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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 24, 1891, Image 12

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MR. REED ON CLOTURE
The Speaker of the House on Ob
structing Legislation.
IN THE HOUSE OF COMMONS.
When Cloture Utile M Flrwt Adopted and
the Mramrn Whlrh UH to It?How Proper
Motion* Nullify a Legislative Body?
Memorable Scenes (n theHouseof Common*.
Written for The Evsnin* Sfar. (Copyrighted.
CUTILIZED MANKIND IS SO CLOSELY
J hound together. so united in thought and
fueling, thvt whatever is happening of human
progress in one region is quite likely to be hap
pening in another. Each condition of human
ity being a natural evolution from the last it is
fairly to be expected that those who have taken
the first step should also take the second.
Hence, widely separated countries having
reached neeirlv the samo level of intelligence
?eem almost independently of each oth'-r to lie
undergoing the stme changes. A careful re
view of the leiislative bodies of this country
and of the -vorld shows a repetition of the same
difficulties and everywhere the same applica
tion of remedies. That Ohio and Kentucky,
New York and Tennessee. Massachusetts and
Virginia, although controlled by different par
ties and representing somewhat different modes
of thought, should have the same obstructions
to their legislative work and meet the obstruction !
of refusal to vote in the same way by the i
method of counting those present to make np a
constitutional bodv is not perhaps to be so
mnoh wond? red at. since these states are com
ponent parts of one nation. Yet the action of
each legislative was so litt!" kr.oirn beyond the
stat<> boundaries and so little heeded within,
that when the same course was taker, elsewhere
members from some of these very states were (
found protesting against what their own friends j
had done at home and of which those friends j
had left a permanent record.
THE SAVE ALL tlTIl TH* WORLD.
A careful review of the parliamentary history |
of the European and North Americnr world j
will show that everywhere except in two small j
countries the same question has be^n agitated j
and discussed ant! received decision. The new j
lnetliod of obstruction now in full tide of sue- ;
<e?'ul experiment in the Senate of the United
States, the method of obstruction by d'bate
so called, is now having a career all over the j
world and will in due time have its remedy. I |
need not say that that remedy will leave real .
debate intact and only exclude that false de
bate which does not even resemble the genuine
article. Mr. Chamberlain's monograph in the
Nineteenth Century forliecember is well worth
reading by an American in order that he may
see in another assembly which is world re
nowned. the sime thing which constantly hap
pens in the bodies which govern his own conn
try. It is but just, however, to say that the
state legislatures are not under the same repro
bation: for. being more under the eye of the
people, fewer abuses have crept in. l'erhaps if
the ( '???(.-. .ui ntuii Krtxml were abolished and the
lif w?j>ai>ers were thereby compelled to give a
fuller account of the doings of the Congress
tome of the evils now existing might abate
themselves.
TEN TKARS AGO B TUT. BOfSE OF COJOfOXS.
So little interest do people take in the modes
and methods of transacting legislative business
that probably not one in twenty has any knowl
edge of some remarkable scenes which took |
place in the Uritisii house of commons ten .
years ago. which scenes illustrate the way in ]
which motions which are in themselves proper
and suitable may be used as effectively as if
thev were a regiment of infantry under com
mand of a tyrant to nullify and destroy a legis
lative body. They show also that the resources j
of the body are powerful enough to sweep j
them awav if exercised with vigor and courage. (
Of course the measures taken to bring the bill j
in question to a successful result have all the !
hesitancv which mark a novel essay, but are in- ;
structive in the lessons which they convey. |
Parliament met in lKdl on January 6. and the ;
real commencement of the proceedings to be j
described was when Mr. Stuart ltendel rose to I
move the address in reply to the queen's j
h. The bill finally passed was the Dill for ;
Eroteetion of person and property in Ire- j
which was the preliminary to the solution
which Mr. Gladstone was then offering of the
Irish question.
DEBATE FOB ET.ETE* SIGHTS.
The debate on the address lasted eleven
nights and was almost entirely devoted
to the affairs of Ireland and the measure j
to be proposed. The debate on the address |
ended cn the 20th of January, and on the 24th I
Mr. Gladstone said regretfully that they had
only reached what would usually be the j
third day's business of the session.
On that day a motion was made for j
leave to bring in the biU. which j
motion was debated for one right As it was s
very apparent from tins first debate that much
time was going to he consumed and many hours
wasted. Mr. Gladstone, on Tuesday, the 25th,
arose and submitted a motion that the bill
should have precedence over all orders of the
day and notices of motions. Such a motion
when adopted would give to the bill the right
of war and deprive members of their right to
initiate legislation. Debate on the motion im
mediately commenced. After it had continued
for five or six hours Mr. Biggar persisted in a
course of debate which was out of order, and
after repeated warnings was named by the
speaker and srimmar-.lv suspended for the re
mainder of the day s session. Then the Irish j
members proceeded to repeated motions to ad- |
joum the debate and for the adjournment of |
the house, alternating them in such fashion j
that they could ail speak again and again. When j
the usual time came for adjournment Mr. Glad- ,
stone gave notice that the government would I
resist all motions to adjourn or to adjourn j
the debate, which meant that the house most |
?it it out and the contest became one of pliysi
eal endurance. Sir Stafford Northcote aud the
tories supported Mr. Gladstone.
COMPROMISE PROPOSED.
About 6 o'clock Wednesday morning a compro
mise was proposed that the debate on the motion
for precedence should be finished Wednesday
and the biU itself should not be proceeded with
until Thr.nnlay. Thiscompromise was rejected
and the alternation recommenced of discussion |
on the motion itself on adjournment of debate
and on adjournment of the house. In England
both these latter motions are debatable and to
any length, or at least then were. At about 6
o'clock m the morning Wednesday, tne speaker
being exhausted. Mr. I'layfair. chairman of
ways and means, took the chair as deputy
speaker and the dreary struggle went on. At
12 o clock noon Mr. l'arnell appeared and pro
posed that a division should be taken, which
involved the decision of the motion for prece
dence on condition that the government sliould
not take up the coercion bill until Thursday.
This, it will be remembered, was the com
promise rejected at 1 o'clock in the morning.
Mr. Gladstone continued to reject the arrange
ment proposed, but pointed out that the pres- j
aut session having already been prolonged be- j
yond the appointed beginning of Wednesday's j
session. Wednesday s session was no longer pos- |
sible and the bill could not by anv means be
taken up until Thursday. After "two Lours more
of debate the motion was put and precedence
was given to the bill, and on Thursday. January
Iff, was begun the second night s debate on the
?lotion for leave to bring in the bill. The last
engagement had been rather a drawn battle,
for while the opposition had carried the
second night's debate on the bill over
to Thursday the government had cot yielded,
and twenty-two consecutive hours had been
consumed in the session before the government
motion could be carried. Sir Stafford North
cote expressed the hope that the debate on
leave to bring in the bill might be ended on the
secoud night- Sir Stafford was quite too san
guine. '1 he second night paaned and also the
third. Mr. Gladstone's pleading that the debate
should then come to an end was entirely in
vain and the debate was adjourned until Mon
day, the 31st of January.
THE MOST PROLONGED STBCOOLX.
At 430 in the after noon of that day
began the most prolonged struggle which
had ever been known in the house of
commons, at least in modern times. The
combatants were the liberal and tory par
ties combtued against a handful of Irish mem
bers, hardly exceeding at any time fifty in
number and seldom showing in the divisions
more than thirtv-five votes. I should perhaps
have remarked tliat at this time the previous
question, or as it l:a? been of late the custom
to call it the cloture or motion to close debate,
was entirelv unknown, ihere was in theorv no
limitation to debate, although in practice there
fr-.i hitherto been nianv arising from a sound
public opinion and an houest unwillingness to
merifice public business to private feeling.
There being no previous question it was
thought when this night s work began that
there was no method of stopping debate ex
cept by physically exhausting the opposition.
While some use was made of amendments, to
waste time, the mam reliance was upon the
U> feijoarn the debate and the mo
tion to adjourn the hmise A< membri
*ould spenk hut once on each question this al
ternation afforded the opposition the chance of
speaking m diiht tim>. a a? tbfl motion# were
renewed, each repetition being a new motion.
Members woold speak upon the main question
and then move to adjourn the debate.
motion irru motios.
After all the time had been exhausted
that could be on that motion a division
would be had and then the motion to
adjourn made and seconded and all the time
that could be wastod on that would in like man
ner be used up- If a member came in fresh
from ttie outside primed with a speech on the
main qnestion, tlien the regular alternation
would be suspended and his spuech delivered.
It trill be seen that each motion was in itself a
proper one to make and debate was in order on
each in conformity with the "prccedenta of
rather more than "a hundred rears." After
about nine hours and at about 1 o'clock Tues
day morning Mr. Gladstone on a motion to
adjourn debate gave notice that the govern
ment proposed to resist the motion. This was
intended and construed as notice that the de
bate must end before the close of the session.
