OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 01, 1890, Image 6

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1890-04-01/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 6

CITY AN D^D I STRICT.
0J~ The Eranxo Stab's subscription lint,
the book* of the office, and it* press and de
livery rooms are at all times open to the wel
rome inspection of any person hating a color
able interest in the correctness of its claims as
to circulation. This is a guarantee to adver
tiser* that is giren by few papers in the world,
and by note oOutr in W'rirtiruiton.'
THE VETERANS' FAIR.
A Brilliant Scene and Interesting Fixer*
else* at the Opening.
?fetches ft senator moody and kethest:nt- I
ATtTr. s'eini.et ? thb lioii r infantbt's
ABMlBT THRONGED?THE DKPABTMENT COM
XASDZB'S BECBPTIOX -*CS1C AND l'OLTKT.
It snowed and it rained lr.st night, but no
body knew it after lie bad entered the
Light Infantry armory, ?nd a big ;rowd did so.
Here all was gayety -.nd warmth. In short,
and vca express everything. Lincoln I'ost, No.
S. U.A.K.. were starting their fair off with a
big rush. The soldier boys- home was deco
rated :n a mo-.t tasteful manner. The American
flag was i rominent in the drapery. The booths
Were pretty and loaded down with useful and
ornamental articles for sain, Pretty girls.
Well, each bjoth seemed to vie
Vitb its neighbor in the beauty
and grace of its fair attendants,
while a cloud of light skirmishers in the shape
?f flower girls, Ac., did deadly work on the
J.jor. Hearts beat and pocket books emerged
and all the tune the Third Artillery Band
played it; sweetest.
RFCEIVINO THE DtrABTXENT CO**ANDEB.
It was b:30 when Department Commander
TTrell and his staff entered the hall, headed by
the Old Guard l>ruin Corps. I'ost Commander
Anderson welcomed the department com
mander in a happy little speech, ic which he
mentioned the objects and hopes of the fair.
It was for the benefit, he said, of the old
soldier. his wife and hi* children and should
prove a grand success.
Commander Urell in reply thanked the com
mittee.
The bone and sinew of the army during the
war. continued Mr. Urell. was made up of poor
Bieu and these men are poor still. Post 3 has
done noble work in caring for their indigent
comrades.
Miss Clara Rosafy. accompanied by Prof.
Bischoff. gave an excellent rendition of "The
?5tar Spangled Banner," which was received
With enthusiastic cheer*.
SENATOR MOODY'S TA1.K.
Mr. Pipes then introduced Senator Moody of
Fouth Dakota. who immediately proceeded to
warm tho hearts of the soldier boys with a
patriotic speech, iu which he commended the
purposes of the fair.
Mr. Moody's remarks were greeted with
cheers when he spoke of the passage yesterday
of the dependent pension bill. "I pledge
myself." said the Dakota statesman,
??as long as I remain a member
of the United states Senate to favor any legis-"
iation. compatible with the income of the
country, in the direction of pensions until
every man. every v.omun and every Union
child has received some portion of the pay
ment due them for the gallant services ren
dered." Mr. Moody remarked that he wanted
to get down and spend some money and would
therefore stop.
An original song?'"Nail the Flag to the
Mast"*?written by Dr. W. K. Frisbee and set
to music bv I*rof. J. 1*. Sousa. was sung with
excellent effect by E. J. Whipple.
ru m'kinley'a speech.
representative McKmley followe 1 with a
short address. l!e thought also that too much
could not be done for the soldier. "No gov
ernment."" ssid he, "'has ever done so much for
its d'-fend rs as has the United states, but on
the other hsud no volunteer army ever did so
much for a government ax our army did for
the United States. We are merely carrying
out the pledges made during the war. I am
glad tho pension bill has pas?? d the Senate,
and if the House will add a servico pension
clause to it a great work wiil have beeu accom
plished.
??Some people seem to be worrying themselves
that under my direction the treasury wdl be so
emptied by impost laws that there will be noth
ing left tor the soldier. Now. don't you be
troubled by any such idea as that. After all
the tariff legislation is completed there will be
plenty left for the old soldier.
"We must see that no old soldier goes to the
poor house or is buried in a pauper's grave.
No poor house or potter's field ou God's green
earth is good enough for an old soldier."
Mr. DeVVitt C. Sprague closed the exercises
by reciting an original poem, after which dauc
iiig was indulged in to a late hour.
IN CHARGE OP THE FAIR.
The members of the post in special charge of
the fair are as follows! President. Marion T.
Anderson, post commander; vice presideut.
James E. McCabe; recording and financial sec
retary. Wm. P. Sevillei corresponding secre
retary. Geo. P. Tenuey; treasurer, l.eander I*.
Williams. Members of the committee who are
chairmen of subcommittees?James M. Pipes,
reception; James P.. McCabe, finance: Wm. F.
l>e Knight, solicitations and purclases; ltobert
McDonald, ball ai.d order; De WittC. Sprague,
printing and advertising; David P. Craig,
music; Geo. W. T. Strieby. decoration; Win. II.
f!ak> r. amusements; Jacob Jacobson. refresh
ments; Jacob C. De I'utron. voting. Mrs.
Emma A. V. Anderson, president Liueolu Be
lief Corps. No. 6, auxiliary to Lincoln Post.
SANITARY LEGISLATION.
The Bill to Prevent the Spread of Scarlet
Fever and Diphtheria.
The Commissioners have before them House
bill to prevent the spread of scarlet fever
and diphtheria in the District of Columbia. A
synopsis of this bill has already been printed in
The Stab. The bill was referred to Health
Officer Townshend for his views before the
Commissioners submitted the.r report lu his
indorsement upon the papers he says that au
thority such as is conferred by the provisions
of this bill ha* been asked of Congress over and
over again in the annual reports of the health
department "This we.isure appears to be an
embodiment of the views of the medical pro
fession. with which I am heartily in accord,
and I sincerely trust it may become a law."
'lhe Commissioners have considered the bill
i.ud will recommend its passage, with aim nd
nients more..?:ug the penalty from "not less
than $ 1 to more than to "not less than c5
nor more than ?30" iu case of second offense
and the insertion of the paragraph on the sec
oad page after the word "person" "knowing
the character of the disease" and striking out
the clause of imprisonment in default of the
Csyment of the tiue. They will send with the
ill to Congress the report of the health officer.
DISTRICT GOVERNMENT.
FER*ITS TOB ENTEBTUNMENT*.
Frequent applications are made to the Com
?ussioners for permits to give entertainments
lor the benefit of individuals. Home of the
applicants are blind, others are deformed,
while others yet are the children of men who
died leaving them iu straitened circumstances.
The law sayx permits to give entertainments,
without paving the usual license fee. shall
only be given to religioussocieties and charita
ble institutions. The Commissioners have
made au order directing a strict construction
of the law hereafter. This order will have the
effect of increasing the District revenues, for
whenever a permit is g.ven the District loses
ti license fee.
jnacF.iXAXEocs.
Chief Clerk McGinn of the health office has
keen granted a leave of absence for one week.
Presented by the Gruud Jury.
After the grand jury was discharged yester- ?
day a handsomely framed act of resolutions |
was presented to the foreman, Mr. Frank T.
lUwhngs. expressing the esteem in which his |
associates held him. Mr. Randolph Coyle
made the presentation address. Mr. Coyle,
also representing the members of the jury,
presented gold and silver handled umbrellas to
Mr. F. H. Schneider, the secretary, and Mr. F.
A. McGee. the assistant secretary of the body.
Suitable present- in ea?h were bestowed upou
the bailiff. Mr. Hughes, and the messenger,
Mr. Farley.
A Powder Explosion in n Mine.
Amaga/ineof giant blasting powder exploded
I ester.Ur in the miues of the Slosa Steel and
ron Company at Coalburg. Ala., and fiftoen (
men. mostly convict miners, were injured, six i
of them fatally. A boy went into the magazine
with a lighted lamp and a spark ignited the
powder. Most of the injured men are colored.
Ml
Tbomaa Cornell of Kingston City, ex-Con
freaamvn and a republican elector in 1HS4,
died Sundav at Uie age of seventy-six at
Boudout, N 1.
THE LAW OF CHANCE.
The Result of Some of Prof. Slenden
hall's Experiments.
BIS TALK OS CHANCE AND THE LONO BUX?OAM'
BLINO A POO* OCCUPATION rtOK A BUSINESS
?TAHDPOtST? TH* CREDIBILITY OF TESTIMONY?
THE ''CHARACTERISTIC CUEY*" OF AUTHOR.
Very much interested waa the audience that
listened to Prof. T. C. Mendcnhall of the Geo
logical Survey as he lcctured on Saturday after
noon at the National Museum ou "Chance and
the long run."
In the beginning Prof. Mendenhall referred
briefly to the history of the doctrine of chance
or the law of probability, saying that it had if*
reel origin in the work of Pascal, who about
the year 1054 wa? called upon to decide a dis
pute between two gamblers. From the time of
Pascal to the present the subject had recoived
the consideration of the ablest mathematicians,
including especially the great La Place, and
nearly every great mathematical scholar had
contributed to its growth.
lie then proceeded to nhow that the probabil
ity. or chance, or "facility" of an event might be
expressed mathematically by means of a frac
tion. AN iien the value of this fraction was one
tlte event was certain to happen. Inferences
were made, in illustration, to tlte tossing of
coins, throwing dice, drawing balls from jars,
Ac. It is possible to calculate the probability
of some very complex events- and the processes
involve the use ol very difficult mathematical
methods. It was. therefore, desirable to verify
the result of this mathematical treatment of
the subject by means of experiment. Several
experimental tests of the principles of the doc
triue of chance were described. It was possi
ble to calculate the probability that a short
stick in falling on a surface ruled with parallel
lines would or would not lie across one of thoso
lines. Having computed thi< probability l'rof.
Mendenhall said that he had verified the result
by pitching a stick upon such a surface and
noting how it fell twenty thousand times. Tiiis
is probably the most extensive experimental
test ever applied. The numerous applications
of the laws of chance were next referred to.
