Madiaon Sgi
Theater. New York. in
J II MM MM
J II M M M M
J II M MM M
J J II M M M
J.IJ II M M M
PPP
T P P
T HE PPP EX MAX.
T P
T P
Next > The S|>e*kiiiir pantomime,
Weekt Ml. SHE. HIM AN1> HER aplft
Health course oe pari ok iukh at the
VoUi>' Meu'a Chriatian Aw? lation. I4(>1*N. V.
aw . IRIDAY. Al'Kll. lit. at s i iu . the I HIKD of
the wiiea, t.y Surif ?*en. ?M. HAMMoNU. retired.
Subject "Nuixitk* tbat Kn<kvc." ll.ktte. lot lot-II
only, on application at the office. aps eo5w
VONGREGATION AL CHURCH. '
Monday, apkil as.
Concert b) tbe
YALE GLEE AND BANJO CLUBS
TICKETS. $1. 7.V . and 5tk
On anient METZEKorg. 1110 Frt.1*.
?mi
w'l'H SEASON ~ 1SSS-1SS*.
O
THE MNTHiW CONCERTS
The doaiuir |>air of thee. .oocorta tor thl? H?a<<u will
constat ol twootvan andaonir re. itala. Br Hna'liof! l? ?
iimt aexiHteil ou the lirat evening by %naa Veweliiia. a
tine ??olitrjlto fnu., \| v. V-r*. lit) . oil tue moiwI e\e
nnurb) M1-1. Nellie \v ii-, a. aoprauo of All Sou!**
chun*h, aud oh lioth eveuiuire li) tola* i.lla Chr)ata..
pianiat. in <vitceri?.l work lor orvau and piano. 1 La
oolH-ert* will l?' niv? ii at th<
CONtiblt.A l 1< iNAL CHI'bCH,
Tueaday ana Hedneaday f n April 16 and 17.
Adn.iMBioU "Ji cuuta.
m>i:i-4t
ASONIC TEMPLE,
Corner ?th and F atreeta h m.
Tbe Beautiful Cantata of
"Vl'EEN EST H I K"
Will be repealed lor the Un< tit of urate M F rhurchM
MASONIC TEMPLE.
Wednewlay Eveuiiur, April 17, 1SSH.
Doora open at 7, entertaiunieut at S.
Tii ketx 2."i ??ents. for ?ale by E. F. l>roo|>. I'enna.
ve.; J. C. Parker, <117 7tiiat ; C. C. Puraelt. 4 IS utli
at . and at the door ou the e\euilitr ol the entertiuii
inent. ai'l:i 4t'
AKIiEN BAZAU
OF THE OLD Ol' ARD
At NATIONAL 1UKI.ES- ARMORY, April 15, ISSUi,
to April 1 Ss'.i
Season tiekot, ."><? centa. apl" 12t
^yiLLARU'S H A1J.
Coniiueu. uiir APRIL 12. 1SSW.
Eora Short Munnun.
Aliierita'? Urea'.u't Work of Art,
CHK1S1 BtloRE PILATE..
Oi*'ii from 1 to 10 p. in.
AdmiaMion. 2."ic.
? ialilreu under ten >eara. ISr. npll In
FoU E ASTER.
THE YOL NO MEN AND BOYS LIKE 10 "COMR
OIT' IN THEIR NEW bi'lUNU bl lTSON EASTER
SCNDAY AS WELL AS THE OLDER PEOPLE. AND
THEY NATURALLY LIKE To BE HANDSOMKLIC
DRESSED.
BEING HANDSOMELY DRESSED
DOES NOT NECESSARILY MEAN EXPENSIVE!.*
DRESSED, FOR VERY HANDSOME AND FASHION
ABLE SUITS CAN BE HAD NOW-A-DAY8 AT
SMALL COST, BY GIVING THE MATTER A LIU LK
C AREFUL ATTENTION.