It kept on its monotonous way, however, until
1:10 in the morning, when Mr. Speaker re
tired and the clerk at the table informed the
house of the unavoidable absence of Mr.
Speaker, whereupon the deputy speaker took
the chair and Mr. Set ton took the floor, and
unlimited debate and unlimited motion-mak
ing proceeded. The memljers were cross, nnd
Mr. Ifc puty Speaker had much trouble in keep
ing them in otder and confining them to the
question and did not often meet with success.
suggestions sot followed.
At 1:30 in the afternoon Mr. Speaker reap
peared and resumed the chair against the ob
jections of Mr. Parneil. The debate and the
motions went on very much as before until
about 11 o'clock in the evening, when there
were made some suggestions to the speaker
that the way out of the trouble was to suspend
all the recalcitrant members as being in con
spiracy against order. To these suggestions 1
Mr. Speaker responded somewhat vaguely,
having evidently not mado up his mind
what course to pursue, and called on the
member who liad been speaking to resume.
At 11:35 Mr. Speaker again retired, leaving Mr.
Deputy Speaker in the chair to struggle with
"her majesty's opposition." After midnight
and in the early hours an effort was made to
induce- the deputy speaker to carry out the
somewhat vague ideas of Mr. Speaker, bat he
declined so to do and the wearisome iteration
went on for many hours more, when Mr.
Speaker, refreshed by sleep-, returned at !) j
o'clock in the morning, and, in a vigorous alio- ;
cution. in great contrast with his somewhat
doubtful and unsatisfactory remarks of the
evening before,
rBOCLAIMED THE SOUM) DOCTRINE
that the s: weaker, as representative of the power
of the house, had a right, and it was his duty,
to overrule proceedings, however regular in
form and debate, however sacred in theory,
which stopped the business of the house. After
this adJress. which is a model of its kind, he
refused fu-ther motions and further debate
and put the question on the amendment then
pending and on the main question, which were
b.ith carried. "These proceedings caused great
excitement," says Hansard, "among the mem
bers present, and those who voted in the mi
nority withdrew from the house crying. 'Privi
lege!' ?Privilege!*" That afternoon when the
house met Mr. Labouchere asked the speaker
by what authority he <iid this thing and Mr.
Speaker replied with spirit and dignity: "I
did it upon my own responsibility and from a
sense of duty to the house."
The house had been in continuous session
from 4 o'clock Monday until !#:30 o'clock VVed
nes-lay. The content had lasted forty-one
hours'and a half. After this lesson of the power
of the few over th-. many Mr. Gladstone felt
that the lime had come when unlimited power
of making motions and unlimited right of de
bate should give way to the transaction of pub
lie business with such motions as were really
needed and such debate as was of real value.
Hence on the Thursday following Mr. Glad
stone offered his motion to remedy the evil,
which after amendment took sncn shape that
when the house on motion of a minister of the
crown by a vote of three to one in a house of
300 members voted urgency, the speaker was
put in full control of all the powers of the
Louse for the regulation of business. This mo
tion was carried after one day's debate owing
to the fortuitous circumstance that the hou>?
was able to turn out all the Irish members for
that day.
DILLON AND PARNELL AND OTHERS SUSPENDED.
When Mr. Gladstone arose to present
his motion Mr. Dillon arose also and re
fused to take his seat, whereupon he was
"named" and suspended. Mr. Pnrnell then
moved that Mr. Gladstone, who had resumed,
be no further heard. Whereupon, after a
struggle, Mr. Parnell was named and sus
pended. When the division was had the Irish
members refused to go into the lobby to vote.
Thc v were warned that they must go. Mr.
Fiunigan. while Mr. Gladstone was talking,
again moved that he be no longer heard. Upon
division twenty-eight members refused to go
into the lobby, and being named in a batch
were suspended on one motion. Mr. Balfour
inquired whether as a point of order the sus
pension could be inflicted on more than one
member at a time, but the speaker replied: "It
is a question not of order but of convenience." !
Mr. Gladstone then began again, but Mr.
O'Kelly claimed a right to move that he be
no longer heard, and was duly named and sus
pended. The rame fate awaited Mr.O'Dounell,
Mr. I'owersand Mr. O Sliaughnessy, who. having
refused to lake part in the division,were al-o sus
pended. and Mr. Gladstone at last had the floor
to explain his new rule.
SUGGESTIONS SOT FOLLOWED.
"It is to be understood," again says Hansard,
"that throughout these proceedings the great
est excitement and confusion prevailed." Un
der this new rule thus made the bill went to a
second reading, on which fonr nights were con
sumed in what we should call general debate.
It then was committed to the committee of the
whole, where it was debated and amended for
eight nights, when it was reported to the house
as amended, and considered and amended and
debated there for three nights more, when it
was ordered to be read a third time. Debate
went on for two nights and the much-coiisiil
ered, much-debated bill wa? finally passed,
having occupied the greater part of tiie time of
the house of commons from January ti to Feb
ruary a month and twenty days.
Measures niurh more restrictive than Mr.
Gladstone's cloture have since been adopted
and still others will be required.
Thomas B. Beed.
BITTEK AMI LA 111).
llow the Gentle Housekeeper Can Tell Keal
From False <MT-llaii<l.
((WHERE IS ONE VERY EASY WAY IN
which any housekeeper cau tell if any
grocer sells her oleomargarine for butter," said
Dr. Taylor, the distinguished expert in micro
scopy to a writer for The Star. "Let her
simply take a small scrap of the suspected arti
cle, rub it upon a piece of glass and look through
it at the light. If it is butter the smudge on
the glass will be a smooth blur: otherwise.thcre
| will be light and bright specks and spots all
through it, which are really nothing more nor
less than crystals of beef-fat stearine.
I "How is the housekeeper to tell real lard
from imitation? you ask. Precisely in the same
way. Beal lard on the glass will make a smooth
blue, while the bogus or adulterated article
will show the same sort of stearine crystals.
You will almost invariably find these crystals in
any lard you examine, because thero is very
little real lard made in this couutry. All the
i big manufacturers who producc the article ou
a gigantic scale contested recently before con
! grestiloanlcommittees that they sold adulterated
goods. They even went so fur as to declare
I that cotton seed oil was better for the con
sumers' purposes than the article it pr< tended
] to be. Pun lard is only made by some butchers
in a small way. Whin'you buy that sold under
the name of a great manufacturer you may al
ways be sure that vou are getting a sophisti
cated product. Without taking the trouble to
resort to the gla*?-?nd-smudge test.
"The secret of imitated lard is this: The
manufacturer can buy stearine compressed
from beef (ft for 3 cents a pound; hog fat costs
6 cents. He prefers to use the beef stearine on
this account, and, inasmuch as it is of too
dense a consistency for the purpose of a coun
terfeit, he dilutes it with cotton seed oil, add
{ ing-to the mixture enough real lard to give
i th- requisite flavor.
"So far as the average adult stomach is con
I cerned, the bogus article is about as healthful
> as the real, though it does not serve eqnallv
j well fur cooking purposes, the cotton seed oil
giving out an acrid odor jjnring the process.
| Ko- the average iierson oleomargarine is ns
. digi-stible as butter: bat this certamlv does not
applr to women who are nor sing children, in
asmuch as butter contains all the elements
which are neeessarv to build a human being -
I flesh, bones and all?and the same is very far
from being true of beef fat.
"Lard will keep for a long time, for the
reason that it contains hardly any tissue to de
compose. Butter is a very lOtnpW article in
its mski'-np. conkuning many different fats,
and amoLg them butyrine, which uecomposas
very rm-lily. and by its decomposition pro
daces the raucid flavor so disagreeable in stale
batter."
LISTS OF FOLKS' NAMES
How the Directory of Washington is
Got Together.
FACTS THAT ARE REFUSED.
Some Very Fanny Thin**?The CaDTMwn on
Their Walks Abroad?*Question* They Ask?
What They I>o In Itecalcltrwnt Case*?Fight
ing an Opposition Directory.
Few people have any notion of
the complicated system by which a direc
tory in made," said Mr. Boyd, publisher of the
Washington Directory, to a writer for Tut Stab.
"We publish forty-two out of the 300 directo
ries printed in the United States. Among them
are the Jersey City Directory, the Peterson
(N. J.) Directory, the New York State Business
Directory, the Syracuse Directory, the Oswego
Directory, the Bingliamton Directory, the Har
risburg Directory, the Beading (Pa.) Directory,
the Williarusport Directory, the Philadelphia
BaMncsi Directory, the Philadelphia Elite Di
rectory and the Washington Elito Directory.
I will simply attempt to give you a notion of
the manner in which a Washington Directory
is compiled.
