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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 30, 1889, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1889-05-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE EVENING STAR
PUBLISHKD DAILY. Except Sunday,
AT THE STAR BUILDINGS,
Northwest Corner Prnasy.vaE.a Ave. and 11th 8t., by
The Efeaiag Star Newspaper Company*
S. H. KAUFFMANN, ITet L
Tfi Fttihh St a r. Is served to snhsrrTier* tn -h*
city h? earners. on th.^ir owu m-rovmt. at 10 cent* i>er
week. or 44c i - r 11:1th Col it at the counter. 2
rent* earb By mull?i-ostawv pr paid?50 cents ?
month on year. $?'.. sii mouths. $3.
I Entered at the Post office at Wuslnngton. D. C.. U
?ecoud-clws nnil matter.]
Tbi Weekly Stab-published on Friday?$1 a
year p- I'.uTf prepaid Sii months. .">0 cents.
JWA11 mat] *n!;scriptio'is mn*t be paid in advance:
Bo paper Kent lomcer than Is paid for.
Kates of advertising made known on application.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
t?- _ ~ M i lll'F - P * 'KHOLDERS
V>CS> F11u>1 < 'imiPi i: * 11> K BUILDING
ASSOCIATION
Of Georgetown. r>. C.
Aula] SteetiTic, ?A"11 l.DtY'.JI NE 1. 8 o cloe? p.m.
Subscriptions to the 8tli series >owre.eivv<l.
utO. M Kl>o,
By2.vrr.l(l.a?.3<wi lary.
8 S. SHEDD ii Bit0.
BEsr.nvont vases,
FOB USE IX CEMETERIE9L
TEBBA COl iA LAW N VASES.
IRON SETTEES AND CHAIRS.
nn3 43" 9th at. n.vr.
r~.- _ 1'HIRD CO-OPEliAllVK BUILDING AS
Kj* S< <1A1 ION Dt \\ ASH1NGTON. D. C ?
'Hi- Third t.o-operatlve Building Association of
V ashn.irtou. D. I ?. issues its !< urth ?rnc? of stock on
theFll.sl MONDAY IN JUNE. 18S9 Shares. $'..'
per month. on which $1,000 i* advanced to pun hait
irs Interest 5 i*r cent |*r annum on withdrawal*.
htihM-rii Hoi:* to stock can be node at the following
nan.. .l i.lw e- A. DEPl t. Pres., 82o *H *t. a.w . J. T.
PETTY. i reasnrer; A. ARC H it. corner 4Hand I st*.
S.W..W.T. WALKER. 1411 G st n.w.; R. A. WAL
KER. 1 ?><>'? Ttli st. i..w.. E. J. BURT T, 410 < til at. s.
w CHURCH * fTLPHENSOS. Hth ai d Maryland
ave a.w. ?. J H JOHNSON. 7th and Maryland ave;
l>r R II OL'NNF.LL. 625 J a. ave.; THOMPSON S
C'U . lutli aid Louisiana ave. n w., CAM MACK A
1>ECKEK. 28th and Kats. n.w.; O. T. THOMPSON,
ts:ii Pa. ave. n.w. mylO-lm
fl KCHASE VoVR OWN HOME.
This yt a can do at a small advance over the
coat of real by beruaiiut a at<%k bolder la tti
J A- fj li> m ILL1M> AM) LOAN AS.v >C1 ATION.
'Il l- .?>? < i.itii>u wai? organized Jannary iW. lssy,
i: ii:t i>i..n tnat lia- l? i >iiie ?o | hi uiar and aucceMi
iu\ *11 1 Illicit![ l:i:: : nd in i.ti.er localiti?-? in ra.
I n al n.eeti- ?.'? lor the |-avn?ei.t of due* at Her
reii I. ilu,!. S...'? r; l a .if., a. e., on the first Wednes
da\ trrftiiiiftftrw h iiii*ntli
Knave* * I |*r moutli. s'.'iiO liet loan on each share.
Miiiiu.uiii cost i.> I irro?er. incluilintf dnea, interest
and | r, ii.iui:. .J'.' i.o i? r >hare i*r niouth, or 41^1 |ier
fio lith lor a 1' Mlol 9l.OU<l.
Ian i hl> ts d< ?crii'tivo ol the raperior advantatrea of
thi-uf- . ,1.1.? ti ii:d all other miorniatiou luruished
UIkiu al plication to
E. A. ADAMS, Pres., 4'"- Sth st s. e.
J. W Wlii LI'I.I V. V.l'r ^ . MM) L. Cap. St.
J. E H Itl.t l.L i nKis .ii'Jf.Pa. ave.a.e.
BiytM-lUt tilo.W. MrKEiU K"h j . .".O.. 1'Jthst-s.e.
fc- REMOVAL. IM-IK. lO ANNOUNCE
wl. to my iri?-nd* and tlit -ul in- that I have re
hwtcU ml iilhcv tu Ulc lltuiliiir biiilii.ui*, 1 H!*tiat.
J. It. HERTFORD.
myEMm Real |'?hl? IIWMr.
tee , 1>T. FAHEV.O! Si:i;\l. CONTKACTOR.
V ,U*. !? 1 - I suib.e Floors Laid with
A?: ha't or Portland Ce...ent
my it>-:?iii lcoo'n 10S. I>>!>man Bnildim;.
^ i i:::su h\va.n\ and klv west
m. s: ..aks.
CH AMI A< ? N E v\ WES,
All the lea.i.n- ' r:i: <, ..x . v. Vorli pricaa.
PEMiii.t hl. 1'1'Kf K\E WHISKV.
111* iV. AS Kl ssl.EL,
1 r | i rter W :o -. Bmidies and S-i^ara,
fl.-, 1:. 1 ; 1. lni.-viv: ma avenue.
Lf^ CUtilllC'AllsuF STOCK. CHEOUES,
p.. ?, and i u.cr ?t iuiiK?. C'oniu erciml litho
llt'lLj attto flu-UK. A. ti. OEDNEV.
i,l linli ard Iiatrtetail'tjetliuiidiiur).
Tt
. OlILINSON'S
Green
o 1NTMENT.
The beit tliirr?r eTer known for' Carbuncle*, Boils,
Felt ii-. 1 r>i* 1:'?*. ii:nci:Ut?l Eytdlda,aud all bkin
irupUoi.-. s^ r> - pum*. and c ats.
11 auvi'.uu-ters, 14J4 New York ave..
my"l-10t*lp Room IS. Elevator.
W>) ?>"!
CalaaOt
There r.re abonf 1501 air* of those fine Pants left in
Bia. k. Brown anu Line C'orks. rew and Diagonal,
win. h ate ?..rtli lr. in *."? to ?7 .">U, and which we sell
now at e- it *'-? 5111 '? ai,e more than a couple
luore to cloat ti.iin oirt. A tturd to the wiae, tic.
About *.*75 Suit* for Bova.5 to 1 will lie sold at
li.r a tew d?\? > 1.I> . n't a suit an.oiiK tlnni
Worth 1. -i than A splendid line ol Sailor auita
from |l.-> up.
$7.50.
Our Business SuiU for tl.,8 price lay over any <10
suit tn the city.
99.25.
Our Popular suit at ?!lt3& will compaM favorably
with any s>uit shown at il~.
? ii
For this t rice we can ahow yon a line of suita as good
as any soli at $15.
$6.50
Foe an All-Wool Serge Suit.
75C.
We wero fortunate to if't another lot of about *-?'
dozen of th' *' White and Fancy Vests, which we sell
at 75c? not one anions the in worth leaa than $1.0'J.
WEVL'S
ONE PP.ICE CLOTHING HOUSE.
?plG-Zm 311 7TH ST. S.W.
A lV.LEAN, K.LEAB IVl'T.
SO FIRE, NO SMOKE, NO WATER. NO DAMAGED
GOODS.
