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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 24, 1891, Image 14

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1891-01-24/ed-1/seq-14/

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WESLEY BEIGH78.
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SOCK VILLI
NORTHWEST WASHINGTON. TERMISUH OF MASSACHUSETTS AVENTTB
EXTENDED. AND ADJOINING SITE OF GRl'-AT AMERICAN UNIVERSITY.
UFFEI.S A RAJ1F. OPPORTUNITY TO PERSONS DESIROUS OF SAFEEY IN
TESTING SMALL SIM& $100 WILL MAKE THE CASH PAYMENT OS A
GOOD LOT. STREETS ARE LAID OFF IS CONFORMITY WITH THE PLAN
OF THE CITT. AND ARE SOW BEING GRADED TO THEIR FULL WIDTH.
SO FEET. FOUR HANDSOME SUBURBAN COTTAGES WILL BE Ul ILT AT
ONCE. SEVERAL PARTIES HAVE EXPRESSED THEIR INTENTION OF
BJ II DING ALSO. THF. WESLEY HEIGHTS BUILDING AND LOAN ASSO
CIATION IS NOW BEING ORGANIZED. ITS OFFICERS AND BOARD OF
DtllKCTORS WILL BE COMPOSED OF GENTLEMEN OF WELL KNOWS
INTELLIGENCE, AB1I.ITT AND EXPERIENCE. IXSURINO 6ECUR1TT
AND GOOD MANAGEMENT. YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO IN
SPECT THii PROPER!'I BEFORE PURCHASING ELSEWHERE. CALL FOR
FLAT.
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HOMES. SUBURBAN SUBDIVISIONS. SPECULATIVE PROPERTIES. INIEBEST-f ilUO PROPERTIES.
MOW 18 THE TIME TO BUT, BEFORE THE SPRING BOOM AFTER THE PERIOD OF INACTIVITY COMES THE REACTIOM.
371 ACRES LYIS3 ON BOTH SIDES OF THE B. AND O. RAILROAD.
ABOUT ONE MILE NORTH OF ROCKVILLK AND FRONTING ON THE
FREDERICK PIKE FOR ABOUT A MUX. UR'ATIo* Is DOJMHTTU
COMMANDING CHARMING VIEWS OF THE BURBOTTIDING COUNTRY.
THE NEW ADDITION TO WT.BT END P VKK. WHERE U?TB SELL FOH $:vO
EACH. IS IMMEDIATELY SOUTH OF THIS PROPERTY. AND THF ELEC
TRIC ROAD BEING CONSTRUCTED FROM THIS CITY TO ROCKVIIXB
WILL EXTEND TO WITHIN ONE-FOI HTH OF A MILK OF IT. THE WORE
OF PLATTING AND PUTTING TH!S PROPERTY IN SH *PF FOR THE
MARKET HA8 BEEN ACCOMPLISHED THE ENTIRE TRACT IS AVAIL
ABLE FOR BUILDING SITES. THERE BEING NO WASTE GROUND,
AN1> IS NOW OFFERED AS A WHOLE AT HIE Lo? PRICE OF $l.*t PER
ACRE THIS IS THE BEST CHANCE FOR ISVFST1IXXX TOACAl'lTAUSX
OR SYNDICATE ON THE MEi ROIVLITAN BLAXCU.
It U a gr*at thing to mtm a Utile bit of tt* LarSt
Earth up to the htaoeiu. A man fetlt the better for it
WUITTIER.
INVESTMENTS GUARANTEED UPON DIVISION
OF PROFITS. MONEY DEPOSITED WITH ME WILL
DRAW 6 PER CENT INTEREST UNTIL SATISFAC
TORILY INVESTED.
HANDSOME 3-STORY AND BASEMENT PRESS-BRICK RESIDENCE
FRONTING IOWA CIRCLE. CONTAINS20 ROOMS AND ALL THE LATEST
CONVENIENCES; FINELY PAPERED AND PRETTILY DECORATED; FIRST
STORY FINISHED IN WALNUT. THE LOCATION 18 ONE OF THE F1NE8T
IN THE CITY. WILL BE SOLD AT A SACRIFICE.
3-STORY AND BASEMENT BAY-WINDOW BRICK RESIDENCE NEAR
DUPONT CIRCLE; CONTAINS 9 ROOMS. BATH. ELECTRIC BELLS,
SPEAKING TUBES, Ac.; HANDSOMELY PAPERED THROUGHOUT;
HEATED BY FURNACE. PRICE. $8,500
3-STORY BRICK RESIDENCE ON L ST. NEAR CONN. AVE.; CONTAINS
?ROOMS AND BATU; HOT AND COLD WATER, RANGE, LATR0RE8.
SPEAKING TUBES; NICELY PAPERED THROUGHOUT. WILL SELL
FOR $U,500.
3-STORY 11 -ROOM PRESS-BRICK RESIDENCE ON K 8T. NEAR
NORTH CAPITOL; HAS ALL MOD. IMPS. ; THIS PROPERTY RENTS WELL
AND lb IN GREAT DEMAND. PRICE. 84,000
200 FEET FRONT ON 7TH STREET, SHORT DISTANCE ABOTB
FLORIDA AVENUE. PAVED STREET. SIDEWALK. Ac.. SUITABLE FOB
BUSINESS BLOCK OB MANUFACTURING CONCERN. 60c. SQ. FT.