"To begin with, the city of Washington is
laid out upon a map into districts, each of
which is to be covered by a canvasser. For
canvassers we advertise when we are ready to ,
begin our annual work. Out of the applicants,
about twenty of whom are usually old hands,
we select eighty, and these we form into two
classes of forty each, for instruction in the
business of procuring in proper shape the in
formation required. They ore told, in the first
place, that they must exercise the wisest
courtesy in dealing with the people, and they
are taught the best way to put '.lie irjuestions
necessary. 'Who lives in this house? the can
vasser must ask. 'What is his full name?
?Whatis his business?' 'Business address, if you
please?' 'Name ot the firm he is with; if member
,,r the firm?' 'Ha* he any sons?' 'W hat are
their names, their business and their business
address?' 'Do any widow ladies reside here?
?What were the numes of their husbands'?' _
"The canvassers are carefully taught, with
the aid of a blackboard, all these points to be
elicited, and after six days' instruction each
man who shows himself capable is ready to
tackle the section allotted to him and coyer it.
lie is not recognized by name, but is given a
number. Suppose that his number is 23. lie
starts out to uo section 23 with pen and ink
and a little block of long f lips fastened together
at one end. In the first house he comes to he
learns that John W. Smith resides; also that
Mr. Smith is a coal dealer at UK) B street. So
his first slip when made out reads:
???John \Y. Smith, No. 333P streetn.w. Coal,
No. 100 B street.'
"The same process is repeated with every
house he comes to. If there is a vacant lot
note is made of the interval of numbers which
it represents. Supposing that a house is va
cant it is noted as empty, 'lhe slips for vacant
houses are sent around to the real estate agents
having the houses in charge and they are asked
for information as to whether any tenants are
about to occupy the dwellings. If nothing
definite can be learned ill this way we wait
until the last possible moment to give the
houses every clianco to be taken, bo that we
can record the occupants.
f-OVEBINO TH* CITT.
"Sixty canvassers, each covering his own as
signed district, can cover the city pretty rap
idly, you see. They bring in their books of
slips, representing their day's work, at about 5
o'clock each afternoon. The batch brought iu
one afternoon is always examined in the office
during the following (lay. Necessarily, it will
not be complete in all respects as to the ground ;
it covers. Some of the houses i isited will have |
been found vacant, while in toiue the people I
will not be found at home. In the former case !
the real estate agents are applied to at once, i
while in the latter the canvasser is obliged to i
go the very first thing the next morning and
trv to find the occupants in. On the third
day?that is. the day after examination has
been made?the slips are assorted in pigeon
holed boxes, the A s being placed by them
selves, the B's by themselves and so on. Each
afternoon, you understand, the batch of slips
for the day is handed in, examination coming
the next day and sorting the third day.
?'After being sorted, according to the man
ner 1 have described, for the first letter in the
alphabet, the slips are again taken ir. hand and
sorted in pigeon holes for the first two letters?
that is, UiejAh's, the Ac's, and so on. Next,
they are sorteel for three letters?the Abe's, the
Abd's. Ac.? and again and ugain to the fifth
letter and beyond. After this the slips are done
up in packages for each letter. One, for ex
ample, will be marked 'N,' and will contain all
the names under that letter so far started, in
alphabetical order. Of course, more N s from
ail parts of the city are continually coming in,
and as they do so" they are inserted in their
proper places, after sorting, in the *N' package.
When tue package becomes too bulky, a second
package is begun, and so on, labeled 'N 1,' 'N
2 4c.
FINAL BOBTISO.
"Now at last the slips are ready for what is
called the 'final sorting,' which must be done
bv men of the utmost (kill in the business.
They go over the packages and their work,
though so difficult, is simply to arrange all the
slips with unerring alphabetical accuracy, for
I the alphabetical arrangement of a directory
must be absolutely perfect, else it is no good,
t Finally, the strips thus arranged are pasted iu
i order upon long strips of paper and are given
! to the printer in proper lengths for coniposi
I tors''takes.' We keep idl the "takes'made up
I in this way one year for reference. That pile over
j there on these shelves represents the canvass
for the Washington Directory of 1N91. It is in
sured for $4.0(10. If ten of these 'takes' should
! be burned before the publication of our direc
tory we should be obliged to make nn entirely
new canvass of the city, because, you see, the
| names on each 'take,' being merely arranged
alphabetically, come from all parts of the
town. With thirty-five slips in a "take,' there
might be names from every district into which
we have divided the capital. By the way, let
me say that a special type is used for directory
work. We employ s printer to make a directory,
but we have to furnish our own type.
BUSINESS AND WIIH>WS.
"We canvass the businoss offices as well as
| the dwellings, and in this way, getting two
shops for each man, we establish a connection
and make sure of a more accurate and com
plete result. About widows we are more care
ful here in Washington than in directory mak
I ing anywhere else. There is more than one
! reason"for this. More widows with business
! occupations are to bo found in Washington I
than anywhere else in the world. They are !
largely to be found in the departments, and it I
is of use to the government to know where ths i
| relicts of edd soldiers and other persons who |
have served the state arc located. Questions of ,
I pension* may be concerned, or what not. It
, would astonish you to know how many people ,
I lost to the view of their relatives or of lawyers j
anxious to tell them of something to their ad- j
: vantage are traced through the agency of the
i directory me n. We were calle d upon only the
other day to find out what haet become of it >
] woman to whom some property belonged in a
' western city. Though she had myved several j
times and married since we traced her to a I
! little store, over which she dwelt, iu Southeast j
Washington. Her inquiring relative ca:nu in |
here one day last week and said: 'What can I
i do for von? You have found our cousin, and
she will secure the property which is hers.'
I 'One dollar, please,' I replied. That is our
j charge for the service.'
??We are continually being called upon to
j trie " people for some useful purpose. Here
ar M il the directories in the Unite d States on
o\T shelve*, and wo are often uble to accom
I plish much. Lawyers come to us constantly
for information which will enable t'.iem to fol
low up lost individuals, fortunes being not in
frequently at stake. People ask of us where
in tliis country this or that comuioditv is man
ufactured or io be purehiseei. We look over
our directories and tell them whom to address.
Ours is a bureau of information, for which
! usually we charge nothing.
WUEN THET Bcrrsc.
"A funny aspect of the oirectcry business re
lates to the refusal of information by persons
applied to for their names, business. <kc. That
is not an infrequent experience of the can
' vasser. But we have ways of getting around
: such a difficulty. If nothing better is to be
done we print 'refused' in large letters after
! the name in the directory with the address fol
i lowing. Now, nothing conld verv well be more
! objectionable to Mr. Jones, who declines to
give the information desired, than to be adver
tised as registering a declination. To every
one who sees his name in the direotory it con
vey* inevitably the idea that he is trying to
hicU himself or his business for some purpose
presumably not a good one. If a man is hon
est and pays his debts why should he be un
willing that people should know where he lives
and what occupation he is engaged in? There
fore, Mr. Jones is likely to prefer on another
occasion to give the information requested by
the canvassers.
"But, u yon say. it occur that at a house
the name even of"the occupant is refused. In
such a case we must resort to strategy. The
canvasser takes three or four empty envelopes.
with bogus name* on them, and rings the Dell.
He shuffles them over and says to whoever
comes to the door: 'If vou please, does Mr. An
derson lire here?' 'No!' 'Does Mr. Robinson
live here?' 'No!' 'Does Mr. Jonea Uve here?'
Y-yes, sir." -All right!' says the canvasser,
cheerfully, and departs. He has got the point
he wanted. lJut he must make assurance doubly
sure; therefore he waits a while until a grocer s
cart or some such tradesman'8 vehicle drives
up. Ho approaches the driver and savs: 'What
is the name of the man who lives here? 4Jones,
is the reply. That settles it; the man s name is
Jones, beyond possibility of mistake. The can
vas3cr goes to the grocer whose name the cart
gives him and gets the full name of Jones. That
goes dowfi in the directorv. Jones is all there.
with his number and the word 'refused, by
which he is made to advertise his business as not
desirable to make public. So much for Jones.
EXPOSED BY THE DIRECTORY.
"A while ago there was a man, whose name I
will call Suythe, in a suburban tity of New
York state. My canvasser failed to procure any
information at his house. I went myself. His
wife met me at the door and screamed: \>e
don't want our name in the directory. If you
put it in we'll have vou arrested and bnng suit
against you!' I put the name in with 'refused
in big letters. Suit was brought. I was put
on the stand and declared that I was obliged, as
a slave to the public, to give the names and ad
dresses. business and otherwise, of the resi
dents of the city. If I sold a directory which
did not give such information in full I was not
doing my dutv nor carrying out my contract
with those who bought what I sold. I he
plaintiff, on cross-examination, was asked wliv
he did not wish to have his name, Ac., in the
directory. He replied that it was because
juries were selected from the directory. Had
he no other reasons'? N x most certainly not.
'Mr. Smythe," said the cross-examining lawyer,
'were vou not at one time treasurer of the
Blank Insurance Company of Sew York city?'
?Yes. sir. I was.' 'And under what circum
stances did you leave the company?'