Bat an All&red Fusilade on Fancy Fixed Prices of
FINE READY-MADE CLOTHING
BIGHT NOW.
In the very heart of the busy season.
?OT 6.780? Strictly All-wool Caasimere Suits of the
ever popular "Salt and Pepper" pattern,
$7.50 A SL IT.
This means death to the 15 puzzle.
LOT 6.857?Very handsenie dark Cassimcre Suits,
basket weave, silk and wool, absolutely pure,
$7.50 A SUIT.
Thia will cure yon of a desire to go to Oklahoma.
Lor 2.5411-Seat dreasy and durable Steel Gray Suits !
of A A J. sawyer's Celebrated Cassiniere. It were
well to state here a !a<-t which no reputable Clothier
will (juest n. and that is that the usual price ol auch |
a suit is ?1 ti. You can purchase one of us at
$10.75.
LOT 2.548 i* another line of Sawyer's Cassimere
Suits, which Is a sufficient guarantee as to quality. '
The pattern is luulestiy eletrant, the make excellent, .
the cut stylish, the lit i>erlect. and the price
$10.75 A SCIT.
We would like to spin out this sort of sweetness a
little bit loi.yer. but haven t the space. This is merely
to five you an idea ol what we can do. COME TO SEE
I s and we will show you the rest.
VICTOR E. A D L E 1 '8
1? PER CENT CLOTHING HOOSB. in
#27 and 7th st. n.w.. corner Massachusetts awt
Stnctly One Pricc
Ol%c Saturdays until 11 p in- my28_
H1LADELPHIA StORB.
FRENCH SATTEENS 100.
ALL THE BEST STYLES. 1?C.
ALL THE FINEST GOODS. 18C.
PLAIN COLORS TO MATCH, 1?0.
BATISTE. 36 INCHES WIDE. ONLY 8c.
1 CASE LAWN. FAST COLORS. 5c.
1 CASE WHITE MUSLIN IN PLAIDS AND STRIPES.
AND PIQUE. ONLY 12*C.
GAUZE UNDERWEAR VERY CHEAP.
WE HAVE A FVLL LINE OF GAUZE AND BAL
BRIGGAN SHIRTS AND DRAWERS FOR CHIL
DREN. LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, FROM 25c.
VP TO THE BEST.
LADIES' RIBBED VESTS, 12S. 25 AND 50c.
CLTINO SHIRTS FOR MEN AND BOYS, AT 35.
V.C, $1.25. $1.50 AND $1.85. OUB $1.85
SHIRTS CANNOT BE BOUGHT LESS THAN
$2.50 IN THIS TOWN.
MATTING GOING CHEAP.
WE HAVE REDUCED THE PRICES ON orR STOCK
OF MATTINGS! CALL AND SEE Ol'R PRICES.
CARHART k LEIDY.
ma29 028 7th and TOO K st n.w.
Sow Is The Tim*
To have your Furnace cleaned, your Ranfe re
paired, your Tin Roof painted and repaired.
We do all these things to you.' satisfaction.
HAY WARD ft HUTCHINSON.
424 9th at.
Who also make the open fire-place and it* ar
tistic treatment a special stud). my25
MISSES' RUSSET AND TAN OXFORDS, 0?C.;
spring Heel, W?c. Men's low quarter Tan Shoes,
? i lU higli-cut Bal.. $1 4? Men's, l adles'. Misses',
Boys'and Children's Black and Tan Wigwams, all
Double Comlsnation. my ,5-bt
[esse Jones & Co,
MANl FACTl REB8
CONFECTIONERS' FINE PAPE
COSFECTIONEKS' FINE t'APEB BOXES.
Ihe moat brauuiul Line in the l ultesi stales.
615 Commerce sc. Philadelphia. Pa.
Write fur dsecnyUve price list aayl?-eo7l
SPECIAL NOTICES.
?-^2, THROUGH li> ULESWOOIM I Ml IIKV.
TheUek'.ngton and Soldiers' llo-tio Ktilinr To. h??
Completed the extension <4 Its ItM by way of \M aud
V streets northeast to Ulenwood Cemetery, and will
commence running through rim from , thuiulNcw
York avenue to-day, every olhor ear running tbfougti.
Double-deckers will run to-day. my3U-Bt
r a- Arrr.T.?t'Aur onk of the cen
"?? TIKV OlCi'lONARY .a Iieautiful volume,
In flexible clotli) in now ready for Jell very. Send
orderst" toneral Agency f >r ?asliinguiu and biltl
more. loot! K st. n. Washington, L>. C.
C'ail lor Illustrated Prospectus. It
SHIRT-MAKERS,
U. F. WOODARD * CO
in
MEN'S IMPORTING FURNISHERS,
l&tii and F sta. o.w. my 30
8^-52, OWING TO THE RUSH MANY WERE
unable to avail themselves of our invitation
tv* dri-jk Osceola Water. 1 therefore repeat it and will
take (ilra* ire in w-iting upon aud giving information
to those who <le?ire to avail themselves of it. Osceola
Water Spcciiic for tine and and liver troubles lree
io-morrow and Saturday. _ ?
uiyao-'jt' FRANK L. HOOD, SH F.
TO READERS OF THE CENTURY.
The Washington office of the Century DICTION
Al'.Y, loot. F Ht. n.w. ?yi?lM
;g- _ THE HOMESTEAD LAND AND IM
PKOVEMENT COMPANY at Denis. >u Hall,
W.':i 1 ot. n.w., FUiDAY. May 21, at 7:10 I'm.
Every Issly interested in getting a suburban home at
cost and p.iJ; II-T lor it m installments invited lo at
tend. No speculation. Purely mutual, Permanent
organization to be effected. D. W. Landvoirfiit, E. S.
ileicher. C. s. Wii!iscommittee. niy*''.t-.it
V
C. t., to-ni
S AN I I Ali\ 1N(.IN 1.) KINO, COLUMBIAN
I mver-ily. in e public lecture by Proi.lava,
ui-ht at ]M.i., oil the sewerage of cities. 1
WA8HIKGTOH, I). I'.. May i! 1, 1881 >.
To the Board ?> Jur. cttn* Industrial Savings
ntui Iai in AwcitUton. 1*100 Put. ii.iv.
Gentlemen: I have to acknowledge the receipt of
?.~>D | aid uie to-day on repunuase of two shares of
stock held in jour as.--<nation by my late husband,
TIJKOIX'KE E. M'Ht.M \C11 tit, who died April 11*,
lS.SJK and I desire to ? xpress my appreciation of the
tienehoial object of your asfcoeiation aud to thank you
f*.r t!ie prompt settlement ol myrlaim. The three lold
object oi your asse?< iation, namely: The repurchase
- ?1 e u >ck at death, u hich is I etter than a life insurance,
the saTii gs and rei umUqk i lans, together with loan
ing natures. >nj i 1 y a 1? ?n-r Mt want. The association
h:.s established a financial management to meet a de
ii.and m the District am<.nvr inrrsons of limited means.
The |K.?pularity ? 1 your as? A*iatii?ii has been pr<xluced
by its accomuiod itimr leaturesand prompt settlement.
Hes^'ttully, yours,
ANIUINtli.. c. SCHUMACHER*
myW-3t 100 -' ;*outh < apitol at.
^ WM. K. AND WM. lll.DlN WCKJDVVAiwl>,
2K.S Attomeys-at-JLaw,
7 aud 1) Uunton Law Buildinfr,
47'J Louisiana ave.
TITLES TO REAL ESTATE. Si?eeial mdiees to the
land records. Keports on titles made with accuracy,
promi tuess, and at reaf?< nable rates. iiiy*Jl*-iUn
FOR GEN I INK EHEE HAND CRAYON
^ Portraits rail ai SM11 H'S Studio b-lore kro
lTkr?l^ where. Prices * 10 to Terms * L per w?m k
or $4 | er mouth. Work delivered at once. Largest
studio in \VaahinKt?.'n.