THE CREDIBILITY OF TESTIMONY.
Especial attention was given to its use ill
expressing the credibility of human testimony
and determining its weight. If the credibility
of a mau wag expressed by the fraction foui
fifths it meant that what he said would, in the
long run, be true four times out of live. Rea
sons were given for believing that the average
credibility was about tlirec-fourtlis, in which
was included not only any tendency to lie
which might exist but also the chances of
being mistaken. It was stated that if the cred
ibility of witnesses was one-half one witness
was as good as a hundred; if it was less than
one-half the fewer such witnesses called the
better, and if more than one-half additional
testimony would strengthen the evidence. Some
of the fallacies of gamblers were referred to
and illustration.) were given to show their ab
surdity. It was shown that games of chance
indulged in for gain were bad from a "business
standpoint" if from no other, as in any case
the loss was greater than the gain.
DETECTING AUTHORSHIP.
An application of the laws of "chance and
the long run" was made in a proposed plan for
detecting authorship by a sort of word analy
sis. The method depends on two or threo as
sumptions.
The nature of the process the speaker aai3,
is extremely simple, but it may be useful to
point out its similarity to a well-known method
of material analysis, the consideration of which
actually tirst suggested to the writer its literarv
analogue.
By the use of the spectroscope a beam of non
homogeneous light is analyzed and its com
ponents assorted according to their wave
length. As is well known, each element, when
intensely heated under proper conditions,
sends forth light which, upon prismatic
analysis, is found to consist of groups of waves
of definite length and appearing in certain
definite proportions. So certain and uniform
are the results of this analysis that the appear
ance of a particular spectrum is indisputable
evidence of the presence of the element to
which it belongs.
an author's "curve."
In a manner very similar it is proposed to
analyze a composition by forming what may
be called a "word-spectrum." or "charcteristic
curve," which shall be a graphic representa
tion of an arrangement of words according to
theu- length and to the relative frequency of
their occurrence. If. now. it shall be found that
with every author, us with every element, this
spectrum persists in its form and appearance,
the value of the method will be at once con
ceded. It has been proved that the spectrum
of hydrogen is the same whether that element
is obtained from the water of the ocean or from
the vapor of the atmosphere. Wherever and
whenever it appears it means hydrogen. If
it can be proved that the word-spectrum or
characteristic curve exhibited by an analysis of
"David Coppertield" is identical with that of
"Oliver Twist," of "Barnaby l:udge."of "Great
Expectations," of the "Child's History of Eng
land." Ac., and that it differs sensibly from
that of "Vanity Fuir," or "Eugene Aram." or
"Robinson Crusoe." or "Don Quixote," or any
thing els.- in fact, then the conclusion will be
tolerably certain that when it appears it means
Dickens.
The validity of the method as a test of
authorship, then, linplit s the following Assump
tions: That every writer makes use of a vo
cabulary which is peculiar to himself, and the
character of which does not material!/ change
from year to year during his productive period;
that, in the use of that vocabulary in composi
tion. personal peculiarities in the construction
of sentences will, in the long run, recur w ith
such regularity that short words, long words
and words of medium length will occur with
definite relative frequencies.
Prof. Mendenhall suggested that the method
w as capable of application to the celebrated
Shakespearan-Bacou problem, r.ud he ventured
to assert that if it were correctly used it would
not tail to settle this question. *
The authorship of the letters of Junius might
also be determined by this interesting process.
AS IMMENSE UNDERTAKING.
Mr. Shepherd's Mining Interests at
liatopilas.
The governor of Chihuahua recently wrote a
letter to President Diaz of Mexico in which he
called particular attention to the vast mining
industries at Batopilas which are under the
management of ex-Gov. A. B. Shepherd. The
following extracts from the letter will be of
interest to Mr. Shepherd's many friends iu
Washington:
"liitopilas is bo important ar.d there is such
fabulous wealth hidden iu its mountains that I
do not think it venturesome to assume that this
mineral will sOrne day produce, if Mr. Shep
herd meets with no obstacles, us much silver as
all the other minerals of the republic put to
gether.
"Mr. Shepherd has iu activo operation more
than twelve mines, but his great project, or. to
be uccurate, the greatest mining venture of the
country, consists of a famous tunnel which
bears yonr name, and in which there have been
already excavated a little over 2.000 feet. Its
entire length will be two leagues and will cut
hundreds of veins of famous history. As you
will understand, all the works of Mr."Shepherd,
either in mines or haciendas, are colossal, it
being sufficient for me to say that iu the ten
years that this man has been working here he
has done over 100 miles of underground work,
contributing thereby life and wealth to the
commerce and industry of all the adjoining
towns, for on freights only he disburses yearly
<250.000. I have visited all his works and have
convinced myself of the enormous sums in
vested therein, and I have seen with great sat
isfaction, furthermore, that Mr. Shepherd is a
good friend of Mexico and very much devoted
to you. whose name he teaches all his men to
venerate."
In view of the fact that it is necessary to
freight the ore to Chihuahua, 120 leagues away,
or to Alamos. 100 leagues, the governor recom
mends either that Mr. Shepherd be grauted a
concession to build a railroad to the Pactlic or
that the government establish a mint at Bato
pilas to coin from *2.000,000 to ?3,000,000 a
year.
Two Murderers Respited.
Both John W. Kudy. who beat his old father
to death in Lancaster county,Pa..and William H.
Smith, the Allegheny county murderer, have
auothcr lease of iife. They were sentenced to
be hanged April 9, but Gov. Beaver has re
spited them until June 26. Iu the meantime
tiie board of purdous will inquire into their
cases.
To Clean Waste Pipes*
From the Sanitary Engineer.
A retired plumber thus gives a point for the
gratuitous relief of householders: "Just before
retiring at night pour into the clogged pipe
euouglt liquid soda lye to fill the 'trap' or
bent part of the pipe. Be sure that no water
runs into it until the next morning. During
the night the lye will convert all the offal into
soft soap, and the tirst current of water in the
morning will wash it aw?y and clear the pipe
clean as new."
DEPENDENT PENSION BILL
Pasted by the Senate, 42 to 12?It*
Provision*?Points from tbe Debate.
Tbe Senate yesterday afternoon passed the
dependent pension bill by a vote of 43 to 12, as
follows:
Yeas?Messrs. Allen, Allison. Blair, Call,
Casey, Chandler, Davis, Dawes, Edmunds,
Faulkner, Frye, George, Gibson, Hawley,
Hearst, Higgins. Hour, Ingalls. Jones (Nev.),
McPherson, Manderson. Mitchell, Moody, Mor
rill, Paddock. Payne, Pettigrew, Pierce. Piatt,
Plumb, Sawyer, Sherman. Spoonor, Squire,
Stewart, Stockbridgo, Teller, Turpie, >oor
hees, Walthall, Washburn, Wilson (Iowa)?42.
Nays?Messrs. Bate. Berry, Blackburn, Cock
rell, Colquitt, Daniel. Harris. Jones (Ark.),
Pugh, lleagan, Vest, Wilson (Md.)?12.
THE DEBATE.
Previous to its passage there was a lengthy
debate. Senator Plumb's amendment remov
ing the limitation as to arrears of pensions was
defeated?yeas. 9: nays, 46?on the ground thnt
it might involve the expenditure of from
fCOO.OOO.OOO to *1.000.000.000.
Mr. Blair said the question was not whether
the amount was large or small, but whether it
was a debt. Why could it not bo paid.-^ llad
the time passed when the republic was without
credit to hire the necessary money? Could not
bonds be issued to pay the debt.' It was time
to call a halt on all such low. selfish and devil
ish considerations as were raited against the
payment of that debt.
Mr. Frye said there was a danger of over
leaping iu the mutter of pensions. When Mr.
Cleveland commenced to veto pension oills the
democratic party ratified what he did. and not
only the democratic party but muny of the
business men in the republican party, too. He
said to Senators who were pressing the amend
ment that they wore imperiling the truest in
terests of the soldiers and were creating preju
dices against pensions. If the amendment were
adopted and the bill enacted in a law the
soldiers who looked forward to a service pen
sion bill would look in vain. He dared not
vote for a proposition that, he believed, would
he absolutely destructive to the best interests
of the soldiers, and he should be compelled to
vote "No" on the amendment.
Mr. Hawley expressed his personal obligation
to Mr. Frye i'or telling the serious truth in the
matter. He did not believe that the American
soldiers asked for the amendment. He would
stake his political standing on the assertion
that out of any live hundred old soldiers there
would be found a majority against it. Head
long extravagance would bring men into power
who would stint and squeeze and deny the sol
dier. There was a limit in the matter of pen
sion legislation.
Mr. Vest offered an amendment providing
that the money necessary to meet the appro
priation under this bill shall bo raised by an
income tax of 5 per cent on incomes between
$2,000 and $5,000, per cent between f5,000 |
and *10.000 and 10 per cent over ^100,000.
This amendment was laid on the table oy a
party voto of 29 to 17.
Not at all discouraged by the fate of his other
motion to amend Mr. Plumb offered another
amendment to pension, at the rate of 38 per
month, all who served ninety days in the late
war who are sixty-two years of age, or as they
attain that age. This too was defeated?yeas
19, nays 39.
THE BILL PROVIDES
that in considering the pension claims of de
pendent parents it shall be necessary only to
show by competent and sufficient ovidence that
such parent or parents are without other means
of support than their own labor, the contribu
tions of others not legally bound for their sup
port: provided, that all pensions allowed to
dependent parents under this act shall com
mence from the date of tlia filing of the appli
cation hereunder, and shall continue no longer
than the existence of their dependence.
