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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, July 31, 1897, Image 22

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IN4 AN EN(
OUR BLACK DIAMONDS
Facts About the Coal Fields of the
United States.
A SOURCE OF ENORIOUS REIFIUE
Worth More Than All Our Gold
and Silver Mines.
THEIR WIDE DISTRIBUTION
eeopyricht..l. 1.97. by Frank G. Carpenter.)
Wrlttaa ter Tihe Evening Star.
HAVE SPENT THE
last few days at the
-U rited States geolog
ical survey looking
up facts about coal
mining. The geolo
gists know more
about coal than any
one else. They can
tell you just how the
world looked when
coal was made, and
they desribe how
there were ages of
of luxuriant growth
(ensisting of pir.e trees, fir trees and
all kinds of mosses and plants, wh'ch,
dying down year after year. became
a great matted bed of vegetation. They
tell you how this bed was bottled up by
being covered up with rocks and how it
finally turned into coal. They can tell you
just when this happened and how long it
came to pass before Noah was a baby or
Cain killed little Abel outside the Garden
of Eden.
Men lived for thousands of years upon
the earth before they knew that coal was
good to burn. All the iron made before the
days of the middle ages was with charcoal.
and a fairy tale is toll in toIgium of how
a poor blacksmith discoveredl the tirst black
diamonds. He found that he could not get
along. for it took so much time to make
his charcoal for his furnace. He was just
about to commit suicide when a white
bearded obd man appeared at his shop and
told him to go to the mountains near by
and dig out the black , arth and burnt it.
lie did so. and was able to make a horse
shoe at one forgirg. This is the Belgian
story of the discovery of coal. The first
coal foun in America was near Ottawa.
Illinois. It is mentioned by Father Henne
pin. a Frenei explorer, who visited there
in 10ti. The firs: mines worked were about
Richmond. Va. This coal was discovered
by a boy white out fishing.
He was hunting for crabs for bait in a
small creek. and thus stumbled upon the
outcroppings of the James river coal bed.
Our anthracite coal fields have perhaps
paid better than any other coal fields of
the world. They were discovered by a
hunter namedt Nicho Allen. when G~eorge
Washington was President. Allen en
camped one night in the Schuylkill regions,
kindling his fire upon some black stones.
lie awoke to find himself almost roasted.
The stones were on fire, and anthracite
was burnng for the first time. Shortly
after this a company was organized to
sell anthracite coal. It was taken around
to the blacksmiths, but they did not know
how to use it. and it was very unpopuler.
Some of it was shipped to Philadelphia by
a Colonel Shoemaker and sold there. It
was not at all satisfactory, and a writ was
gotten out from the city authorities, de
nouncing the colonel as a knave anti scoun,
drel for trying to impose rocks upon them
as coal. Still Philadelphia has largely been
built up by anthracite coal, and -.tuI,455)
tons of this coal were taken out of the
Pennsylvania fields in 1i.k.
Since then some of the se coal lands have
been sold as high as $1,'5Ni an acre, and the
Philadelphia and Reading Company in
1171 paid S44besMasIehn for itsw,tumI acres of
coal land in this region. As L sample of
the amount of business done in anthracite
coal, the Delaware and Hudson Canal
Company paid $~.sMabeI in one year for
mining. and their coal sales that year
amounted to more than $14,teNI,t1he.
We Beat the World.
It is hard to estimate the enormous
amount of money the United States makes
out of its coal. We get more than three
times :se rauch Out of ouJr coal mines as
out of our gold mines, and the silver metal
is not in it with the black diamonds. There
Is a little region in e.astern Pennsylvania,
about a hundred and twenty-five miles from
Philadelphia anri n'>t more thar two hun
dlredl mites from New York, which pro
duces evecry year coal to a greater value
thai all the gold mines of the Rockies.
Canada and Alaska. It is our anthracite
coal fields which turn out between --M,4MN,
tms and ,5,s'.in.ib tons of anthracite every
year. We have in addition to this a hun
dred and thirty 041d million tons of bitu
mincus oal atnually. We have, in short.
the biggest andi besat coal measures on the
globe. It i estimated that our coal east
AaEX
of it coal
lfite Rommky mtont ca aoers ou of n
ditaa. met.k nd witin, the past gret
yArspalha bie prodes metan for
tome th famwest. Theorad ill mentood
bbabereath anfaturin Appatchon mcoun
tah tha ayre olelds, the wod he
cWaoing Wayte a to ttvingsoarethick,
ande in somenmnes theyo car almarOt of the
topna ofteground Illioiy and btherehal
Apacohira fields roducs mres eth, tu
onmes hsin esmeon. Ther is mre egood
aens tha Aankawhch, eoe if the gol.gcal
the i asyr o tat the veicns re tgidokr
and inlsme malins the shrp elot.o Thi
topaofkth round.l Theaby bre ubette tsp
any ther al~ trade. and titsrepctanc<
surveye appreteated whencotes remembereodc
that the largest fleet that sals~ the Pacifi<
is the coal fleet. Most of the coal from thai
regiana coma rnearo anstrania ana Japan
LISH MINE.