341.000 8Q. FT. OF GROUND ON H 8T. N.E.. WELL LOCATED FOB
BUILDING PURPOSES; ON A PROMINENT BUSINESS STREET CON
VENIENT TO STREET CARS AND HERDICS; GROUND IN VIC1NITT
SELLING FOR 50c. Sq. FT. AT 16c. SQ. FT. THIS IS A BARGAIN.
ECONOMICAL BUSINESS LOTS ON PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE. KEN
TUCKY AVENUE. 13TH AND 14TH 8T8. S.E. THIS PROPERTY IS
ADVANTAGEOUSLY LOCATED AND ON THE LINE OF THE PROPOSED
TRACTION RAILWAY. EXTENSIVE IMPROVEMENTS ARE BEING MADE
AND PRICES WILL ADVANCE RAPIDLY. PRICES 35c. PER FT. UPWARD.
CHOICE AND ECONOMICAL BUILDING SITES WITHIN 2*
8QUARES OF THE CAPITOL AND NEW NATIONAL LIBRARY
BUILDING. ON AN AVENUE WITH WIDE PARKING. SUR
ROUNDING IMPROVEMENTS FIRST-CLASS AND CONSTANTLY IN
CREASING. A CHANCE FOR A LIVE BUILDER. HOUSES IN
THIS LOCALITY RENT READILY. PRICES, $700 TO ?1.200 PER
LOT.
NO TROUBLE TO SHOW OUR PROPERTY. THR
SHOWING SELLS IT. BUY NOW WHILE PUCES
ARB LOW.
THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY.
NEAR WHICH LOTS SELL FOR 30c. SQUARE FOOT. IS ABOUT ONB
AND A HALF MILES WEST OF 100 ACRES OF HIGH AND BEAUTIFULLY
LOCATED LAND ON THE BUNKER HILL ROAD. THI3 TRACT IS NOW
OFFERED FOR BALE FOR THE FIRST TIME AND FAR BELOW THE
PRICE OF THE ADJOINING PROPERTY. A TWENTY MINUTES' DRIVE
OVER EITHER THE SOLDIERS' HOME. BUNKER HILL OR BRENTWOOD
BOADS WILL SUFFICE TO REACH IT. THE NEAREST RAILROAD
STATION IS RIVES. WILL SUBDIVIDE PROFITABLY AND IS AN UN
USUAL CHANCE FOR A SYNDICATE OR CAPITALIST TO INVEST IN
THK NORTHEAST SECTION OF THE DISTRICT. A BARGAIN AT $250
IH DROIT PABK.
UXU6UAL OPPORTUNITY FOR BUYING HOME8 IN LE DROIT PARK.
WE HAVE THE LARGEST ASSORTMENT OF HOUSES AND LOTS IN THIS
POPULAR SUBDIVISION; SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS IN THE WAY OF LOW
PRICES AND EASY TERMS. INTENDING PURCHASERS ABE INVITED TO
CALL AND OBTAIN SPECIAL BULLETIN.
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ONE OF THE CHOICE LOTS IN WOODLET PARK. CONTAIN
ING ABOUT THREE-QUARTERS OF AN ACRE, OVERLOOKING CON
NECTICUT AVENUE, THE ZOO PABK AND THE NEW BRIDGE
NOW BEING CONSTRUCTED OVER ROCK CREEK. WILL SELL AT
40 CENTS PER FOOT ON EASY TERMS. THE ATTENTION OF
PARTIES OF MEANS INTENDING TO BUILD A FIRST-CLASS
RESIDENCE IS ESPECIALLY CALLED TO THIS LOT. FUBTHEB
PARTICULARS ON APPLICATION.
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FBNXSYLVAN1A AVENUE EXTENDED.
FIFTY ACRES ON THE HIGH PLATEAU IN LINE OF PENNSYLVANIA
AVENUE EXTENDED. ABOUT 31* MILES FROM THE CAPITOL AND
THREE-FOURTHS OF A MILE FROM NEW BRIDGE. THIS VALUABLE
TRACT LIES ON BOTH SIDES OF PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE EXTENDI D
AND ABOUNDS IN BEAUTIFUL VILLA SITES. COMMANDING ORAND
PANORAMIC VIEWS OF WASHINGTON. SEVERAL ADJACENT PUB
DIVISIONS, NOT HO DESIRABLY LOCATED. READILT SELL FROM 5 TO
10 CENTS PER SQUARE FOOT. THIS PROPERTY WILL MAKE A
SUPERB AND PROFITABLE SUBDIVISION AND ? AN BE PURCHASED AT
THE LOW PRICE OF 850.000.
ON AND OFF THE STAGE
8ome Interesting Notes on Interest
ing Topics From New York.
A STRANGE COMBINATION.
Booth and Sullivan a* a Dramatic Team?
How PoublM Can Hoodwink AutlUmi-,
The S|mni?li l> anrlng t'ad?AntlqulU I In
Um Ballet Corp*.
8[ ?lal Comapon.lea.s of Thr Evsnine Star.
New York, Jan. 23.