Section 2 provides that all persona who
served three months or more in tho military
or naval service of the United States during the
late war of tho rebellion, and who have been
honorably discharged therefrom, and who are
now. or who may hereafter be suffering from
mental or physical disability, not the result of
their own vicious habits, which incapacitates
them from the performance of labor m such a
degree as to render them unable to earn a sup
port, and who are dependent upon their daily
labor, or on the contributions of others not
legally bound thereto, for their support, shall,
upon making due proof of the faet according
to such rules and regulations as the Secretary
of tho Interior may provide, bo placed upon
the list of invalid pensioners of the United
States and be entitled to receive *12 per month.
Section 3 provides for pensions to widows,
minor children, or mother or father at the
established rates.
Section 4 says that from the date of the
passage of this act the increase of pensions for
minor children shall be at the rate of *4 per
month instead of $2 per month, as now pro
vided by law; and in case a minor child is
insane, idiotic or otherwise helpless, the pen
sion shall continue during the life of said child
or during the period of such disability.
Section 5 limits the attorneys' fee in any one
case to *10 and any person who shall violate
any of the provisions of this sectiou or who
shall wrongfully withhold from a pensioner or
claimant the whole or any part of a pension or
claim allowed or due such pensioner or
claimant under this act shall be deemed guilty
of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof
shall tor each and every such offense be fined
not exceeding ?5'M), or be imprisoned at hard
labor not exceeding two years, or both, iu the
discretion of the court.
WILL VICTORIA STEP DOWN?
A Report That She Again Seriously
Thinks of Abdicating.
It is now stated in London on tho highest
official authority, as well as being a matter of
gossip in parliament aud at the clubs, that the
queen is seriously considering the step of
abdicating the British throne. The recent re
ception of the Prince of Wales by the German
emperor has had a great effect on the aged
queen, who is now convinced that her son
ought to have a chance to play the leading role
in England during the rest of her life, which is
certain to be short. The queen's bodily in
firmity is increasing and 6he is so rapidly rnn
ning to flesh that massage is necessary to assist
her breathing. One strong objection the queen
has to abdicating is tho contingency of being |
called ex-queen. Sho wishes to assume the
title of queen regent for the rest of her life. A
special bill will be introduced into carliament
when she is willing to resign the actual throne,
and the Prince of Wales will be crowned king
of England and emperor of India. The queen's
daily fare at Aix consists of tea and toast in the
morning, a chop, stale bread and cocoa at noon.
At 5 in the afternoon sho has tea and crackers.
Her dinner consists of clear soup, underdone
beef, chicken salad and ciaret. She is not al
lowed any beer, champagne or vegetables. Sho
passes a quiet evening with Princess Beatrice
and Prince Henry of Battenburg, playing the
piano, singing and playing cribbage. Poor
Battenburg finds this deadly dull, and after the i
queen has retired for the night he sneaks out
and smokes his pipe by the lonely sea, or drinks [
beer at a bar.
Cardinal <ilbbons in the West.
Cardinal Gibbons arrived in Chicago from
Baltimore at noon yesterday and iu the after
noon. iu company with Archbishop Ireland of
St. Paul, Archbishop Feehan of Chicago aud a
number of the clergy and laity of Chicago, left
for Milwaukee to attend the funeral of the luto
Archbishop Ileus.
It is n Coek-and-Rull Yarn.
A special to the New York JleraOi from
Ottawa, Out., says the story told by T. B. Ai
de rson in regard to A. Rawlins aud A. K. Beg
bie. farm pupils.who he supposes to have been
foully dealt with, has brought out information
that Begbie was formerly a member of the
northwest mounted police.
Fred White, commissioner of the police, says:
"Apparently Begbie did not like the police, for
he only stayed 125 days. Ou August 26, 1S85,
he deserted while on escort duty at Winnipeg.
Probably he went to the states, but at any rate
a deserter would not want to make his where
abouts known."
A Monkey in the Parlor.
J. B. Sieberling's son Charlos returned to
Akron. Ohio, yesterday from an extended trip
through South America, bringing with him a
large species of South American monkey.
After tea the box containing the monkey was
brought out to be opened amid the curiosity
of the family circle and a few friends. The
monkey was untamed and had been closely
confined since it was shipped from Buenos
Ayres. via Loudon. The moment the box
cover was loosened the animal broke the fasteu
iugs aud escaped into the drawing room.
Catching up a costly vase the monkey dashed
it into iragments. knocked a French clock
from the mantel, demolishing it, and ran among
the picture*, curtains, bric-a-brac and decora
tions. He was finally driven into the dining
room, where the battle was renewed and the
monkey bombarded hi* pursuers with knives,
saucers and plates.
Several gentlemen were severely bitten and
scratched before the South American native
was forced to strike his color*. The damage
done make* him undoubtedly the cosUle*t mon
key iu the country.
WHY BISMARCK RETIRED.
He ia Reported to Have Said Ills Act
Was a Forced One.
The Vou<*che Zritung of Berlin ?ay? that in
replying to an address from the citizens of
Dresden expressing regret that he had re
signed at so critical a time Prince Bismarck
declared that his retirement was not of his
own seeking. The reply has caused great
excitement in Dresden. Tho I'osfifchf Zei/wig
adds that public opinion demands a true ex
planation of the circumstances of Prince Bis
marck's resignation. Emperor William has
promised to pay Prince Bismarck a visit at
Friedrichsruhe. Prince Bismarck received
three thousand citizens of Hamburg at Fried
richsruhe yesterday afternoon. The prince
was attired in a military uniform. Last night
there was a torch light procession. 1,100 torch
bearers being in line. The paraders
marched around the lake and castle and were
reviowed by Bismarck. Extraordinary pre
parations have been made for the celebration
of Prince Bismarck's birthday today.
? - ?a?
| COLORED CONVENTION CALLED.
A Meeting In Richmond to Consider the
Needs of the Race.
A convention of the colored people of Vir
ginia has been called to meet in Bichmond
April 15. by J. T. Wilson, chairniau. The pur
pose of tho convention is wholly non-political.
Each county and city is to have not less than
two delegates, who are to be chosen by the col
ored voters. The convention will consider the
means of advaucement of the colored raoc in
education, morals and finance. Several per
sons have been asked to prepare papers refer
ring to the better education of the race and to
their emigration. The most significant paper
to be read will be from the pen oi a well-edu
cated colored man of Norfolk, Va., entitled
"Will the acquirement of lands in Virginia by
the colored men reliove them of their civil dis
abilities'?" The convention will be in session
three days. The leaders have determined to
ask for a charter for a company composed
wholly of Virginia colored foiks. who will buy
lauds in the west on which to settle those who
arc dissatisfied and willing to migrate.
Municipal Telegraphing Free.
The Atlantic Postal Telegraph Company ho*
secured the passage of an ordinance by the At
lantic City council granting the telegraph
company the right to erect poles and string
wires along Mediterranean avenue and across
all the intersecting avenues. Tho company, in
consideration of the privileges, agrees to wire
all municipal dispatches to and from Phil
adelphia free of charge, and also to keep its
ottife open day aud night from February to
October, and until 11 o'clock the remaining
months.
Kalakaua Took the Jack-Pot.
From the Chicago Tribune.
Paul Newman, ex-attorney general of tho
Hawaiian Islands, has been spending a few
days at the Richelieu. He is a bosom friend of
King KalakauR, and it grieves him to hear
stories about tho king's fondness for poker.
''In traveling around the world," said Mr.
Newman hist evening, "I heard a story of the
king's poker games in every nook of the globe.
As a matter of fact the king never plav.: over a
?2.50 limit, and he never lost over #1.0?K)at
one sitting in his life. The last time we played
was the night of the rebellion last summer.
Just as the game was getting interesting mes
sengers informed us that a riot was taking
place. It was decided to go home directly
after the jack-pot. consequently the bets were
high. As the king placed his last befr on the
board the report of guns was heard.
"'llun for your lues,' cried the king. Wo
ran out one door and he got out another. Wo
were about half way home when he made us
stop and play out the unfinished jack-pot.
Do you know wo were so nervous that the king
ran "in the joker for an ace and scooped the
money with an alleged hand of four aces?
After "the riot was over we discovered the trick,
but as ho had been a loser all summer it was
hardly good form to sav anything."
?
The Weaknesses ot English Women.
Eugene Field In the Chicago Xewa.
Every American woman who sojourns in
London raises her voice against the large and
ill-fitting shoes which she finds here. The na
tives seek to justify tho monstrosities on the
plea that the feet should bo clad loosely aud
stoutly. The truth, however, is that English
women have big feet?abnormally big feet.
Moreover, marvelously low insteps seem to be
a characteristic of the typical English feet.
The English women are exceedingly sensitive
upon the subject of their prodigious pedals,
aud they make it a point to talk of the pro
priety of wearing large boots and shoes in
order to avert corns and other similar discom
fitures; yet I am told by dealers in footwear
that corns and bunions are quite as prevalent
here as elsewhere. Yet there have been En
glish ladies with wonderfully small feet. One
of the fatnouj beauties of tho court of George
IV. wore a shoe only five inches in length, yet
she was above medium height and was other
wise symmetrically proportioned.
Lacing is a vice tnat obtains very generally '
among the women of this country; nowhere else
are to be seen such slender waists as are found
here. The vice of tight lacing is practised in
every class of society; be she duchess or bar
maid. the native woman indulges witli the same
persistence her vanity iu this particular.
Another abominable practice that obtains
among English women is that of indulgence in
spirituous liquors. Gin. rum aud Scotch whisky I
are freely taken by women of every class here. I
I suspect" that if the English houses were better
heated there would be a much smaller demand
for liquor. As it is, everybody drinks more or
less (aud generally mure) in order to keep
warm. 'Iho treedoni with which women fre
quent the tap rooms is simply shocking. It is a
common sight of an evening to see a woman
with a babe in her arms reeling in or out of a
public bar room. These wretched creaturcs
belong, of course, to the lower class, but in the
so-called better classes of society guxiling
obtains to quite as considerable an extuut. It
is the alcohol they have consumed that gives to
so very many of the swell ladies to be seen iu
London the rubescent nones, the coarse, ilabbv j
cheeks, the purple lips and the swollen eyelids
that have come to be regarded as essentials to
u typical English face.