R B. SMITH. ArtUt,
Cor. 0th and Massachusetts ave.
Open until 8 p.m. my28-lw*
tm, a\VE LIKE TO GIVE THE PUBLIC A GOOD
thintf. See our BAICGAIN TABLE. Suits
tfUc.? u the < I. GEORGE 8PKAN?>\,
?y7*9B 4.54 ithli. B.W.
^ ^ OFriCE COLLECTOR OF TAXI S. I)IS
TK1C1 OF ClM.l MB1A. Washinoton, May
ism).?The attention of taxpayers is called to the
tax levied for the year ending June- 1HW', on r?*al
and personal projx rty. lii? se?*ond half of such tax,
where not previoualy l aid, mill become dne and i aya
bie on the hrnt ?tay ?>f May, aud il not paid be!??re the
first day of June, ensuing, shall thereuixm be in ar
rears and delinquent; and a penalty ol two i?er centum
ufH'ii the aiuouiit thereof shidl lie added,and ttv same,
with other taxes* due ami in arrears, will be listed lor
advertisement and tax sale in the manner presented
by existing law. By order of the Commissioners of
tnc District of Columbia. Attest; L. G. DAN ls. _Cul
lecU r of Taxes. > ~-^0t
OFFICE FRANKLIN INSURANCE CO.
\\ ashinoton. D. C., May *^0, ISStl.
A meetinirof the ?t? < khol?iers of the trankliu In
surance Company,of Washington, D. C.. will be held
at this offtt-e on MONDAY, June Is, for the election of
twelve (1',') directors t?> serve the eusuing year.
JUls open from X'J to ? "'^^UlCK YOrXO.
mylil -ecOt Becreiary.
r i niNCETON EXAMINATIONS -EXA.M
??. matiui H f, r entrance to ITii.cetoii College
will b>- bel<l in Washmifiou > u June ?_'?> au.l ~i at a
pla. <? hereafter to If desikniated. Intending "I'l'J1'
cants lor admission to an> ?>! the departments ol the
college ii.ay obtain all ltecanaan inforinstloii Irom the
un.l. rs-gne I. HENltY K DAMS,
my-f-tu.th.a.'.'w 4?>h Louisiana av.
ME-.SRS. W. <1. METZEROTT & <'<). IN
JL ??, resi onsi to htunlr. il-<'t iiic|iiirivs, desire to
state that til. NEW i'VI i.N i'El) Mil'A I. KEi -Ml I'
puHT. recently iutro.luce.1 into the liarduiaii l'lahiia,
consists iu a complete iron frame or i-helt placed under
and s-ninsirtiwr tlie keys ol the instrument, replacing
entirely the w<jod?-u bottom u*eU in every other Lp
riKlit nianiitactnred, and which is certain to warp
under utu.osphcrii changes, thereby causmir inequality
in the touch of the a. ti> n. 1 ue new invention insures
Permanent evenness ..1 touch throughout the entire
le-igtii ot th?- keyluard, a point previously irtil'O'Sible
ot attainment and ..ne ol the utmost importance, as
will be vouched for by all piano players, whether ama
teur or prolessional. ap'J'i-Altu
OFFICE GEORGETOWN GASLIGHT CO.
May IS. lMS!t.
1 !i<- Annual Meeting of the sbs-VhoISi-rs of this com
pany tortile election . ?! ??P!I Direct, rs will U- h. Id at
thisoffice MONDAY. June l.'S'.t. l'oils o|>eli at 11
o'cits-k a. in. and close at 1 o'clock p. m.
mylH-Ut & W. C1IOH1T, 9mfg.
THE NATIONAL SAl'E DEltJSIT
J. ^. Company, loth st. and New \ ork avenue,
rweives silverware and all kinds ol[ valuable* on de
poult. Sales of all a z. s tor rent, \aults Ure-proof,
Durglar pro? f. damp-prtsil. maide of their new build
ing with walls t. et t> inches thick. Construction
fln"proof tnroughout. Equipment unsurpaaaed as a
bate Dei>osit Company.
Aj artm nts provided exclusively for ladies,
luai-ectioii invited. mvll-lia
YOL'R ATTENTION CALLED SPECIALLY
?, to new lines 1'laui.el Sl.irts. Sashes. lklU,
\ ..sisTlIosiery, Underwear, aud prices of same, shirts
to or.ier a : I'.-, laity. 1*. T. HAI.L. !M?S 1 n.w. mlH-.lm
MB. OEROMK DKSIO HAS REMOVED
?C^r^his Jewelry R<*jma to the ground Hoorof his
oldstaad?l"-'l penn. ave.?where lor i?U days goods
will be arid at a discount of percent. mylB-lm
IE ~ I. A FACT WORTHY OF NOTICE AND
consideration. Kor the past two years I have
beeirtelling the highest grade Vajs.r Fluid lor stoves
on the market, and as a strong evidence ot its quality
and reliability 1 have enjoyed a steady and growing
trade without a aim^e complaint, and I have alwa>s
sold the one grade. 5 gallons for i ;>c , delivered.
myl0-3w CHAS E. HODGK1N. ?1? ithat.n.W.
^ (iARDEN HOSE. HOSE-REEL. HOSE
?k-*.-0Futures, for garden and street use. for
larkfebuildiligH and tire department: best goesls; all
s"^^ lowest prices. (lOODVEAR Kl'llHElt CO., 309
ttth st. U?u Tennis, Yachting, and Bicycle Shoes.
Leather and Rubber Uelting. Full stock. Beat
griulea. my8-lm
BI CCIAS PERFECT OAS STOVEa.
Guaranteed B.'st and <*heai>eat.
All Styles of
GAS FIXTURES.
Call and sec.
C. A. MUDDIMAN.
y.Mti F street,
ap"0-3m Next lo Johnson Bros.
EQUITABLE
CO-OPERATIVE BUILDING ASSOCIATION.
"EQUITABLE BUILDING," 1003 F ST.
First payment
17 tli issue
May, 18?a
Office open daily from 0 a.m. to 4 .no p.m.. when sub
scription for shares and payments thereon is received.
Shares $'^.00 per uiontii. 41,000 advanced on each
I share.
lamphlets explaining the object and advantages of
| the Association auu other information lurnished upon
application. THOS. BOMERVII.l.E, Pres't.
JS0. JOY EESON, Sec y. *P-U
OAS FIXTUHES,
J,, L A M P 8 .
MANUFACTURERS' PRICES.
GUARANTEED bESl UlAUTV AND WORKMAN
bill P.
8CHULTZ GAS FIXTURE CO.,
spC9 3m 131 j F at. n.w.. Sun Building.
klNUSLEY BROS.' CREAMERY CO.
CHOICEST DAIRY PRODUCTS. WHOLESALE AND
RETAIL MILK AND CREAM DEPOT.
929 and 931 D st. n. w.
Fend orders by postal, telephone or our wagons. The
best milk and the beat service that can be obtained at
all I
Oar Wholesale Batter House. 216 10th at n. w .wlU
shortly remove to our new building. 927 and 929
Louisiana ave. mh23-3ui
FOB BRIGHT, QUICK FIRE ANDCHEAP,
I LEAN Htt ??
QUICK FIRE AND CHEAF,
^tupany's Coks. JOHNSON BROTHEKS.
\+L-Vu< Exciuaive An?ta,_
_ WASHINGTON SAFE DEPOSIT CO.
016 Pa. avenue.
Wirrifft Departments all above ground, iny 4*4m
Washington News and Gossip.
lade* i* Advertisements.
