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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, August 01, 1889, Image 6

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DESTRUCTIVE STORMS.
Virginia and Maryland Particularly
Feel Their ERects.
BIVERS mUIXO I* BOTH STATES?RAILROAD
niDnu swrrr aw at a.xd tbai>? dilated
OBKAT DA*AOI TO rBOPERTT AND CROPS
BflLDINOS TORX FBOM THEIR rotTODATIOilS.
The ?torm? of yesterdsy and the day before
covered s wide area of territory and did a large
amount of damage. Last night the force of
the itorm wai spent in Virginia and Maryland.
A? the result of recent heavy rains there is
the largest flood known in the Danville river,
Ya., and its tributary streams since 1873. Cot
ton mills, ice factory, foundries, electric light
house, and other machinery on the river front
are flooded. Low lands in the lower part of
the city of Danville are submerged. The At
lantic and Danville railroad tracks for a dis
tance of six miles are under water, and thou
sands of cross-ties awaiting rails between there
and Milton. N. C.. have been washed away.
The roadbed of this new line is greatly dam
aged. There are seven washouts on the Vir
finja Midland road between Danville and
ynrhburg, and travel on that road is entirely
?upended.
The damage on the Danville and New River
rmuroad is very great, there being numerous
bad washouts and the bridge over Cascade
creek being swept away. There were no trains
over that road yesterday. From Caswell and
Rockingham counties in North Carolina and
Henry. Franklin. Pittsylvania, and Halifax in
Virginia come reports of terrible damage to
property. Bridges, fencing, and low ground
crops have been swept away in every direction.
The county bridges over Sandy river and
Bandy creek, near Danville, were washed away
this afternoon.
ALABM FELT AT FREDERICKSBURG.
The people of Fredericksburg were in a high
state of consternation yesterday over the high
waters in the Rappahannock. On Saturday last
the river rose to the capacity of its banks, but
did not overflow. Tuesday afternoon the rain
poured as if bent on the total destruction of the
city. With unabated fury during the entire night
the storm continued. Long before davlight
yesterday the people were on the streets.' fear
rag a flood like that on the 31st of Mar last
Daylight showed the river overflowing its
banks and rising at the rats of 18 inches an
hour, the rain falling as heavily as ever. The
streets in the lower portion of the citv are
flooded. The citizens there have moved out of
their houses, carrying with them their furni
ture. Ac. The repairs on the dam have all been
swept off. entailing a loss of thousands of dol
lar?. The injury to tbe canal id alao great and
cannot an yet be estimated.
Dispatches from Orange Court Hon# sav
that the Rapidun river is surging and sweeping
ail property along its bauks. Information
comes from the upper counties that the flood
will be destructive indeed. The trains on the
Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac rail
road were greatly delayed yesterday, owing to
the uncertain condition of road bed. bridges
trestles, and culverts. On the R.. F. and P.'
railroad there were no trains yesterdav, manv
of the bridges and much of the trestlewirk over
Hazel run. Furnace creek and other places hav
ing been taken away by the flood.
RICHMOND LIKELT TO BE SUBMERGED.
At Richmond the month ending yesterday
will pass into history as the wettest ever known.
A calculation made np to Saturday last shows
that the rainfall there was 9.86 inches, as
against 1.40 during the whole month of July,
1888. Ihe record for the year promises to
snow that the rainfall was twice as much as
m?v preceding within the memory of the oldest
resident rhe effect bt these continuous and
Heavy rains has been disastrous to the farmers
of Re state, especially on the low lands Re
ports from the James river valley and other
Ik ? ,*k *eC,,OM of fhe "tate are to the effect
that the growing gram crops have been greatly
damaged and in some cases.it is believed ut
terly destroyed. ul
The James river is rising and a freshet is
dreaded. At 6 p.m. yesterday the river wns 6}.
feet above tide at Tredegar bridge, and was !
rising at the rate of one foot per hour
iw!n* t0 Ta8h?a* on the Richmond and
1 ami e railroad between Lvnchl.nrg and i
? b''.ull1r condition of affairs on
the Richmond. Fredericksburg and Potomac I
railroad near Penola. 33 miles from Richmond, '
Passengers and mail over both roads are being
handled by the Chesapeake and Ohio railroad.
The indications are that the lower part of the
city will be submerged.
A I EESHI T THREATENED.
At Petersburg acother serious .freshet is
threatened. A dispatch from F*rmville savs
that the river there is now 3 feet higher than it
rh?reUhly*,,he fre"bn ln Merchants
there h.ive been warned to remove goods be
longing to them fr?m the railroad freight
Zr\rv*il?'\n> altogether the greatest anxiety
* 1 Ja8 fe" r?in?g heavily for the
past three or four days, and farmers are in dis
tress ov*r ruin of crops.
Flood* In Maryland.
At Ellicott City the heavy rains of yesterday
have caused a considerable rise in the Patapsco
river and occasioned considerable alarm for the
safety of the new Baltimore and Ohio railroad
oPthiVT r ? la,?r0 to tLe I'our'nK mills
of the t. A Gam brill manufacturing company
wa*a,,ne 40 th? jai?
company at the mills at
Orange Orove. which was washed out during
lit t h 13i and Wa* in course of repair
All the new work has been washed awav and a
Fom'erV daln which "Urvived the
thrnn l k damaSt' to roads and bridges
throughout the county was heavy. Lightnuie
struck the stone barn of Mr. C." W. D. Ligon
and tore out several feet of the wall of one end
and shivered several heavy posts There w?
no sun k in the barn.
Westminster rain commenced filling
about 3 o'clock Tuesday afteraoonTnd h^ Lep?
it up ever since, sometimes pouring down. The
very hieh "U/h?Ut CarT?U coun^ haTt been
1?r and "?,me Places the county roads
fUU H? ^rrorn,. V wa,,hed- The Patapsco
falls at Carrollton were over the track of the
W estern Maryland railroad. The water of Rig
Hpe creek at Trevanion is over the bridge,
making travel impossible. The meadows alolg
fr? -n 1 ' ew Wlnd?or to Union Rndge
re all under water. No serious damage has
been reported. The water is subsiding.
8TBEAMS OVERFLOW THEIR BANKS
Tuesday night's rain has done a vast amount
of damage to Harford county. The rain was
accompanied with very vivid lightnine and
strong win J. The com fields are badly washed
and streams that were never known to get
beyond their bauks are now good-sized rivers
Winters run at Archer A Howaida
^ air? fourteen inches from the
bridge floor. All the fields along this stream
are flooded ,nd Lake Fanny is i raginj C
rent. Bynum s run it orer its banks 400 or 500
yards and about twelve inches from the bridge
-^r" i.e ?tream 18 usually a bo in forty i Jit
wide and two feet deep, but vesterdav it w.a
about fifteen feet deep. Oeer creek b"
been as high for years. No loss of life h "b?n
"? to
At Chestertown the fall of rain Tn?^..
mght and yesterday was'unp^cedenUci
The corn crop in Kent county will be cut
Muav farm ' b,T ** "^me" wet wither!
farmers will not make enough corn to
servethem. much less to make amends for a
damaged wheat crop and no peaches.
obeat loss or hat and wheat.
Thus far Talbot county has suffered less per
haps. than any other of the peninsula counties
from uup-ecedented rains, as no heavy damage
?/?' d<;ne pohd*, roads or bridges h^t
hundreds of tons of huv have been lost'
thousands of bushels of wheat are bein^ d,"
aged, and the outlook is that Talbot nTav
corn enough for home consumption
" * tomatoes ST ??
saasttrzsrfzrjic %
&iv^dU.SeU!,dini,,'0ple bQ'n? -'nom
"Pending money sparingly. Canning
t he^??? ^'?mmenced up the IMaware and
peake railway ui Caroline county u it i.
tSZZ'UZ,'? Peach"'7 ,ralt be,0re i*
11 reaches, canning stock are
60 cmw ! th,? ^ '"?? table u^ br"?
#0 c??s a basket in l^ston. The rains havf
anrferraon the
Th? Delaware Peninsula.
The enure Delaware and Chesapeske penin
wl* has suffered from tremendous rain storms
) ln mauy ?actions in disas
trous floods and washouts. in Wilmington
heavy showers of rain have fallen at interval,
for two days past and the street, ha^e blen
?f *?ter. The low-lving districts of th?
city sre inundated. Last ni|ht the BrtLdr
w?e was seven feet above high-tide insrk ./i
jtdl rising It u feared that^eat da^J ^
be done to the flouring mill* of tbe William
LeaASons Ca. to the Vh-st^et and
delphia. Wilmington and Baltimore railroad
bridges and 10 many ship-yards and factories*
From the Market-street bridge the river was a
boihuf torrent level with the dam above the
bridge. The force of the water tore the bridge
at Birmingham Park, on the Wilmington and
Aorthern railroad, from its piers. Several
to.?-!**
DAMAGE to the fbach crof.