In Jail for Stealing a Process.
There has been trouble for some time be
tween Johnstown people and the North Branch
Steel Company of Danville, Pa., over the man
ufacture of an alleged patented steel rail, aud
for some time litigation has been kept up. Par
ties lmvc been seut disguised as workmen, and
various attempts made to discover tho exact j
method of manufacture, but so far without suc
cess. Yesterday morning at 2:30 o'clock four ,
rneu entered tne drafting room at the Danville
works, and, opening the safe, took from it
drawings and plates of the rolls used in the
making of the rail. When they attempted to
escape they ran into the arms of three detec
tives, who had posted themselves ,in regard to ]
this attempt and were waitiug to bag their
game. Three were arrested and placed in jail.
The fourth escaped, but it is said he was em
ployed on the other side and was drawing tho i
others into this clever trap. The burglars gave
the names of Robert S. Murphy, Henry Shea
and E. li. Entersoll. and registered at the hotel
as from Philadelphia, but in telegraphing for
money for bail they sent to Johnstown. They
are still in jail pending the fixing of the amount
of bail.
???
Tho Philadelphia League Clnb people will
in all probability institute civil and criminal
proceedings against President Johnson of the
Cleveland Players' Club for bribing their play
ers.
I?,
feline
POWDER
Absolutely Pure*
A cream of tartar baking powder. High
est of all In leavening strength.? V. &
Government Report, Aug. 17, 1819.
?hl7-tu.th.?.Cp
DEAFNESS AND CATARRH
CURED.
Dr. LlghthlU takes pleasure to submit
to those Interested the following testi
monials of cures:
FROM MB. X. E. ROESSL*.
PBOPBIETOH OF THE AKLINGTON.
"Tit* Aklikotox."
?Washhsotos, D.C., Much 8.18901
Mr Dfjlk Dm. Liohthill:
It aire. m? gTeat pleasure to state that yo?
effected a remarkable cure of deafneaa and die
chary** from the ear* in the nee of my cousin,
Marcus C. Boessle, and that the case baa
proved aa permanent aa it waa radical. I ieel
tme that without your skillful aid my cousin
would have been a deaf man all hia life.
Knowinir of other eases in which you have been
equally successful, I cheerfully trive you leave
to refer to me at any time and hope that your
practice in Washington will prove a distin
guished succe&s. Yours truly.
X. ?. KOESSLE.
FROM-*!*. H. P. DEGRAAF.
PRESIDENT OF t'hEBOWEBV NATIONAL BANK.
New Yobs, May 7, 1888.
Db. Liohthill:
My Dr.ax 8m: It affords mo Treat pleasure
to Join the Ion* list of grateful patients who
have been relieved from troublesome and oheti
tate complaints by yotir ani?rior skill. My case
was chronic catarrh, from which I had suffered
to such an extent that it weakened my general
health and finally gave rise to such ae vote pain
in and about the head and throat that it pre
vented me from akeping and alarmed my fam
ily. I am happy to state that the very first ap
plication of your treatment gave nie prompt
and decided relief. In a few days the pain had
disappeared and by degree* the other distress
ing symptoms characteristic of catarrh yielded
to your administrations, until I now find my
self completely cured. I therefore) cheerfully
tender you thia testimonial of your skill and
,access, in the hope that others may be bene
fited by its publication. H. P. DEGBAAF.
Dr. Liglithill, for thirty years a Specialist in
the cure of the diseases of the Ear and Respira
tory Organs, can be consulted on Deafneas,
Catarrh, Asthma and Diseases of the Xhroat
and Lungs at his office.
No. 1017 15TH ST. N.W.
Herdics pass the door.
Office hours from 8 to 12 and 3 to 5. ulo
SUMMER RESORTS.
? boscoisel,"
JL Kentucky aw. near the Beach, Atlantic City
Beautiful n?-w hotel; ali modern improvement*. Mrs
A. F. MARION, formerly oi the Lay ton.
nih2U-eo.hn-jei<-;iO, Sim
fiuTk LAw ION,
JL TJfi*M?a??fc AVE.. NEAR THE OCEAN,
ATLAK1IC CI I V, N.J.
New management. Entirely refitted in superior man
ner. Cuisine ami werviee unsurt assed by any house
ou the island. (in 18-unti I in J B.STEPHEN.
f|>HE liKHMAN, A I I.ANTIC CITY. N.4., OCEAN
A end of Pennsylvania ave.; enlarged, improved, and
heated by hot water. Open ail the year.
f4-tu tli.s^lm&Juleo'Jm F. W. LEHMAN.
D
li. GAKSlDE'b.
715 PACIFIC AVE,
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.
H
A Ilome by the Sea. in a salubriou* summer and win
ter climate, for the care and treatment of ladies or Ken
tlemen suffering: lroxu Nerve lire, Derangements of
Nutrition and allied disorders. Quiet, homelike,
cheery, select. Prospectus on application.
b4-tlUU-I0t |
1JOB REM OOl TAOK8 AT CI NOX,RANGIBK) IN
prices from $t?U0 to $vS,000 the seanon. B. H.
ROBERTSON. 15 1II st. mSTJ -tit
flMIE KESDER'ION, ATLANTIC CITY. N.J.,
X Tennesae avenue, near beach, now oi*?n. Greatly
enlarged.
mh*i4-Jm MRS. J. F. NEALL.
mHE VICTORIA, ATLANTIC CITY. N.J.
A Enlarged, remodeled, thoroughly renovated.
Open all the year, South Carolina ave. Near the Beach.
mU2-1 m M. W1 i.LlA M s
/to TO' ATLAN i K CITY, ? J-.
VJT This season and stop at the well-known HOTEL
M i'. VERNON. Pacific ave. near Ohio. Now open. 64
ocean rooms. Large piazza overlooking the sea. Excel
lent cuisme. to $14 per week; |L50 to |SpiC
day. No tiner house onthe island ai these rates. Send
tor cut ol house and particulars. JAMES S. MOON,
ml 5-f>m
ADDOJThALL, ATLANI IC CITY, N.J.j
NOW OPEN.
LEEDS * LIPPINCOTT.
Roliert J. Peacock, Chief Clerk. iu8-4m I
SEASIDE HOI SE, ATLANTIC CITY. N'J."
OPEN ALL THE YEAR,
Much improved; new nun parlors, hot sea water baths
in the house; elevator, etc. i
?i Wl CHARLES ETAOT. j
ff>HE ARLINGTON, OCEAN GROVE. N.J
A Accommodations and appointments tirst class,
hervicea the best. Accommodate o^O. Will oi-en May
1. 1KUO. \VM. P. DOLBEY. Prop. mii4-oxn
HOTEL LA FAY KITE, CAPE MAT, X. JL.
Accommodates :*00 Kuests. oi*n all the year.
Omnibus and sea water free baths free to guests The
finest summer and winter resort on the coa^t. House
within filty ieet ox the surf.
m3-<3m JAMES & sTEFFNER. Proprietors.
fpiIE RENOVO. ATLANTIC CITY. ^'.J.,
M. Tennessee Avenue near the Beach, .thoroughly
heated.
_mhl-3m V/. E. CHEESEMAN
\V AV EK LY, AT LA N TI c CITY.- ELEGAN1 LoCA
tioii. thoroughly heated for spring guests. Hot
sea water baths on each lloor; sun parlors. Will re
main open enure year.
f5-aS MRS. J. L BRYANT.
flxllE DENNIS. ATLANTIC CITk, N.J.
X Ocean end of Michigan ave.; oj-en all the year. All
modern conveniences.
fUMirn JOSEPH II. BORTON, Proprietor __
miu CHALTONTE, ATLANI IC clll, N.J
JL On the l>eocb. North Carolina ave.
Unobstructed ocean view.
Milt water baths in the house. Elevator.
Now open.
lS-tim E. ROBERTS & RONS.
JENNHUR8T, A 1 LANT1C CITY, N.J., NOW OPEN
Michigan avenue near tue ocean; steam heat,
eiectric beila and other modern improvements recently
introduced. JAME> HOOD. Ja^kKfiu
1
N
WINTER RESORTS.
TEW WINTER REPORT,
THE PRINCESS ANNE,
VIRGINIA BEACH. VA.,
secoud Season.
On the Atlantic Oc? an, 1 N miles east of Norfolk. Ac
eeaslble by Norfolk and \ irginia Beech liaiiroad, which
connects at Norfolk with all linen of travel. Hotel and
appointmeuts unsurpassed. Address
ap 1 -tu.tli,i?i:tt S. E. i'hl'1 i ENDEN. Manager.
Brow v s mu .ls-i n - t h e-pi n es. e i . eg a n tly
furnished New Hotel now <?i?en. Sun parlors,
open wotnl firt-s, electric lights, elevator. Thirty niiits
from Philadelphia via Pennsylvania raiiroau. ior
rooms,cuculais, address P. b. A1 TICK, Manager,
Brown's Mills P.O., N. J. llMi
ZlUkkWOOD. FORTRI 88 mom hob F.UL, VA.,
O ULD POINT COMFORT.
The New Hotel .lust erected on the site of Eaton Cot
tage; accnmnuHiation lor */-'50 guests. o|n*n all the
year; everything new; m 11 the modern.conveniences;
steajii ami oi?en grate heat, speaking tubes; electric
bells; hot and cold baths. The very best accommoda
tions at moderate prices.
in 11-1 m* GEO. BOOKER, Owner and Proprietor.
PROPOSALS.
PHOPOSAI.S FHK IMPROVING UUNKF.U HILL
lioAlX ? Office of tlie CommiMiiouera. I i.e. \S a.h
ington, li.tX. Man n 'J'i. 1KUC1. Sealeil 1-rui'iniai. will
1 >t. received at th.a ull.i'e I N 111. 1 Wt,l.Vh O'CLOCK
M. ouSAiCKDAi. A1'$1L 1IFTU. 18U0, for grad
ing anu graveling the Hunker Hill roaiL Blank tonus
ol I'roposulH aiui sreeilii atieiiH fan Ihj obtaiuea at this
office Ui on application tlierelor, lottether with ail uee
eaiiary lnturiuatiou. and 0n(a ui on tli^^- tonus only
will lie considered, 'iheiitfht i? reserved to reje?-t
any slid ail Oics or parts ui bi'ls. J. W. UOCGLAah,
L. G. 111NE, H. M. hOlii.Hl. Commissioners. U.C.
m'JM-tlt
MEDICAL. &c.