"The case ended right there. After making
a few remarks derisive of the methods adopted
by the defense for defeating the prosecution
Mr. Smythe's lawyer said that he and his client
were not there to trifle and that they would
pay the costs cf the suit themselves rather than
bother with any longer, The fact at the bottom
of it all was that Sinythe had stolen !j:fl),000 from
the insurance company when he decamped and
that he had refused information to the canvas
ser because of his desire to seclude himself
from observation and pursuit.
"I will take another sample case of a roan in
New York who, embarrassed little short of
criminallv, flits toYonkers. He leaves no trace
behind, but tl.e week after his arrival at his
new location the Yonkers directory man comes
wound. The canvasser has no notion that
anything is wrong about Mr. Simpson, but in
formation is refused, lie swoops around and
Mr. <r. Washington Simpson (.refused) goes
into the directory. The directory goes by the
first mails to Bradstreets and to other com
mercial agencies. 'Why?' shouts a chorus of
creditors, 'O. Washington Simpson is in Yonk
3rs!' When upon they pounce upon him and
render him i.ito cash, pauperism, or Sing Sing,
is the case may be. Perhaps you have got
tome notion by this time of the usefulness of
i directory as "an agency for the detection of
rlishonest persons, l'eople who do not want
their addresses and their business published
liavo in nearly every instance some dishonesty
to conceal.
"We have some funny experiences in this j
svnv. A woman came in not long ago to this j
i>!li"ce and made most urgent request tlmt we
*b'>nld not mention her name in the directory.
She was so anxious about it that we could liarilly
help assenting. 'But, madam,' I said, as she
started to go out, 'you must tell nie what your
name is.'
" 'Indeed, I will not,' she replied.
" 'But, madam,' I protested.
" 'Why, how absurd,' she paid. 'If I were to
tell vou vou might put it in.'
?? :Iiut how am I to tell what name to leave
ontV' 1 inquired in despair.
??But she was gone, thank goodness! I
haven't seen her since, though I have been liv
ing in daily expectation.
"All sorts of pleas are presented to un where
fore we should leave oui names and addresses
from our directories. When the reasons are
i{ood we grant the request, but that happens
rarely. It is mostly people that i debt
aid wish to avoid payment of their .itions
who are anxious for such omissions. >.. .ire not
accustomed to gr.uittbe favor in such eases.
Suits have often been brought against us for
putting people s names and addresses into di
tories against their will, but we have never
lost. Our defense is that our business is for
the public and to no private or personal ad
vantage, and the complainant is usually roost
unwilling to air in court his reasons for not
desiring to appear in the directorv. There is
[it present not a single person 111 the Washing
ton Directory against whose name is marked
the word 'refused.'
NO OPPOSITION.
"We have no monopoly in the directory
making business in Washington. You might
start in tomorrow aud get up an opposition
directory, procure advertisements for it and
sell it. But. let me w?rn you, it require* capi
tal to begin with a.iii, more important yet,
knowledge. We have this field covered. Do
you imagine that you can cover it so well and
so thoroughly at a lew weeks' notice? A while
ago, in a certain one of the cities we tmblish
directories for, a rival came into the field with
a directorv of his own. He quickly found that
he could not do the thing off-hand as well as we
could; so he copied our work. Our directory
is copyrighted, and, to catch our adversary, we
put 'into our directory more than a
score of bogus names. One of them was
?Duar. Frank, no, Ac:.' The number was a
vacant lot. We sued the other party for vio
lating our copyright. Our assertion was that
the said party had copied our directory. As
an example to show it we called attention to
the name I have mentioned and asked the
judge to read it after dividing it in the middle,
first right and then left. It read: 'Hank 1' raud!
The judge wept with laughter and our case was
won. liiat was an instance of what we call a
??lip,' introduced into a directory to catch a
rival napping. In that ease, in order to get
hold of the advance sheets of the opposition
publication, having tried every other way, we
bought waste paper by the thousands of pounds
from a shop that purchased such stuff from the
printing office where the rival directory was
being turned out. We went over every scrap
of it?purchasing it at 1} * ccnts a pound auu
selling it back to the fame concern at Yt cent
a pound? until we curne across proof s of the
opposition advance sheets, which furnished us
with the evidence we wanted. The result was
the ruiu of the opposition directory.
FIOUT1KO FOB A GRIP.
"Often it happens that wo have to fight for
our grip as directory makers for a city or dis
trict. Wo must make the battle with such
weapons as we have made to our hands by
years of labor in the field. Suppose, for in
stance, that an opposition directory concern is
started in Syracuse. We must fight it. How
many men has the opposition got at work?
Ten. Then we must have twenty. Our
ageAcies in various parts of the country are
drawn upon, and experienced men are sup
plied promptly. Instructions aro that two of
our men are to work wherever one of the op
position is working. One man must
precedf the opposition man, and the
other must come after. If our first
man captures the citizcn first, he gets his
order for the directorv and his advertisement.
If lie finds him out, tile opposition man does
likewise, presumably. Our second man does
nothing but follow the opposition man like a
shadow. If he sees him sent away from a house
he knows that the people are not at home, i>nd
lie waits. When the citizen comes home he
gathers him in before the opposition comes
back. There are tricks in every trade, you
sec. The directory business, onco fairly es
tablished. is hard to set up a successful opposi
tion to. It covers the field, and people who
are satisfied with it* work are reluctant to try
another concern which may not do as well.
"Some i*=ople imagine that a directory ii a
Sold mine for the publisher, and yet that is
ardlv true. It i? profitable, else we could not
carry on the business; but we only print i.SOO
copies for Washington, and out of that number
we give one to every advertiser and one to
everv charitable institution that asks for if
The District of Columbia Directory has a larger
circulation outside of the limits of the popu
lation it covers than anv other directory in the
United States, owing chiefly to the fact that
this is the scat of the national government."
A Social Kiddle.
From the Atcliiason Globe.
When married women (it and stare at the
fire what are they thinking about? They usu
ally have such an odd look abont the corners
of their mouths and so manv wrinkles in their
foreheads, it can't be anything very pleasant.
Let Otlters Blow far Yon.
From Puck.
Beputation may be a bubble, but it U not
beat made by a blower.
Qftwa Lamcu possesses In the highest degree
the restorative and Invigorating qualities of du
el) una (Peruvian bark), which ? the best known
medicine for giving tone to the digestive organs:
It succeeds completely In removing languor, weak
ness, wasting diseases, excessive thinness and dis
gust at sight of food; U Is the beet remedy for fere*
and ague.
ALL nr A DROP OP WITH.
A Microacoplst ExpUina Why It ia That
He A void* the Flold.
4*"Y7"OC asked me the otiieb pat
why I entertained ?uch a prejudice
against water," said the gentleman with the
toddy blossom on the end of hia now to a 8ta?
reporter. "If you will kindly gaze through this
microscope I shall be able to explain withoot
having recourse to wordy argument. I will
take a drop of water from the tap here at the
washstand. There! You observe. I let it fall
upon this little piece of glass. It is ready now
for examination under the instrument, which I
adjust to a high power. Let us see if, in swal
lowing this pure Potomac fluid which the people
of Washington are obliged to consume, they do
not imbibe very many extraordinary and un
inviting creatures. Let me turn the reflector
little. Now. there is a cheerful specimen
right in the field of vision. Apply your eye to
the microscope and drink him in, in imag
ination. Isn't he lovely?
"That, my dear sir. is
a beast known scien
tifically as the "bos
mina longirostris.' The
latter part of its name
signifies long-beaked.
Observe the coquettish
_ _ pose of its hind leg.
You drink lota of those fellows every day at
meals.
"Let me move the glass a trifle, so as to
bring into view another part of the drop.
There are two rather unpleasant-looking fel
lows for you.
"The wormlike one. which you see squirming
around in a transparent sac as if anxious to get
out. is called an 'anguillua.' 'Cyclops' is the
name of the other, which resembles a young
six-legged baby somewhat. I think. It is young,
too. being newly hatched; but it will grow
much bigger, which is a comfort. You yourself
consume ever so many such.
"But look here ! Kow that I have moved the
glass a trifle the other way I have brought into
view still another part of the drop, in which
you may see cavorting the 'cyclops quadri
cornni,' so called because it is a one-eyed mon
ster with four horns and ten legs. Take a look
at him.
?'I won't bore you with any more just row,
but I could show you more than two hundred
species of such microscopic creatures in the
water, each of them with a scientific name of
its own. I might mention, for example, the
vorticrlla of formidable jaws, the closterium,
precisely the shape of a pair of cow's horns;
several species of hydra with waving tentacles,
and the 'amphara gi^as.' in the shape of an
ornamental letter O. There are no end of
things which these creatures imitate in form.
One looks like a fish, but is not. Another re
sembles a broom, still another a coal scoop, and
so on ad infinitum.
"N'ow, it is all very well for persons who are
not acquainted with these things to drink
w ater, but a microacopist like nix self ought to
know better. And when you consider the dis
ease germs, like those of typhoid, which are so
apt to haunt the fluid, you ccnnot but realize
the desirability of avoiding it ns I do. The
great point about whisky is that it will kill uny
tliiiig."