Much Australian coal is brought to San
Francisco. During my travels in Japan I
visited r ne coal mine which had fifty miles
of tunnels under the sea. and I learned that
the Japanese were making a great deal of
money out of their coal.
They were shipping it to China. notwith
standing the fact that the geologists say
that China has some of the largest coal
fields of the world. I doubt the extent of
the Chinese fields. The people are thrifty,
and it is curious that they do not use the
coal if they have it. They are among the
most economical of people, and in the dif
ferent Chinese cities coal is so valuable
that it is ground to dust and then mixed
with dirt, being sold in balls about the size
of a biscuit. It is interesting to know the
coal fields of the world, as estimated by
the geologists. Here they are:
China, 2151,tsnw square miles; United States
east of the Rockies. 1l1r'tss square miles;
Canada, ei5.1Np) square miles; India. 35,510)
square miles; New South Wales, 24,111)
square miles; Russia, 2(P.4il) square miles;
n'rited Kingdom, 11.I0 square miles;
Spain. 5.511 square miles; Japan, 5,001)
square miles; France. 2,0S0 square miles;
Austria-Hungary, 1.7.10 square miles; Ger
many. 1.770. square miles; Belgium, 510
secLare miles.
England'. Coal Playing Out.
From the above table it will be seen that
the English coal area is small. Still Eng
land has for years been the center of the
coal production of the world, and for years
it mined more than half the total amount
used by the world. The United States is
now probably ahead of it, and we are in
creasing our product every year. The En
glish coal veins are thin. The miners have
to lie on their sides to work many of them.
They have dug out the surface coal and1
they are now working at great depths. One
English vein, fourteen and a half inches
wide, is aheady down over twelve hun
dred feet. Such a vein would not he work
ed to any great depth in Amerira. The
Newcastle coal fielfi, which is the richest in
England, has veins from three to six feet
thick, while the Wales coal veins are less
than three feet in tnickness. Some of our
Pennsylvania anthracite veins run from
thirty feet to sixty feet in thickness, s.hile
the Pittsburg bituminous coal veins are
from eight to sixteen feet thick. At the
present rate of mining it is e.4imated that
all the English coal will be exhausted in
212 years if it is worked down to 41,00 feet,
and this will be 11:1 feet deaper than any of
the English mines now worked. Notwith
standing the enormous amoul:s of coal
which we have taken out of our anthracite
region it is estimated that we could go on
at the present rate for 61'; ;,ears.
As England goes further down her coal
mining will become more expensive, and
her days as a manufacturing nation are,
consequently, numbered. Already we sur
pass her a great deal in manufacturing,
and there is no doubt that we, with our
vast supplies of coal and iron, are to be
the chief manufacturing nation of the fu
ture.
Our Appalachian coal fields alone could
supply the world with fuel for centuries.
They ar- the largest and richest known,
and they are so situated that the coal caw
be shipped from them long distances by
water. From Pittsburg coal can be car
rie-l for eighteen thousand miles on navi
gable streans, and the grate fires of the
south blaze with the rays from the black
dianiotds from Pennsylvania. The Ohio
river is the great coal chute for the Mis
sissippi valley. The coal is carried down
it in great barges pushed by little steam
ers. and so fastened together that a single
steamer will push acres of coi!. Loads of
twenty thousand tons are taken. A vast
amount of coal is carried on the canals
and the great lakes form one of the chief
highways of the coal traffic.
The amount of coal carried on the rail
roads is almost beyond conception. The
Philade'9hia ndReading has more than
fifty thousand coal cars, which are dragged
by nin~e hundred coal locomotives. These
cars are kept busy in carrying anthracite
coal. The Pennsylvania railroad employs
more than seventy thousand cars for the
movement of its coal anid coke trade, and
the Central Railroad of New Jersey carries
about five million tons of anthracite coal
every year. More coal is handled at New
York than at any other place in the worldi
except London. more than fifteen million
tons being used or transshipped at that
point annually.
One would think that there would be a
lot of money in coal for the miners. There
is not, and it Is a question whether the
present strike will materially better mat
ters. As far as strikes have gone in the
pret, they have been against the working
men. So'ne years ago Carroll D. Wright,
the 1'nited Slates commissioner ot labor,
figured up th'e profit and loss of ten years
of striking in all branches of labor. He es
timnated that the employes during this
Itime lost fifty-nine million dollars. an av
erage of forty dollars to each striker in
volved, while the employers lost a little
more than half the amount, or thirty mill
ion dollars.
The coal miners live as poorly as any
other class of workmen in the country. For
the most part they are in dirty villagezs.
with narrow streets, their houses blackened
by coal smoke, In many mining distr'ets
the houseq belong to the company cwuning
the mines, and the miners pay ren': for
them, so that when a strike occurs and
they are out of money they are given or
ders to leave. Many of the houses have
nothing more than two roos anid a
kitchen, and in some places the only
stores at which the miners can trade are
american miners are far better off than
he miners of other countries. The coal
miners of Japan receive only a few cents a
lay. Both woien and men work in the
nines, and the foreign snips. which get
:oal at Japan are always loaded by women,
rha pass the coal up the sides of the ship
n ba-kets.