ONE OF THE MOST WIDELY KNOWN
of the current farces in which two gro
tesque comedians are coupled in the usual
Bunr.t r an stars haJ j'?t finished a week at a
theater in the Bowery. One member of the
duo wu ill in a h wpiul. but the audiences saw
? ami heard him in the play notwithstanding his
absence. He hut for several seasons been u ,
favorite with tlieui. they had enjoyed his per
form .nee before in the same role, and how i
could they bo Eii->Uk~n as to hi* identity? Yot i
they were. An imitation actor ww the substi
tute *ud so clo m -VJM the likoness that nobody
doubted thnt it was the origiiul Clever coun
ts rfi its of that sort are frequently passed upon
theatrical audiences, and perhaps it w is those
successes of mimicry that led a manager to i
make a queer proposition to Talm :ge.
r*? ju?t ha<l an opportunity to duplicate '
myself," said the Brooklyn pc!j it orator to
your correspondent. "A theatrical manager |
think** he has dw .ivered an act >r who cau look
ami speak precisely a* 1 do. The scheme is to
have me provide this actor beforehand with
the manuscripts of Sunday morning sermons
and authorise Kim to deliver them *in charac- i
ter simultaneously with my utterance of them |
herein Brooklyn. Mv doable would be taken
front city to city, hn!!s hired for his iue. ad- i
mission fees cU..n;r 1 and half the proceeds ;
tamed over to our tabernacle builJint; fand. !
Wasn't that a curiocs idea? It was almost a
J,ih to ?ay "no.""
it is only with stars of the middling or minor ,
grade V..*t the fooling of audieuci- by sub- {
stitutes can oe accomplished, as a rule; yet it |
has of tea beer, done in th?- caae of Nat Good
win, wIiom conviviality hos to be insured
agairst <iamage. lju-t season ' "harles Coote ap
peared in the guise i4 (*oodwin so cl'??e to New
York us j;:it across tlie river in Jersey City. ,
while Goodwin hll.isulf was jolly off the stage
on Cr< adwsv. Sometimes a star in need of
rest or luipcilvd "ov unrent business or inerelv
laziness will seinf a sol??t:t'lte through a week
of "one-night stands." without the really harm
lass Iruud being detected.
TH* OLD TrS* ALTERED.
One of the things that are successfully dis
guised in the theaters is an old tuus. The ?
greater proportion of the catchy airs ere ?
merely alterations of former favorites, which. '
it would be supposed, could not so easily es
cape recognition. Gen. Sherman is nn invet
erate attendant st dramatic performances in ,
this citv, and he has a habit of ni liing com- ;
ments in a loud tone as Uie performance goes
?m- Still, a deep respect for the old warrior
makes even his interruption* more interesting
than annoying to most people. A| a musical
comedy the other night an actress sang the
popular ballad "I'own on the Farm." anil she
did it very neatly and sweetly; bat all through
it Sherman slapped one hand on his knee in
r% thin with the melody, and during the chorus
tills demonstration became really noisy, while |
?n audible humming of the air came to s :
climax in an explosive exclamation as the song
stress finished. a
"I thought so." he sai.L, in a vans audible to
half a dozeu neighbors. ' I~ha(M only a n
vamp of Trail'. Tramp."* I
So it was, as the reader may boMamonstrate
by playing one tuiie after the uth^fen a piano.
booth's TinmnanT.?
A few (lays before Billy O Brien died crazy i
he had the most singular interview with Edwin
Booth imaginable. O Brien had been in the '
?how business in a rough and tumble way. It was
be who managed several of the six-day ped-s- j
trian races, of some of the pugilistic events in ,
which Sullivan figure 1 sad of other exhibitions
of muscular achievement. His dementia
developed suddenly, and in the first stages of !
the mental disease- which so speedily killed
km no peculiarity of manner or speech was I
..uxi. urn; nigDi ne vat ]3 a Broadway
theater where Booth was the occupant of ii
proscenium box. The taciturn tragedian was
the central ami silent figure in a group of
sycophantic, hero-worshiping acquaintance-, as
usual, and many observers wondered whether
ho was suffering from their obsequious atten
tions as keenly us he seemed to be, or whether
he secretly enjoyed the adulation. That ques- |
tion is a puzzle to persons close to Booth and '
conversant with the eccentricities of his genius. ]
He has never publicly spoken or written a word j
of theory or opinion regarding the drama; he!
cannot be led into conversation with casual '
acquaintances on the subject, and if ever he
utten his views on a topic of the stage it is
fuite confidentially to very intimate friends,
he writer once went to him with a request to
contribute an article to a periodical published
at a fair held by the famous Seventh regiment, j
A wore of the mm; eminent men in the couu- .
try had consented, bnt BoBtli firmly declined, i
"Sit down there," he sa.kl, pointing politely j
to a chair beside a lable on tne veranda of his '
summer villa, "and help ine with the beer and
tobacco." He was smoking a clay pipe and he j
be?nn to fill auother fro;] a canister of tobacco
that steed on the table. ? I can't oft'er you a
cigar, because I haven't one. I like a pipe
beiter. And this pitcher contains ale that s
been bottled. I prefer it that way."
No host of a stranger was over more gracious.
But he would not talk at ali 0:1 theatrical topics.
He chatted and listened when other things
were under discussion, but as to the crrar.d of
the visitor he would only snv that he had no
theories of acting, and couldn't express them
interestingly if he had them. Sow, how does
he find any satisfaction in the society of tho j
men who filled that theater box. and his oars, j
with conversation about theatricals'/
fcOOTH AND sri.LIVAV AS A TEAM.
It was on Ins way out of tlie theater that j
B >o;h encountered Billy O'Brien. The actor j
was leaning heavily on a cane as he walked, j
and his decreptitude was painfully manifest.
Billy joined him in the passageway and bluntly |
yet politely said: "Mr.Booth. I'm Billy U Brie 11, |
the sporting man. I vc handled some of the
best men in the prize ring. What yon want to I
do is to get to work."