STKAXGKIt THAN FICTION.
A German Komance Whlcli l'roves the Trutli
of tlie Old Adage.
From the Gu'.ixnani Messemrer.
The daughter of a Jewish merchant at Ham
burg resided in Berlin with a brother and made
the acquaintance of an orthodox Christian so
licitor. They fell in love with each other, but
the solicitor's father made his consent depend
ent on the young lady's conversion to Chris
tianity. liut the father of the Litter expressed a
wish that his daughter should remain a Jewess,
at any rate until his death.
In spite of this she was baptised on a certain
day in December last year, at 2 o'clock, im
mediately after which she became engaged to
the solicitor. About an hour afterward a tel
egram arrived from Hamburg announcing
that the death of her father from an apoplectic
stroke had tuken place 011 the same day at 2:o0
o'clock.
When the father's testament was opened it
was found that bvJides the share of his prop
erty legally belonging to his daughter he had
also bequeathed to her a legacy of 20.000 marks
under tlie condition that she remained a Jew
ess till his death. Her conver-ion. however,
having taken place half an hour before she lost
the legacy. Legal proceedings were instituted
by her to dispute the validity of the clause, but
they have been unsuccessful.
A Prolonged Farewell.
From Mnnsey's Weekly.
0 P.M.
10 P.M.
U P.M.
J3P.M.
SKINS ON FIRE
With Agonizing Eczemas and other Itching, Burning, Scaly, and
Blotchy Skin and Scalp Diseases are relieved in the majority of
cases by a single application of the Cliticura Remedies! and
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cured, when physicians, hospitals, and
all other remedies fail. Cliticura
Remedies are the greatest skin
cures, blood purifiers, and humor reme
dies of modern times, are absolutely
pure, and may be used in the treatment
of every humor, from the simplest facial
blemishes to the severest diseases of the
blood, skin, and scalp.
CUTICURA
The great Skin Cure, instantly allays
the most intense itching, burning, and
inflammation, permits rest and sleep,
clears the scalp of crusts and scales,
speedily soothes and heals raw and
irritated surfaces, and restores the hair.
Cuticura Soap, an exquisite Skin Puri
fier and' Beautifier, is indispensable in
cleansing diseased surfaces. Cuticura ? ?
Resolvent, the new Blood and Skin Purifier, and greatest of Humor
Remedies, cleanse^ the blood of all impurities an- poisonous elements,
and thus removes the cause. Hence the Cuticura Remedies cure
every disease and humor of the skin, from pimples to scrofula.
" How to Cms Diseases or ths Skin, Scalt, and Blood ** mailed free to sny a<Mre*s. 64
pages, 300 Diseases, 50 Illustrations, too Testimonials. A hook of priceless value to every tuflem.
CrncnRA Remedies are sold everywhere. Price, Citiccra, 5or. ; Ctmcuna vOAf, 85c.;
CtrncuKA Resolvent, $i. Prepared by Potter Drug and Chemical Corporation, Boston.
jflPK An Fve for Peautv ilh'p0'
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Soap, incomparably the greatest of skin purifiers and beautifiers, while rivalling ta dtn*
cacy and surpassing in purity the most expensive of toikt and nursery soap*. Price, a^c.
AUCTION SAI.ES.
AUCTION SALES.
THIS tVKMMi.
Fl'TI'CK DAV*.
"1> ATCLIFFE. DARR & CO. \n 'tionvers,
-AV Pennsylvania ave. n.w.
CONTINUATION OF ASMGNEE*8 SALE BV AUC
TION OF UAIANC1 uF^T(?CK Of- DUMONDS.
WATt'HKs, 4E\% lLRi OF Al l. KINDS. >oi.l??
HI LVEh AN D S11;V LB-PI. A 1 ED ^ A il EOF HE ST
MANUFACTURES, C.OLD AND SILVEK-H1 U>
UMBRELLAS AND CANES. HOLD PENS,
CLOCKS, BRONZES. GOLD PADLOCK BRACE*
LETS. IMPOKTFD OPEHA .-LASSES. 00LD
SPECTACLES AND EYEtiLASKKS AND EVERY
THING CON TAI NED IN 1 HL JE v> ELRY STOKE
OF THE HUM OF
\OlOT A HAAS, 713 TTH ST. N.W.
Sale TOMouitoW a'rida> > EVENING, 4ANUAHY
TWENTY-THIRD. at Sh v EN O'CL'X'K. and continu
ing each evenimr at same hour until stock is disposed
of. Goods sold at private sale durin r the day. l.aui-s
esiHM'ially invited to the sale. By order of
ja2*J-<it O. E. DUFFY, Assignee.
I I TI KK DAVS.
fHOMAS DOWLING, Auctioneer.
SPECIAL AND IMPORTANT SALE
By Catalogue
Of an
EXTRAORDINARY COLLECTION OF
ANTIQUE AND MODERN ORIENTAL RUGS.
CARPETS, PORTIERES. EMBROIDERIES. Ac..
To be sold by public auction
At my Art Rooms, 11th aud l'enn. ave.,
TUESDAY. WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, FRIDAY
AND SATURDAY,
January 27. 28, 29, 30. 31. 180U
At 11 a.m. and2.30p.m.
On exhibition with Catalogue
Monday, January 26.
By order of the Oriental Trading Co.. Importers.
Ja23-3t THOMAS DOWLING. Auctioneer.
?JHOMAS DOWLING, Auctioneer.
I MIX) in ANT SALE.
32 MILCH COW*,
ONE BULL, ONE HORSE. ONE PHAETON,
2 8ETS HARNESS. 2 CARRIAGES. 2 WAGONS.
FARMING IMPLEMENTS. ETC.. ETC.,
AT AUCTION.
' On THURSDAY, JANUARY TWENTY-NINTH.
| AT ELEVEN O'CLOCK A.M., at the country rwu
dence of the late John B. Clagett. on 7th street road,
about one mile north of Bright wood. D.C., I will sell
the above tfleets.
TERMS CASH.
By order of W. B. CLAGETT, Attorney.
Ja21-dts THOMAS DOWLING, Aurtioner.
U
ATCLIFFE. DARK * <X)., AmttoMcn.
1) ATCLIFFE, DARK k CO., Auctioneers,
XV 8Q0 l'enn*. ave. n.w.
ENTIRE STOCK OF HARDWARE. HOUSEFUR
XlSHlNGS, CUTLERV, sliou CASES, C OUNT
ERS. SHELVING, ETC., CONTAINED IN
STORE NO. ,t07 SEVENTH STREET NORTH
WEST.
AT AUCTION.
On WEDNESDAY MORNING. JANUARY
TWENTY-E1GH I H, 1801, AT TEN OTDk'K. we
will se!l ;it theaiwflnamed store thsentire stock < on
taine.l therein, to which the attention of the trade and
private buyers is called.
TERMS CASH.
Ja2.J-4t RATCLIFFE. DARR k CO., Aucts.
)S. E. WAGGAMAN, Real Estate Auctioneer.
TRUSTEES' SALE OF FIVE (5) TWO-STORV AND
BASEMEN 1 . RICK DWELLINGS, VnITHTWo
STORY RRICK LACK lHlhDINGS, ON O
STREET BETWEEN 1ST AND 3D STREETS
N.W.
By virtue of a deed of trust, recorded in Ltt#?r No.
142tj, folio :{:*?>, ot the land records of the District of
Columbia, and at the reqiiet.t ot the party t Hereby
secured. we ail: sell at public auction, in front ol the
premises, ou WEDNESDAY. F. BEUAR\ FOURTH.
IS 1, at FIFTEEN MINUTES OF FOUR O'CLOCK ,
P.M.. lot*i>r>, ?J4i, (u. tXandtf^, in the subdivision of
J?art of lots 7 and S, iu square .V>3, as i?er plat in book
t>, pave 141), o; the records of the surveyor's office of
sa.d District, with the improvements above stated.
Terms: One-third cash, of which $101) must be paid
on each lot at timeot s?ie and the balance in three
equal installments in six, twelve and eighteen mcnths,
for winch the notes 01" tne purchaser. bearing interest
from day of s ?ie and secured by deed of trust on prop
erty sold, wiil t?e taken, or all cash, at option 01 pur
chaser. If tern s ar. not complied with ;n fifteen days
from sale the trustees r<-serve the light to resell tne
property at the risk and cfpt of the defauitimr pur
chaser or purchasers. Ail conveyancing and recording
will be at purchaser's cost..
THOS. E. WAGGAMAN,#
J. W. PILLING, ; Trustees
Ja23-d4da 1KOS. E. WAGGAMAN. Auct.
THOS. E. WAGGAMAN.