Tk* worit feature of the heavy raiaa it the
damage to crop* in the ^>wer part of the
state and on the lower peninsula. Unless
there U an opportunity to harvest it the
oat crop will be a failure. The corn field* are
muddy and swampv and the crop will be
ruined. Strawberries and blackberries
brqnght losing pri es this season, and the
added disaster of these storms will nrove
most disastrous to the farmers of the lower
peninsula. From Middletown and Smyrna
come reports of deluged fields. The Baltimore
and Delaware Bay railroad between Clayton
and Bombay Hook is so damaged by washonta
that traffic is temporarily suspended. "Wheat
is sprouting in the shocks about Dover, and
from that point down peaches are badly dam
aged. ADOut Georgetown peaches are greatly
damaged and are rotting. Bridges are so
swept away that the extent of the damage can
not ret be'learned. Communication between
Seaford and Laurel and the eastern part of
Sussex county is cut off. There will not be
half a corn crop. Much wheat is unthrashed
and is becoming ruined. Whole orchards are
rotting and peaches that should remain on the
trees until September are ripening.
The Loss In New Jersey.
The great damage done by the rains in New
Jersey was told in yesterday's Star, though the
violent showers of last night added to the in
jury already done. The dam at Feltville gave
way yesterday, completely inundating the vil
lage of Scotch Plains. Many mills and facto
ries were wrecked and there were some narrow
escapes of people. There was great fear for
the Orange reservoir and the people living in
the vicinity were prepared to move at a mo
ment's notice. The Passaic river at Patcrson is i
rising rapidly. The Peterson mills along the
river banks have water in the cellars and wheel
Eits. Operations will be suspended. There
ave been many washouts in the suburbs. The
dam at Haledon is liable to burst at any mo
ment. The Passaic falls never looked grander.
SUMMER HOTEL LIFE.
It Generates Bad Manners in Some of I
the Mildest People.
From the Boston Gazette.
If people could only be vaccinated to prevent
contagion from bad manners there would be less
danger from summer hotel life; but the dis
ease. though prevalent, seems to be under no
control, and though we start from the doors of i
our city homes with no hint of the malaria of I
malice, envy, false pretense, or greediness, we
come back in the fall with our systems so full
of it that it is far into the winter of our own
hearthstones befdre it can be eradicated. Mrs.
Placid may be a nice little woman with modest
desires and manners, her little soul serenely
above anything but the welfare of the little
Flacids and Placid pater familias, who are
correspondingly modest and serene. Before
th^r have been one week in the summer hotel
Mrs. P. adopts an aggressive manner toward
one family, a supercilious one toward another,
toadies to a third and imitates a fourth; her
nice little manner changes to a bad big man
ner and there is as grand a transformation
scene as that of the ugly princess when the
toads began to drop from her mouth. She has
been a woman who heretofore has carefully
refrained from praising hnr husband or blam
ing her servants in public; but now.
frum the remotest corner of the nurse's
dining room to the outer edge of the front
piazza, Plymouth liocl^ pants are not more
widely advertised than is the fact that Placid is
just as attentive as wheu he was courting, and
wear? winter flannels all summer on account of
an inherited tendency toward cholera morbus,
and that her cooks have all been escaped luna
tics and her housemaids Pinkerton's detectives
in disguise. She bawls to her children loudly
from all parts of the hotel, complains of the
service and food, crushes the call boys with
her tones and makes a vain attempt to boss the
clerk. And old Placid grows pompons; he tells
a little bigger story every ni^it in the bar
room and begins to speak in a flippant manner
of Mrs. Placid, a thing he has never attempted
nor thought of before. He places his income
a little higher than it really is and his religious
principles a little lower than they really are.
He says ugly things about Jones, who is making
more show than he is, and patronizes Smith
who boards at a smaller house and walks to the
train. He thinks it commendable to insist on
having his money's worth, from the sound of
*1 i!--? ' ' - ?
.iic uibi rising Dell to the tinkle of the last
pitcher of ice water, and says "Damme!" with
a frequency that brings even his equally evil
communication-corrupted wife up with a jerk.
And the little Placids! Peevishness settles in
their tones and small-sized envy in their hearts.
They begin to "sass" people in parlor and on
piazza; from quiet, well-bred children they
turn into blood-curdling ecreechers who
trip old ladies and nurse maids up with
strings, cut hammock cords, and walk with re
sounding steps and whacks through the corri
dors in the early morning. And not the Placid
family alone loses its individuality in the sum
mer hotel. Heretofore quiet and digcified old
maids grow kittenish and artless under the in
fluence of some old centenarian merry-go-roun I
who finds la the summer's flitting compensa
tion for a lonely winter's brooding. Reserved,
noiseless people learn to slam their doors, to
hum as they walk briskly by other people's
doors, grow familiar with the hotel clerks,
stare at new comers, and pull their chairs from
one end of the piazza to the other, as if in de
fiance of the hotel world in general. Little
Mrs. Pigeon, s^io never has had a day's or an
hour's uneasiness about her Pigeon, grows sul
len and suspicious under the influence of some
cold grav-eyed woman; and Pigeon himself,
usually an innocent and unoffending man.
grows worthy of suspicion under the tutelage
of some old, hardened habitue of the hotel,
who watches this evolution of a rascal with the
same amused indifference that an old fisher
man feels at the writhes and flaps of the bright
eyed little trout on his book. And the conta
gion goes on till hardly a person escapes: yet
funulies rush joyfully into its jaws, and the
hotel clerks keep uu the languid murmur, "All
full; never had such a season!"
FOREIGN NOTES.
The employes in leveral extensive cigarette
factories in Havana have struck for higher
wages.
In a theater at Ashton, England, during the
performance of a melodrama an excited woman
threw her bonnet and umbrella at the "villain"
on the ?tuge when he was strangling one of the
characters. She "brought down the house."
Thirty persons were killed and eighty in
jured by the recent earthquake on the island of
Kiou Siou.
Mr. Wm. O'Brien, M. P., has applied for a
new trial of his suit against Lord Salisbury for
slander.
King Milan and P.egentsBelimarovich,Guics,
and Histics are conferring together at V ranga
on the dynastic question and King Alexander's
relation to ex-Queen Natalie.
Martin Farquhar Tupper, the famous author
of "Proverbial Philosophy," lives in a band
some country house *in England. He bears a
striking resemblance to Longfellow in his old
age. Tupper does not agree with his old
schoolfellow Gladstone on the question of
home rule.
The empress and the imperial family have
gone to Wilhelmshohe, where the Emperor
William will rejoin them after his visit to Eng
land.
In the turnerverein contest at Munich yes
terday a prize was taken by Staeber of New
York.
The shah of Persia in his wanderings in
Paris vesterday bought a black diamond for
*6.000.
Cretan Mussulmen have burned over one
hundred houses in a village near Cane*. The
insurgent leaders have appealed to Greece for
assistance.
-?
Atlantic Cm Exccesiok.?As usual the B.
andO. K. K. Co. announces the first popular ex
cursion of the season to Atlantic City at the low
rate of for the round trip. Tickets good
on all regular trains Saturday. August 3. Spe
cial train will also leave B. andO. depot at 4:20
p.m.. Saturday. August 3. and tickets will be
valid returning until Monday. August 6, in
clusive. Yon can leave Atlantic City at 4:45
Sunday afternoon and reach Washington at
10?5 Sunday night. *
Kindness to Animals In Japan.
Froiy the Boston Bud*?t.
The following picture of Japanese life by
Prof. Morse shows how pleasant may be the re
lation between the human and the brute cre
ation: Birds build their nests in the city houses,
wild fowl, geese, and ducks alight in the public
parks, wild deer trot about the street, and he
had actually been followed by wild deer in the
streets nibbling melon rind out of his hand as
tame as calves and lambs on our Michigan
farms. A dog goes to sleep in the busiest
streets; men turn aside so as not to disturb
him. One day a beautiful heron alighted on
the limb of a tree and the busy, jostling throng
stopped. Every man's hand went into his
pocket, just as they would with us, but instead
of bringing ont a 'popper' ont came pencil and
sketch paper.
ALL Scalp and Ski* Disbash, dandruff, falling
of the bair, gray or faded hair, may be cured by
using that nature's true remedy, iiali's Hair lie
newer.
HE WON AFTER ALL.
How n Jockey Revenged Himself on
His Master.
From the St. Lonis Republican.