It is a fact that Booth, although compelled |
by bad health to abandon the stage at the very ,
time tli^d upon for a long New York city 1
engagement, is better when acting; and so the
proposition commanded his attention. He 1
not-bled along beside the impertinent sport |
and gave ear to him.
"Ive got a scheme, and I'll give it to you |
straight." Billy wtnt on earnestly. "You want j
to doable up with John L. Sullivan."
Here the tragedian ejaculated. "Eh?" en
couragingly, for he thought that some plan '
for beneficial exercise was in view. Billv con
tinued: "There s big money in it. You'll play
(h-lmvlo in 'As You Like It'and Sullivan he ll
plnv the wrestler. Sec?"
What the great actor saw may have been a
vision of himself in a wrestling match witu tile'
great slugger, and, a-ide from any purely ar- i
tistie damage v.hich he might suffer from a
"doubling up" with John L., the probability j
01 more material t.i m may have arisen viv- 1
idly to his mind. lie glanced at Billy per
ple.vedlv and parsed on. The demented sport
ing man diet! with the scheme of a Booth-Suili
\an combination in his muddled mind.
T3I CAUincrtA JfAD.
The case of this Spanish danccr, Carmencita,
is illustrative of the fact that the unexpected is
what usually happens in the show business.
She was a ballet danccr in the theaters of Spain
at wages of never more than *20 a week, that
being lair remuneration in that coontry of gar
lic and bruneta. During the Paris exposition
she tiguied among the Spanish adjuncts as an
exhibit of tho peasant dances of her country,
and her pay was doubled. American mana
gers were on the lookout for novelties to bring
across the ocean, and two of them decided that
Curuiencita would prove a profitable import.
They bi 1 against each other, until one of them
offered tlOil a week for a term of four months,
in r. spectacular piece here in New York her
contortivu dancing did not please the specta
tor- much, and she engaged another manager at
the hundred dollar salary, having signed a con
tn.ct for a year. Then the strange thing hap
pened. An artist, desiring to amuse a gathering
of friend* m his studio, hired Carmencita to
dance before them. Paul Dana of the Not saw
the performance and was so struck by its nov
elty that he ordered the publication of a long
illustrated article about it. That started the
< armenciia boom. Other journals followed
with depiction. It becameia fad for parties of
fashionable ladies to fill the boxes. The Yander
bilts and the Astjr- had Carmencita daneing at
their receptious. Other Spanish dancers, real
and imitation, bnt nearly all of them quite as
excellent as Carmencita, were employed in the
traveling farces and burleeaues, until now all
American cities have had all they want of them.
Carmencita is famous, and she can go back to
Madrid a rich woman, as Spanish fortunes go.
But if she had been a prophetess, able to fore
see Ler freakish triumph. she might have se
cured to herself at least half of the iylOO,OUO
which will be made by the end of her year.
ANTIQCITY IS THE BALLET.
It seems that the jokes about matronliness in
ballets are not unfounded. A troupe now en
gaged in a Broadway theater actually contains
three nu mbers whose relationship are those of
grandmother, mother and daughter. The state
ment is more of r. shock, however, than the
sight of these three graces. The grandmother
is a year or two under fifty, and a graceful,
supple woman yet, with a face whose lines of j
age can readily be smoothed over with the 1
chalk and rouge of imitation youth. She looks
no more than sixty per ccnt of her years. The j
mother is thirty r.nd the granddaughter only
fourteen. There is a strong family resemblance i
in the trio, not only facially, but because they j
arc of almost precisely th same size and shape. ;
One of tliiir contributions to the entertainment
is a skirt dance and in the play-bill they are
declared to be sisters. It may fie worth a re
cord. Moreover, thnt grandma can kick
higher than either of her descendants.
Kickero.
POLITICS AM) THE t'AIK.
Illinois Legislator* Who Want the Election*
lllll Tabled.
The Illinois senate yesterday passed unani
mously the house joint resolution thanking
other states for making appropriations in
behalf of the world's fair.
A resolution was introduced setting forth '
that the legislature of Alabama had laid upon
the tabic the proposed appropriation for a j
state exhibit at tlie.world's fair on the ground |
that if the elections bill pending in Congress |
should be passed such nn exhibit would be of
no value to the state, uud calling upon tho Illi- I
nois delegation in Congress to vote Against tho j
passage of the elections bill i n tho interest* of t
the fair.
Motions to table and refer to a committee j
were defeated by the full democratic vote, aided j
by the three Fanners' .Mutual Benefit Associa- j
tion votes and one republican. In the course
of the debate it was pointed out that tho two
Senators from Illinois hold the balanco of power
in the Senate and can defeat tho passage of the
bill.
i'ending action on the resolution the hour for
the joint session of the House and Senate to
ballot for United States Seuator arrived and the
matter went over.
After the eighth ballot for the day and the
twelfth of the contest, without change, the
joint assembly adjourned till today.
MISSOCIU WILL WAIT.
The resolution which was tabled in the Mis
souri house Thursday in reference to the world's
fair appropriation bill was called up again yes- 1
terdnv and was passed. It declares it the reuse j
of the house th.it no appropriation should bo
made for world's fair purposes while the elec
tions bill is pending in Congress, and, further,
not a penny shall be expended by Missouri
should the force bill become u law.
The Dead l>lglan Prince.
The official bulletin issued by the court phy
sicians of Belgium states that Prince Baudouiu
died of congestion of the lungs, caused by a
chill which he contracted while watching at
the bedside ol his sister, the Princess Henrietta.