1 Real Estate Auctioneer.
TRUSTEES' SALE OF FOUR (4) TWO-STORY AND
BACK BUILDING BRICK DWELLINGS. ON
NORTH MDEOF O STREET BETWEEN FIRST
AND THIRD STREETS NORTHWEST. AND
FOUR (4) TWO-STORV BRICK DWELLINGS.
ON THIRTY-FOOT ALLEY IMMEDIATELY IN
REAR OF SAID FIRST DESCRIBED HOUSES.
By virtue of a deed of trust, recorded in Liber No.
144.^, folio 44S. of the Land Records of the District of
Columbia, ?nd at the request of tue party thereby se
cured, we wi;l sell at puDiic au *tiou, in front o: the
preiuiaes. ou WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 1 OURTH,
lSMl. at Ft?L'R O'CLOCK P.M., lots Ttk 77. 7S, 7W.
SO, Si, 82 and SJt, in the suUlivision 01 lot 10. and
part of lot 11, in square .Vj3, as per j?iat in Book IT.
paire ."iR, <?t the ?ie? ords of ttie Surveyor's Office of said
District, with the improvements above ste.ted.
Terms: One-third cash, of which $ 100must 1*de
posited on each lot at time of si'e, and lmlance in
three equal installments in tj, 12 and 18 moutiis, for
which notes ot purchaser, beariir-r interest from day
ol sale rnd secured by deed of trust on property sold,
will be taken, or ail casa, at option of purchaser.
Terms to be complied with in fifteen days from ?iay of
s.ile, or trustees reserve the ri*ht to resell at risk anl
cost of detau tine purchaser or purc hasers. All con
veyancing and recording will be at purchaaer'scost.
T. E. WAGGAMAN,'
J. W. ?PILLING. i Trustees.
THOS. E. WAGGAMAN. Anct. ia23-dkd?
rpHOMAS DOWLING. Auctioneer.
POSTPONED UNTIL MONDAY, TWENTY-SIXTH
INSTANT.
A SMALL COLLECTION OF
CHOICE SPECIMENS OF JAPANE8E BRONZES,
PORCELAINS. ANTIQUE CONVEX MIRROR.
ALSO
AFRICAN BRASS OOODS, DRAPEBY,
SPANISH CABINET. ANTIQUE SOFA.
kc.. kc.
On MONDAY. JANUARY TWENTY-SIXTH.
1891. at ELEVEN A.M. and THREE P.M.. at my art
rooms, 11th and Pa. ave., I shall sell a consignment
of the above goods, among which an some choice
pieces. Now on exhibition.
TRUSTEES' SALE OF 3-KTOBY FRAME HOUSE,
WUIH IS.om EEET GL'H M>.?>N SPRINGS!'.,
NEAR MAPLE AVE.. AN Alt's i 1 A.D.C.
I"n?!er and by virtue of two certain dee?i*of terust.one
r-couied ;n Lii?er 14"?*>.'olio3r? ett?t-q..? ue?>f th* laul
records i??r the District i>t Co.utulua. tire other men
to the more efie**tua?ly dewr.^ tit*- gn?undand prem
ises and record'-d m Lil-tr ? ]i?4,oi:> of tit>*
land records ot the I'isirtctot ColumlHa.and .it the r?
qiaeat ? : - n.- i?art> -? Mired tn*T?'b> ,tLe und?
trustees wii! se-l public ;.u?-tion in tn-nt ??! t-:a
premises, t?n >1 NhAi. SECOND DA * K>k J i.bl?? -
A1U.A.D. 1SSM. at 1 oUR (M l.i ? K P.M.. ail ol ... ^
t* 11 (lO), eleven ill", twelve PJ). thirteen 'LP rid
lour - u (14 . H. A. i*risHold's miI^Iims- ti ? i i>-t?
se\ IJI.) ..lid tw? ve ( i'jirt . I * 111 i:e*t* T. to.eti.er
witii u*jprovenents.&;< ..mi 1 j?ii ti ?e : je ? ^ .,r parr, s
ot i*nn ?aa i?reu.is*? ij ;n*: oetween tlie noatiiwist l.n?
o. ot luxred t? 11 41??> 01 it ? n;.on< ?i suU> \ .sion ..nd
the northwest iinem Momsro;.<i..ts at 1 n * l' ?-onsti
tuted.and the ritriit of way over rw allej to the west of
s.i:d lot ten ' Km. . ntinue ? t..r?>.ig^i 10 b..;u Mom
roao.together with improvements,?c.
lerms 01 saie. One^tinr<i 01 purchase money to be
paid incasn. tesiuu- monthiv. quarterly, sen - ana
aijy or annually . iwyiuenta mr.-mratiiu not M sstuan
six Lun-irea dollars per yt;.r ; no j.t. n st at ??
|?r cent per siMimii. payaole qu y. ior wiuch
purchaser is to ?ve prt?iii.ssor>' note* s?**urec. l?y ur-ed
cf trust on property soid. t?r aii cash, c? option ?>. pur
chaser. li terms of s<*ie are not compl ied in ten ? lO)
days irom <lay of sale the trustees n serve the n^l.t to
resell at risk sind cost of the deinuitiuv' purchaser atter
five days1 auv? rtisement of such r<*sale in Mine news
paper published in \t ps'iiiurtt*!. D.C. A de}<ieit ot
two hundred dollars I) will be required wi.? 11 bid
is accepted. All conveyan in.' and re?> >rdinir at. < sx of
the purchaser. ALBER1 1J. Rl EE, T rustee.
dZiyialM W. R. RALDVUN. TniNU?.
T^HOMAS DOWLING, Auctioneer.
TRUSTEES* SALE OF THE 6TOCK IN TRADE,
FIXTURES. GOOD WILL. WAGON AND HAR
NESS OF THE PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLY
STORE OF THE LATE C. 8. CUDLIP. No. 439
PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE NORTHWEST.
By virtue of a chattel trust, dated the loth day of
De.-e:ui*T. !NS!*, mil recorded anu.nir the l.?tud
Re'-ordsol the I>.strict of Columbia. 111 Li.ier 14-V>.
folio i.*,and by direction of the parties ae, uredtberehj*.
the undeisigned trustees aili sell st public auction on
tlie premises. No. 4. ?!? Pennsylvania avenue northwest,
on 1 HU..SDAY THE 'I EN"! I'-NIN 1H DAY OF
JANUARY. 1HM, at TEN O'CMX'K A. M. (and if
not then disposed of, afrain at SEVEN P. M.), ail the
stock in tratie. views, nentivea, pictures, show cas ?*,
fixtures and all the photographic supplies now in attd
uioii tire ai ove-mentioned premises. Also watron and
harness used iu and at?out said bus>:nees
The stock ? <insists in part of 3 Dallmeyer I^enses. 1
old Harrison Lens. 7 Cameras. lar>fe lot of Cards of all
sizes. Transparency 1-raii.es, stock ol l'liotoiTaphic
t'neudcals, .arire lot of Netratives of Viows of Wnsh
in-rton. larae iot ot Stereoscopic and other views. Ac.
All ot said i?ert?oiial property wiil first Oe ofieivd as a
whole and ii no adequate i?id obtained the aame will be
ofl'emi in leUil lots.
Terms of sale: If sold as a whole one-half cash: bal
ance m e<|Uui installments in on* and two years, se
cured to tne satisfaction of tiie trustees. If so d 111 re
tail lot8, all cash. No *oods removed till terms of sale
are complied with.
A. A. LIPSCOMB, I ?r
Ja22-dta MILLS DEAN, { 1T
R
ATCLIFFE. DARK ft CO., Aurtionw.
IKXI IVniisyivbuui .ve. n. w.
THOMAS DOWLING,
1*22
SO HOtIKE, NO. 1S7 MAJkV]
northeast, within a sgi
U. S. CAPITOL OBOCNDS.
VALUABLE BRICK
land
ICARE
TRUSTEES' SALE OF
DWELLING HOU8
AVENUE
OF THE
By virtue of thnv dwi? of trout to ai. I*.rityr d.t*
April 17. A. D. lMKJ. Aprtl UB. aTD. ItMt ud
January -J3, A. D. 1MB, aad rerordxd I ?y.i-ttT^ly iu
llbm bom. l'WI. tolk> 1SU ? nq., 117N folio 3ia<
tt ??).. aud 1?B, folio HI ti. Mq . of tb* land rarord.
ot tlif Dtotiict of Columbia, ud .t the irquMt of ti?
bol<ler of tkc Dotn thtmliy Hcund. w, will off?rfor
Hie, in front ot tli. pmotaM, on 1UKSDAV, tfce
TWkNTY-SKVENTH DAY OF JANUARY. A. D.
lHUl.rt HALF-PAST FOUR O'CLOCK P. M.. lot
numbered twenty--nine (2U). in Charles Kennedy's
recorded snbdivison of square numbered aev?n hun
dred and twenty-seven (7So, the said lot beinir im
proved by a turee-story brick dweJiiv house, and Is
situated m the beat part aC the northeastern
the city.