Bobby Swimm was a great Jockey, but he
would drink. On one occasion in Lexington
there was to be a race between Him Tar, then a
three-year-old, owned by CoL Thomas of Fay
ette county, and Cammie F. Swimm wanted
the mount on Himyar, but Price advised against
him and hit offer was declined. "Now is my
chance to get square." said Bobby. "I'll rids
Cammie F. and beat the best three-year-old
this country has ever seen." Going to the
owners of Cammie F. he told them just how he
felt and that he would win the race if he rode
her. He got the mount T&ls was the night
before the race and it rained all night. At the
break of day Swimm took the mare out and
sent her around the course once. Then he dis
mounted and walked around the track, care
fully examing its condition. . ,
When the race came off Himyar took the
lead and Bobby took a pull on Cammie P. He
kept, however, forcing the colt to do his best
until they entered the homestretch. Then
Himyar seemed to come away. Bobby, how
ever! was not napping. Cammie F. under his
guidance seemed to swerve and the shout* of
the multitude of spectators went up, "Himyar
wins!" A moment later they noticed Bobby
coming on the outside of the track with Cam
mie like a streak of chain lightning. He had
got on the dry part of the track -and they
cheered him as he lauded the mare a winner,
making the deposed jockey feel well rewarded.
As he walked up to Col. Thomas after he had
weighed in he exclaimed: "I guess you will
let me ride Himyar the next time he starts.
He never did, however, as the colonel could
never place any confidence in Bobby.
SERVANTS IN PERU.
A Place Where They Will Only Attend
to Their Special Duty.
From the Kmntas City Times.
When a new servant is engaged the employer
must instruct her as to the full extent of her
duties on the first day. That is the sample of
all days, and thereafter she will do exactly as
she did then, and no more. The morning after
our arrival at the hotel in Caracas I called for
a glass of milk while dressing. On every sub
sequent morning during our stay a glass of
milk was brought me at precisely the same
hour without instructions, and, although th<
sefvant was told several times that it was not
wanted, she did not appear to understand and
continued to bring it just the same.
In the hotel were electric bells. The first
day I rang for something and a certain boy
answered the summons. The next morning I
rang again and again and no one responded.
Finally I went into the dining room and found
there half a dozen servants.
"Didn't you hear my bell ring?" I asked.
"Si, senor," was the reply.
"Then why didn't you answer it?"
'?The boy that answers your excellency's bell
has gone to market with the manager."
"But you knew he was not here and you
should have come in his place."
"No, senor; it is his occupation to answer
your bell. I answer the bell of the gentleman
in the next room."
And this provoking stubbornness ^outlasted
my indignation. As long sh I remained in that
hotel my bell was only answered by the one
particular boy. If he was not in I could ring
for an hour without receiving a response, al
though the house was full of other idle serv
ants.
Dangers of a Nap on the Grass.
From the London Standard.
The habit in country parts of stretching
one's self out on the ground for the purpose of
faking a nap is common enough in the summer
time, but from a case that is reported from a
village in the Dordogne, 'in France, a nap on
the grass is not unattended with danger. A
farmer residing near the village tired with the
heat of the day and with his work recently laid
himself down to rest beneath the shade of an
oak tree in a meadow. He was suddenly roused
from his repose by a sharp twinge of pain in
one of his ears, the pain increasing to such an
extent that before the poor fellow reached his
home he was half beside himself. For several
days he suffered the greatest agony, which
neither doctors nor the remedies they pre
scribed could allay, and the patient was brought
to such a pass that he made up his mind that
he must die. It chanced, however, that a
neighbor had the felicitous idea, as the sequel
proved, of pouring a little turpentine into his i
ear, the immediate effect of which wus to make
the patient fall back insensible on his pillow.
On recovering consciousness he remarked that
he experienced a strange feeling of relief, the
cause of which was soon explained by the exit
from the car of an enormous worm, which had i
taken up its quarters there during the larmer's
sleep. .
Misfit Photographs.
From the Detroit Free Press.
"Misfit photographs for sale" is the sign on
a Michigan-avenue photograph gallery. The
man who owns the place says he hit on that
plan to get rid of pictures that people order
and never pay for. "But who buys the pic
tures?" asked tho sketch artist. "Oh. many
folks. You see, a young man comes ia here
and sees a nice picture of a girl and he buys
one and sends it home to his friends. Then he
takes one for himself?perhaps two?and in
that way I get my money back. I know one
voung fellow who took some of mv best work
and sent it to Germany to represent his wife.
The picture could easily have passed for hers
as far as the features went, but she was never
dressed out like that. Mothers who have little
children often buy pictures of children with
long hair when theirs hasn't growu out aud
send them around to friends at a distance. I
can sell brides' pictures without any trouble.
I sometimes thins pictures that ain't taken for
people look just as much like them. Besides,
it saves you all the trouble of a sitting."
Popular Seashore Excursion.?The B. and
O. K. 11. Co. will run a popular excursion to
Atlantic City next Saturday at the rate of *3
for the round trip. Tickets good on all regular
trains of that day. The special train leaves at
4:20 p.m. Tickets good until Monday, inclu
sive. _ "
Disillusion.
From the Denver News.
She was posing, evidently, as she stood on
the steps of the Cliff house at Manitou.
Two impressionable young men were looking
and admiring.
I "How statuesque she looks," said one.
"What a grand figure she has, hasn't she?
Such refined features and such a clear com
plexion. She must be a new arrival from the
east to have such a lovely complexion as that,
and I wonder who she is. I am going to in
quire."
"Oh," said his companion, "she must be
from the east, as you say; if she had lived here
any time her complexion would have been
spoilt. Wha^ grand eyes and hair she has.
And what grace. Let us find out where she's
from. It must be New York or Boston."
They proceeded to the clerk's desk and
asked confidentially whether sho was from
New York or Boston.
"What makes you think she is from either
of those places?"
"Oh," chorused the two admirers, "her
beautiful complexion, her natural grace and
her exquisite figure."
"Well, gentlemen, she is from neither place.
She is from n small village, I believe, nssr
Stockholm, Sweden, and is employed in the
house washing dishes."
Her posing on the front steps lost its charm.
And the two young men from tho east went
down to the iron spring and remained there an
hour, drinking the mineral water.
"She was not such a pretty girl, after alL I
looked at her closely as we came down."
"No, some girls look well at a distan ce."
The Bloomin' Bloody Sparrow.
From the Cincinnati Gazette.
The other day lightning struck a tree, as is
^hown in our dispatches, and killed about three
hundred sparrows. Nature has evidently come
to our relief, and there is little short of a thun
derbolt that can "phase" the English sparrow.
His motto is, "Let me at the home birds and
the street Utter, and I care 'not who eats the
caterpillars." The pertinacity'of the sparrow
and his grit and obstinacy are well illustrated
in this odd old English doggerel which is going
around the press:
"The bloomin', bleedin' sparrow went np the
bloody spout;
The bleedin' rain camf down and washed the
bloomin' sparrow out;
The bloody sun came oat and dried up the
bleedin' rain.
And the bloomin, bloody sparrow went np the
bleedin' spout again."
Her cruel fate?"Yes," sighed the young
wife, "I married a professional humorist, and
I wish I hadn't"
"Why?" asked her friend.
"Because he reads all his work to me before
ha puts it in the paper."?Bottom Courier.
AUCTION SALES.
THU AFTERNOON.
mSO?A8 DOWLING, Auctioneer.
fiCECTTTOES' SALE OF TWO-STORY FRAME
DWELLING, No. 808 D 8TKEET SOUTH WEST.
Under ul by virtue of the last will of Peter KeVliT.
O'CLOCK, the north W of Sub Lot U, In square 681.
betuk Mo. 208 D street southwest.
Term* rut FEU AN k LEO WARD,
}y*7-dAd? Executors.
THIS ETKNDIO.
BROEEB'S SALE.
We will aell at 1009 E st. n. w. at Public Auction all
Pledges forfeited by non-payment?ell numbers under
8,000?ON THUBSDASVAUGUST FIB8T. COM
MENCING AT H \LF-PABT SEVEN P. 1C.consisting
of Gold. Silver and Metal Watches. Diamonds, Brace
lets, Pins, Earringa. Rings. Locket Chains, Studs,
Pistols, Clocks, Open QUnses, Valises, Silver and
Slated Ware, Clothing,.Musical Instruments, House
old Furniture, PhotoAf and Type Writer. Persona
holding tickets please notice.
w GBACE k WILLEY.
ROOT k LOWENTHAL, Auctioneers. Jy30-3t
ro>noHRow.
D
UNCANSON BROS., Auctioneers.
fi: C. PABLOB SUIT, BED BOOM FURNITURE.
DINING BOOM FURNITURE, MATTRESSES,
SPRINGS, BRUSSELS AND OTHER CARPETS,
STOVE KITCHEN REQUISITES. ?C., AC., AT
AUCTION. ..
ON FRIDAY MORNING, AUGUST SECOND.
i889. begiuuing at TEN O'CLOCK, we will aell at
ouse 404 O STREET NORTHWEST, the small
collection of Furniture contained therein and to
which we invite attention.
Jy31-2t DUNCANSON BROS- Aucts.