The remains of the prince now lay in state on
the bed on which he died, surrounded by tall '
wax candies in golden candlesticks. The body
of die prince is ut tired in the handsome uni
form of a captain of the Koyal Belgian Carabi
neers. In one hand the dead priuce grasped
his sword and the other hand held a handsome j
rosary, from which is pendant a golden cross. |
The features of the prince ate calm, pale and |
placid and apparently not in the slightest de
gree changed by death.
Guarding the door of the bed chamber and
the palace l* a guard of honor from the Carabi- j
neer regiment, to whicu the prince belonged, i
Officers of that regiment, in full uniform and I
with drawn swords, will guard the prinoe s ?
bodv nniil it is tinallv laid to rest in the burial
vaults of the royal family of Belgium. Among
the additional facts gathered in connection with
the prince's death i* the news that King Leo
pold visited the dying prince's bedside at mid
night and that the ministers hail previously
been called to the palace of th* Count of
Flanders.
False Ecokoxt
Is practiced by many people, who bay Inferior
articles of food, because cheaper than standard
goods. Sorely Infants are entitled to the beat food
obtainable. It is a fact that the Hall Borden
"Eagle" Brand Condensed Milk to the best Infant
food. Your grocer keeps It
MADE BY DEFT HANDS.
Skill of tlie Native Indian Workers of
Nicaragua.
? STAR CORRESPONDENT^ EXPERIENCE AS ?
RELIC HUNTER?WOMEN WHO CAP.VE CHOCOLATE
CUPS BEAUTIFULLY?FILIOKEE WORK? MAKINO A
HAMMOCK?ANTIQUITIES NOT EAST TO OBTAIN.
Correspondence of The Evening Star.
Okanada, Nicaragua. Dec. 30.
4 MERICAN3 ARE FAR-FAMED RELIC
*- buuters. and following a natural instinct
wu determined to make the moat of our oppor
tunities for ferreting out interesting native
work and antique remains of the aborigines of
Nicaragua. My companion, Mr. 8. C. Rruida.
has traveled in many odd comers of tho earth.
A professor of languages at Princeton, speak
ing perfectly half a dozen idioms, he gare up
the dull routine of a collcge life two years ago
and has siuce been iu the active service of the
Nicaragnan Canal Construction Company. On
tho staff of Chief Engineer Menocal he now
accompanies him on a trip to the capital and
inspection of the work west of the lake, and
while the chief engineer is engaged in official
matters we find time to go hunting?hunting
for what is odd and curious in Nicaraguan handi
work.
It is almost impossible for one accustomed
to uctive commercial life in the states and un- i
tutored in the wnys of people here to compre
hend the ways of doing business, the possibil
ities of trade here and the mechanical genius 1
of the people that, through the force of eir- I
cumsUnces, has been allowed to lie largely dor
mant through past generations. The idea that ]
is very prevalent that tho peoplo living in these
warm climates are indolent beyond reclama
tion is shown to be false in many ways. As
sturdy laborers the canal company can find no
better employes than those it hires here, and
one who travels through tho country seed evi
dences of induatrv, handicapped by a lack of
improved methods, that would be a power if
properly guided. After all, in dealing with
questions of national character, the immediate
incentive to effort and the possibility of finding ;
intelligent guidance in work is answerable for j
a large part of what is accomplished by a peo- |
pie. Here we find, in abundance, the native
mxtinct for the execution of artistic work, but
on the one hand tho local market is too nmall
to bring an industry to any large proportions
nnd the work done is not of the kind that can
be exported except as curiosities.
CUP C'AKYEBS.
Of half a dozen cities of the country with pop
ulations ranging from 10,000 to 40,000 each has
n distinct class of work that is turned out, and
what you will find at one place is made nowhere
else. " We started our htint for curiosities at
Rivas, less than twenty miles from the Pacific
anil west of the groat lake, as p.re all the larger
settlements of the country. At an outlying
town to which we are guided we stop before
the liars that form the only gateway to the cac
tus hedge, and taking down the top ones, en
ter the yard. Our every step is contested by a
couple of dogs that bark, but retreat before us.
They are useful in bringing out to the doorway
of the adobe house a young girl with Indian
features, who calls off the canines and salutes
us with a "buenos dios." This young girl and
her sister are known as the carven of "jiearas,"
or chocolate cups, in a manner that no others
can equal. We enter the living room of tho
house, walking on the hard clav floor, and
inquire if she has any of her work on hand.
Hhe goes to an ad joining room and bring* forth
a single sample, a gourd beautifully carved
with forms of birds amid a mechanical design
encircling it, the piece being cut off at one end
to form a cup. We succeed in getting two or
three ticaras and if we want more we must
order them and wait for weeks. The custom
of working by order is so prevalent here that
it is almost impossible to find anything ready
made of any kind. Later on we vitit another
expert carver, but her work is of a different
style, her designs being made np of shields of I
the various Central American republics, whioh
she copies from silver pieces of rnonev. They
each do their work with the point of an old
table knife, the latter carver being surrounded
bv a brood of rather dirty-faced children, who
plav on the mud floor of her cane nous*.