Wenen and Children In the !ines.
Women are still used in the coal mines
if -Belgium. They dress in trousers, just
Ike the men, and they do much the same
work They help load the coal, and in
ome of the mines they drag the cars
rom the tunnels to the bottom of the
shaft. L. tnimonin, a Frenchman, from
whose book on underground life the ilius
:rations of this letter are taken, describes
the horrors of their life in 'he mines. For
a long time women were used in this way in
England and Scotland, .nd it was not un
til about twenty-five years ago that parlia
ment passed an act keening them out.
Children are employed in the Belgium
mines today. The English and Scotch used
them for years. They were taken into the
mines at seven, eight and nine years of
age, and were kept there until tney grew
up. The English coal veins are very t'hin
and the tunnels were not more than a yard
high. These children - were used as beasts
of burden. They were harnessed to little
carts filled with coal, and had to crawl
along on all fours with belts about their
waists and chains between their legs drag
ring the coal carts to the surface. Women
became dcforrred by this work. They were
:dressed in trousers and shirts like men.
They learned to fight and swear like the
men and became bad characters. At the
tge of fifty they were usually worn out.
in Scotland young women were employed
to carry the coal on their backs out of the
mines. They dragged the coal to the foot
of the ladders and then loaded it on their
backs, holding it there by a strap around
the forehead while they climbed up the
ladders to get it to the surface. They
worked from twelve to fourteen hours a
day, and would do work, it is said, which
the men world not do. tramping through
the water with their loads of coal. Ac
cording to law women cannot be employed
in our mines.
Boys, however, have been largely us-ad.
They drive the mules, and in the anthracite
regions they pick over the coal, taking
the slate and refuse out of it. They get
from 50 to till cents a day for bending over
the dusty coal, roasting in the summer
and almost freezing in the winter. They
are frequently hurt, though it is by no
means as bad with our children as it was
with those of Europe a few years ago,
when in one investigation it was stated:
Thait they seldom slept with a whole
'kin, and that their backs were cut with
knocking against the roof and sides of
the tunnels, a..d that the walking in the
water covered their feet with festering
sores."
Some Dangers of Mining.
Have you ever been down in a coal mine?
If so you can appreciate some of the
dangers of. mining. A coal mine is like a
great catacomb. It is a city under ground,
the walls of which in many cases are up
1'eld by timbers. Now and then you come
to rooms out of which the coal has been
cut. The coal is taken down with blasting
powder, and there is danger of the wall
f[lling and of the miners being crushed.
There is also danger from fire damp, or
the union of the gases of the mine brought
together by the light from a lamp or can
dle. This causes a great explosion. It
comes like a stroke of lightning. anl with
a clap of thunder. As the explosion occurs
a roaring whirlwind of flame goes through
the tunnels, pulling down the timbers and
caving in the walls. It burns everything
within reach. Miners are blinded, scotched
and sometimos burned to cinders. Hun
dreds have often been killed at a time by
such explosions, and by the flood of car
bonic acid gas which follows them. The
statistics show that even in the United
States one miner is killed for every hun
dred thousand tons of coal minerl, and
those who are in,ured number many times
this proportion.
FRANK G. CARPENTER.
ARTESIAN WELLS.
Uncle Samn's Attempt to Get Water in
Texas.
From the Kansas City Star.
Artesian well' are now pouring a never
ending flood of subterranean water upon
the er.rth's surface in nearly every state
located within the well-defined limits of the
artesian well basins of this continent.
From British America to the Rio Grande
the busy drill has penetrated the varied
strata in search of water lying under a
pressure suflicieitt to raise it to the light
of day. In sine localities, notably In Utah,
a flow has been secured at a depth of less
than 415J feet. In other places thousands
of dollars have been expended in boring
3,4KNJ or even 4.455) feet toward the center
of the earth without results.
The average depth at which water is se
cured seems to be abcut 1,400 feet and such
a well under ordinary circumstances costs
between $2,.300 and $3.l1K). This is with the
imprnved machinery and trarm portation fa
cilities of modern days. Deprived of these
well boring becomes expensive to the point
of impracticability.
Uncle Sam dug a well himself many
years ago in the Panhandle of Texas. It is
the first attempt on record to secure an
artesian flow in the Lone Star state. It
was only 700 feet deep and no water ever
came to the surface from it. Since then
there have been hundreds of artesian wells
bored- in Texas which threw fine streams of
water and the pioneer hole has been for
gotten y all except a few cld-time fron
tiersmen who went on this peaceful mis
sion into a country which was far from
peaceful owing to the arti-eivilization
creed of the roaming Comanche Indians.
it was in 1857 that this attempt was
made, as the United States government
thought it advisable to have a water sup
ply for an arrr y post on the Staked Plains.