AMrwvmCTB Par* R
ATTORNEYS p^ 0
ArCTJON sales p,,, o
ARCHITECTS B
BOARDING p^a 3 1
books AND STATIONERY Pure
Bl'siness CHANCES Pa*? 3 I
bicvclks a
CITV ITEMS. pk, 8
COUNTRY BOARD p^re 3 I
COUNTRY real ESI ATE . "Vure3
deaths &
DENTISTRY P^e
EDUCATIONAL Pure
excursions Pa^e 8
FAMILY SUPPLIES.. p*re
FINANCIAL. Pat;o 7 I
FOR kent (Room*) Pure 2
FOR kent (Houses) Pure 3
FOR rent (Offices) Pure 0
FOR rent (Stokes) Pairs !!
FOR sale (Houses) pa,? 3
FOI1 sale (Lots) p.? 3
FOR sale (Mi9CFtu!iiou?) race 3
GENTLEMEN'S goods pajre fi
hotels pTL^
housefurntshings * Pam,
INSURANCE..., Paire '5 1
LADIES' goods p.^, 0
local MENTION............ Pa*e 8
lost AND FOUND IVe 1
MEDICAL Paire 0
miscellaneous Pure 5
money to loan paire 6
NOTARIES PUBLIC p4lfe
OCEAN STEAMERS Pa^e 7 I
POTOMAC RIVER BOATS Pure 7
PIANOS AND ORGANS ."."...Pure 6
PERSONAL.................. Patre "
PRINTERS Paire <j
PROFESSIONAL Pure 6
PROPOSALS Pa,re 0 I
RAILROADS p,? 7
SPECIAL NOTICES I'iiKO 1
SUBURBAN PROPERTY.....! Pu-e '
SUMMER RESORTS Paire '
SPECIALTIES I'ure '
WANTED (Help) Paire 1
WANTED (Houses) Paxre 12
WANTED (Rooms) ."!."!!'.!!pne 2
W ASTLC (Situations) m Pure '!
WANxED (Miscellaneous).... . . . poire
wood and coal pa^u
The White House was deserted to-day
Mrs. Harrison, Dr. Scott, Mr. and Mrs. McKee,
and Mrs. Brown went to Arlington, leaving no
one at the hon-e but Sergeant Johnson and
some of the domestics.
Tin; W eekly Stab.?The current number of
TnE \\ eekly Stab, issued to-dav, is a very
complete and excellent one. The news col- [
umus cover all the principal events of th? past
week, and its literary and miscellaneous depart
ments are exceptionally well edited. The
" EEKI.T Stab continues to grow in popularity
as an out-of-town paper, and its attractions as
a reliable and desirable news and family jour
nal increases with every issue. Copies, ready
wrapped for mailing, can be had at the office
ot the business counter at 3 cents each.
nis resignation Accepted.?The Secretary
of the Treasury has received and accepted the |
resignation of Geo. H. Davidson, collector of I
internal revenue at Covington. Kv., for the
sixth dibtrict of Kentucky. Applications for I
this place have been received from Thos. Jones
and Walter Craig, of Newport; Dan'l Hemin- |
Kr.v' J- J. Landrum. D. II. Coniingore, and J.
C. Michie, of Covington.
Army Orders.?Assistant Quartermaster O
H. Cook has been granted leave of absence for
three months. Capts. Albert D. King, third
cavalry, Samuel McKeeves, second in
fantry, Gordon Winslow, eighth infantrv,
Thomas G. Troxel, seventeenth infantry,
have been ordered home to await retirement.
Second Lient. C. G. Morton, sixth infantry, has
been relieved from duty at the East Florida
seminary, Gainesville. October 1, and has been
detailed as professor of military science and |
tactics at tne Florida State Agricultural
college. Lake City. First Lieut. L. H. Orke
man, United States army (retired) has been re
lieved from duty at the Florida agricultural
college. Lake City, and detailed for duty at
Peeksville military academy, New York.
A Democrat Succeeds a Democrat. -
S. Spencer, president of the Commercial [
national bank, at Charlotte. N. C., and who is
disbursing officer of the fund for the Federal
building in course of erection in that place, has I
been removed from the latter position, and J
R. Holland, cashier Merchants' and Farmers'
bank, appointed to succeed him. Both are
democrats.
Personal.?J. B. Montgomery, Portland,
Oreg.; B. F. Thompson, Texas; Curtis Clark,
Boston; C. A. Ferguson, Philadelphia, and W.
D. Caldwell, Chicago, are at Willard's. G.
H. Kendall. A. W. Sexton, and E. Stratton of I
New York, J. Lynch of West P .it. Miss.; 11.
F. Brv.ui of tlif United States ? aw. G. Shaefer
of Baltimore, Chas. Ward of Tennessee, M. C
Mott of North Carolina, T. Hunters of Duluth,
and M. L. Nelson of Tennessee are at the Eb
kitt. C. Lamshe of New York, T. S. Alexan- !
der of Buffalo, J. W. Shipp of Denver,
\\. Baren of Indiana, Q. F. Watson
of Pennsylvania are at the Riggs.
L. J. Hoaring of Michigan, J. W. Prescott and
T. W. Green of New York, and W. H. Travers
of West Virginia, are at Welcker's. J. C.
Mulchall of St. Louis is at Worinley's.
Sam Nichols of St. Louis and C. T. Uouser of I
New York are at the Arno. E. C. Parkinson
of Nebraska, S. II. lleuderson of Toronto. H. S
McSwan of Boston, Mass., and W. R. Eastman
of Wellesley, Mass , are at the St. James.
Dr. VV. M. L. Phillips and James Buchanan of I
Trenton. N. J., are at the Normandie. Mr.
Frank M. Pearson, who has been studying
music in Europo for the past two years, has
returned to his home in this city on a visit. His
I voice has greatly improved, and he has sung
both in concert and opera with marked success.
THE MENTONE ARRESTS.
Secretary Blaine's Instructions to Minis
ter Held.
Rev. Gilbert Van Nostrand, of Newberg, N.
Y., yesterday afternoon had a conference with
Secretary Blaine in reference to the recent ar
rest and imprisonment of his sister and two
other American ladies at Mentone, France, on
the complaint of a dressmaker. After the con
ference. at which Mr. Van Nostrand was well
satisfied, a cablegram of instructions was sent
from the Secretary to Minister Iteid at Paris.
It is understood that the dispatch contained
authority to demand a full apology for the in
sult and annoyance to the ladies, and also the
dismissal of the offending official.
President Harrison in Brooklyn.
President Harrison, accompanied by Secre
tary of the Navy Tracy, Gen. Lew Wallace
and Private Secretary lialford, arrived in New
York last evening on the 9:10 train from
Washington. The President was received by I
a Brooklyn delegation consisting of Grauil
Marshal Henry W. Knight, chief of staff; B. R.
Corwic, police commissioner; James D. Bell,
chairman of the memorial and executive com
mittee, G. A. 11.. and Dr. Simonds, chairman of |
the committee on public ceremonies. The
President spent the night at the house of Jos.
F. Knapp, Brooklyn.
Applicants for Railway Mall Clerkships.
In order to secure registers of persons
eligible for appointment to the position of j
railway mail clerk, special examinations of ap
plicants for that position will be held by the
United States civil service commission on the
dates and at the places named below: June 12,
at Denver, CoL; Cheyenne, Wyo. Ter.; Fargo,
Dak.; Bismarck, Dak.;Yankton. Dak.;Wilming- |
ton. DeL; Jacksonville, Fla.; Atlanta, Ga.: Sa
vannah, Ga.; Macon, Ga.:New Orleans, La.;
Khreveport, La.; Vicksburg, Miss.; Jackson.
Miss.; Oxford, Misa.; Providence, 11. L;
Charleston. 8. C.; Columbia, 8. C.; Martins
burg, W. Va.; Charleston, W. Va.; Parkers burg,
W. Va. June 14, a* Boise City, Idaho; Miles
City, Mont.; Helena, Mont; Carson City; Nev.;
Albuquerque. N. M.; Portland. Or?; Roseburg,
Ore.; Salt Lake City, Utah Ter.; Spokane Falls,
Wash. Ter.; Seattle, Wash. Ter.