Terms of sale: One-third of the _
cash, payable within ten days from the day of sale,
end the balanc e to two equai payments at one and two
years from the date of sale, with Interest at the
rate of 0 per cent per annum?interest to be paid semi
annually?s?id deterred payments to beeemred by the
notes ol the pnrchsser ana a deed ot trust on the prop
erty. or all tue purchsse money may be paid in cash at
any time within ten days frooktl
posit of $100 will be required at
M day of sale. A de
the time of the sale.
IMPROVED REAL ESTATE ON THE EAST SIDE
OF TWENTY - FIKS1 STREET liETUEEN E
AND F STREETS NORTHWEST AUCTION.
On MONDAY AFTERNOON, JANUARY TWENTY
SIXTH. at HALF-PAST FOUR O'CLOCK, we will
offer lor sale by public auction, in front of the
premises,
THE NORTH 00 FEET INCHES FBONT OF
LOT ? IN SQUARE KM,
Havinir an even dei?th of Hi feet. This property is in
a neighborhood which is rii>idly advam imc in value,
and beine easy of access from the centers makes it a
irood chance for investment.
Terms: One-third cash; balance in one and two
years at t> per cent per annum, secured by deed ol trust,
or ail cash, at purchaaer's option. A dejHieit of *1<)0
at time of sale. Terms to be complied with in fifteen
days trom day of sale, or ri*rht reserved to resell at
ris& and cost ot detau It nsr purchaser. All convey
ancing and recording at pur uaser s cost.
RATCLIFFE. DARR It CO..
__Ja20-dts Auctioneers.
1 TRUSTEES* SALE OP VALUABLE IMPROVED
PROPERTY IN THE NORTHS EST S1CTION OF
THE CITY, OONSlSl I NO OF A Kit E LOT ON
THE NORTH SIDE OF b Si REET BETWEEN
FIFTEENTH AND SIXTEENTH STREETS. IM
PROVED BY ATWO-STORk BRICK DWELL1N<E
KNOWN AS PREMISES NO. loU3 tt ttTRLET
NORTHWEST.
B> virtue of s deed of trust dated May 5. A. D. IRTft,
snd duly re orded in liber ilia, folio 222, et seq., one
of the lsnd records of the District of Columbia, and.at
the request of the holder ot the note sscured thereby,
we will sell at public au tion, in front of the premises,
on TUESDAY. FEBBl'A&x 1U1RD, A. D. 1KU. at
HALF PAST FOUR O'CLOCK P. M.. the followm*
de> ribed real estate, situate in the city of Washington,
I)istri?-t of Columbia, to wit All that i?iece or j*ai\?l
of ground known as and bein?r lot numbered two (2)
in Blake and Reilev's recorded suIkLvision of square
numl-ered one hundred and ninety-one (1UD. together
with the improvem-nts thereon.
Terms of sale: One-tuird of tbe rurchse* money to
be pai.i in caah and the balan.-e in thret equal install
ments. respectively, in one (1). two (2) and three (3),
years, secured Oy a deed of trust on the property sold,
with interest st ti per cent per annum until paid, inter
est payable semiannually, or all cash, at the option of
the purchaser. Adei>ositoi $100 required at the time of
sale. Terms of sale to lie complied witn in ten days irom
day of sale, or property m ill be resold at rwk aud cost
of defaulting purchaser on live days' advertisement.
All oonveyan ra* and recording st purcbaa
BRAI>ARD H. WARNER.'
HENRY STRASBUROER.
JalMfcAi DUNCAN SON BROS,, i
ALTER
B. WILLIAMS k CO.. i
TBU8TEE8* SALE OF PROPER TT, BOUTHWEST
CORNER OF SECOND AND Q STREETS SOUTH
WEST. AT AUCTION.
By virtue of s deed at trust dated March 23, A.D.
IMC. and duly recorded in Liber No. 1241. foSo 207
st seq.. one of the lsnd rsoords of the District ot Co
lumbia. snd by direction of tbe party secured thsrsby.
we shall sell at public auction, injront of the naas
ises. on TUESDAY. JANl ArlY T7. A.D. ISM/ AT
HAUF-PAST FOUR O'CLOCK P.M.. all that rsstsia
piece or parcel of land snd premises known snd d?s
tinjruishsd as snd beinr iot numbered sttrht. in square
numbered six handled snd two, ss laid down m the
plat books ot the city of Wssiungton. D. '
with all the improvements thereon.
Terms at ssls: Ops third cash. baln _
two years, for notss bssriap interest from day at sale,
and sscnrsd by s dsed of trast on propcety sold, or all
cash at tbe oouon of tbe purchaser. All eonveyandnr.
kc., st purchaser s cost. $100 down whsn the prop
erty is struck of. snd if the terms o< ssls srs nst v*m>
plied with within ten days trom day of sals ttte trus
tees rsssrve the rUrht to recall the propsrty at risk snd
UTTDERS, I
~OP*lM*.i
oo ?wi
. ^c??gAT^S
Pkr-c ii i mj
0 CWkTSo:
.TARRH REMEDY
IwUUlx nbm
AUCTION SALES.
11 Tt lit MK.
G
*?xr oriextal. KA/AAR,
loss conwcnerr avr .
D. L TaiHUiVUI ft oa
XfTrr bmy Ortental Xw aif cm UvM.
?rin .?ootttalw* owr ?rtnAL HA1.I of
nrrrjti ouDitu. rcos ?oj car
ItTS
Oir RXDrCKD PRKT.8 dttrinr ths laal
vert h?v? aurtixl tb? pnUlc. I* Ibw ba
far* tiuylm* ??**
tlonwr ? 1ms SB J many <lMB>l"nU?a m
wm.
OOOD6 SEXT OX APPROVAL.
"GRAJiD ORIENTAL BAZAAR."
IOC' Com**" Kot sts ,
)?-l-4t D. K VA.UZHABKDIAX ft OO.
* ' N1 I I II HI A I 1.x MAKMIAL't" kAUL
My virtw of Mt c*nW it*.* . ??-1I.-1 ..?? *1 th*
rfli v (>? tin* Sui'1>':m ??f t'n* I* Htrift <?t ? ?? iliu
bta Mdin/ ? si.mr* ' . t urt hi aduurait) ? -*?- V :<W.
M?*r**<*itb. iitw?!'auta. a-??:n?t thr*t??aiii
tu.' LumIm. Ii?t tarkf, ?? ???!? .. finii ur . * A.-.,
aul to in#* I will iM- i ?t i???* i. kj.?? n-rtv'L
at ??r ii-art..?* loot ? f Hurli miwt m u aaiu
lttshid, vlii^ ?'if n >? '..?** < n * \ im -??a\ . i 111
1 HIlSTt-t l??H1l! \*K\ or JAM Ait% . 1HM. at
T'*lLVK?iHl<h K M . f!??? aavl t-Wm tu*r
I liertii' k. . aii'uPPl, fwr:utt?r?'. A:
pASiii. m i:an*i?ki i*. r.? M?ntni.
KATTI.IM l . I ? M. It A ?*o . At* ?*. >?V-t. ?
LAD1 FX <;<X>1>S.
Vv
?hite M'l.PHfR *?l.? l"li IMF II'*;
j I jruoa. Mir. a l?.tti? fW' im?ml tliiNWil
Mt<at, Ml. ? |H <11-1. llii|WVf?t -r. t
? alp? ??*<?!?*. I.'w ? 1> 'i. At Ikl/n71 V\kKl S
?bar ?.* ^ . .-or. Mb and fc *'? * ? |
MKK V Hi. * .-I I . v J IM I . . ? -I N I .
..?rimr'vot VY.. invit.*. llw |*tr??n*4.' m \\??b
lnrft >n lad** Diai!< in i.M*-*?t ?rty ?* I>r
l#ft t*t at it?HkfkU' i?r;A*. 4'utiimr au.t !*>? irnr r ?y
rialtjr. 4 ' .
L.'i.o~xn: ?vokih:'!
X Alviyninonlt i ) |>ltiufNil*uw
?AT?
VI-I I. M. I. PKAVM^
lXA'I'at B.w. (Mi* Hmti*>ii%K
Fin? I m. ? ixiur (io'xU.
ir?*r.li*fcH:iur. H|uuupnnl?r.
hit*
I~ liK\? It AHX)BDi?m miTIKO. I?Hl?? :i*\
1H! >ii. . ktiiia, l?-r >a nnd r**+> y ?.? i
piiif. n- l>rTc??n?t a~w:iu iua. blue. fU? .Ml i !. *
ir jk wiii ?*t. n.w.
v I \ i I * ? M - ! oR M AKIVi I'M H 1 :
31 Uu.|'HtM4f?, k . I?\??r? t??r t!??* irrriiiaii. k r p
J?l>! tio??b?. Nsj k?o-. I an*-. I - * i~.i
U --.-I h.tuiH,.V I*r ? ?????! I'atlit. .i?f.?*.
tti?-liW StU*l??**?. J. JAi iHJl L.I?. UUiSt.