OUR YOUNG MEN'S SUITS AND OVERCOA18
ARE SPECIALLY STYLISH THIS SI'RINU, AND
HAVE NEVER BEEN CHEAPER.
SEVERAL HOUSES IN NEW Y'ORK
MAKE UPGOODS ONLY FOR Ifc.VS AND YOTNtt
MEN, AND PAY PARTICULAR ATTENTION TO
THESE TWO LINES. WE HANDLE 1 HEIRGOOD8
AND HAVE THE NEWEST THINGS BKOluUT
OUT BY THEM.
IN SMALL BOYS' SUITS
(SHORT PANTS) THE STYLEK AND PATTERNS
ARE PARTICULARLY ATTRACTIVE AND HAND
SOME THIS SEASON, AND WE SHOW IN THIS
DEPARTMENT ALSO THE NEWEST AND BEST
STYLES.
WE HAVE NEVER BELIEVED THAT WASHING
TON WAS THE PLACE TO SELL ONLY LOW
1'RICED GOODS. AND OUR EXPERIENCE
TEACHES US THAT THE PEOPLE HERE ARE
WILLING TO BUY THE
NEWEST AND BEST AT FAIR PRICES.
ACTING UPON THIS EXPERIENCE WE HAVE
THIS SPRING PROVIDED A STOCK SPECIALLY
SUITED TO PEOPLE WHO WILL APPRECIATE
SUCH GOODS.
BEAR IN MIND WE ARE NEVER UNDERSOLD.
E. & BARN IT M k CO..
ap!2 fc21 PENNSYLVANIA AVE
Henrietta Siitinq,
ELEGANT DRESS GOODS
n beautiful bpnufc- shade., uearlj one yard and a I
wide, all pure line French wuuL Mk.
HEAVY GROS uLAIN BLACK SILKS. K.c, ?1.
LONSDALE I AMllHlC, \er> tineet -luabty, 10c.
HANDSOME CLOTH PLAIDS. 0-'*..
BEAU'lIFl L SAT! LENS, hueel quality. 'Jic.
BLACK SURAH slLKs. excellent quality. jOc.
TEIOO CLOTH Drew" Ooorta, npriiiir ahadea, <
double fold. i'Ule wool, -ic
PLAID Ml'sLlN, new at>lea. 5c.
Valuable Preaehla lor Cwnh CuaUmiera.
Select oue ol the lollowii* Preaenu with a purchaae
of A (<nir ol laiye-a:? line Dnuia?k Towel., worth
7.V.; a hill tioirii ni.? Dauiuak Nai'kiua. aortn idv4
or a pmr ol Silk Embroidered Coraeta, worth 7 jc.
AO CREDIT, but the verv lo\.e?t price* lor i.'aali
CARTEBH.
711 MARKET SPACE
Xe*t door to the Boatcn Variety Store.
FANCY SILKS, 37W *0. 50. tJSc. _ ,
HEN KIEV! A CASIftoEiiEb. in new Sprtuir Shad^
extra aide, double width, all |>ure wool. 44c. _
Beautiful SA1TEENS new Krench at) lea, 1 jr.
FRUIT OF THE LOOM Cotton, jird Wide. Sfcc.
MOIKK sILKs. 50. ti'J, . J, S"C.. *1
LADIES' BROADCLOTH, aprtna' weirht, pure wool,
vara and a half a ide, S?^
Valuable Prwaenu for Caah Ctwtomena.
Select one ot tbe toll< wictr preaenu with a purchaae
ol ?10 or more. Two iwini of larye aiae Damaak
Towela. worth <1.50. one down Ane Dai.iaak Nap
kiua, worth ?1.50, or a Unre aiae handeoine Bnifa!
guilt, worth 51.50.
Grrr The Best.
THE.CONCORD HARNESS.
LUTZA RROu
497 Nbs. ar? , adjoining NaUonnl 1
Trunk* and Satchel* of beat rfka at low
?pi ??

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