An elaborate expedition was fitted out un
der Captain Polk. who subsequently be
came a general. Equipped with the best
well boring apparatus available at that
time, a formidable wagon train, a force of
mcchanics and a guard of cavalry, the ex
pedition started from one of the posts rtear
the gulf coast. An apparently suitable
location was selected and the work begun.
Unfortunately for -the government. how
ever, the geological survey had not yet
reached that section of the country and
the well boring was purely experimental.
After going down 700) feet and failing to
strike flowing water t'he scheme was aban
doned and the expedition returned to the
place from which it came. This was the
first attempt ever made in Texas' to dig an
artesir~n well and it cost the government
over $100J.U00.
A CHICAGO PHILOSOPRER,
Why Mr. Dooley Didn't Attend the
Logan Celebration.
From the Tlmes-lieraldl.
"I knowed Logan, i tell ye, an' though
I'd 've nailed him with a chenk of anthra
cite twihty years ago, I'd put a wreath on
his grave today, It on'y takes a little
while to smooth Out th' char-ackter iv a
man that fought long an' hit bar-rd. But
not r'r Logan nor t'r Char-lea Stew
art Parn'il wud I thrust mesllf to
that crowd downtown. i've been there,
man an' boy, forty years, an' it's
twinty ne thim most since I see th'
lake. i've beer. in State sthreet foor or
flve times in all these years. I've been to
th' Audiotoroom twict an' wanst I wint
by th' Masonic Temple on me way to get a
car comin' fr'm th' city hail. What f'r
shud I lave quiet an' pace to dodge cable
cars an' have me pocket picked? If there's
annything goin' on I see it in th' -pa-apers,
an' it reads betther th'n it looks To me
th' Logan monymint is a h'undhred miles
high an' made iv geold. That's because I
niver seed it. If I'd gone with you it'd be
no higher than an Injun cigar sign an'
built iv o1' melted-down dog tags an' other
joiry. Th' crowd was magnificent to read
about; if I'd seen it it wud've been just a
million sweatin', badly dhressed people,
squallin' babies, faintin' women an' a bad
smhell. Th' sojers were sojerly an' gr-rand,
but if I'd seen thim close by i'd 've picked
out more thin wan man that'd r-run away
fr'm a cow. The bands piayed beautiful
in th' papers, but if I'd been on th' aurb
with a man with a tall fat standin' in
front iv me an' a woman behind me atin'
rock candy in me ear all th' bands'd stop
playin' befure they come by. So I set here
in th' cool shade, 'playin' solitaire with me
sif an' cheatin' outhra~geous, an' whin th'
pa-aperm come up I bought wan an' en
joyed th' gloryous scene f'r two hours. I
heserd t'h' oration; ye didn't. It was grand
an' th' man that made it knew more about
Shakespeare thin Logan did. But i'll bet
ye a hat he was a fat nian in a black coat
an' swabbed his forehead with a wet towel
between sintenoe.
"Glory be, I've often thought I- was lucky
not bein' prisint at. sme iv th' grand occa
aim== Then v-reeA eanout. T kruoned a em
ranut that see th' pope iv Rome an' he be
come a ragin' pagan. 'Why,' he says, 'he
was a little bit lv a thin man that didn't
neigh more thin wan hundhred pounds,' he
Lays. 'He cudden't cary a bucket Iv coal
ipstairs,' he sa
"He was a liar Mr. Hennessy.
"I believe he. 'said Mr. Dooley.
But he wiat ts -lust th' same."
Prom the Portland
In the middle a docopah hills, in
arisona, is what wn as the Lake of
[nk. Though su I y beautiful springs
)f clear water, e' uld of the lake is
flack and of a iA ike character. The
temperature va irm 110 degrees to 216
legrees, accordi to he location, and the
water feels am -I oily. According to
the Indians, not nd of the vicinity, but
tar away, the atest of the lake have
strong medicinal qualities, though most
white people would hesitate to adopt the
mode of treatment prescribed. The Invalid
Is buried up to his mouth in the hot vol
:anic mud for from twenty to thirty min
utes. Then he is carried, covered with
mud, to the edge of the lake, into which he
Is plunged for from lifteen to twenty min
utes, after which he is rolled In a blanket
and allowed to sweat on the hot, sulphur
ous sand or rock near by.' The cures
wrought are said to be wonderful.
Willing to Please.
Prom the Chicago Post.
"This is too much!" he exclaimed when
his wife appeared in her new baNting suit
for his Inspection.
"Do you think so?" the asked. "Well,
I'll take off six inches more of the skirt."
She-"Who was It that said, 'There's no
such word as fail?'"
He-"Oh, I don't know; song smart Alecic
who never tried to open a car window, I
suppose.":-Yonkers Statesman.
AUCTION SALES OF REAL ESTATE, &c.
Today.