Edward Murphy, a Pittsburg temperance
orator, has been threatened by alleged White
Caps, who predict his death after June 18.
A negro squatter at Fredericksburg, Ya.,
named Peyton, resisted the attempt of a sheriff
and posse to dislodge him and set fire to his
house. He was subsequently arrested and
lodged in jail.
THE HONORED DEAD
MEMORIAL DAY, 1889.
Decorating the Soldiers' Graves.
EXERCISES AT ARLINGTON.
THE SHERIDAN MONUMENT
EMORIAL TO GENERAL PAUL.
The Dead at Other Cemeteries?Deco
rating the Statues?The Parade?The
Orations?Incidents of the Day.
All the statues of soldiers and patriot
statesmen were wreathed and garlanded with
flags and flowers when people began to stir on
the streets this morning. The committees
charged with decorating the statues performed
their duties last night. The clouded sky of the
early morning caused apprehension, not only
among the Grand Army men, who consecrate
the day to the memory of their fallen comrades,
but to the thousands who had planned to take
advantage of the holiday to have a day's out
ing. Before ten o'clock, however, the sun dis
pelled the clouds and shone forth in May glory.
Many hundreds of people went out of the city
to attend excursions, and thousands congre
gated in the cemeteries, where memorial ex
ercises were held. The general program was
as usual, but the ceremonies were of more than
usual interest. The parade of the G. A. R. in
the morning was made more imposing than
customary by the presence of the District na
tional guard as escort. Formal decoration-day
exercises were held in the Soldier's Homo and
Congressional cemeteries in the morning. In
addition, detachments of the Grand Army vis
ited other smaller cemeteries and placed flow
ers on the graves of soldiers buried in them.
The exercises at Arlington began at noon.
The day was made especially memorable there
by the unveiling of the Sheridan memorial and
the dedication of the monument erected to
Gen. Gabriel It. Paul.
The Decorated Monuments.
The various monuments which adorn the
citv were nearly all decorated by committees
from the Grand Army Postsand in one instance
an additional honor was paid. The exception
was in the case of the statue of Gen. John A.
ltawlins, situated at Ninth street and Penusyl
avenue. The bronze figure had been beautified
by flags and flowers anil at about 'J o'clock this
morning John A. Rawlings Post Xo. 1 inarched
ast the counterfeit of the man it delighted to
onor and silently saluted it.
Kit Carson Post No. 2 hung flags and wreaths
upon the equestrian statues of Washington
and Jackson.
Lincoln Post No. 3 attended to the statuo of
tho great liberator in front of the city hall.
O. P. Morton Post No. 4 and Chas. P. Stone
Post No. 11 dul their duty by the Scott statue.
Loving hearts and willing hands from Meade
Post No. 5 placed tributes on "Pap'' Thomas'
figure at 14th street and Massachusetts avenue,
and on Greenough's Washington.
Dupont's statue was decorated by members
of the John F. Reynolds' Po9t. No. 6. and <iar
field's memorial received every attention lrom
Garfield Post. No. 7.
Rurnside Post, No. 8, had no statue of their
own hero to beautify, but they performed that
plcasiug duty for the statue of Mcpherson.
Charles Sumner Post. No. 'J, decorated the
Lincoln emancipation statue and also that of
Greene.
Farragut Tost, No. 10, cared for its own and
did it well; the statue of the admiral was
really beautiful.
The Clrent Parade.
Grand Army hall was the scene of much ac
tivity this morning. As early as 8 o.elock and
long before the hour of 10 arrived most of its
rooms were tilled with members of the various
posts who were waiting tho signal to fall in for
the great parade. Shortly after 9 o'clock tho
crowd commenced to assemble. The various
committees who had been assigned to decorate
the statutes of military and naval heroes re
ported to headquarters that their labors of love
were over. On the sidewalk in tho vicinity of
the hall the scene was at least an interesting
one. Hundreds of veterans congregated there
and discussed everything from the firing on
Fort Sumpter to the heavy masses of cloud
which threatened raiu. There was an infinite
variety of martial material. Some of tho sur
vivors?most of them, in fact-were Clad in tho
regulation blue; some wore their best clothes,
and a few of them evidently didn't have any
??best clothes" worth mentioning; but they
were none the less loyal and none the less
brave. Time had dealt kindly with a great
mauv of them, although war's assaults had laid
heavy hands upon not a few. Empty sleeves
swung idly in the light summer breeze and
crutches "were numerous. The maimed, the
halt, and the blind were all there; all ready
and willing to pay the annual public tribute of
affection to the men whose
"Swords are rust,
Whose bones are dust.
Whose uoiil* are with the saint?, we trust."
Old comrades who had not seen each other
siuee last Memorial Day?exehauged affection
ate greetings. It was a pleasant reunion; a
Grand Army lyve feast.
THE VBOCESSIOS 8TABTR.
It was 11:30 when the head of the lengthy
column left 15th street and Pennsylvania avenue
and moved toward the Aqueduct bridge. Fol
lowing the platoon of mounted police and
astride of a sturdv roan horse was Chief Mar
shal Col. Fred. Brackett.a fine-looking specimen
of the model military equestrian. Rehind him
came his staff, composed of A. J. Huntoon. T.
W. Tallmadge, Newton Ferree, James M. Mil
ler, O. H. Ross, Dr. Florence Donahue, and
Roger Bellis. The two latter attracted a good
deal of attention; Dr. Donahue because he
was mounted on a fiery little buckskin.mustang
and CoL Rellis because he rode so skilfully,albeit
he is minus the whole of one leg. Then came
the national guard of the District of Columbia,
commanded by Gen. Albert Ordway. aud very
clean and soldier-like tho boys looked. The
signal company, under Lieut. J. M. Field, was
next, and following close upon their heels was
tho National Guard baud, led by Bandmaster
August Hchroeder, a successful military musi
cal organization, viewed from any standpoint
aud Judged by any standard.
Nobody would have recognized the Washing
ton Light Infantry corps, disguised as it was in
the plain blue blouses and trousers and brown
leggii^gs of the militia, had not Col. W. G.
Moore been at its head and Adjutant Loefflcr
not so far away. It was the same old infantry,
however, when it came to solid marching. The
first, second and third battalions of the first
regiment were commanded, respectively, by
Ma}. W. N. Dal ton, Maj. C. R. Gary and Maj.
T. 13. Harrison.
Lieut. D. O. Leech, in command of the am
bulance corps, was on the left of the first regi
ment, and his command was judiciously scat
tered throughout the column.
At the head of the second regiment was Col.
Cecil Clay and the National Guard drum corps,
and then with military precision followed the
fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth bat
talions, commanded respectively by Major E.
R. Campbell, Major J. A. Long, Capt. J. W. F.
Williams. Major C. A. Fleetwood, and Major F.
C. Revells.
THE TWO FEATCBE8 OF THE PARADE
came next?the light battery of artillery and
and the troop of cavalry. Capt. Arthur Bates
was responsible for the appearance and move
ments of the gunners and he had nothing to be
ashamed of. Everything was in first-class
order and the drivers had excellent control of
the well-kept horses which were engaged in
hauling the valiant caisson decorators.
The nodding saffron-tinted plumes of the
cavalry aud their jangling equipments
aroused positive enthusiasm, aud Lieut. H. 8.
Barbour seemed well content with the recep
tion the public gave his command.
The orator, the chaplains and the poet occu
pied carriages immediately behind the cavalry
tiui just in sdvuee of that combination of in
strnraental talent known as the Marine band.