Ladies who kkquibe thil hkbvickh of
Kxperlenced Ftmaie Ph>siciana shouid consult
lir. or ilrs. WILSON, 110o 1'urk place n.e.. between
li uud C, 11 tli and 1 -tii sts. u.e. Ladies only, ltem
mly $5. Pills ,1. Prompt and reliable treatment
Only irenuino Ladies l'hysuiau in tlie city. Lstab
llaiied lKiW lu.~>-^4t*
lcLLON.
Tne oldest Kstah'.islied and only Bellable Ladles
Physician in the City,
can be consulted daily, 41S4 C st . between 4!, and 0th
Sis. u. w.
Prompt treatment. Consultation strictly confiden
tial. Separate rooms for Ladiea. Uetlicine, Ptila,
$1. Office always open. m^8-Ot*
I8KA8LS OF SKCHET?tXJNSULTATION !??
Oentleiuen only. L>r. Condory (formerly assistant
physician to iTof.lJr. hici.rd of Parist. office hours: W
11.1U and li to H o'clock. l'-X'ii 1 :tlh st.n.w. m'J4-luif
MMK. OK FUKKST, LONG-ESTABL18HKD AND
reliable Ladies' Physician, can be consulted daily
at her residence, UOi 1'st.u.w. Office hours trom 1
to U p.m.; with Lsdies only. mh.'i-lm*
KOFESSION A L M ASS AGE CAN BE OBTAIN ED^
with best ol medical reference, by apply iuir at 111.1
Wth st.n.w. nu-liii'
WOMAN?HEB DISEASES, WEAKNESSES AKD
TV IrreKularitlaa Promptly Cured by Dr. K. k.
THOMAS. -'73 N. Exeter st.,BalUmore,Md. O^Uoouia
for non-residenta. Jalt^eoilm"
FTEB ALL OTUKKS FAIL CONSULT"
DB. LOBB.
No. 3SS M. 15th at, below CaUowhlU St..Philadelphia.
Twenty year,' experience in special diseases, cure*
the worst case of Nervous Complainta. Blood l'oison
iluf. Blotches, Eruptions, Piles, Catarrh. L Icera, Sorea.
Impaired Memory, Deeimndency, Dimness of Viatun.
Lung, Liver. Stomach, Kidney tBritcht'a Disease).
Consultation Free.
Treatment Strictly ConndenUaL
nrCall or write for vmtioa liat; alao, book ta
Special Dtsssasa. Ja27-3m*
DENTISTRY.
TVH. STABB PABSOXS. DEXT18T. UTH 8T_ OOB.
MJ En.w.?Flrst-daas Fillinfa inaarted. Applicattoa
to rirna prsventa pain la aztraetlntr. All bsanrhss at
DwiMqr. At praasnt location tea yeara. mbl7
AUCTION ^ ALES.
TO-MtlKKOW. "
^ALK OF VERY VALUABLE T H REE-STORY-AN D
0 BASEMENT BUCK RESIDENCF. No. 300
MASSACHUSE 1 T8 AVENUE NORTHEAST
We will mil on MONDAY AFTEhNOON. MARCH
THIRI Y"-F1RST, 18WL AT H ALF PAST FOUR
O'CLOCK, in front of th* prst, uses the folio" ;us
described rroperty, kucwn u 1, t No ?. in F-nima It.'
Lut a MtaivWon of |?rt of orunnal lot ?? In
squar- 7M1. together villi the improvementa. which
cousist of a plhitf-itorr-uid'bu?bi*iit Brick Resi
dence, containing Dinf roosia, with all the iuo>iern im
provements, Na iioo Massachusetts avenue iiorth*w#L
Terms aiinounced at sale. All * ??? veysnciii* inAi*
eordinz at purchaser's cost. Two huudred dollars
deposit required at the time of sale.
iiAitUHl, D.uut k CO.. Auctioneers.
m-O-dts
rr-ABOVF. BALE POSTPONED TO WEDNESDAY.
AlKIL sECON D. at aam- hour. 11
J ALTER B. WILLIAMS A CO, Auctioneers.
ENTIRE STOCK OF GROCERIES IN STORE NO
toll P SI RF FT NOR IHW EST. CONSISTING OF
TEAS, COFFEES. CANNED GOODS. SPICES,
8YRIPS, VINEGAR, CIGARS, TOBACCO. ?'li.
CAN. SCALES. CHI ESI SAFE,Ct>FFEE MUX,
BUlVHFRs SCALE AND lOol.S. Ml KI.R
Pl.ATED sHOA CASES. ON* DESK, T11IKTY
FOOT AWNING,G<>ol> AS NEW
On MONDAY, MARCH THW* l'Y-ONF, 1K<?0. at
TEN O'CLOCK, in store So SOI Psireet northwest,
we will sell Uir above well assorted stock without rw
serve
Terms cash.
in2T-.lt WALTER B. WILLIAMS A CO.. Aucts,
nr-CONTINI'ATION OF THF ABOVE. SALE OH
WEDNESDAY MOBMNG, APRIL SECOND. same
hour an<l place.
iT alter b. Williams a co.. au.
w
STOCK AND FIXTURES OF A CONFECTIONERY
AND DINING ROOM, Sl'CH AS iHUILS.
TABLF s. RITCHi;N VltNMl.t, Nil KEl.
FLaTED RHoW CASI-S, CANlilEs AN1> .IAh>.
BAKER'S PANS, TABLF l l 1LERY AND N1
MEROls 011'F R AR 1 M'LFS.
On W IDNESDAY MORNING, APRIL SECOND,
1 ?<?0, AT TEN O'C'IXX'K. ?< will "ell in store N
?130 O street northwest the above ato?-k without re
serve. WALTER B. WILLIAMS A CO..
i!i:ll-2t Auctiotieers._
JpHOMAS DoW'LING, Au< tlou?r.
ONE 8UPERB KNABF PARLOR GRAND IN PER
FECT ORDER. WII H COVER \N1? STOOL. I'AR
l.oR URN1TI Rl IN SEPARATE PIF.i IN
FANCY CHAIRS. WINDOW HANGINGS. BKUS
SI LSCARPET* MADE IN Till FORM OF RUoS.
BRUSSELS S'TAlIt AND MALI CARPUS. IN
GRAIN ART SOUARES, WALNUT FMhiK i vsE.
HALL TABLE AND KA( K. PIC H RES, SfPE
KIOR WALNl'T M. T. CHAMB1R si T, [ HUM
PIECES; CARVED OAK CHAMBER SET. WITH
F'RENCH-l LATE M1KROK: FINE 11AIK MM
TRESSES. FEATHER PILLOWS ANI? BOL
STERS, WIR1. SPRINGS, BEDDING. TOILET
WARI. TABLE LINEN. WILCOX k GIBBS
MACHINE, WALNL'T WORK CABINET. COM
l.oUE, VERY HANDSOME OVKjDlN ING BOOM
Sl.T (CONSISTING OF HANDsOVU OVRVr'D
MlRRoR-HAiU SIDEBOARD. EXTENSION 1\.
BI E AND SIX LEA I HER-COVERE1' ? HAIRS I,
SILVER-PLATED AND GLASS WARE. HAND
SOME DECORATED l'l N N I- R AN1> TF \
SF.IJN ICl . DECORATED FBI IT CAKE PI.ATKH.
JAPANESE W \RE.fcc.; KITCHEN liF.gl Isl'l I S.
On WEDNESDAY MORNING. AIRIL SECOND.
1S1M1, roiuinennnK at TI.N (VcLCtcK. I ahall a?-il at
The reHldence of Mr. Ounuey A l'eaixui (who la it?
eliniu,- honaekeejiintri. No. 1 j'.'S o atr- at uorthmeat, a
HUi't'nor toileolioii ui Household FRfCtn
in','t?-:tt THOMAS DOWLINO. Auct.
ri ri hi: ?ti\
rpHOMAS DOW LING, Aurtlouoer.
VAl.lABLF. CSIMPKOVED I/ITS OX CAI.I.AN. K
AND G STRi.EIS NOE1HEAS1 AT I'lHI.IC
AUCTION TO CLOSE 1UE AFFAIRS UE A
SYNDICATE.
On MONDAY. APRIL FOl'RTEENTH, l?l>a at
HALF-PAST FOUR O'( LOCK P.M . iu Jront of the
ureniiaos, I will sell I/)ta :M5 *?> 4W, lucluaive. and the
E?tl Feet of Lot :>j in Caih-n's nub of S'|ii?re Ki'i.
Iro'.itiuif about '_'o Joet each on north aide ot Callan
atreet by a d.-)Hi uf feel lo an alley l'J feet wide;
water iuai:i la.d.
Immediately after
Lots M to 1", inrlu?l\e. iu Mire * ;uare. each fronting
t!0 feet on K >tre*-t l>et?een llth and Tth utreeta north
east by a depth ot 1(10 f* el to Callan street.
Immediately after I
lots 104 to li:i, iti Kelly i. Curnder., trustees', tub
of fart . f miuare S.">!?, lrommir 1.? feet ti lurbeaefc h
on north Ml!'- of G str.-et. between ?ith and t III
,stree!? northeast, by All av^raiie d< i<th of 100 l?et to
au alley.
Term*: One-third cash; balance in one and two
jvars, ith interest, and ae?-iire<i l?> a deed of trust *?l*
the pro|?erty, or all cash. II.- r*i:u* and eonve\ an
lUK at cost ot purchaser. A deiooit ot $ >0 will be re -
nuired on each I'lf-i.-e at time of sale. T itle iriswl or no
ile. THOMAS DviWElNG.
ai>l-d.';.i< Auctioneer.