Chancery sale of dwelling No. 3027 0 St. n.w., on
Sa.tunlay, July 31, at 5 o'clock p.m. Mahlon Ash-.
ford and Coasitantine i. Williamson, trustees. -
Monday.
Duncanson Bros., Aucts., 9th and D sts. n.w.
Trustees' sale of daelling No. 310 C st. u.w., on
Monday. August 2. at 5 o'clock p.m. Mahlon Ash
forl and Aldis B. Browne. trustees.
Thomas Dowling & t:,.. Aucts., 612 E st. n.w.
iSle of luoperty No. 25 and 27 Mnro' st., Ana
rostla. D.C., on Monday, August 2, at 5 o'clock
p.m.
AUCTION SALES.
MONDAY.
Ratcliffe, Sutton & Co., Auctioneers,
920 Penna. Ave. N. W.
0
Within our robms, (920 Penna. ave
MONDAY,
AUGUST 2,
At 1l0 A0 M0 &
4:30 P. 1.
For Ladies and
Gentlemeno
These wheels are strictly
high=grade, with factory
guarantee. Assortment of
colors and sizes of frames.
Now on exhibition.
Ratcliffe, Sutton & Co., Auctioneers,
920 Penna. Ave. N. W.
jy29-3t
DUNCANSON BROtK, AUCTIONEERS.
TRUSTEES' SALE OF THE TIIREE-'rTORY AND)
ATTIC BRICK DWELLING, WITH BRICK
STABLE IN~ REAR, No, 310 C STREET NORTH.
WEST.
By virtue of a certain deed of trust to us dated
Marc'h 30, 1897, and duly recorded Mlarch 31, 1897.
In Liber Nc 2099, at folio 448 et seq., of the land
records of the District of Columbia, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, we, the un
dersigned trustees, will sel at public auction, in
front of the mrnises, on M4'AY, THE SECOND)
DAY OFi AUGUST. A. D. 1897, at FIVE O'CLOCK
P. M4., the following described' land and premise.,
situata, in the city of Washuington, In the District
of ColumbIa, and designated as and being all of
lot numbered thirty-four (34) in reservution num
bered ten (10). together with the improvemuents,
consisting of a three-story and attic brick dwelling
house, No 810 C at. n.w., and the brick stable in
the rear of same.
Terms of male: One-third of the purchase money
to be paid in cash -ad the balance in two equal
installments, payable in one and two years. with
interest at ala (6) per cent per annum, pyable
semi-annually. from day of sale, secured bydeed
of trust upon the vroperty sold, or all cash. at the
option of the pur. luser. A deposit of $400 will he
required ->f the purchaser at the time of male. All
conveyancing, recording and notarial fees at the
purehaser's cust. Terms of sale to he complied
with within ten days from day of sale. othe'rwise
the truates reserve the right to resell the prprty
at the risk and cnst of the brcaser in defaut.
A LN ASiIFOltD,
- ISiROWNE,
jy20-d&ds Trustees.
THOM AS DOWLING & Ctl.,AUCTIS., 612 E MT.N.W.
AUCTION SALE OF VA BLE BUSINESS PROP
ERTY. NOSI. 25EAND 27 MONROUE STREETr,
ANACOHnTIA,
On MiONDAY, AfUW SE!OND. 1897, At
FIVE O'CLOCK P.3!,Wwill sell, at public auc-.
tion, in froat of tSIatlises, Nos. '25' and '27
Monroe street, AngestU. D. C. Impirovena,-ata
coneisting of a brick and frame store and 'weltling.
Terms: Sold subqe to a trust of $1,500, bal
snce cash. $100 dst1)eurdat time of sale,
and all conveyaneit recorditng at the pr
chnser's coalt. T'ruof ile to lbe complied wit in
flfteen days, or tb~ui~ y will he resold at th
risk and est of pukllitrhser. j27-d&ds
FU'(VRN DAYS,
RATCL1FFE, SU'r'ION & CO., AUCTIONEERS.
'T0 WHOM IT MA&1 ~CElk, TO PAY STOR
'AOE IHAGmII, &c.
I will .ell at the uoa.i Ratellffe, Sutton & Csu.,
9R) Pa- ave. n.w., a A RDtAY THE SEV'ENTH
DAY OF AUGUST, A.Dt187, Ar TEN O'CLICK~
A.M., a lot of househld goods stored with me in
the name of F. H. Jones. All parties interested
will please take notice.
jy3l~ 31UENE MAY.
WALTER B. WIULIAMS & CO., AUCIONERS,
Bicycle
Sale Extraordinary.
Hamilton-Kenwood
1141T -MOD)ELS.
Strictly H1Igh=Class Wheels
and Fully (luaranteed.
To he soid at bhc slAt oar sales m sear
WEDNEEAY. AU , at~
3EN 4..K -ad IrUUR P.M.
Wait for this great s.
AUCTION SALES.
. RUE DAYs.
DUNCANSON BROS., AUOIOXNSMi.