Yy ALTEB b WILLIAMS k CO., Auctioneer.
SUPEBIOB MADE FURNITURE, NEARLY NEW,
AT AUCTION.
MAGNIFICENT ROSEWOOD CASE PIANO.
HEAVILY CARVED (CHICKEBING MAKERS),
RATTAN PARLOR SUITE. TEN PIECES: HAND
SOME CHERRY HALL. BACK. CHERRY CABI
NETS, HANDSOME OAK SIDEBOARD. VERY
COSTLY; PEDMSTAL EXTENSION TABLE,
TEN FEET; OAK DINING-ROOM CHAIRS,
ANTIQUE OAK CABINET KEFRlliERATORS,
ANTIQUE OAK WASHSTANDS, OPEN TOP;
CHIFFONIERS, HANDSOME CHAMBER SUITES
OAK AND ASH CHAMBER FURNITURE.
CRERH* CENTER TABLES, CHAMBER SUITES,
IN HfcAVlLl CARVED OAK, OVAL MIRKOH,
WARDROBES. LACE CURTAINS, LARGE
OFFICE DESK. HANDSOME BRASS BEDSTEAD,
MADE IN ENGLAND BY MAPLE k CO.; RAT
TAN COUCHES, LARGE ANTIQUE OAK ICE
CHEST, KITCHEN UTENSILS, ko.
On FRIDAY. AUGUST SECOND, commencing' at
TEN O'CLOCK A.M., we shall sell at residence No.
K street northwest, opposite Farragut square,
tlie ubove collection of superior made Furniture.
Those desiring well kept furniture o! the richest style
and best workmanship have in this sale an opportunity
rarely offered.
Terms ash.
Jyoo at WALTER B. WILLIAMS & CO., AucU.
THUSTEE'S SALE OF UNIMPROVED PROPERTY
SITUATE IN THE COUNTY NEAR BidGHT
WOOD AND ON ABOAD NEAR THE MILITARY
?ROAD. .
I nut-rand by virtue of a decree of the 8upreme
Court tof the District of Columbia, in a cause wherein
Bessie E. Sipperiy was plaintiff and William Sipperly
was deieudant, known as equity cause No. 11(19, the
undersigned trustee will on FRIDA1, AUGUST SEC
OND, 1880, at the hour of SIX O'CLOCK P.M.. in
iront of the premisea, sell at public auction all that
certain piecc and lot of land known as a part of "Girl's
Portion,"conlaming three a< res,and more particularly
described in the proceedings in said cause.
The terms of sale as prescribed by said decree are as
follows; One-third of the purchase money cash, bal
ance in two equal installment, to Oe secured l>y the
notes of the purchaser, at one and two years, and a
deed of trust on the property soid. or all cash, at the
purchaser s option A deposit of $' 00 required on the
day of sale. All conveyancing at the purchaser's
c6st. Sale to be complied with within ten (10) days
irom the day of sale,otherwise the trustee reserves the
right to resell at the cost aud risk of the defaulting
purchaser. B. D. CARPENTER. Trustee,
Residence, Brightwood. D. C.
DL'NCANSON liKi_S..
Jy25-d*<U Auctioneer*.
FL'TUKE IIAYN.
T
llOMAS DOWLING, Aucuoneer.
REGULAR SALE OF HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE,
kc., AT MY AUCTION ROOMS,
SATURDAY. AUGUST THIRD, 1880. commencing
at TEN O'CLOCK, embracing n part 0 French-plate
Mantel ?Hd Pier Mirrors, 6 liauusome Parlor Suites,
10 Handsome Couches, Rocking and Lasy Chairs,
Marble-top and other rabies, Dining Room Furniture,
Chamber Furniture iu Suit** and separate pieces.
Mattings and Carpets, Rein* era tors. Cooking and
Heating StoVe?, Kitchen Requisites, &c.
Also,
AT TWELS E O'CLOCK?
Horses, New and Second-iiand Carriages, Hnggiea
Wagons, Ac. aul-2t
R
OBEllT VOSE & CO.
AUCTION RALE OF DESIRABLE BUILDING LOTS
ON E STREET SOUTHEAST.
On MONDAY. AUGUST FIFTH, at SIX O'CLOCK
P.M , wc will offer tor sale, to the highest bidder. Six
Choice Lots. 20x170 feet to a 30-feet alley, situated
on liorth side of E street, between lath and 14th
street* soutiieast. An excellent opportunity lor im
provement or investment.
Terms at sale.
aul-at ROBERT VOSE k CO.. Auctioneers.
D
UXCAJSSOX liKOS., Auctioneer?.
IttVSTEES SALE OF TWO-STORY AND BASE
MENT BRICK DUELLING MO. tilli PENNSYL
VANIA AVENUE EASA.
By Tirtne of u deed ol trust duly recorded in Liber
No. 77v.?,lolio ll#~, one ol the Laud Records for the
District of Columbia. I will sell oil TUESDAY. THE
THIUD DAY OF &EFTEMBEK. A. D. 18^9, at HALF
PAS I FIVE If CLOCK. P. M.? in front of the premises,
tne followiujf-deecribed real estate, situated in the
city ol Washington. District of Columbia, to wit: Lot
numbered forty-one (41> of Marceron's subdivision of
lot 7,in Square numbered eitflit huudred and seventy
three <?7:*>, toother with ail the improvements, ways,
easements, rights, privileges, appurtenances and
hereditaments to tho same belontfiuif or in any wise
appertaining This Lot is improved by a two-story
ana basement Brick Dwelling, and has a front on
Pennsylvania avenue and a Iront on C street south
east.
Terms: One-third cash; balance in one and two years,
notes to bfear G percent interest, payable semi-annu
ally irom day of sale, and* to be secured by deed of
trust on premise* sold, or all cash at option of pur
chaser. Conveyancing, &c., at cost of purchaser. A
depohit of required at sale. Terms to be com
plied with in 10 dujyi; otherwise,the Trustee reserves
the right to resell tte proi?ertjr at the rink aud cost of
the Uetaulimtr purchaser after 3 days' public notice of
such resale in some newspaper published in Washing
ton, D. C. UEOuGE bAtEK, Trustee.
aul,?.l5,22,^8,20,30.:Jl&se!i,3
T
HOMAS DOWLING, Auctioneer.
\ ALU ABLE IMPROVED PROPERTY, NO. 807 0
SillEET NORTH WEaT. AT AUCTION.
On TUESDAY. AUGUST SIXTH, 188?, AT FIVE
O'CLOCK 1. .U, 1 will sell, in front of the premises.
Lot 1, In square 3U8, improved by a comtortable two
story-and-oaseuient brick dwelling, with all modern
improvements.
Ternls: One-third casb, balance in one and two years,
with interest, and secured by a deed of trust on tin
property or all cash. A deposit ot 4100 required at
time ot sale. Conveyancing aud recording at cost ol
purchaser. THOMAS DOLLING,
aul dfcds Auctioner.
I \UNCANSON BROS., Auctioneer,.
TRUSTEES' SALE OF BK1CE HOUSE, NUMBEB
1612 NINTH STREET NORTHWEST, NEAR
RHODE ISLAM) AVENUE.
By virt ue ot a deed oi trust, duly recorded in IJ'ier
No. J317, folio 400 et sen.,one ot the Land Recorus ot
the District ot Columbia, we will sell at public auction
iu front of the preinlsesou TUESDAY, THE SlXlH
DAY OF AUGUST, A.D. 1880, AT HALF-FAST FIVE
O'CLOCK P.M., the following described real estate,
situated in the City of Washington, District of Colum
bia, to-wii: All that certain piece or parcel of laud
and premises known aud distinguished as, and
being part of, lot numbered biteeu llo) iu
square three huudred aud sixty-tour (304), beginning
for the same at the south .-asl corner of said lot htteeu
I If)i, thence ruuuing west ou the south line ot said lot
one hthidied aud tmrty-ciKht feet nine inches (ia8 ft.
M inches) to the line o. alley, thence north teu teet
seven and oue-hali inches tiO ft. 7X inches), th'nee
east to tue west line of Niuth street northwest, theuce
south to the place of beffinuiuir. The same being
known as premises numbered 101? Ninth street
northwest.
Terms: One-third cash, balance in one and two
Sears, for which the notes of Sie purchaser, secured by
etd ot trust on the property sold aud bearing interest
from day of sale at the rate of six per cent per suuuiu,
will be takeu, or all casb, at the option ot the pur
chaser. A deposit ot 1100 will be required at tiuio of
sale. All conveyancing, fcc., at purchaser's cost.
ieruisof sale to be complied with iu teu days from
the day ot sale.otherw ise the trustees reserve the tight
to resell the property at the risk aud cost of the de
faulting purchaser alter live days' public notice of
such ressle In some uewspai>er published i0 Washing
ton. D* C.