1 hey started out with a medley of marchinz
aire prominent in which wag Hub Smiths
catchy quickstep. -Listen To My Tale of Woe."
i'lre,n^l!10n,of tllis was 80 n"tural that mnnr
of the bystanders imagined thev could see the
'?peach of emerald hue" that double-up
Johnny and his sister Sue." and Prof 8ou?a's
mouth mvolutarily puckered up at the sour
taste the imaginary peach put therein.
THE GRAND ARMY DIVISION
closed the column. It was commanded by De
partment Commander W. 8. Odell, and sup
porting him was Junior Vice-Commander 8. E.
Faunce and the following members of the de
partment commander's staff: Assistant Adju
tant-General C. H. Ingram. Assistant Quarter
master-General Charles Matthews. Inspector
James W. Butcher, Chief Mustering Officer
James E. McCabe, Aides-de-Camp John F.
Vinal. Wm. H. Slater, J. W. F. Willisms, Thos.
J. Burrill. Alex. W. Coulee, Wm. A. Gatelv
Thomas G. Hensey. Alexander Freeman. Nv
th iniel Sprague, C. P. Bundick, A. H. Tan
Dusen, P. M. O'Bryan, Chas. Shambaugh
Geo. Wagner. W. H. McMonigal, Wm. G. Hall
Bobert Johnson, James Wood, L E. W. Thomp
son. Geo. 8. King.
The -Old Guard," Cant. James M. Edgar
commanding, did escort duty and looked well,
and after them came the great body of veter
ans the majority of them carrying flag-decor
ated canes. Some of the "vets" were extremelv
old. and some looked decidedly young. Thev
varied in their views as to what was the correct
step, and they paid but little attention to the
last regulations as to cadence, but they all
seemed to be happy, and every man's heart
bounded behind that certificate of honor?a
Grand Army badge. The music, which aided
many a lagging footstep, was intensely
martial, anil was noisily extracted from shriil
pipes and tightly-stretched drum-heads. The
lifers decorated their instruments by stuffing
bouquets into the corked-lip ends of the shriek
ing cylinders. Nearly every man inline was
jloraliy decorated, and a few, principally mem
bers of the colored posts, were almost hidden
behind an array of badges that eclipsed the
most lavish display ever made by a professional
fakir. The younger soldiers were verv anxious
that the Grand Army should march well, and
they were, consequently, much distressed at
tlie carelessness of those of their older com
rades who didn't care two cents what the
platoons looked like; they were content to rest
their claims to distinction upon their twenty
hve-year-old record as warriors. Much more
attention was paid to the alignment by the col
ored posts, and they marched with "as much
' h^ d.''Ja t'oluo militia companies
I he eleven posts of the department of the
lotomac were commanded, respectively, bv
Augustus C. Paul, Thos. H. MeKee. Marion T.
Anderson* Chas. Ii. Douglass, Calvin Farns
worth. Henry Jenkins. Frank W. Paige. Arthur
Hendricks. Thos. \V. West, A. F. Dinsinore, and
It. J. Be-all.
AT ARLINGTON.
Kxerciscs at the National Cemetery.
From Arlington Heights early in the day the
city could be seen across the Potomac, now
under the shadow of dril ting clouds, now shin
ing forth in glory, and reflecting back from
dome and monument the bright rays of the sun.
Early in the day members of committees and
others whose duties required them to be early
on the ground began to assemble in the old
mansion and then disperse about the grounds,
laden with flags and flowers. On the brow of
the hill near the mansion stood the monument
just erected over the grave of Gen. Sheridan.
The shaft and its bronze bas-relief were
swathed in flags. Ladies of the decoration
committee heaped about the base many floral
Offerings. One representing a saddle, placed
at the base of the monument by the woman's
relief corps, department of Potomac, was es
pecially beautiful.
?Back in the grounds the monuments erected
over the graves of Gen. Ilazen, Gen. Myer,
Uen. Lyford and others, were beautifully deco
rated with flags and flowers by loving hands
Amid the trees rose the tall shaft erected
over the resting-place of Gen. Gabriel It. Paul
but which during the morning was hidden from
view by a veil of dags.
LIVELY BCEXKS ON THE ROAD.
Soon after 10 o'clock the roads from George
town to Arlington were thronged with vehicles
and pedestrians bound to the cemetery.
There was the usual long caravan
of wagous temporarily improvised into
stages. Along the route in shady nooks, as
usual, enterprising colored people had erected
booths for the sale of horsecakes and lemon
ade, and the hokey-pokey man deserted the
asphalt ot the city tor the hour to push his per
ambulator and shout his monotonous call
among the bushy pathways about Arlington.
A LARGE AND DIS1INGUISHED ATTENDANCE.
The attendance at Arlington was unusually
large, and the grounds never looked more
beauiiiul. At times during the morning the
sun was obscured and there were threats of
rain, but most of the time there was bright
sunshine. The main interest in the morning
seemed to be centered about the Sheridan monu
ment, mid as the people gathered thev thronged
about the flag-bedecked shaft. This point, too,
is one of the most attractive iu the whole
grounds as it overlooks the city. Kome time
before 12 o clock
M118. HARRISON- ARRIVED,
accompanied by Mrs. MeKee and Mrs. Brown.
I>r. Scott and Mr. MeKee. They brought with
them a large bouquet of flowers, which was
placed on Gen. Sheridan's grave. Gen. Scho
lield and members of his staff arrived about
the same time. Civil Service Com
missioner Lyman and Mrs. Lvman
Senator Sawyer, Attorney-General Miller
Commissioner Mitchell, of the patent office, ami
Mrs Mitchell, and persons distinguish, d in offi
cial life were in the throng that gathered about
the old mansion. It was considerable after
noon before the procession arrived from the
city. The line passed through the grounds and
the people assembled
At Sheridan's Monument.
The first ceremony of the day was that at
the Sheridan monument. It was simple. There
were no speeches or poems; only music and
flowers. When the procession arrived the Ma
rine band marched to a spot on the hill a
few feet below the monument Inside the
enclosure were members of the G. A. It. com
mittees and of the Woman's relief corps.
I he Loyal Legion commanderv of the District
of ( olumbia. of which Gen. Sheridan was a
?member, was represented by the commander
Senator Manderson, the recorder. Major W. P.'
rt^' HU<1 a committee composed
of Major-Gen C. C. Augur, Brigadier
Generals B. C. Card and T. M. Vin
cent, Col. J. H. Oilman and Capt. J. A. Snyder,
of the army; Capt. Silas Casey and Chief* En
gineer Philip Inch, of the navy; Major W. A.
Coulter, Captain Thomas Wilson and Lieuts. P.
E. Chapin and A. C. Pearson, of the volunteers."
The floral tribute from the commander)' placed
on the grave was in the form of Gen. Sheri
d'in s battle-flag, of crimson immortelles and
white carnations with gilt staff resting on an
easel of smilax and asparagus vines.
\\ hen the band had played a dirge Qoartcr
master-Sergeaut A. W. Bogia, of the Old
Guard, pulled the rope that detached the
fas teaings, and the flags that covered
the monument fell to the ground.
Just at that moment the members of the Wo
man's relief corps threw a shower of roses
upon the grave. This ended the simple cere
mony. Col. Michael Sheridan and a
number or army officers witnessed
the ceremony. Mrs. Sheridan, who is
confined to her room by sickness, was nnable
to attend. Later in the day, however, after the
unveiling ceremonies, the children of Gen.
Sheridan visited the cemeterv and added their
flowers to the heap that had been thrown upon
the gallant soldier's grave.
THE MONUMENT
is a plain, broad granite shaft, of sharp and'
strong outline, upon the face of which rests
the bronze medallion of Sheridan. It is erected
by Mrs. Sheridan in memory of her husband.