TR.UWF!' SAI OF A NEAT AND AT'RAC
TIVE TWO-SHroRY BRICK DWULtI l, t)N
TAINING SIX ROOMS, BATH AND ALL
MODElTN MI'MROVXI~ENTS, IN THE NORTH
WE iT SuCTION OF THE CITY KNOWN AS
rilEMIst 1231 T STRElrn NORTHWkiT.
IOT IS 18x100 FENT.
By virtue of a certain deed of treat dated the
twenty-second (22di) day of October. A. D. 1896.
and recorded among the land records of the Dls
trict of Columbia, in Uter 2167. in folio 70 -*
seq., and at the ieqaest of the holder of the otes
secured thereby, we will offer at public auction.
in front of the premises, on TI ESDAY. THE
TENTH DAY OF AUUST, A. D. 181)7. AT FIVE
O'CLOCK P.M., the following described real estate.
situate in the city of Washington, District of Co
lumbia. and known as and described as follows:
All that certain piece or parcel of land and prem'
ises known and distinguished as and being lot let
tered "Q" in W. B. Todd. Jr.. et aL. aubdivison in
sumre numbered two hundred and seven'y-fotr
4 4), as per plit recorded in Liber C. H. B.. tollis
167 of the record of the ollce of the surveyor cf
the District of Columbila, and situated in the cl.ty
of Washington, in said District, together with tie
improvements thereon.
Teres of sale: Property to be sold subject to a
deed of trust for $2,50, dated October 12, 1l92.
and due 4h-toter 12. 18148, and interest on the
same from O-tober 12. 18496. at 6 per cent per an
num until paid. Balance of the purchase money to
be paid In ash. A d"'posit of $1,10 will be required
at the time of sale. Sale to be eoed within fif
teen days from day of sale. otherwise the property
to be resold at the risk and cost of defaulting pur
chaser ifrer five days' advertisement In some pa
per published in the city of Washington, D. C.
Conveyancing at the cost of purchaser.
LOUIS D. WINE.
CLARENt'E B. RHEEM,
jy21-d&ds Trustees. 916 F at. n.w.
C. U. SWAN & CO., AU(f"lONEERS, 1407 G ST.
TRUSTEES' SALE OF FitAME DWEUIING ON
TIIIiI) STREET NEAR L STIREET NORTH
EAST. WASilINGTON. D. C.
By virtue of a deed of trust, dated the 12th of
July, 18143, and duly recorded in Liber No. 1844. at
folio 95 et seq., one of the land records of the Dis
trict of Columbia, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, we will sell, at pulitic auction, to
front of the premises. on WEDNEI4I)AY, AUGUSl'
EI:EVENTII, 1897, AT FIVE O'CLOCK P.M., the
following described land and premises, situate in
the city of Washington. 1). C.. and known as and'
being lot numlwred thirty-one (314 in Patrick O'Don
oghne's subdivision of square numbered seven hin
dred and forty-nine t749), as the same is recorded
In the surveyor's odilee of said city of Washington.
D. I., in Book C. H. It.. page 137, together with
the improvements, consisting of a frame dwelling.
Terms in relation to deferred payments announced
on day of sale, when $100 will be required as a
depsit.FN A. WOODWARD,
jy29-d&ds JAMES WHITE, Trustees.
C. G. SLOAN & 00., AUCTIONEERS.
TItUSTEES' SALE OF TWO-STOIY BRICK STE F
ANI IWELLING, NO. 300 N STREET SOUTH
WEST.
By virtue of an order of the Supreme Court of
the I)ktrict of ('olumbla, passed in liuity Cause
No. 15417, and the power contained in a deed of
trust recorded among the land records of the Iis
trict of Coumbia in Lit.er 1949, at folio 371 et +q.,
the undersigned nill sell, by potlle auctio,. in
front of the premises. on TIlli'tSDAY. Attl'$T
FIFril, 1897, AT FIVE O'CLiiCK P.M., lot 'u$.
In square 316, accorling to the sulblivision recordsi
in tie otlice of tih surveyor of the District of Co
lumbia, in 1hank 14, page 98.
Terms of sale: Oine-third of the purchase money
nust he paid il cash. and the balance in two equial
istSallments, payabe one still two years after the
day of sale, respectively, with it.terest at the rate
of six per centum per annum fLum said day, and
represented by the pron.lssary notes of the pur
ch,.ss-r, secured by deed of trust on the property
sold, its form and tenor satisfactory to the under.
sige.d, or all cash. at the option of the pur'
chaser. A deposit of $100 nill Ie required at time
of tale. The right is rsirved to resell, at the
risk and cost of the defaulting pnrhaser, if the
terms of sale are not complied with within fifteen
days. All conveyancing, recording and notarial
fees to be paid by purchaser.
ALFIRED S. WILISON.
EDWARD F. BUCKLEY,
jy26-lOt Trustees.
DUNCANSON BROS., Auctioneers.