A third carver of fine work we And here uses
only the cocoanat as his material, and this he
adorn* with birds and shields, afterward stain
ing them black, which gives the whale a rich
ebony appearance. The jicara is the drinking
cup of the country for the mas* of the people,
and at nearly every house it is common to see
a tree-shaped stand within doors on which they
hang. Every cup is carved in some fashion,
butif yoa want fin. carving you will be told
tossnd to Rivao. If yon give m order and
have pati.no. yoa oaa have any design imi
tateil by tho?e carvers, whose work is quite
handsome and artistic. There are others who
carve ringK and ornaments of the ceyol nut,
used in making Jewelry, each workman confin
ing himself to a separate branch of the work.
MAKING A HAMMOCK.
But now we want a hammock. We can find
none where the cups are made, though the
plant which gives the fiber needed for it a manu
facture grows here us readily as anywhere in
the country, and we are met by the sight of
hedges of it on all sides. We must go to Leon
or to Masava and there probably not find a
single hammock ready to bo sold. We
must order them and wait for a month or so
until they are made. The Ind'aus are the
manufacturers of these Imnimoekt. the easy
chairs and lounges of the country, iu which
midday siestas are taken. Visiting the neigh
i borhood where they are made our attention is
i attracted by a couple of Indian girls and a man
? backing across the road from one of the yards
of the houses, each with a bundle of fiber in
hand and gradually lengthening, a cord being
twisted from the other end. As we approach
we notice an old Indian several hundred yards
from the others turning a great wooden wheel,
which gives to the strands the rotary motion,
allowing the makers to feed the fiber to the
! end, thus twisting it into longer and longer
j pieces. It is kept from the ground by pronged
i sticks oil which It rests. Starting ut the great
I wheel those feeding the fiber retreat hundreds
j of yards in any direction in Which they can go
| iu something like a straight line. When the
single threads are so made two of them are
I twisted together for greater strength, and with
this material in another portion of the yard,
I which is well shaded by mango, tamarind,
plantain and other varieties of trees, we can
| tee men or women weaving a net not unlike a
seine, striped blue. red. yellow and white,which
forms the body cf the hammock. Two poles
ore placed perpendicularly in the ground and
the weaving is done with a large wooden
needle from bottom to top. On order any
variety of design will be worked, a hammock
forming an American Hag being a favorite.
When the body is knit the cords for suspend
ing it, with a fringe of tassels, are
added. Wishing to purchase we inquired from
house to house where the weaving was in
progress, but could find no completed ham
mock. The Indians doing this work all live in
cane houses .with mud floors and a fire for
cooking on the ground, in true wigwam style.
The labor is all done in the open air. What do
they do when it rains? They rest, but then tho
dry season here lust* for six months, and dur
ing that time seldom u drop of rain falls and
the Indians are never interrupted in their
work.
THE WEAVING or SHAWLS.
If we wish to Bee the weaving of shawls,
which are finely embroidered in bright colors,
we must go to Granada, where only lately heavy
shocks of earthquake drove the people from
their homes and where they are now busy re
pairing the cracked walls and broken tile roofs.
Working with weaving machines, fashioned in
the manner we are accustomed to see in
pictures of the tools of past centaries, we find
them. The spindles ure thrown from tide to
side by the weaver's hands and the woof is put
in with a treading motion of the feet. A little
engine and a few machines of approved pattern
would do the work of hundreds of these relics
of post generations. Hhawls are made of silk
and worsted and ono has only to go to church
on Sunday morning to see a display of them of
great variety.
fiugbib worn*.
The most interesting of the industries found
here is tl^e filigree work that is turned out
chiefly at Leon, Chinandega and Managua.
This is done in gold and silver, is of Venetian
style and the metal is of the same purity with
which it came from the mines. We have en
tered the shops of these plateroa, or silver
smiths, and we watched the delicate and rapid
manipulation of the threads of metal while
being formed into jewelry. Brooches weighing
from half ounce to an ounce of gold are made
with no hidden part of base metaL The coyol
nut. inlaid with gold and forming the setting
of a brooch or earrings, is used with fine ad
vantage and often skillfully carved. This nut
has the appearance of ebony and from it ring*
are also made, as they are of turtle chell, which
is very plentiful here on both the Pacific and
Atlantic coasts. The criticism of the work
that is at first suggested is the poverty in the
variety of designs in the articlee manufact
ured. .The capacity for doing fine work is
shown, but while the workers are able to copy
satisfactorily designs are lacking. It has been
suggested that a school of design be started
here to encourage such efforts that the results
of native labor may be suitable lor exportation,
which might be done, for labor is cheap. Fili
gree work is turned out in great quantities and
one has only to walk through the streets of any
of the cities to see who the patrons of this in
dustry are Nearly every woman met has or
. naments- -many of gold?brooches worn with
chains of gold beads. linger ring* and earrings
I in abundance. There in evidently a great fond
ness for jewelry. Among the maww of the
] people theHe native-made ornaments are very
j popular, but, as everywhere clue, that which u
j "foreign'' verv often has the preference among
the upper classes, tnough it may not l>e so
! tasteful. Parician jewelry is eold on all hands
and diamonds are the most popular of the pre
cious stones. and they mceet a ready sale.
KVV STATUES.
Among the curioiu things found in Masaya
! are the mud figures made by the Indians. They
i represent familiar scenes here?women engaged
I in making tortillas, men and women packing
heavy loads, Ac., painted gaudily in red and
, yellow. They form quaint records of the life
of the people, but in ?kill of elocution do not
I equal similar work done by the Mexicans.
INDIA* AXTIyUITIER.