Soon after the general's death she consulted
with Mr. Samuel Kitson, the artist, who under
took the work of designing a memorial in
granite and bronze fitting to the character of
Sheridan. The bronze medallion shows Sheri
dan in bas-relief, framed in a laurel and p?'*^
wreath, with the headquarters flag for a back
ground. Just enough of the shoulders and
chest is shown ta display the general's
uniform and military decoration* of
Telegrams to The Star.
the natiovs dead.
Impressive Decoration Exer
cises in Various Cities.
PRESIDENT HARRISON IN BROOKLYN
FIGHTING EXPECTED IN BEHRINC SEA
Remarkable Statements Made by
a British Naval Officer.
BROOKLYN'S GREAT DAY.
President Harrison Reviews the Grand
Army l'arade.
?1 RECEIVES AN OVATION AS BE RIDF.K ALONG
the use MEMORIAL, day fittingly ob
served?ruz ORAVES IX MANY CEMETERIES
TRANSFORMED INTO FLOWER-BEDS.
Brookly*, N. T., May 30.?The celebration
of Memorial Day in Urooklvn was. u* it has
been for many years, an unqualified success.
Ihe parade in always made the especial
feature, the services at the cemeteries, as a
rule, being held on the Sundav preceding Dec
oration day. The Grand Army men in the
past have been so fortunate as to obtain the
attendance of Presidents Grant and Arthur
in the reviewing stand, and to-dav they had
a Grand Army of the Republic veteran.
Gen. Iknjanrin Harrison, President of the
tinted States, to review them. The President
was assisted by another veteran, Gen. Btnj. F.
Tracy, Secretary of the Navy.
THE PRESIDENT BttEAKFASTED
early at the residence of Joseph F. Knapp in
company with Secretary of the Navy Iracv
and Mayor Chapin. After breakfast" several
?aUed and 8Look ''ahds with
i resident Harrison.
.was "Lur W o'clock when the President
Aslhe be^fyr Hrted ,?Ut to rt vi' w the parade.
As the head of the column reached the review
uJn Dark itUf ,Uoaghbv - venue and Wasliing
to thr Lr. uMd l? V'? Uft il"J Jrewt J back
the curb. When the signal was civet! tin
Kecretarv TWvd V car.rid^ lD company with
rit'h t r?f ?K r r.?dt from the left to the
right of the line. As he moved over the route
HE RECEIVED A GRAND OVATION
from the spectators who lined the sidewalks
and doorsteps and filled the windows of the
houses. The organizations saluted and
Chief ?banTl PiP8*, "Hail <o tlio
i , . /lle President gracefullv ?<?
accordcif'Unon'tak" "a,tt<r'"K recognition
vw?T,,,V. P.? t!ikins h"" r'^e on the re
l.niT, . f thf organizations wheeled col
umn and resumed the march, passing through
several streets to Flatbush avenue, whe^e the
parade was dismissed. ' Ult
dentC on thc ? of the Pro?i
come Th- cam?u? 'or a graceful wel
i " The veteran and paid firemen and the
SSK""*" got of ***#
sons wer/S,timkt<id ^ twentv thousand per
the intfr P?? d ?U Fort ?rttue P??a and
StoSSSSfrT* " "" w " <
decorating the graves.
The various divisions of the Grand Army as
signed to the cemeteries then repaired to their
respective destinations. The cemeteries
visited were Greenwood, Cyprus Hill
tvercreen. Holy Cross, and Flatbush!
where the mounds which marked the spots
where esteemed comrades rest in peace were
transformed into flower beds, anil eloquent
orations were delivered, in which tributes
were paid to the memory of the fallen heroes
for their valor and lovaltv.
After the review the "President, with Secre
tary Tracy. Mayor Chapin and others went to
Mr. Knapp s residence, where an informal re
ception was held.
?i ??m'd..bce1u. arranged that the President
should attend the ceremonies at Gen. Grant's
tomb in this city, but this was given up. The
party will return to Washington in the private
car this afternoon, leaving the Jcrsev Citv
depot at 3:45 o'clock. 3 7
THE DAY IX NEW YORK.
Vice-Presldcnt Morton, Gov. Iini and
Mayor Grant Review the l'arade.
New \ohk. May 30.?Ihough the earlymorn
ing did not give promite of a fair day. yet it
could not be said to be a very unpleasant pros
pect, for the rain fell only lightly and at ir
regular intervals, while as the morning wore on
the rain ceased entirely, and the sun at times
almost broke through the clouds. All the
public buildings displayed their flags at half
mast, but there was a very meager display of
bunting elsewhere except at the hotels "and
newspaper offices. Even along the line of the
march of the parade there had been no at
tempt at elaborate decoration. Points of van
tage along the line were taken up by sight
seers at an early hour, and the reviewiiiK
stands were well filled before the parade
started from 58th street The line of March
was a short one. down 5th avenue to 14th
street, and thence to Broadway, and around
L nion square. The most elaborate feature of
the decorations was noticeable at Union
square. where the Lincoln statue
was beautifully adorned. Around the
base and within the railing verbenas, gera
niums. and flowering plants were massed in a
solid bank; the pedestal was covered with
bunches of flowers, laurel leaves, and green
vines with insignia of war traced in flowers
The Washington statue, also at Union square
was also beautifully decorated, and the seventh
regiment monument, in the west drive in Cen
tral park, was also a great center of attrac
tion to lovers of flowers as tributes to
the patriotic dead. The parade was started
promptly at 9 o'clock, with Gen. O. O. Howard
and a battalion of marines and soldiers at the
head.
The parade was reviewed by Gov. Hill, Vice
President Morton, and Mayor Grant. After
the parade the members of the G. A. R. went
to the various cemeteries and decorated the
graves of their dead
AT FREDERICKSBURG.
Impressive Decoration Exercises?Gen.
S. 8. Burdett's Oration.
Fredericksburg, Va., May 30.?The national
memorial to-day was held under the auspices
of Phil Kearney Post, G. A. R., No. 10, of Rich
mond. Va. The city was thronged with visi
tors. The contributions of flowers from ex
confederates were numerous and handsome.
The procession formed and marched to the
cemetery in the following order: Voelker's first
regiment band, chief marshal. Department
Commander H. DeB. Clay; visiting comrades
and veterans from the department of the Po
tomac, Phil Kerney Post. Fraternal Legion
drum corps, representatives from Hart
ford, Conn.; New York. Philadelphia, Pitts
burg, Williamsport. and Eastern, Pennsylvania
Baltimore, and a large number from Washing
ton posts, citizens and city officials. The pro
cession marched to the graves of the unknown
dead, where the band played a dirge, ' The
Fallen Heroes." The graves were then deco
rated while the band played solemn music. At
the grand stand the exercises were opened
with vocal music. "Mv Country Tis of Thee "
Commander Burr, of Phil Kearney post, called
the assemblage to order, and Chaplain C. H.
Coreey delivered the invocation. Gen. Edgar
Allen, P. J. vice-commander-in-chief, intro
duced Gen. & 8. Burdett, of Washington,
passed commandsr-in-c hief of the Grand Army
of the Republic, the orator of the day, who
spoke as follows:
on. buksktt's oration.
"All that a man hath will he give for his
lifs." saith the preaehsr, "and all that hvsd an
swsr to his text with yea, vsrily. let we
upon ground where twenty-six years ?go (treat
armies joined in mortal strife and left upon the
field nearly 16.000 of their dead aud wounded.
And who were they and who are we? Tbtf
were the first born of a gre.vt people. For all ?*
them there wiu> a right of contest for the high
est honor* their country had ui store. a*xl for
moot there w?? leave to strive for atid right W
gaiu the lofUest place.