R
AlCLIU'E, VKHli i O..Am tioneer?,
ir^O 1-enijFyivaui* ave. n.w.
PEREMPTORY SALF. OF VALUABLE BfSINrKS
PR< ll'ERTY, No. 3:S'J PENNSYLVANIA A YEN Ik
NORTHWEST.
Also.
THREE-STORY CRICK AND FRAME BACK BI'ILD
iNG, No. 4os Maryland avenue solth
WLST, TO CLOSE AN F.sTATE,
AT AUCTION.
On TIll'RSDAY AFTERNOON. MARCH TWENTY
SEVENTH. AT HALF PAST 1 OUR O'CLOCK, ?e
will oiler for ?ale iu front oi the premises
LOT '-'a. RESERVATION A.
Improved by a Two-story F rimf and lirick Stable in
lear No. liil'J Pennsylvania avenue northwest.
Also,
AT FIVE O'CLOCK, >AME AFTERNOON,
We will ofier for sale iu front of the premises
LOT O, SQUARE 4?-'.
Improved bv a Three-story Brick and F'rame Back
Buildinir. No. 40S Maryland avenue soutliKest.
Terms: oue-thirdcash. lialanre in ?> and IV months.
C per cent, secured by deed of trust on proi?-rty sold,
or all cash, at option ol purciiaaer. If terms of sale
are not complied with in 10 davs rl^'ht reserve*! to re
sell the proierty at the risk and cost of the defaulting
purchaser after live davs' advertisement in some ie-ws
psper published in W ashi'ufton. D C. A deisjsit of
$','0C required upon each pie. e of property at time of
sale. Ail couvtri anoint-, kc. at cost of the purchaser.
RATCLIFFE. DARK a. Co.,
m'JOdkds Auctioneers
CiV-THE ABOVE SALE IS POSTPONED ON AC- 1
count ?>t the rain until MONDAY, T'HIRTY-FIRST
DAY OF" MARoH, same hoiiri- and places.
RAXCL1F EE, DARR A CO..
m28-d Ads Auctioneers.
Sr-THF. ABOVE SALES AP.F. FURTHER POST
ponedon account of the weather until THURSDAY,
THlttD DAY OF' APRIL, ?aui>- hour* aud places.
RATCLIF EE, DAiiR A CO.,
al-dAds Auc tioneers.
ATCLU FE, DARR A CO.. Auctioneers,
1VJ0 Pennsylvania sve. n.w.
TRUSTEES' SALE OF VALUABLE BUILDING
LOTS ON SEVEN 1H STREET BETWLEN G
AND I STREETS SOUTHEAST.
By virtue of a deed of trust duly recorded in I.iber
l:t ,s. folio 4'J 1 et. se<j.,ciiie of the land records for the
District ot Columbia, we ?dl sell at public auction, lu
front of the premises, on MONDAY. THE FOCR
TEfcNTH DAY OF APRIL. 1SO0, AT FIVE
o c loci; I-. m
Parts o: oriiriual Lots nundjered forty-one <411 and
forty-1 vi o <4*J> in square uumt>ered eurht hundre.1 and
seveiity-eitrlit <STH?. l*aiunui(f lor the saioe at tin
s uthwestern corner of said 1 ot numbered forty-one
(41). the lice runniiur north nlon?r the line of the pub
lic alley forty -sir. (40) feet aud Uiree (II) inches. thence
east oue hiindrid and thirty-two (133) feet and
four and one-half (4m inches; thence south
forty-six (4(i)ieet and three Inches, theno wist ? ne
hundred anil thirty-two ildllifeet and lour and oue
hall (4Si) niches to the place of l<e?riuni!i?r. together
with all and sinp'ular the improvements, rights, Ac., to
the same belon.iUKor in any wise appertaining.
Terms: One-third cash, balance six and twelve
luou i lis; <j per cent; securod by dc?-d o'l trust on
property so!d: or ail caah. at option of purchaser, if
terms of sale are not complied with iu fifteen days the
trustees reserve the ruhi to resell the property at
the risk aud cost of thedeiauliintr purchaser, after live \
days'advertisement in some ncwsiaper published iu
Washington. D.C. A deposit ol $1(10 upon acceptance
of bid. All conveyancing. at o st of ptinchaaer.
"-EE.. x
li
Ml< HAEL l WELI.
apl-dAds GEORGE R. Rr.PET'l 1,
Truetoea.
D
UXCANSON BROS.. Auctioneers.
VALUABLE UNIMPROVED PROPERTY OV M
blREET BETWEEN TWENTY-SECOND AND
TWENTY-THIRD STREET'S SOKTHViErT.
. ON MONDAY, MARCH THIRTY-FIRST. AT FIVE
O'CLOCK P.M.. we will sell in trout of the premises,
at public auction.
PART OF LOT IN SQUARE 50,
frontier 114 leet ti inches on the north slue of M street
bv a depth of 100 leet to an alley.
No section of the city has more rapidly improved
than this in the lust few years.
Terms: oue-tlurd ot the purchase money in cash;
balance in one and two }ear*. with Interest at ?i per
cent per annuu:, payable semi-annually, and secured
by deed of trust on the proparty.or all cash, at option
of the purchaser. A deistsil of ^lOOwill be required
of the purchaser at the time of sale. Terms of sale to
be complied with in hfteen days.
xu&i-d&da DUNCAN SON BROS., Auctioneers.
fir-THE ABOVE SALE IS PO-TPONED ON AC
count ol the inclemency of the weather uutil THURS
DAY. APRIL THIRD. 1 SilO, AT SAME H 'UR AND
PLACE. lull 1 -dials
ritUOMAh DuWLlNO. Anctioueir.
EXECUTORS' SALE OF VAI.l'ABLF REAL ES
TATE IN* ThE CITY OE WASHINGTON.
Tlie tuidersm'ti^il, exe?*iitors of the last will slid tes.
taiuentof Leviu X. Powell, deceastdL will s-11 st pule
he auction U|K>U the premises oil 1HI ilSDAY THF1
TENTH OF Al'lilL A1 HALF PAST "1 HHEE KM .
that paivei of real estate known as Lot numl>ered For
ty-one i41> in mlslivision of reservation uuiul>eied
tcuilOin the city ol Washington, havint; a trout on
the ?est side of I'sl street between 1 en ua> lv aula ave
nue anil C street of twenty-five (V5> feet and running
oack with that w idth lo au alley twelve (12i feet wide
This proi^erty is improved by a three story brick
dwelling house, and is in every way very desirsble.
Terms of sale cash. CHAllLi^S D. DRAKE
WILLIAM B WERU.
m2T-dts Executors of Levin kl. Powell, deceased.
The (treat Syndicate Clothing
COMPANY.
S.E. Cor. 9th and E sts. n.wWashington, D.C.
We lake pleasur< to tuiorui the clothing buyers that
we have been able to secure our buildluir loue enotwh
to dispose of our stoi k uf CloUiiny. and iu order to do
this we will certainly irive you prices lower than ever.
W e invite all to come aud see as, and those who don't
buy themselves will irladly tell their mends * her"
these lisiyaius may be secured:
Mt n's \ ery F iue Dress suits, formerly sold at (18
and ?:;5, lor SO.50 and tl~.U5.
Men's Very Fine Pi luce Alberta, wofth SVo, you may
take at glli..>0.
Fine All-wool Black Cheviot Suits, worth tlo, for
87.00.
A Very Fine All-wool Corkscrew Snit, worth S16-50.
for SW.50.
Fine Ail-wool Businesa Suits that will cost else
where? 1S for *11.yd. ...
Wc hsve severalchea|>er (Trades that ware 910 to Slo
you may take at ?4 and t,. 50.
Men's Fin* Tai.or-iusde Dress Pants that coat to
manufacture ST.50 for 84.75.
Cheaper irrade. worih ao, for SS.37. . ? ,
Men's Working Pants, sold elsewhere at S3.60. for
85c.
Boys' Lour Pacts Suita. from 14 to 18 yeai* foe
Sli-'.-o, ?4. *0.50. S7.75 aud S8 ?0.
Children's knecranta suit*, from 4 to 14 years, for
Sl.ao. SL0a*1.75. S--5V. SSandSA
A very larae assortment of Bcys'_ Odd Knea Pants,
from 4 to 14 years, for itt, 30, 42.
Men's Very rina All-wool spriinf-weirat OvsrcoaU
at S5.50. *5.75, *0 aud S'-87. ...
Now please rememoer our coods are bere .or your
Inspection, and if you pn us s caU we will assure you
you will not leave dlaappointad. as we will seU you our
Koods and save you 75 par cent. Kxpreeslna our sin
moo g.e. con Wth and k ata n.w..Waahlnifton. D.C.
Xn Thomson-Houston Electric
coMPAirr,
WASHlKGTOJi 0X71CK, 1339 V ST.
JdMSs
RAILROADS. ^
THI uKt.it
WXSSVLVAM* ROCTE
_ romsoKm, *m> n. i th* r*r.
DOIBI.E l'KAi'K. KI'llMMl'SdNHll
SlLAl. kAlLic U*uM)'IC?M r.gi 1I MI.XT.
. r..1" E??" M.r.i i 1MM).
?A?HI>UToN >H< M UTATIO*.
COKNt.K 6TH AM) MsTKttl*.AK ?\>I-Ia?* >i
Iw a!*. Il.? W.?t. fbi.w 1 ..u.:tad I VJ.?
ot I ul.iuu N<7"ibnl?d l"ar? at 10 !>???? (Ullti
1U:.V) a.m. <tail> to <oiunit>ua ana *
l^ -.iia. witb Miriiw tar. from fmaiir* to < o
lumbua da>i>. ?u*|<( Haturlai. to ruirar?
wnL sleeptuv < ar Alu?>:i? to<'hn-aar< W. I *??.