1AI>||>' Ol.D^*TVUC M \l>hlN ?.%lti.?Ni"H
j .iv^l -nd M^mxl into r-m -t >??? ^ a.
?kili ia? A .. ii.? . ?l~r 11 -
! CI NMNnbAU. IJOM Wti at. U * ??*l X i??
'
t-' VNt'H I>VKTN?*.S?'i?1 I.IN?i ANV l?K\ ? l.l .\N
' : ?;al ik. T?.'ii*, ' N.'* "k ?v- i
rlmtw LidiV ?ud i-. nt*.' w?irk ?>t ?w\ tit*.rti'M.ia.
Hii*1-. v^vpt nix* i vt-utu*' \Nl?N ASM
('AM'UKK ii.W ll. luni*."i? ?Hu A. J i? Hiii
I*n?
i N 1 ? i S I 1 >? .1 I h > l?KV < I.I AM Vi' i > I \ 1 ?
;1 }*?: ,^i. n.l l>-rk?. ?*t?.ii ?
r." I ? i?: nil k.u?.? ? ?i-? !..-4
m i our lieu. - r .jMf t- I v^itmr | .r. v>. ?. ? ?.| ?fc
r.uity. ? . ir> Hv?* yauv ew r;.*?i v. I n**? i. m
f ?ad <kiiv<t?d. >?4
U K< UAkMIM\ "?MW^
fit
\ dW* ?fWOa ?'" uTUiUfc" bi?-A
a. rif*rHrn.
i
FAMILY SUITUKS.
()M AT Riwmn* I \ 1*KICKS.
1-11). full Hal. u>f l\'V<Ur 4nr.
)ttr?nfii bftiMNtt ? oa" 4-?\
B??t H?iii> 1 1*c*
ikb. ('?? Tab.** lVsa? iH-a
. r*n t *iih'rnu A|>r. ??ta ?
B.**t I-U?nda ?>raiifc;?ts I ?*f * ?
UooUry Maivt *
Vt?r>' b* ?*i Macafi?
a iull line oi 1 uii. y i*r^i r.i* ?t w ????*? rr? <* toe
Casu. N. A. K>Ui.L. li *- ?
'.*4 U. ?vr. ?i.
Oltl.AMI K\ MTTHU*. I'iJi IVil-NU.
J# lilK" Initi.r Kra|w wilM*,
7 IL#. I'll k*LPa5.
Vt. botiU* ?w?'t ratiiwba mine, 2T?r.
i; i'?. i**^t i-iHtt*'.
iH-.u-uiiif lirt?kiiiMt Ui<\?n. 1(V. |???r lb.
M\ "lii-iiqufi ' hwm ?.nl> |<K 111
>1:4-1 Ui* OHAiil S. 1 V4-r? vVb tt.W.
GENTLEMEN'S GOObS.
ALL t^TOCK
or FoREiav ro*TTxr.?. vtsttvo*.
81IT1NO*. <IVB?C<>ATlX<i-< AND I'HiW*
LK1M.S Hh'i.lUll fiKNTl.l MKN *11"
AVKlKLFlliOl -CLAKK1 AllXMUMi ABEI tf
VI1U/TUINM'LI'T. iii.UiAMUIl>lir
Hi H. I>. hAl.K. Ull I A. AM:... AUti.l Aii
AM Hi) lu ML VI llii. CUKKI -. 1st lu>
?IS
ME1HCAL &c.
U LUBIJ. S. 1.'|1H HT.. PHIUnWJ'HIA,
I'a. T*?-aty ytars ?*n*n.<i ?. s.ud lor <-^-k
(?? aied) <H>uia?u:xiv ?uil |"aruru*ani lor 4.1 i;fc
. l.nr.H li<>UT> \* to 2t?4i to II ?\rtliUK* *?'
1>
tiwi/Klunr.
^<11 VTIHC MAMMat l .l> !>??? OB1A1NKD At
0 su7mil ?t. u ? _
1-1 I , . 1
UK -? ? .1 .??? ??
of nenmm ?? - *A. ?''u* ti,rtw?
UHlixjcalitiitiouBl ???1wl" l.l??-tr?-w ?
latlii. I.Tin*! tHi?rfimtlirt\ li^ ktol ? ?* lm*iui'*l
kll"?U t(J IJBijr ?... ?
Hoax * to lu i.n.. .*? to H I'.wi. 1-4 l?
T>Ul>l I sMoKtl. MASSAuU ?>* M,i> H ? AM
r EHON. ^illihn. 11 *..?if?iilwrt?? -? ' ??"
qiihut a spaitaMy. K?lw? j?tiiii"?.< u t?. ii-?n? -i
! tli* uriW itwiiiWI Mwiil tiMinrtm. j*^!"
Iinon.r-M''S a 1 \|?>M'.I ? a N ill "UlAlKU
with l??t oj uitAiirM rurrvbi' by ?wllliw ?t "I
ink?.??. ^*'u"
Dr. k. M?VEXBKIWi.
MxurtK Pli??. l?n,
bl . I2th?t. n w.
From 2 to 7 rm; *r'lui
UfIaO ABU B? ?lsr..-l*R
I ? . ? | | a 11 ll lllf BIM1 llMlk ""III t )l?t 1
tl*uldcM ?t?l>ll?li?<l? ?>"*1 ?!?< i?iurt III I.J? >-|ty
trlil irtlmrmiit-?? rul* Hi sll *?! i '? *i>'> inrtiin!
i. nr.<ir no' Uanre.. <>o?u.i?no?i iiml sdvi.* irwj
MiyUourot till-.lay Mi?.tiubu ?iid 10 i??ur
u.H,r Ur.tilUl'lUtUh. >AJIl k.i. ? *IU->. ? l?<f
rutin tn riul lor U? Lii?ir?.t m CoiBu.i4a.u.i? ?. 'Ul
01 July. IMC. I hi
T HAS NEVKB BEF.K CIIHTRADirtBI lHil
? Ur hW'lUUUlK ti? ?...!??! "??;
Uy)*dw pliysMHH in tli* .11) Ur.BBOl HUttk
HUlilm-*.w. hnrivi- )'**"'
MANHllOD UEfTOKtl' BV I SI SO A BOIIU
ortwool Itr.Bho i J1ERS-' ui?urof?tin* . ..rJ^L
I*ill run* 'a- cwu Miiiuiii?i.ait>
QLI). YorNG ANL? MIKIH.E AGED.
If yon mtff?r from any?|"rt?l <w twrrom /!!<?*??,
Mood |^11>?. tirUII imli?T?ioti, W nU ??
I>r. O. F. lur-i. iiH Ni>rtli 1 i.urtn ?t.. Wo*im*
Ptulanrli'liiK. I**.. Mstinar your aiid t?r?? "*
"TraMr ?sptaalwr ii?'? to ? ?r?d
qu.il l?i. lliwi iiimk ? HL>iu.iui m tli? I w.?4
Main to .'UT* ?lirli mil wUirt? l?ll. Dot* illiMAIiil fIff
Tlat otbfni nll?ll? llourm. b to J. ti ?o IA
ui) I. ?i to Li.
1
DENTISTRY.
UK*. A Eft M B 0mMklI"N.KL*TAl.rAKl/>l4^
?tt?l.ll?l.?J 1N1T. liV*l I4tl. ?*. B * CAI???UOW
*10 ?|.r.?t ?H Old ptotM *^1^1
^?lt?d ???!>?. All 111? tllrflKa
1 It. UUMIAM> R. BBO?B
JJ h?. nmi nt? .a?? to
i.vn iviiii?r ?Mii?
? jast-im* fCrown and urldn* work. I
I1TAKB- DKKTAL PARWKh, 1'JIT FA. AV. K.W.
li Twill rrtmrtod |?miti?Wy wiUiont pain nr dnaaar
kiw oar teln.ee H?*u : ? IwruiMw* ?l??til? *???? la
S. by nToauj. It*?Car?>?* plnMBt awl tr.lmH
ArtiH. ial ImU. crown and umic* wort at rmoualil*
prtaa. Jaa-lm*
He pextal ixriRiiART.-TF.rt n nLL?S
artibciaJ Math -.nanted without rliarf>.?.xr. pt
^?f^TtoS^ ^sr- ? lM*^T
m~~ (ST ALK 1ARMOMS, llkXTIHT. ITTU ?T , OOR.
b w - Flm-laa. UlitM* taamd A|| llfBim
to ronia mma pain in ntrartinir. All
t pr?.-1 lucama M raars Bdu.
I I^Slties.
pKOMFT. HAFE Afcl) ^ujirAALlB* .IB
gp w.
TkR. MCLLRR. I?7> 1 ST K.W . TRRATI AiX
t^^kk0BryT?r?tmaO'taS* ?
Bow: K?u Dta-Bi. aalllD 7 p.ia <?-^b?
PRINTO&
H. u

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