CHAS. C. DUNCANSONJ Trl]ttaM
CHAS. W. DARR. i
jy2o-dkda
T
HOMAS DOWLING, Auctioneer.
TnUSlEES' SALE OF FRAME DWELLING NO.
1-ai) T STllEET NORTHWEST.
By virtue of a deed of trust dated the 10th day of
September, 1880, aud duly recorded in Liber No.
l?'i>4, folio ao&. et seip, one of the land recorus for the
District of Columbia, and by direction of the party
secured thereby the undersigned Trustees will oner at
Public Auction in trout of the premises on MONDAY,
the FIFTH DAY OF AUGUST. 1880, at FIVE
O'CLOCK P.M., the following-described Ileal Estate,
vix: All of Lota numbered :iO, 21 aud 22, In Henry A.
Willard's subdivision of square No. 161, together with
the lmprovemeuta, which c< insist of a Two-story Frame
House with Irame stable in rear, situate ou the north
side of T street between 17 th and 18th streets north
west.
Terms of sals: One-fourth caah, the residue at 0,12,
18 and 24 uioutlia, with notes bearing interest ai aix
per cent psr annum until paid, aud secured by a deed
lit trust un the property aoid.
All oouveyancinK and recording at purchaser's cost:
(200 deposit reuuired at the time ol sale.
BENJAMIN P. SNYDER, r - -
Jyl9-dAds ALBERT L. S1URTEVANT.j Trustees.
SUBURBAN PROPERTY.
SOUTH BBOOKLAND. SOUTH BROoKLAND.
Notice to the Public: Persons desiring to visit the
above-uientioned Subdivision will hud it a short (about
teu minutes; drive lrom the city by way of Lincoln
ave., turning oft opposite Glen wood Cemetery at Cen
tral ave., wuch street has been opened all the way
through. jyU-lin
WOOD AND COAL.
1M>RIUMT dodge
i; COAL, COKE AND WOOD OF ALL KINDS.
FAMILY COAL A SPECIALTY.
Best quality George's Creek Cumberland Coal for
steam purposes.
Office, X214 31st st.: Telephone, 906-2.
Yard and Wharf, 3008 W ater st.; Telephone, 064-3.
Ji'W
HOTELS.
T" 317 and 318 4H st. n.w.
Pleewatlr located; accessible to all parts df city by
two Rnesof streetosrs. Terms91.60 and IZper day.
Special taws by week or mouth. Jy&l-Ot^
1BBITT EOCIi
WASHINGTON, D. a
UNDERTAKERS.
PIANOS AND ORGANS.
K K Nit R A EBB RU
K K NN N AA I % 1
i\ iy h h t ?
P I A N O 8.
_N TONE,
akd r?ri
CNEQUALED W.TONE^OCCT^WOH**AIWHI?
Special sttentioc of "Purrbum" to MM to their
Hiou
SECOND-HAND MANOR. - A tela* aMottasak
cor prising almost every well-known make in the
country, In thorough repair, will be rioted oat at eery
low figures. SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS offeredbuti
id prices sud in tenas, which will be arranged on EAlix
MONTHLY INSTALLMENT* when JtminZ.
_?
MEDICAL. Sx~
f ADIE8 WHO REQUIRE THE SERVICES OF AN
EjExperienced Female l'hyaician ebonld consult Mrs.
DtTWILboN. 1106 l*ark Place ne bet Bami C. l lUl
and 12th ata. n.e. Ladies only. Remedy (A. Je2?-ttw*
DR. LEON,
The Oldest-Establishsd and only Ladies'
j Physician In the City,
can be consulted daily, 4?4 c at, between 4U and 8th
ata. n.w.
Prompt treatment. Correspondence and consulta
tion strictly confidential. Separate rooms for ladise.
Q*ce always open Jy lO-.Tw*
\| ME. DE FORE8T, LONU-ESTABLI8HRD AND
JJ1 reliable Ladies- Physician. can befaulted daily
st Mr residence,,iM)l T at. n.w. Office hour, from I
(v V p. m. with Ladies only. JylJU-lm*
IT HAS NKVEK BEEN CONTRADICTED THAT
Dr. BHOTHEltS is the oldest-e.tabhil'edXd^iJ
in* Ladiea' Physician in the city. Ladies yon can
confidently conault Dr. BROTHEKg. WW B st. s.w.
I*srticulsr attention paid to all diseaeee peculiar to
^??'O.lni^ ?r Forty years' experience. I
KEAD AND BE WISE-DR. BROTHERS, 94H) B 8T.
me and msde oath that he Is
vue Oldest Established Exi?rt Specialist in this city,
aud will (fuarauteea cure in all caaes of private diseases
of men and furnish medicine, or nocharye. consulta
tion and advice free at any hour of the day. Sub
5s7yu?Ii"V? iTSTa10 be'ore D'e by l)r. hHoTHEKH,
SAMUEL C. MILLS, a Notary Public in and for the
irfO-lm* 3d day ox July, lsb?.
Manhood rebtored by using a bottle
or two of Dr. BROTHERS' Inv^UnfoSdW
niu cure any case of Nervous Debility aud loss of
Mi^male" JSJbS. f?T ?? 'Syl^l^
throat, us sal, or skin troubles ? urinary ^mmicuim
in forty-curht hours. Price, i*r bor. m
>r. DODD'S NERVINE No. 2 permanently curve
R ^SriS!^e-8lvitainy,nervous debil&y,aa.
*f- 0Vnc?* 8ent sealed by mail For sale at
J*31 BTANlUEOlil) 8, oor Uth^ud F ?.?.
DENTISTRY.
DR. S1ARR PARSONS. DENTIST, 0TH ST
,f??? E 1 lrst-clasa Gold Amalgam aud
wuite hillings BH|?cialty. Aching teeth saved. Appli
cation to inuui prevents i>aiu in extracting. Hours
1 " J- JytS
D* J*_- .'ft:yKyC'E HA8 REMOVED HIS DEN
tal Office and residence to lt>01 Ost. u. corner
or lflth st. Ihe red herdicw i?ss the door my 1 -3m*
DK-HAML'EL L 8COT t71>ENTIST.
, ' -0' * st. n. w., will resume the practice of his
profession on the 10th of September. Preservation of
the natural teeth a specialty. Jj l-Jm
PRINTERS.
Gibson brothers,
PRACTICAL BOOK AND JOB PRINTERS
. , _ AND BOOBBISDEKS.
- i"'?! l~?Jb Pennsylvania aveaoa.
HfcQtEEN k WALLACE.
1 usss'nw.flsssa'a.
"HSMffVgraytEBJ' SSBS"
FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. dl9
FAMILY SUPPLIES.
? lbs- granulated sugar for sl
.Tj Full Crtmu Cheese 1 tic. i*r 1 b.. y lbs. for *1
Beat Creamery Butler ',':ic. i>er lb., 6 lbs. for <1.
J lbs. Lard for L'.w.. 13 lbs for #1.
"Perfection Tea" 50c. per lb.
Star of the East" Flour 40.75 per hhl #1 tw???
kbbl. "Old Time" Family Hour $5.?0 pe'r ifi?
* 54 bbl- J- T D- fvles, '
*12 4th st. se.
11 TErVtHME^Y FAILS T<J CURE DYSEN
HEITMCLLER'8 CASTELLOX WINE
THE ONLY CURE. NEVER FAILSL
For sale by
JA8. L. BARBOUR k SOU
?Wholesale Airents.
myll-3m
financial!
JNO. W. CORSON. JNO. W. MACARTNEY,
Member N. Y. Stock Ex.
CORSON ft MACARTNEY,
GLOVER BUILDING, 1419 F ST. S. W?
Bankers and Dealers in Government Boudi
Deposita. Exchange. I^ians. Collections.
Esilroad Stocks and Boiids. and all aecuriUes listed
SLi t? "? New York. PhilsAelj.Uia, Boston
anQ Baltimore bought and sold.
A specialty mailt- of investment securities. District
Bonos and all 1-ocsl Railroad, Gas, Insurance and Tel
ej Loue btock dealt in.
Amerii un Bell 1 elephone Stock bought and soldJy 18
PROPOSALS.
I Pfu^HT^ F,?,K?i^TfUJSG AN ELECTRIC
VvAsHIVOTim I> AX iU,e xavi yard.
a;>UI>G10N, D. C ?Bureau of Yards and Ix^ka
I Navy Department. July ?, 188U ? Separate sealed'
proposals, each in duplicate, endorsed "Proposals for
Electric Lighting Plaut for Washington Navy Yard."
ti V>!r>Tv ' a*! ,i-i-1 V-r??" un?'i TWELVE M.. on
1 LEbDA\, ALOLST SIX, 1880, aud publicly opened
immediately tnereafter. Specifications and blank
tornis of proposals will be furnished ui>on application
to the Comiuundant of the Washington Navy Vaixl.