M.iC.u; iiiiiau r n r.--* :l <0 I ui daily:
Hu-locCar WaabimrVMi t<> Itarnaburv. um! *i.r,>
lunari Harriabi.rv to M L*>uia, OliuaiM nil
Aluoitnati. aii.I Muta* c?r Harn.bur. to st
Louie. *??tern t x|>re? at . 4?j-m. daily. w.ta
Sleeping Car. Wa?hiatft .u to O\.ra*o an.I Hi.
Louis. imDDk titur daily at HarTi?t.<irw*ithtliro.i?-,
feleeiwra for Louiaviile au-1 Xatnphia. ?V in
It.aa, 10 iKIp.ui daily,for lll'thur* and tl..
?ilii through Sleeper to Pittal.urc. afill.ti.barv
^ALtTKoRE AND POTOMAC KAILKOATt,
For Kafte. Canaudairtaa. lw*u?*i*r aud NiatfaraP*U4
daily. fitT|i >uiikU) . > lo a ui.
For tn?', CaiiaitiWuA aluI li?t n?*t#rdwlr f?<rnjf.
falf and Niagara tail) .i-toe* t saturda>.lo-uop
with Hl?*p:iNr i ar ** aat.. ton lo Iuk u?eter.
For H illiamapoii. Loot lia^a aud L uuiraal 10 ol
a.m. dally. except Sun *a)
For VMlliamaport daily, .i Jo p m.
Foil 1 itlLW'l 1J lilA, M * i V'KK AND TIIT F.\*T.
7JM, t? IHk 11 m> and 11 40 a.ui., V U\ 3 l.s
4:10, Ii? lid an 1 11 ,0 | m. *?n MUkI^.I* t?k
11 40 a.m., V 10. A. I.V, 4 10, Hi ??U and II vd
ui. Limit?M IlIITYM of liiiati.au l'ar? r i ar%
40 a m dailr, nKYpt Suiklft), aud 4 00 p ua
tiaiiy mill IhbIiik ? ar
>???. I ttlt \I'KI1HU ONLY
Fipt i.ijtow > it? a.iu. *i ?-a day*and b lOp.m AadV
Aown. i. (lit | .H . dal>.
For bo* too ?it inn.i ckauarv. 51:1.? p ra. every ?liir.
I'or lh\?&l|u, N V . a*1 Uironch trains c<?Uiia4 al
Jtrary city rniih boata of hrt?iAl>n \rtie*. aflor>
in* dirtti tnarfrr U? tuitou ?lrnH, au .uili#
tit?.01** irrr:.wT a> n*a? Nc? fcoifc City.
For At. an uo City. ll:4oa.tu. ll:V0i n.
dail>.
For Lut;inor?. 6 .TS^ ~ S;10. K.ou. v 40. in H
ll:i?uuud 11 4.1 a.iu . U :o4. V 10. a .
4 1K?, 4:Hl, 4:^0, -4 :4*?. 1? OU, 4o.S:lO, lM:?Hf
and 11 .*U |> m ? n suuda>,w tni, v.i.
11 4U a.Hi., 10, .* i. . .t .Ml, 4 mi, 4 10,0 i?*A
? r4i>% lo ahj aud 11:2U | .in.
For 1 %?!??? a t m k ;..ua, I .'U a.au. and 4 40 | m daO|r,
cicf|*t Sunday
For Antkai-oha, 7 '.'0.1 00 a.m., 1% 0.'?aud 4 '.'dr.iu.
dail), suu^iay. Sunday s i? OO a.a.. 4 1J
p.uu
w \shin .1 >x -onK. I;\
IN EFFECT WW * .i 1M* '
For Altxi&uruk 4 do. *i ;i.*?, T 4\b 40, W 4.V, lO.'-T
a.iii^ 1"J 1-4 nuusi. ? v?.?. 4 4 i?. 0 ol,
lu o.>ai d 11 :i; ill. i'L >un.ia? ai4
7 4i. l? 4d? 10.J7 tin.. ~ 'o(\ O.Ui. o U? aud
lO :Uj J*.III.
Arci n.u xiat.t.ti for Vuantiro, 7 4'? a.to. aud 4
| .Ui ?^kuk>?. 7 4o a lu 8ui.d:?>a
For l.ionun :.d a:id lif htiuib. 4 -vO, 1U .?'?7 a.tu an I
4 1.? i'.ui. daily* A? coinniodaUA. u 4 05 r in. ?w?4
in?
Trvini* leave Alexandria for aalnnirtoii. 6 O.V 7 0s
h OU, l?-.let. liv la*. 11 A>~4 a.u 1 -u. d o??. i.s
0 .lO, 7 :Oo, JO lO .d'Jaud 11 uj y. in Min
dly at \* lo iind 1107 a.iu.. ~ .i U ?> Ilk
"t .no, *J '-U and 10: Sp.Bi
I and ni!ornutUc?n at tlie oftoi, iiorttKaat?N>r
r? r ol latii atrert and rn:u>\luuu a\* rue. and 4
tli* atatiutt, a In rv oidrra t an u- .?it u-r tn?* i li<\ k.uf
UKKaif** to d?'?tmauoiA lioia liol?ia aud ivaid* u> ? ?.
I'll A*. K. 1U (ill. J. 11. V%IH*1?,
Uvutral Maua?f??. finliitl OrB liaa Aa^uL
RlCHMi?ND AM) HAN\ ILLK fti\lLKOU? i ll.
M?fl(vt MAliv M I^jH)
S i?0 a.iu ?I n?t h iiniisk* Mui, da;ly !i?r W?rr?"v.
ton. i*ordi?tiHViU^ i liar lot llff. l.yucli^?nr a.< 1
MUtionabelin ? n Al^iandria mi t l.> u< Lbuu- lw.*au<>k ^
Atlasita. H tat *1. Knoinlte.<'kiattM<n?aai)j Mrini L.i
1 uiiiuai. >it?i ??: ..- mrton t?i hm.MtA
II -'4 a.m. likt Mud 'Uii> tor Cui|H>|iar. Thar
lott**?\illo. Muti'im ? It* and oliiu K ita,
LFDchbnty, h>>? M? ui.t. i?au%ill?t and stalivmp
tw<**ti Lju. Lbtitv and I%?ir(Ue,Omin?liutv', ha., ur'i,
Aaht .di . Cliarloit**, ? ?>iuiub a. Auoiala, Atlanta.
15:rn.in?rtiuin, M??uUfoin?r>, New ??rl?an?. T* iaaa' t
I Gallioruia. l'ullinati !?k|*r N? \ rk to Atlanta
an>l l'uliuiau Atlautt to N?t? i?rl?au?. I'uil
luan Klefpei l>au?ill(* to i oluiulna ax.d Auiruata. I
, tnau Sle?*|H5r* W^biutfton to t ini lutiati * la l. aud JL
Kout?.
p.m.?Dailf. norpt Sninlajr, for Bfanaaaa^
Straitburir aud mtermed:au- atatiooa.
d IiO p.m.?Dail) via Lvn?*Ln..iv. Hri?t?>l and <'hal
tan"orfa. l*ulluuu \<?tibulf Kltwjnara Wiahinvtuii m
M? T!.i 1:.-v. t v j.n t . . t.t . . . 1. - jai. j v.
11 :'Jo i .in.?V?i?ttn. Eii rma da.lv for Mawaawa^
Cl.arl?'tt*-avuie, Staunton, LuillfVtllf, CluciSDatv.
j \?nlib\ll? train Haalni.wtvt *.
v?itli a I'ullfnan aiMfirr 2or Luuitville.
11 tK) ixni.~8*.utli? rn Ei|>r?*M da.ix ;or Ln bbuiv.
Diuitillf, ftul? rU, a -??. \.. i ?? i'barlotta, ? ? .ut.'??a,
An^uHta, Atiautn. Monumu.* r>. N? wori"an*. r>
and t'aliP'rnio. htlinuui \ ^tif<alr i'?r ^aabmit> urn
Nt'Wl?rl'?li?\ll At.?! >
S;-* !*'' Wa-!,i. . ? \ ria I . ?
ai.'l '""rv.u l*acitn railway. an<l Pullman bl?**i?:
urtoo t., %?be\iU<* aud Hot S|>nnaa. N < via
8ali<*bur^ . Alao Waaiunartou to AuiruaLa Tta i?an . ill-*
and Charlotte.
1 raiao W an hi nsrXou and Ohio divlaion l^ar.? \N aaU
l&irtou 0:*H> a.m. dai;y fio'pt sunday an-4 4 4 ? p.m.
tiaily. arrive Kouu l llill 11:30 a.ni and ^ .'O p.ui
return.nir l<?a\?- ltound Hill 0 * HI a in. daily and l'J *.'?
p m. dally eicept Sunday. arriMUtf VVa?loiiirt>*u s .m
a.m. and l\ :t ."? I'.ui.
Ihr iurb traina irom the* aouth via Tharl tU, l?ac
\illo and L\n< hburv ani\?-in dav.itnMoi. . o.; am
and 7 1(1 tvlti.; via last lcnneaa*^. brla'ol aud
J-> n< hbur?r at 2:110 |vut aud !? ?<? p.ui. . via ? b?aa
pr-ake and ' ?hn? r??ut?* aud CUarlotleffville at ? 4s p in,
and 7:10 p.m. and 7 :0da.m. htrai*bw:yr 1 n-a! at Iti 4 7
Ju.
Hrkrti alot i lmr rar iviMvatloa and trnformatt?
fnmi?tb<*d. and UiK<a?rerliei-k*-d at ? ttt?*e. l.vOO ivon
ay lv an la a v?*. and at 1'aaMei^r atatiou, l'eu:.a> iovii
i railroad. Otli and U ata.
mill J AS. L.. TAYI?Ki. Oen. I i^i A*r st
Baltimore Am? Ohio 1{mi.hoad.
hchtM!ule in ?? fleet lumber *Jn, 1 bHR
Lcav ^aalimyion lroui atatiou ivmur oX Nt* J -rwf
_ avenue and C atreet.