In our hunt for antiquities we have not been
! rewarded by any especially interesting discov
! erics, though for this purpose we have visited
outlying Indian villages, where such things
might be found. We have not been able to
1 carry on our searches in this line in the proper
way. The only sure way to And remains of the
aborigines that collectors would value would
: be to dig up the graves of some of the old In
dian burying places, time having r.Imost oblit
erated the monuments that have marked these
localities, though a number of them of great
j antiquity are still known. The island of Kopo
I tera, in Lake Nicaragua, and the neighborhood
| of Granada are especially promising fields.
1 Grana being, it is thought, the oldest settle
1 meut in the country known at the timo of the
discovery of tho new world. A curious
Spanish map. nearly three centuries old,
' that we have seen here showing tho American
discoveries of that time, which marks the
region west of the thirteen colonies as un
known, yet defines the shore line of Nicaragua
1 and her great lake plainly, and the only city
located is that of Granada, thenan Indian village
! of considerable size. Sonic pieces of pottery
! have been secured by us, they being dug up
; north of this place. The paiut on them is well
| preserved, though the rpecimens must be of
I great antiquity. An idol of stone with hideous
features, and a mold, which the Indians used
' in their work, are among these pieces. A pe
' culi&rity of the relics is that all are formed
' hollow and have inclosed pieces of loose clay,
shaped as marbles, which causes a rattling noise
when moved. All the pieces of bowls found
have this peculiarity, the supporting legs being
generally in the form of some hideous monster
or other fancy, but always with the loose
marbles within rolling about. The ,
hibit of burying household utensils
with the dead has preserved great stores of
these things, which can be had for the labor of
opening the graves. One of the most wonderful
of the remains of Indian work is found back of
Managua, on the shore of one of the many vol
canic lakes of that region. On the flat surface
of a large stone, located where the sun strikes
it, is painted in bright colors a figure of the >
sun, and when the full rays of that luminary |
strike the representation the reflection is daz- j
zling, so dazzling that the eye cannot long rest
upon it. At what time this painting was made
is not known, but it was evidently before the
discovery of America, yet the paint is as bright
and unafrected by the element* as when first
applied to the rock. Full of interest is a study
of this region and vary satisfactory the rewards :
that one will receive who devotes a few months
to a saunter through these out-of-the-way
place*. C. E. K.
A Genuine Novelty.
From Manser's Weekly.
He?"Will im go with me to the Lyoewm
tonight?"
She?'T? awfully sorry, bat I ?Mt
last evening with a theater party."
He?"Oh, I want you to go with m? te
to the play."
Wriltea for The Eveninir Star.
A UVtLV CIlKrSE.
An Adventure of Two Anaerteaa Officers In ?
Mexieau City.
A PBETTT OIBI.R RKKiHT EVER THE CArsE OFTH1
DIHCOVEBT?A ISUlHh CMIC, LI' r FINAL cap
tuce?the don's hospitality and the cmgc!
SAFE CONDt'CT SOT*.
ON A BRIGHT UOKNINO, IMMEDIATELY
after the full of Very Cruz, a coluuiu in
command of one of the volunteer generals- I
have forgotten which?swung out from Gen.
Scott's main army and took the road leading to
Alvarailo with th1 object of capturing that city.
Oil it* arrival at its objective point it wa? ft und
' that Hunter?Alvarado Hunter as he was after
ward called?had slipped into the harbor ?ith his
man-of-war and bugged the game. Here then was
a sourcc of much disappointment to those of the
! intended attacking force, who had visions of
brevets and good times generally on getting
into the city. Of course maledictions were
showered on Hunter's devoted head, still the
fact remained that to him belonged the glory
of having captured Alvarado and the trooj*
could do nothing but accept the situation. The
men of both services soon met amicably and
proceeded to reconnoiter every nook and
corner of the city, as soldiers and sailors will
do on such occasions.
Among them were two officers as gallant
gentlemen as ever drew a blade, old cam
?Hiigners and bosom friends, vho loved a lark
Letter than anything in the worlX These
worthies, whom I will designate ms K. and T.,
as usual with them, at once essayed to start up
some- fun. Sauntering along, passing bolted
and barred doors, thev finally came to a large
mansion fronting on tlie grand plaza, the door
of which was ajar.
A BLACK-ETED MEXICAN OTBL.
A canning looking, black eyed little Mexican
girl, who could not resist her curiosity to see
what was going on outside, peered through the
opening. Discovering her bright eyes the
troopers stopped short and commenced con
versation with her. She plead with them not
to enter the house as then- was a corpse within.
The conversation was. however, continued, and
the party soon found themselves withiu the
main door opening to the court.
To the right, and n? ar at baud, was another
door, which the girl pointed out as the door of
the room in which lay the corpse. T., it is very
probable, feeling tbe necessity of some support,
incautiously leaned against this door, which
sprung open, and he was precipitated into the
room headlong. Rolling over and over he landed
on the pallet on which lay the corpse.
The last of T.'s revolutions brought the hilt
of his saber in rude contact with the dead man ?
short ribs, when, wonderful to relate, he uttered
the sound "eouch." With that T. made a grab
for him, exclaiming at the same tine, "By
heavens, 8., he lives."
A LIVELY CO a PS E.
The corpae taking in the situation at once
made a vigorous bound,landing on his feet,and
with his winding sheet and ail fled precipi
tately from the room. As be passed 8. shied at
him a billet of wood, which only served to in
crease his speed. The trooj-ers immediately
E' ' ped out their sabers and gave chase. The
who had maintained her post at the front
, seeing the trio approach, quicklv threw
it wide open to allow tliem to pass, and as they
flitted by she fairly screamed with laughter
and called oat to her unfortunate master:
"Ran, ran, Don Pedro, the Americans are after
you."