Responsible security will be reamred for the faithtul
I>erloruiunce of the contract, ana the ritrht is reserved
to reject an> or all proposals not deemed advantageous
to the government ana to waive defects.
Jyll-law4w o. B. \* HITE, Chief of Bureau.
LADIES' GOODS.
DOYiiU KNOW THAT GEO. WHITE
the Ladies' Tailor, is making all kind of Dresses at
summer Prices!- From ?luup (ThO. V,Hl?^
Ilul -8t 1110 F st. n. w.
rpHt REAL ACCORDION STANDING PLEATING
A done at biniou a Pleatiutf Entabliahmeut. T'Jv* E.
Km If Washington office. J. J. HOL
lai fcn. VUo t nt.. Masonic lemple. J>"-i^-lm#
l^KONTb! FKONT8!! FBONT8!!! "
. Just the thing for summer.
Always in order by plain couibiut?,
M'llk M. J. PRAN'DL
1329 F st. n.w. (Sirs. Harrison's^
Importer of
Fine French Hair iioodt.
Hairdressintf.
Je3-2m* Shampooing
DYEING. 8COUKINO AND DRV CLEAN
. E81 ABLlhHMENT, 1*J05 New York ire.
j- lrst-ciass Eadien and Gents' work of every deacriol
l'lush. Velvet and Evening Dresses ANTO^f
A N D CAllotl N1, LERCH, formerly with A. l^schar
and Maiaon V i iese. Fans. jat'l
Anton Fischer's dry cleanTno fstarI
LlbHMENT AND DYE lfouK, ?st!u w
indies and Oents' Garments oi all a mds cleaned and
I > tu w ithout being ripp&l. LadieH1 Evening Dresses
a specialty, lhirty-hve years' experience. Prices
lituieratc. Goods culled lor and delivered. sl4
4 LL-UOOL GAitiMENlH. A1ADE LA* OH KiypKH
t\ cd u good mourning black.
.1(A A. FISCHEa
834 bOiiG st. u.w.
A.?? Yod Sargain Hunting,
SWEET BABY BUNTINGf
If so, pkuse and rest awhilo. You need go no further
You've struck a Corner AS IS a Corner, which UN
LOADS for YOUR Mhieflt, a corner which is the
avowed and implacable enemy of any and all TRUSTS
No matter if one is as sweet as SUGAR and another as
bitter as Quinine. We are extremists, 'tis true, but not
exactly in the llue of TRUSTS. We trust you'll be
lieve us when we declare to you that tuis is a Clothing
Corner-conceived in a desire to do (rood and born and
reared in the fostering aud fulfilling of that desire
toward all men. We have succeeded so well that we
propose hewing close to the same line for all time to
come, snd invite you to share the rich fruits of our
bountiful reward.
Your (renerous patronage has made it poaaiDle for as
to do some TALL tumbling in the matter of pricea
terrifying indeed to those dealers who stick to TALL
prices-but exceedingly edifying, avreeable, aye. par
ticularly pleasant, to BUYERS of high or low degree.
It tickles them tremendously to have spread out be
fore them an array of Elegant Suita, worth from
910.76 to 11X75, and be told to take their choice
AT 97.50 A SUIT.
And yet another agreeable surprise follows close
upon the heels of the Unit. Here we4ad Imported
and Domestic Worsteds. Cheviots, and Cassimers,
fashioned by the tailors' art into perfsct-flttlng Suits
for Men, worth from 914.25 to 920 a suit. Tato your
choice, neighbor, x
AT $10.75 A SUIT,
VICTOR E. ADLER'S >
10 PER CENT CLOTHING HOUBE, 10
BV7 and M? 7th st. ^.w?
Comer Massachusetts avenaa
STRICTLY ONE PRICE,
Opes Saturdays until 11 p.m.
Finest
MEAT-FLAVORING 8T0GE.
LIEBIG COMPANY'S
SZVBA0T OV MEAT.
USE IT FOR SOUPS,
TEA. SAUCES, AND MADE
?mtr with faealoile at Jmtm m
SIGNATURE IN BLUE UTS
ioui oo. xm.
ENGRAVE* AND
w lot* PA ATS,
RAILROADS.
Baltimore Akt) Ohio Railroad
Bcbedale la effect JUNE 28, iwm
Lan V'uhinfion from >utiaii conn of New Jmht
maw *nd C tlmL
FbrChKimud North Wfet. Vrstibaled Limited ex
PKW d*ll> 11 .to !?? Mima
Far Cincinnati. St. Lotvt, ud ludianapolta.
Ml.3: 00 and 11:) 6 p m.
For Pittebuiy and CWvwtaad, Veetlbuled UrnlM ex
?*2" "Ujir!? sad nrrai * 40 pja
roT " heeling, Parkereburg aud principal *tatious
U?*. expreee duly except Monday, it 3 .U
For I?xlngtoo and Local Station* 110 30 a. m.
t5T0pU^r' 13 55 a.m.. tloao am., t.1 Oo p.m..
HT.?F WUBor^wrt days, 4:00 6:00. ?:W,TI0.
.?u?nutee>. 945. tli <>u. IS OO
(tO-D II UfMt ? ?? 1 O In O .It'-. .a- a
7J. ? ?w. ?30 <4f>-minutes) H45 a. m.,
i?V;1^jtpaggm
iiV jbV^4 ^ 6 'ao-'
For War Station* bete
t ao. ?.oa io io.
? ? ii iM Washington ?a<! Haiti
more, 5:0ft 0:40. 8:30 a m., 12 10,3 ?-?5.4 35.0 -0.
11:80 p.m. suudaya. 8:30a. dl. 1:1&. 3:25 4 34
6 .10. 11:30 P. m.
Traiu*leave Baltimore for Waahington. weekday*,
5:10. 0:20, 0 30. 7 15. 7 20, 8 00(45 minutaek.
8.30. 9.15, 10 'JO (45 minute*) a-m- 11:11, 1 45
J45 minute*). 2:00. 3:00. 4 :05)45 minutest. 4 15.
1:00,0:00. 0:30. 7:40, 7.45. 8 00. 10 05.10 lOaud
11:00p.m. Sundays 0:3ft 7 15.8:30. 9 15. lo 20
(45 minutes) am, 12 50. 1 -45 <45 uiinuteeL2 Oft
4:15. Oft 0:30. 7:40.7 :45.5:00. 10 0&. 10 lOaud
1 1 flfl I, n.
Wash
1:00 p.m.
For Bay Hidffl, train* lea** E and O. depot,
Inrtou. > wk dayi V:05a. m.. 1:25 aud 4 .30 r
Sundays 9:50 a. ui. 1:45 aud 3 15 p. m
Leave Bey Ridge week days 0:10 aud 8 30 p. m.
Sunday* 3 40. S.-Oo aud 9 00 p. m.
For Annapolia, 0:40 and 8 30 am.. 12 10. 4:2\
and 6 41 p.m. Ui Sundays. 8 30 am., 4 :t5 p.m.
Lear* Annapolis, 0.40, 8 37 a.m. 12. OS, 3:50, and
0:15 p.m. Sunday*, 8:37 a m., 4:00p.m.
For Station* on the Metropolitan Branch. t0.45,
110 30 a. uu. {1:15 p.m., for principal stations ouly,
?10 30 a m_ t4:30 and t5 30p.m.
For Rock vllle aud var station* t4:3b p.m.
For Gaitbersburg and intermediate points, *0 00 a.
m., tl2:30. *5 35, til :20 p.m.
For Boyda and intermediate stations, t7 00 p.m.
110:00 p.m.
Church train leavea Waahington on Sunday at 1 15
p.m., stopping at all atatiun* on Metropolitan Branch.
For Frederick, t0.45. t10 30 am, t3 OO. t4 30*
m. 8undat'a.l:15aud ;3 55p.m.
For Hagerstowu. T10 30a.m. and t5:30p.m.
Train* arrive from Chicago daily 11 4.> a.m. and
4:05 p.m.; from Cincinnati and St. Louisdally 3 50
a m aud 1:55 pjn.. from Pittsburg 7 :10 a.iu_and
0:50 p.m. daily.
NEW YORK AND PHILADELPHIA DIVISION.
For Mew York, Ireutou. Newark and Elixabeth. N.
*4:00, th:00, *9:30, *12 .OO a m . *2 :30. *4 20 aud
*10:30 p.m. Buffet Parlor Can ou ail day train*
Sleeping Car on the 10:30 p uu. o|?n at 9 OOp uk
The 4 20 p.m. train doea not atop at [Uiialieth.
lor Philadelphia, Newark, V* ilmington aud Cheater.
*4 :Oft t8 00, 9:30, *12:00 a.m., *2 30, *4 20t *7 t>0
aud *10 ;H) p.m.