For Cblcaffo and Northewt. \?Mitibul#d Liuutad
einreaa <iail> 11 -Jtt a m . ex^rtiaa f .iiO p ui
For ein? innati. st. Louu and lLdaanai'o'.ia, eipnMi
daJy. d lo and 11 :io |> ui.
For ilttabur^ and i l?vclaod, V?*t J u!ed Limik>4
e&preaadaiiy ll XOa. in an>. ? xi re?.s ^ 40 p.m.
for lit 11 mrton aud Local biatn>ua t lo d0a.*u.
kor v\ iuv ut*i?-r ami ma> auoiona, to.30y.ni
For Luray, S 4U p.m. daily.
Foe liaiLim??ru, ueek days. 4 00,.?.00, t? 4<\ 7 ?%
8 dU, U -,0, y 4o, il I OU, 12 00, 4a'> inluuifMi a. iu^
\* :00, 1 0 :d0 and 11 :u(j p m.
For \tay sutu r-t. betmeon Wadlnrki and BalU
more, 6 .-OOl t> 40.b :U0 a. im, 1V. 10, d. Jo, 4 t; m
11::ki P.fc Simaaya, fc:3o a-rn.. l .luw d .^o. 4
0:>0. 11 uMtp.ui.
to lo
d ou, 4
'1 ra*n? leave lialtimore for ^ aaluiitf t n. 1
6:10. 0:2U> ti:d4L '? JU. 7 40, b .ou, S JO.
10:15 a.m. : l? :t.?0t l^ lo, I oO, 'J Alt. J
4 1 o, & Oik o 00, 0 ~0, 7.10, V do, S ::u, s ^o, iu .u
10 -io ami 11 00 p.m. bui.day^ t do, ? 4o, s dt4
1^.lo, lo. 10 a.m., 1* 00. l?.0o, 1 On, ?'.lu, 4 1^
6:OU, t.;'U, 7:10, 7 dO. b.dU b dO, 10.V0. lo .3
and 11 :0oi .m.
For AnnapoJia, 0:40 a?id h:.*>0 a.m., l'J:10 and 4
p.m. On Sunday a, b .dO a.in.. 4 . .0 p.m. Lea%e An
nai>olia (5 40 and b .< u.m.a l?:o0 and o.*Ai p.ui,
Sunday a, b d< a.m.. 4 OU p.m.
kor atationa on tne Mt tropolit&u Brunch. 40 4.^
{It*.dO a.m., {1 lu p m. tor prm* lpai aiaiiouaomjr*
11U:30a.m., 14 :dC and tO do p.m.
1-or Ivockville and V\ay Htatmna. ' 4 :top m.
?'?>r OaitLerabuiv and :nteiuieciiato poiula, *0:00u
t in., 11 :uu. *0 30. f 11:d0 p n..
| Fcm* b<yda and inieimcdiuto itationa. t7:00p oa^
I ilO:OU p.m.
Church train lf-av? ? V aahimrton 00 bumlajr at 1 1 <|
p.m., atopi iuk at all r?ut:on*?on M^;rop???na!i i>raaicU.
For Frederick, tU 4*\ Yli:.ua.m., td 10. 1* **j k
m. Sunday a, 1 :1 (riuiu.
For limterttovtu. tl 1 '.'Oa.ra. and lO .'H) p.m.
Inttuaurnve irom Chicairo daily 11 to a.m. an*
4 Uo I'.Iti.. truUi < llii.iut.ati ?ua M. l.ir,u? lUU) ? ? * ??
a.111. aii<i l.>ioy.iu.; IcuiiiItttaUurif 7.10 aiu. o.jO
| p.ui. dailv
j .St.V? loliK ANI? I IIIl.AUt IJ HIA DiriSIUX.
lor Jit a \ork. In-utotu >' ?^rk ami tu. f
I 3.. "4 .00. tb.uu, *i< -'O. *1V .<JUa.ui. ?- :tv. *4 -'.I au4
1 * JO :.*U p. in. i'ar.ir <?in on all >iii) iraiu^
blecl'iii^ car on tli?-10 .tu l ui , ? |m u al U i*i p i..
kor ltiiadni Lia, Nr.ark, Willi..ualoii andCl.ctor.
"4.UU, 1:OU. O.-'U,-l^.OU ail.. *_.ju "4 ^u.*7.1tf
IXd *i 0 :iJ0 p.m.
lot niu ni.ciliatp lirt?<m L,*!liii'or?aii'l J'uU
?ovl|'i.i?, t.).un atu U -'u a. lu? "l - i.u, i:t li>,.iu.
iiaiiia tra\? Nt? lurk tor Maaliiiia-u(i. ^ M
111 :UU a.m.. *-:uU ?iiOO i> ui. ativl 'i.'O
UWbU
'Iiaiiia leave I'b>iadel|>LiA lor Uaalniiiri u ?4 401
, 'h." 11 lua.ui., 11 "4 4.1. *0 *i?*. 40 i-.m.
1-ur Atluutic City *4 :OU a.?i. uuil 'i'.':UU m >ua
<la>> 4 <JU a ui and 1^ ;uu boou.
1t.xc-iJt bun da). *l?ailjr. iSntidayonlir.
lJa^?ia*re railed lor aiid ctie<-k<*d froni li...< i. -1. ' ?*?
?dt-iict-a Ui I'uiou 'J ranaior Co. on order, lettai uuafll
ullicck, tilU ui:d lajl l a. aw. and si
i. X UbhLX, LhAs U. M I'LU
d:i0 <??-u Manatre-\ Ocu. I'm Airt.
POTOMAC R1VEK BOATS.
pUIOMAC TLAKblVKTATlON C<jMi AXl.
l-'or Baltimore and IUv.-r landing* Steam- r St'li,
Capt. UMKlievau. leave. M< i iieiiM>u'. * ii .rf ewry
Sunday al A o'clock l.iu. >ur lurtlicr uili-ruiilml
apply to
M'?J?ll?.\s<)X k UltO..
tnbK-Cm N?v.l.Ul hlfiat UlMl
fllo NUKtVI.K AMD rtiK'i MM. J.
X iuk fonLAK lion k
i HE OUil'AVualiL s ll.Alit-.il liw >(UiE LF.AKT.
SfJ.l.l?l. Mil. COMt-XIk'l AUUL
AinVllitiui uta ftrht. laMi. Tabic uu? xc iied. Stat,
room, larire. >u.t. >rtaul** and t.eated L) utecui. 1'oLI.
aud attentive ottkeera. i liorouirli diacltiluie.
J-ivui 7th-atreet aiaarl MoNDaIb. WtlOCSDAVI
and 11UUA1S at 0 i>.ni.
1 lie only Meaiuer landing at lioatoti . ..art, Norloia
and Uie only line lu.ntur eacluaivi?< onne. ti,.u *nu
BOsloN A.NU 1-Uiiv lilt Ni 1. MUHtiis.
Cotuiiieuciiiir M AKCM 1. lMiu, tbc tare to Nvrluifc
and old fi-mt will be aa tolloaa:
HKsT-tLAss fi.
ktn .ND THIP ?.i.
HMXiMD-CLASBtl.tfa tACH ?AI.
Ticket, aiul room* at til9 and 1 X*11 feuuaylvanlt
ave ; Mawley'a. llltb and F u.w.. aud fcnox'a l.t| r-?a,
a bo will check Lajnratrt Iron, bolela and idta!* Mil'
dencea. 'lelepbonc No. 74M
nl?_ _? M. K Wt-U H. Supt. and Gen Kfi.
VOHFOI.K, FoKTHtsH MOMtOK A>il> THI
Sioiitb.^Wi* <1.50 On ana alter Mo\UAY. No
vember IK. 1K?M, SK-ainer l*d> ol tbeLak., liaviuir
been repaired and neal> lurnianed, mill leave sixth,
atreet wbarf. terniinna 7tii aud Wtb at roe t ? ara, at i
p.ui. 'lueaday, Iburaday and suudav. iU-tuiuin*,
leave C'ljde'a ?liai1. .Vortolk. loot Madiaon at. <Jl-.a?
? onuectiona tor N<? York, llilladelpfcia au<l No riband
South, lor atate roolua aud lutortnaUou rarmdiiiy
iriirbt call at V> bart ?r lelei-houe Call ?4. Ala-j Ik
auo 0.1 irkel ottteM. 01k? and i;?jl Hi ave? and Ha?
?e>'a Kti-n-M INLANll A Ml blAbOAhu OOA11?
ISO OoMtAtiV. ulto
rniOLXl VEUNOX
STEAMER W. W CORCORAX.
Oapt. L. L blake. leave. 7th-.t. wliart daily uir^t
Suiida) i tor Mount Vernon, leaving at lOa.uu, h-^A*
in* Uaaliiimu ii about J<? p.ui.
1-arr, round inp, <1. ilit ludma artrnaaiop to ynun^i
ar il imiiitI'H Mil
IM>R FOTOMAC KIVEU LAMJIXuH.
1 NEW lHuN HltAMLlt "WAKEt 1ELI>"
l>av?> 7 lb -at. wbarf on MOMJAlfc, lillHtiDAYf
uij SATl KUAl s at 7 a.m. Ueturiiiu, Tl tabAVN
KKIDaYH aud Hi KDAlt p.ui.. toocblti* at Hner
Laudimra aa taraa Xiiuiiui < l.ek.\a., st < w-uienu ilay
and Leonardlovu. Md. Conuarta with H and o it K at
Uhepberda See ached ui* JU11.V V. lAlAll'llti|V
C. ?. RIDLEY, tUiuwr. >jk>
GENTLEMEN'S GOODS^
Merchant Taiixjaino,
FALL AMD WINTER. '89 *90.
Oar own Importation, now nodnl, and |M
ar. lavlud to inapect at the w.11 -known
" H. D. BARE.
IMPORTING TAILOR.
Mil 1111
SPECIALTIES.
DM. HAYWARD. HMtCIALUrr

xml | txt