There certainly was no need for this admoni
tion, for the don at the moment was putting
down his beat licks. The pursued and pur
suers bounded from the house into the plaza,
where this remarkable apparition brought forth
uproarious shouts and laughter from the people
there assembled, a number of whom joined in I
the chase of the now very animated oorpee.who j
was soon brought up all rtanding at the farther i
side of the square by an adobe wall, which he j
boldly leaped, and bowing low his head ran to
the corner of an inclosora, where ha ensconced
himself and awaited anxiously the arrival of
his pursuers.
la a few moments the trwpeis ware steading ,
over his with their drawn sabers. After sur- '
?eying the frightened don for a tew
the ridiculousness of the situation appeared to
them and they enjoyed ? hearty Laugh, in
wnicn me nptina corpue jomfu.
whole affair
So
when they made their way to the plan. wfai re
they were oner more greeted with roara of
laufhter. The people by thin time hud lea -ned
tlmt the corpse ?? none other than the ali'sMu,
Don Pedro Mono*. who I'Uyrtl dead. villi the
object of saving birnwlf irorn arrest or M*
It station. From toe taa/a the troof* rw mmii
r?ou Pedro to his home. on reaching which
be cordially invited bis new-made friend* to
enter.
Fro* the hospitable mansion of Hon- Pedro
Muno* it was said tlmt sounds ol revelry were
beard that night and continued till the we?
i mail bourn of mora, when a clanking of ssber*
was again lienrd and our tr<?op? r friend ? ?|s
peared on tilt aide walk in front ol Dun I'udro a
residence.
4 tTMQnt *?rTor???.
There they held a few mii.tit-n' conversation
during which S. said be intended. as Don,
Pedro was a joily good fellow, to give him a
little better safeguard than the one be had iiu
pro vised the evening before.
T. at once expostulated with him and sug
gested that serious consequence might result
from this assumption of authority on bin part?
all of wliieb mud; no impression ou 8.. who.
taking from bin pocket an old lette r, wrote on
the back of the aaine tbe following lined:
"Trillium n i In lilii|iiy to the armies of tbe
United State- employed in foreign ]>a; Ik shall
force a safeguard shall suffer death.
After having aftiKed this aateguard to the
door of tbe don's mansion he turned to T. and
Bald: 'H ome. T., let's get out ..f thin." W ith
that the precious pair went rolling along the
sidewalk toward camp, which they reached in
time to be rcjxirted present at reveille. h-A
Canada Ki?d> tu Kwtpmeate.
Hon. Mr. Chapley, secretary of state for
Canada, in a recent address delivered, referred
to the extended powers of Secretary Maine
and said In believed that Mr. ltlauie was. in but
innermost h. art, a friend of Canada. He said
that thi we who argued that < 'anada must sur
render her growing industries to the United
States are opposing the wlshe? of the |?ojile at
tbe dominion. It is impossible, be declared,
t" have free trade with tbe Cnited State* and
at tiie same time to discriminate against Eng
land Canada was. however, prepared for free
trade relations with tbe United Mates. He was
in favor of full reciprocity with the United
States in natural products. If at any Urn*
there was an expression of ill-feeling between
the ttro countries it never went from this aid*
of tbe line. Canada wants to deal with the
Cnited States as nation to nation
IMnner to Mrarj M. Mauley.
Tbe Arrangements for the dinner to be given
next week at Delmonico's by the New York
Press Club to Mr. Henry M. Stanley are now
complete. Th re will be speaking bv many
En>ons outside of those on the regular toast
t. The following are tbe invited guests and
tbe formal toasts to which thev will respond:
"The iireas." Murat Halstead. "Whv we lova
Sew iork city," Hon. Cbauncey M DepeW:
"What the world owe* to Guttenberg al
Faust," Col. Bobert G. Ingersoll, "Tbe press
as seen from the pulpit," Bev. T. De Witt M
mage; "The old army, Gan. W. T. Sherman;
"The new navy," Admiral D. L. Braine; "The
future of American literature." Mr. Klehard
Vctioii Gilder; "The development of Ameri
can art." Mr. J. Q. A. Ward: "The serious side
of life?' Bill Nye; "Sew Tor* and its law
makers," Speaker Wm. F. Hheehan.
George H. F.ngeman. Wm. A. Engeman, J no.
J. Engeman, Andrew H. Batteraby and Charts*
B. Haas, the Clifton race-track Managers and
owners, were arraigned yesterday in l'ateraoa,
N.J.. on the charge of keeping a disorderly
house at Clifton. They pleaded not guilty.
Each was raquired to furnish (A.000 bail aid
their trial was set down for next Wednesday.
hytoaa Insist sa ramsU's 1
A meeting of the committee of the MoOar
thyite section at the Irish members at parlia
ment took place in Dublin veeterdav and was
largely attended. Mr. Timothy D. Mealy pre
sided. During the coarse of 'an address Mr.
Healy said that Mr. Jim tin McCarthy and Mr.
Thomas Sexton had gone to meet Mr. John
Dillon and Mr. Wm. O'Brien at Bon
Mer. Mr. Healy added that the object of Iks
visit of Messrs. McGarthv and Sexton to Bou
logne was to effect a settlement of the trouble
existing in the lru* parliamentary party on
the basis of Mr. Pnrnell retiring tram the
leadership. No othsr condition, said
Hsaley, would be sgrsed upon ss

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