-PRIt'STEES' SALE OF TWO BRICK Il1WSFS OF
SIX ROMIS EACH AND MODERN IMI'R4VE
MENTS, NITS. 231 AND 233 OAK STREET, LU
)1itT PARK, NI~itTlfnt EST.
1ty virtu,- of a certain deed of trust, recorded in
Liber 2110, at folio 211 et seq.. one of the land
records of the District of Columbia. we shall seli,
in f:ont of the premises, on TI'EDAY. THE
THtIRD) DAY OF Al'Gi'ST. A D. 1897. AT FIVE
O'CLtM'K I'.M., lots thirty-six (361 and thirty-seven
Gi7l of block ten (10, in ltarry's subdi-ision in Le
Droit l'ark, recrdad in Book onty No. S. page
140, of the s.urveyor's office of said District.
Terms of stile: 4 ne-thild eash. balance In one anl
two years, with 6 per cent interest per annuns,
payable semi-annually. $5 ont eachis house required
at time of vale. CHARLE F. BENJAMIN,
WM. Ii. DUNCANSON,
1y27-d&ds Trustees.
DUNCANSON B110., AUCTIONEERS.
TRIlSTEES' SALE OFL VALIUABLE IHEAL ESTATE
tIN FirRITEENTH STItEET EXTENDED NEAlR
S'ItINi ItOAD.
1ty virtue of a eettnin deed of trust to us, dated
Jlanuary 14. 18446. and duly recorded Janunry 31.
1816, in Liber No. 2103, folio 84 tt seq., of the
land records of th_- District of Columbia, amd at
the request of the slrty secured thereby, we, the
undersign,-d trustees, will s-ll at imbulie auction.
in front of the premises. on W'DNFIDAY. THE
I.EVENTII DAY OF AUGUST. A.D. 18:7, AT
FIVE OCI.i:IC P.1., the following described land
and prembe-s, with the easemlents, rights, ways and
uppurtenances thereunto belonging. situate and ly
ing in the county of Washington. In the District of
Columbin, l.an'ly: Lot five lst It. In the subdivision
of the 4tract of lnd known as "l'ndsworth." as peer
tlat recorded in Liter Levy Court Carberry, folio
24. of the records of the ofice of the surveyor of
the District of Columbia.
Terms of sale: One-third of the purchase money
to be paid in eash, and the balance in tow elul
installments. payable in ne and two years, with
interest at 6 per cent ler aunnum, payable semi
atmmlily from day of sale, seented iy deed of
trust upon the property sold, or all cash, at the
option ot the putehaser. A deposit of $5100 will
be required of the 1,urchaser at the time -of sale.
All conveyaincing, recording and notarial fees at
the tost of the purelmser. Terms of sale to 1e
complied with within ten days from day of sale,
otherwise the trustees reserve the right to resell
the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting
pure laser.
CORCOItAN THOM,
WM. H. DUNCANSON,
jy20-d&ds Trustees.
" C. G. SWAN & CO., AUC'S, 1407 U ST.
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF VALU
ABLE AND DESIRABLE
BUILDING LOTS ON
3d ST. NEAR H ST.
N OR THEAST,
WASHING
TON, D. C.
By virtue of a certain dee-id of trust, dated the
5th day of JuneW, A. D. 1894. and duly -eorded
in Ltieer No. 1:yi0, folios 114 iet se.i., of the land
records of tile D!s:liet of Coleunhh. and at Ilie
request of tile party secured thetrebiy, I u-ill sell
at public auctisn, in front of the premises, on
THUR?4DAY, AtiE'ST TWELFTH, Isi7, AT
HALF.PAST FOUR O'('I kK P.M1., the following
described land land premuise~s. with the easements,
rights, ways aand almarteTnanen.s thercunto bielong
ing, situate and lying in city of Washington, ID. C.,
to wil:
Parts of hits anumbered nineteen (194), twentg
4201 anad twenty-two a22i, mn Jhnl W. Starrs subi
dIvision of hots In s14inare nl~utwd seven hundred
and seventy-seven (7774, as paer pl recorded in
Liber No. 12, folio 10. of the records of the
etilce of the saurve'yor of tie District of Columbhin,
beginning for the satme on 3d, two (21 feet sIx tCi
Inches soth of the northwest corner of said lot
nineteent (19), and r-unnaing north on said street
sixty-tne tIl2 feet six (41) inches (with the excep
tion of the 20 feet front of lot 21, whlichI is not
included) to tile noirthawest corner of said lot twen
ty-two 422): thence e'at one huandred feet; thence
siouth sixty-two (62) feet six 46) inches (with the
above exc-eption of 20 feet), and thence west one
hundred (1100) feet to the place of beginning. sub
ject to a right of ay over the rear or east five
15) feet of the above described land, and with
perpetual right of way over a strip of land Ilae
C5) feet wide immediately adjoining and extending
tile entire length of the east or rear line of the
above described land.
all of lot mtmnbered twenty-three (2i) of said sub'
division of lots in square numbered seven hundreel
and sevesty-seren 4777} (fronting twenty (21)) feet
on 3d street by n even depthl of one hundredl
(1010) feetp. Thmese lots u-ill be sold in separately.