For intermediate points between Baltimore and
Philadelphia, to .:t0 a.m., *2:3o aud t4 3o p.m.
I raiua leave New York for M aahimrtoii. *8 30.
*11:00 am. *1:3ft *2:3ft *3:15, *5:00 p.m. aud
12 ;00 Ulirht.
Train* leave Philadelphia for Waahintrton, *4 1ft
*8:16, *11:10 a.m, tilaa. *4:15. *5 05. *5:43 aud
*7:30 p.m.
For Atlantic City 4:00 and ?:30 am., 12:00 noon
and 2:3o p in ,-unda\*4 i>0 a m.,and l'.':00 uoou.
For Luu?r Brant h and o eau Orove t4 Oft t8:0O a
112 :00 llo. >11. S'J :30 a 111.
tExcept Sunday. 'Daily. tSujiday only. {Except
Sunday aud Monday. ?? t.xrept . ,
Baiftratre called lor aud checked from hotel* aud
fraiaences by I'uiou 'Iruuafer Co. ou onlerm left at
ticket office*. 01M and 1351 peniiH lvauia aveuue. aud
at Depot. CH AS. O SCI iX. lieu. l-aa> Airt.
J. '1. (JDELL Ueueral Mauatcer. J? -7
PIEDMONT A1B LINE.
Schedule in effect June 30.1880.
8:30 a. m.?lA*t Tciiueaeee Mail, daily for Warren"
ton. UordoUHVille, Charlotteaville, Ljucuburr. and
atation* l?etweeu Alexanui ta aud i-> ncliliiir^r, lioauoka,
bnatol. Knox Mile, Chattauootra auil MempLia. liill
Biau Slee|>er V\a*hi3KU>n to Mt iuphia.
11:24 a. m.- 1'aat mail daily for Warreuton, Char
lotteaville, Oordonaville, statioU*Cbe*a|x-^ke aud Ohio
Boute. Lyuchbunr. Buck)' Mount, Danville aud sta
tion* between Ly uchbunt and Danville, orveusboru',
Baleiyh. A*h< ville Charlotte, Columbia. Auauata,
Atlanta, Birmingham, Montgomery, New Urleaua,
Texaa and California. Pullmau Slee|?r New lork to
Atlanta, l'arlor cani Atlanta to Montgomery, Pullman
Sleeper* MouUroniery to New Orleaua. ilUluiau
Klei |>er Ureenaboro' to Columbia and A u?ru*ta l*uii
man Sleeper* Waahiiuctou to Cincinuati via C. aud O.
Boute.
4:15 p. m ?Daily, except Sunday, for Mauaaaa*
Btraabnrr and intermediate atatioiia.
7:25 p. ill -Daily via l.yucliljurtr. Bnatol and Chat
tauootra. Pullman Ve*tiL>ule Sleeper* Maahiuvtou to
Meniphia, connectii^r thence for all ArkaLaa* iviuta;
also WaahiiiKtoii to New Orleaua.
9:40 p. ui.?We*teru Expremi, daily for Manaaaaa,
Culpeier. Unaure. Charlottearille. stauutou, Louia
ville,Cincinnati. Pullmau \e.?tii>ule train Uaahiu?rton
to Ciuclnuati with a Pullman nleet-er forLoUisviile.
11 00 p. m.?Southern Kxi rea* aaili for L) nchnurK.
Danville, Kalrijrb. Anhcviile, Charlotte, Columbia,
Auiruata, Atlanta, Monuroiner)', New Oriean*, iexaa,
and California. Pullmau Vestibule Car Waahiuirum to
New Oriean*. via Atlanta aud Montgomery Pullman
Sleeper Washington to Birmingham, Ala., vu Atlanta
and Ueonria Pai inc Railway
'1 rain* on W aahimrtoii and Ohio divlaiou leave Wa*h
iuirton ?:00 am. daily except Sunday, and 4 45 pm.
! daily: arrive Bound Hill 11: 0 a.m. aud7:20pm.;
returning leave Hound Hill 0 05 aiu. daily and 12:20
p.m. daily except Sunday, armiu? Waakiinrton 8 30
a m. and 2:53 p.m.
Throuirh trains from the South via Charlotte, Dan
villejuid Lynchbuiy arrive in Washington 0:5.1 a iu.
?nd 7:13 p.m.; via Ea*t Tenuesaee. Bristol aud l.yncli
burv at 8:03 a.m. and 10:40 p.m.; via Cheaapeake
? lid Ohio route and Charlotteaville at 2:35 p.m. aud
i i :13 p.m. aud 0:53 am. btrasbuiv local at 9 18
1 a.m.
Ticket*, sleepinr-car reaervation and information
furniahed. and Uurir^re checked at office, 1300 Penn
sylvania a?enue, aud at Patwmrer Station. Ituiuylva
liia Hailruad, 0th and B atreeu.
Je29 J AS. L TAYLOR. Gen. Paa*. A*enC_
'I Hi UREA I
X PENNSYLVANIA ROUTE
TO THE NORTH, WES1 AND Sol THWF.ST
Dol Bl.i. TRACK. SPLi NDID 8CKKEBT
bTKLL RA11.S. MAGNll lChM LOITPMENT.
. IN EFFtCl .Ii At '.?H1H, 18SU.
TRAINS LEA\E WASHINGTON,*! ROM STATIOS,
CORNER OP S1X1H AND B STREETS. AS FOL
LOWS:
For Pituburir and the West. Chicago Limited Expreaa
of Pullmau % estibuledCara at !i .50 a.li: daily, Fast
Line, 9 :50 a ui. dally to Cincinuati aud St. Louia
with sleeping Cars troai PiUaliunr to i luciuuati,
and Harriaburv to St Louia. daily, except Saturday,
to Chicago, with Sleepmr kar Altoona to Chicaaro.
Weatern Expreaa, at 7:40 p.m. daily, with Sleeping
Car* Wasuimrtou to Chicago and St. Ix>uia, con
liectintr daily at Harriabuiv with through ??>ieep. r?
lor Louisville and Memphis. Pacihe Expreaa. lo OO
p. m. daily, for PittaOurtr and the West, with
through Sleeper to PittaburK, aud Pittabur^ w
Chlcairo.
BALI I MORE AND POTOMAC RAILROAD
For Kane, Catiandaifrua, Rochester and Niagara Falls
daily, except Sunday. STOa.m.
For Erie. CanaiidaiKua and Rochester dally; for Buf.
falo aud .Niiivara daily, exceot Saturday, 10:W0 p.
. m.. with Slee)>uiK Car W ashington to Rocheater
For Willi*ius|>ort. lxick Haveu aud Eliuira at 9.50a.
I m. daily, except Suuday.
FOR PHU.ADL.Li'HlA, NEW YORK AND THE EAST,
7:20, 9 :00, 11:00 aud 11:40 am.. '^..>0, 4:10,
10:00 and 11:20 p.m. On Sunday, 9:00, 11 40 a.
ni., 2.50. 4 10, 10:00 and 11:20 p m. Limited
Express of 1 ullman Parior Cars, H:4u a m daily,
except Sunday, aud 3:45 p.m. daily, with Duuimc
Car.
_ .. FOR PHILADELPHIA 0M.Y.
Fast Express 10 a m. %ek days, and 810 o. m.
dally. Expreaa 2:10 p. m. daily. Accoiu. 0 p iu.
daily.
lor Boston, without chanfre. 2 50 p. m. every day.
For Bruoklyu, N. V.. all through trains couuect at
Jersey City with boats o! brooklyn Annex. aBord
lu? direct trauslcr to Fulton street* avoidiUK
. double ferriage acroaa New York cit)
For ocean nt> aud poiuta ou Uc.aware Division,
1:1 < p. UL?eei days.
For AtlacticCity 9:00. 11:00 and 11:40 a. m. week
. days. 11.On. in d..in
For Baltimore. 0:35, 7:20, 8:10, 9:00. ?:40, 9 50
11:00. and 11:40 a. in., 1 ^:05, 1 17. 2:10, 2:50
1 3:45, 4 :1(1, 4 :20, 4 40, 0:Oo, 7:40, 8.1ft 10.00.
and 11:20 p. m. On Sunday, 9:00, 9:tio, 9:50.
11:40a. ui.. 2:10. 2:50. 3 45, 4.1ft U:Uft 7:4ft
8:1ft 10:00. and 11:20 p.m.
For Pope'a Creek Liue, 7:20 a.m and 4:40 p.m. daily.
except Sunday. '
For Auiiaivlia. 7:20 and 9:00 am., 12:05, 4 20and
0:00 p.m daily, except Sunday. Sundays, 9:05
am., 4:10 p.m.
ALEXANDRIA AND FREDERICKSBURG RAIL
WAY. AND ALEXANDRIA AND WA.sUiXul08
liAI L \\ AY*
IN EFFECT MAY 12. 1880.