And who are we'r The comrades. tlie fellows
in heart and hope in trial, in purpose aud m
endeavor of those that sle< p hi re; who spared
to see with these earthly eyes the fruition of
our dearest hopes have ma.le it the law of oof
life to attest once in each year so long as wo
may live our sense of the value of the sacrifice
they made, our Kricf that their own suusvt
came while yet the cloud* were lowering over
th< ir country, and in such measure as we mar
persuade the roniig generation* to retneoilier at
what a cost the Union wm> prrd rrrd. What
ever loyalty to the dag and Constitution re
mains supreme. th<v who remember hut did
not participate with us in the strife, and those
? ho have since come upon the stage of acUoS
to a bom it is but a story illustrated by the**
gatherings and accentual d by the more passer
by. yet weir on our connug together with all
heartiness, and.only second to ourselves, find in
them occaeiou for cougratulatiou aud patriotio
pleasure.
Comrades. I do not forget where we stand
nor the century hour that has just been struck.
This is Virginia; that Virginia ahoae masterful
uuUiciice might have staved the haud of rel?el
lion m its first hour of gladness, but whoa* ad
hesion to that cause gave it the men. the lead
ership. the fortitn. ami. 1 uiav say. the moral
force, which made the struggle the greatest
for which our earth has ever furnished field,
lie who puts his life id pi. an for the cause ho
champions has closed discussion on the ques
tion of the sincerity of his purpose. No better
illustration ot the death of rancor, of
the innate manliness of Atu< ricans to whatever
section native, is knowu to roe. than was the
gracious act of those confederate survivor* who
one year ago to-day, seeing that too few of our
comrades were present here to do full justi.-e
to the occasion, generously led the way and
made complete the work of garnishing these
graves with flowers.
Who to-day. no matter on which side of the
Potomac he dwells, is not glad bvyond the
pow? r of speech to tell that Virginia stood be
] side Pennsylvania, that South Carolina stood
beside Massachusetts, when thirty days ago all
tae sisterhood of th< states, uuder the lead of
him who fills the s< at first held by Washington
and beneath the flag of an uubroken country,
saluted the century of the Constitution Just
closing aud invoked the blessing of the
merciful Father on all the years to come.
It excites only pleas-.ireahle emotions that Vir
ginia and her southern sisters have been and
i will l>e the chief gainers from that struggle in
which they write themselves down the 1 nosers.
I The looms of the new south warn fti Massachu
setts that competitors are ou her track, the
turn ace tires of Tennessee aud Alabama have
pent their gleam athwart the Pennsylvania
skys and challenge the iron king to do buttle
for his supremacy within his own domain.
Those marvels of our aged cities to-day where
j there was wilderness ou yesterday, are no
longer the phi noiuouou of the north alone."
1 ii conclusion Gen. Burdett paid a parting
tribute to the comrades who iav buried about
tlieni.
At the conclusion of Gen. Ilurdett's speech
the baud plavcda reveille, tien. Allen then read
poem "Thi Nation's Dead." At the conclusion
of the reading visiting comrades pouted five
hundred rose trees and fioaery shrubs in the
cemetery. As the veterans were returning to
the city thev ai re loudly cheered by couteder
iites along the line. lien. Burdett aud other
distinguished visitor* were given au informal
reception at the hotel this aileruoou.
AT PHILADELPHIA.
Gen. Sherman Participates in the Cere
monies ut Laurel II ill.
Philadelphia, May 30.?Although the sky
was overcast with clouds which frequently be
came ominous there was no rain here during
the morning and at times the sun shone bright
ly. The day was generally observed as a holi
day. all public offices and nearly all business
houses being closed. The ceremonies incident
to the decoration of soldiers' graves were wore
than usually interesting. The thirty-six Or aud
Army posts of the city decorated the graves in
ninety-eight cemeteries located in the city and
adjoining counties.
A number ol Philadelphia comrades also left
the city to attend the ceremonies at the grave
of Gen. Grant in New York. Geu. McClellan at
Trenton. Geu. Heyuolds at Lancaster, aud Gen.
Hancock at Norri?town.
The most interesting decoration oerfmonies
in this city were at Laurel Hill cemetery, where
Geo. G. Meade post was assisted by Lafayette
post. No. 1?J0. of New York, aud were accom
panied to the cemetery by mauy prominent in
vited guests, the most notable of whom wnl
Gen. Win. T. Sherman.
SOME FIGHTING SOON.
That's What a British Officer Expects
In Hehring Sea.
HE SATS THAT NO ATTENTION WILL B* PAID TO
THE PRESIDENT'S PROCLAMATION, AND CANA
DIAN SEAMEN WILL HE PROTECTED IN HCNTIM
Fob seals in the dhpcted waters.
Chicago, May 30.?A special to the Timet
from Victoria, B. C., says: Startiiug revs lo
tions concerning the teuor aud extent of the
orders issued hv the admiralty authorities to
Admiral Henegc, commanding the Pacific
squadron, aud uuder which the British men
of-war Swiftsure. Icarus, and Am|thion. now at
Esqmmal. will proceed to Behriug sea early in
Juue. were made yesterday by an officer in
high rank attached to the flagship. He and a
number of other officers attended a luncheon
given by local club men. and before tin- affair
c.ime to a close all were very much uuder the
influence of champagne. At the height of the
festivities the officer iti responding to the toast
of the navy said in substance that
there wocld BE home fiohtino
soon in Ik hring sea if the American authori
ties attempted to prevent Canadian scaics
from huutiug there. No attention would lie
paid to the l'resident's proclamation, he said,
and the admiral would not only dispute the
claims of the Americans to exclusive soveiguty
in the disputed waters, hut if American cruisers
should take iuto custody Canadian sealers
caught fishing there the British men-of-war
woul take steps to recapture them. He said
further, that the admiral commanding the
North American station had sent the British
cruiser Buzzard from Bermuda to New York,
and while there orders were received from the
admiralty
To act at once
and send two war ships from the North Ameri
can station to reinforce those now under orders
to proceed to Behring sea. If the statements
made by the officer are true it would seem that
Great Britain means to resort to force rather
thau wait for a diplomatic solution of the aeal
fishing difficulty. Late yesterday afternoon
the admiral heard of the statements made by
the officer and at once ordered him under
arrest. Strong efforts were made to keep the
matter secret, but it leaked out and caused
great excitemcut. He has communicated to
the admiralty authorities by cable.
Mr. O'Brien Refuses to Testify.
London, May 30.?Mr. Win. O'Brien refuse*
to testify before the committee ou prison rules
because it fails to deal w ith the question of the
treatment of political prisoners.
This Government Must Apply.
Toronto, Ont., May 90.? A special from Ot
tawa to the Empirt says: The Canada Southern
railroad company has applied to the customs
department for permission to transport United
States troops through Cauadiau territory, the
thirteenth regiment of New York being desirous
of visiting Minneapolis about the middle
of August. The reply of the department was
that the application must be mad< through the
United States government. 'I he Grand Trunk
railwav company made a similar application
two or three weeks ago and the same answef
was given. The privilege is usually accorded.
Disastrous Kfleets of a Tornado.
Emporia. Kan.. May*).?Capt. Milton Browa
was the only person killed outright in the
Clement's tornado. His wife, however, is not
expected to live, having had her leg terribly
mangled and almost torn from her l>ody. Their
son Edward had his leg aud shoulder broksa.
Miss Sarah Brown had an ankle broksa andis
internally injured, and a baby is alei
hurt The storm was about 1C0 feet in
and traveled almost around Clements, fe
mg the cyuree of the Cottoewood river is t
southeasterly course, and more than a doses
farms are denuded of their buildings oafi
orchards and crops are destroyed. Capt
Brown was a prominent member of the G. A.
K. at Cottonwood Falls, and was a wealthy
farmer. He came ' > Boas county, Ohio,
shortly after the war
Connecticut's Democratic
Nrw Hater, Oow*., May 80.
Carlos Preach has been elected a member of
the p?democratic committee to repre
sent this stats in plaos of William H. BarsUn,
For aOm- Tdegrafktc Asms sat papas S sad ft

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