For Alexandria, 4 M), 0 3... 7:45. 8 40, 9:45. 10 57
a.m., 12:04 uoou, 2:05, 4:25,4:55. 0:01, 0:2L
8:02, 10:0o and ll:3ip.m. On suuday at 4 3lt
1:4a, 9:45,10:57 am., 2:35,0:01, S:02 and 10:0o
p.m.
Accommodation forQtiautico, 7:45 a m. and 4:65 p.m.
weekdays. 7 :45 a.m. Sundays.
For Richmond and tne south, 4.3o, 10:57 a. m. daily,
and 0:21 p. m. daily, except Suuday.
Iraius leave Alexaiiuna for Waahuurtou, 0 05, 7:05,
8:00,9:10, 10:15, 11 07 a. In., 1 :2ft 3:O0, 3:1ft
5:10.7:05.8:00,9:20, 10:32, aud 11:05 p. ui.
Ou Sunday at 9:10 and 11:07 a. in.; 2:0ft o:10.
7:05, 8:0ft 9:20, and 10:32 p. m.
Ticket* aud information at the office, northeast cor
ner ol 13th street and Peuuaylvauia aveuue. and
. at the statiou, where oruers can be lelt lor the
j checkiun of bawa** to deauuation from hotel* and
I residence*.
CHAS. E. PCGH. J. R. WOOD.
general Manager. General PaaaeuKer A?rent.
CATSKILL MOUNTAINS,
SARATOGA.
LAKE GEORGE, adihondack8.
On and alter by NbAY*. June 23. exprea* tiluT on
west shore Railroad will run Daily, except Sunday,
to aud frem the Jersey City statiou of the Peuuayl
vauia Heuroad, niak;uK close coiiuecUoiia with last
trains to and from Waahitnrton.
CATSKILL MOUNTAIN EXPRESS.-Leave Jersey
City Station at 8:50 a.in Arrive Phoenicia, 12:55 p.
m., Grand Hotel. 1:45 p.m.. Hotel Kaateraklll, 2 18
p.m.; Mount House SUUon, 1:20 p.m. Paienviila,
1:2ij?j?. Drawnuir-rooui Car* Jeraey City to Grand
Hotel Statiou aud to Phoenicia tfor Hotel w???v.o
and Mountain Houae).
w SARATOGA AND CATSKILL MT EXPRESS -
Leave PtiUdelphia, 8:20 a m. Arrive PImuiicm, 3 30
P.m.; Graud Hotel, 4 :-5 p. m.; Hotel Kaaterakill,4:51
p.m.; Mt. Houae Station. 4 15 p m.; PalenvUle. 4 20
p.m. Arrive Saratotra. 0 2O jxui.; Caldwell, Lake
Geonre.8:10p m. Drawing Room Cars Philadelphia
to Grand Hotel Station aud to Phoenicia (for Hotel
Kaateraklll and Mountain House., New York to Cald
well and Jetwey City to Saratoga.
SARATOGA AND CATSKILL MT. SPECIAL
Leave Waahimrton, 9 00 a.m. Arrive Phonicia, 7 51
p.m,; Grand Hotel, 8:45 p.m.; Hotel KaaleraaULu 13
p.m.; Mt. House statiou. 8 00 p.m.: FfcWnville, 8 o5
p.m Arrive Saralosra. 9 25 p.m. Runs to r*hi ?all.
Lake Geonre. on Saturdays only, arrtviu* 10:50 p.m.
Draw^ 8oom Car* New York to Graud Hotel Station
and to Phcrnicia (for Hotel Kaateraklll and Mountain
Houae), aud Waahiufftou to Saratoga.
Purchase tickets at Punaylvania Railroad office*
and connect in the Jeraey City Station for all northern
resorts by % eat Shore IIroad Banrare chscksd
throurh. Saratoga trains run via Albany. ~
^ C E. LAMBERT.
>24taep30 General Passenger Agent. k*w York.
GENTLEMEN'S GOODS.
H* Da BaEB,
IMPORTER AND TAIL0I,
1111 Pentia. are..
From July 1st to 15th, inclusive, will tak* o* 20 per
cent from present prices on all rooda maita to order in
his establishment. My lane stock most be i'*dnaa4
No *uch lndutemeaiavw beforr offered to gentlemen
who deetre to be well drasssd Ontara mnstbs Mt be
tween 1st sad 15th.
Terms Cash. H. D. B.
>29 1111
PROFESSIONAL.
If ME. BBOOEE TELLE ALL TME EVEETB OF
au. *lw, >e3-10w*
I^AB twi^a^cCTiffd^utiali Ottos hooiA ?
ATTORNEYS.
i A
H
Fir """
6* w WW w
ii. vv
P L A I l\l
fT* A oor rrrr s?,
C_ AA CO T 5 ?
r A G J
THK RVRKIKQ STAR to a PAPKR
OF TO-DAY, not of YESTERDAY nor
of LAST W KKK. It prints ALL THK
N&WS, Loral, DonnUr and Foreign,
loxq is advance or the morn.
ISO PAPERS.
This U coBiplruomir true of all -? ,
of Dfwi, but especially .o to regard to
Local News and DUtrlot Affairs.
THK STAR has a very much LAR(.KR
?nd BKTTKR forte of LOCAL RK
POKTKKS and SPECIAL WRITKRt
than any other paper In Washington
ever thuu(kk of employing, sad ITS
M KCHANICAL KgilPMKNT AND
PRINTING FACILITIES ARK MORE
THAN THREE TIMES AS POWKR.
FUL AND RAPID AS THOSE OK ANV
OTHKR WASHINGTON PAPKR. It Is
therefore able to print earh day a full
report of ever)- transaction of public In
terest occurring in the District up to
the very hour of coins to press.
By the free use of the OCEAN CABLES
for RKGI LAR AND SPECIAL D1S
PATCHES, and witii the difference of
time In its favor. It Is also able to give
its readers every afternoon the news of
the WHOLE EASTERN HKMISPHKRK
for the entire day, and up to 12 o'clock
midnight, thus leaving literally nothing
In the way of news from Europe, Asia,
and Africa for the morning papers.
Equally does THE STAR lead all Its
contemporaries in the publication of the
NEWS OK OUR OWN COUNTRY.
Receiving the regular dispatches of
both News Associations; with alert and
enterprising special telegraphic cor
respondents at all important points; and
with wires leading directly from Its own
office to the general network of telegraph
system touching every city, town and
hamlet In the L'nlted States and Terri
tories, it Is enabled to receive and print
at once a full report of every event ol
consequence occurring duriug the day
an> w here between the Atlantic and Pa
cific Oceans.
W NOTE ? THE RESULT: tt
THE STAR HAS MORE THAX
THREE TIMES AS MANY REGl'LAR
SUBSCRIBERS and MORE THAN
FIVE TIMES AS MANY REGULAR
READERS AS ANY OTHER DAILY
PAPER IN W4SH1NOTON. It to de
livered regularly by careful carriers at
the HOMES OF THE PEOPLE, AFTER
THE BUSTLE AND WORRY OF THE
DAY ARE OVER, and It Is thus read
leisurely and thoroughly by EVERY
MEMBER OF THE FAMILY.
They know that It prints all the news,
and has only the Interests of the people
of the District In view, with no partisan
measures to advocate, and no private
schemes to forward. They know it, la
short, to be THE PEOPLE'S PAPER,
and nothing else. As an ADVERTISING
MKDII/M It Is, therefore, ABSO
LUTELY WITHOUT A RIVAL. It to
In fact worth more as a means of reach
ing the public THAN ALL THE
OTHER DAILY PAPERS IN THK
CITY TOG El HER.
Furthermore, In proportion to the re
turns it gives Its patrons, ITS ADVER
TISING RATES ARE THE CHEAPEST
IN THE CITY.
:o:
In conclusion, the public should 1mm
In mind this one significant fact: THE
STAR does not rely upon empty boasts
to impress the public. ITS CIRCULA
TION IS SWORN TO; IU PRESS
ROOM IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC;
?nd its BOORS MAY BE INSPECTED
by any one having an interest in their
examination. These are CRUCIAL
TESTS, which tew papers Invite, and
which those that boast most are
able to stand.
The esteem In which THE STAR
to held by the reading aad advertising
public to conclusively shown by the fig
ures given below.
In the first'slx months of each of the
five years named the average dally cir
culation of the paper was:
1885 22,507 i
*886 24,382 ?
? 25,702 "
'1888 27,OSS -
1808 Btr.Sil **
?* 1887
M
im
Equally
regard to the
the paper, which to thei
of Rs
of publicity. The number of NEW AD
VERTISEMENTS printed la the col
umns of The Star
*
In 1SS5 1S,I
44 188<f
? 1S87.... 27,61S
" 1888 27,840
" *888 .S1.97S

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