Termus of sale on each lot: Oine-fourth of thle
purc-hnee moey in cash, the balance in one, iwo,
three and four years, secured by a deed of trust
upon the property, with Interest at 61 per cent per
annum, payabile semi-anually, or the purchasers
may lilly all eCail. A deposit of $100 will he re
quired on cach lot at the time of sie. All coo
v-eyanchag, recording and notarial fees at cost
of the purchasers. Should the terms on any lot he
not compled withl in titeen dlays from the day of
sale tihe lot or iota so in default may, at the dis
cri-tion of the trustee, he resold at risk and cost
of defaulting iltrehaser or purchasers after five
days' readvertisement of such resale in The Even
ing Star newspaper of aforesaid city.
THOMAS I. JONE!F, Sarv-lving Trustee,
jy20-d&ds 15th at. and N. Y. ave.
IATCi.IFFE, SUTTON & CO., AUcr1NE.
TWO BRICK HOUSES, NOS.
303 AND 305 FIRST STREET
S. E., 11 ROOMS EACH, WITH
ALL MODERN IMPROVE
MENTS, BY AUCTION.
On SATURDAY AF'EiRNOON, AU1GURT SET
ENT1H, at HALF-PAST FOUR O'CIA)CK P.M.-, we
still offer for sle, by publie auction, in freat of
the premises, stublota 15 and 16, square 2, foust
ing cath 18 feet and rennaing paack to an alley,
Ternms very Ubherai, and stated at the time of
sale. $200 deposit on each house at time of sale.
Open for inspection Sturay from A a.m. to hour
of olo. R1ATCIFFE, SUTION & COl.,
jy30-deda Attetiamees.
RAi~TCXalBTE, BUTON & CO., AUYCTIONEENh.
TOI WHOM IT MAY COlNGEN.
COLLATWIAL N(l'E AT AUCTION.
On FRIDAY AriNtOON. AUGUST SIETH,
A.D. 1W07, at TWO O'WCEMC P.M., we winlsail,
within our -sales room., 9U IPamylwania awen
northwest, hby eider of the beider, ems caneateral
Note of S. A. Terry far S, date$_Jne 23, l1W?;
230 shares Wttarml (Opital Street Ca Metor Cea-e
All usir itenraestwl sisrake nes..
. AUCTION SALES,
FU' RE DAVS.
C. G. SDAN & CO., AUCTIONEES, 1407 G KT.
TRUSTEFS SALE OF A VAIA'ARIZ TWaST'IitY
AND BASEMENT BRICK DWELLING.
KNOWN AS NO. 911 NORTH CAROLINA AVE
NUs SW)THEAST.
By virtue of a certain deed of trust. datud the
twenty-firat day of Fetbruarv. liir. and duly me
cor-dj in Liber 119. folio 42 et sql.. ne of the
land reords fur the letetrlct of Columbia, and at
the request of the party secured thereby. we will
sell at public auction, in front of the premise. on
THURSDAY. J:NE SEVENTEENTH. 1A147. AT
FIVE O'CLACK P.M., the folowiug der itsad land
and prenises. situate in the city of Washingeon.
District pf ornrumbia. nnd designated ias and retr
part of tot sixteen (16. In square 943. laceitfng
at the northwest earner of said lot ant ruminhrg
thence southeasterly 87 fe., 7 Insh.'s; thence north
easterly to public alley. and again be-ginning at the
narthweat corner of said lot. running naatheaserly
along the line of North Carolina -rve-nne- siit.-en 4161
feet eight Eta inches; tlhrce southeasterlr on a line
parallel with the west line. of lot It: to public al
ley, together with the irnprovensents. counsisting of
a two-story anal hasemt brick dw'-lling, knwn
as 911 North E'orolina arena.- southeast.
Terms of sal': tne-third cash. lsnaree in one
and two years. with int,-rest at the rate of 6 p.r
cent per annum, payable serml-anuail. .Ind m.'uced
by d.ld of trust on the property old. or ail erh.
at the optic'r of the purehtnser: A deposit of StEC
requhyd at time of sale. All .vneyane.ng arta
recording at purchaser's cost. If terms of sale ar
not rplried with within ten dIs from day of sale
the trustees reserve :the right to re-sel tIre pm;erty
at the risk and .st of the defaultmng purcsersr
after due notihe of such resale publish.l in some
Warhington newspapier.
GEO. H. It. WHITE.
HENRiY M. BAKER,
jeS-d&da Trustees.
E7THE ABOVE SALE IS TtIft:Ety POsT
ponehd. on aerwmt of the rain. until TI'ESt tY.
JU'NE TWENTYI-E'O)ND, 14497, AT liALF-l'AST
F1)ilt aICO''K '.M.
jelS-dts By order of the Trustees.
The purchaser at the above sale having fall.l
to comply with the terms thereof he pr.pertv
therein memtion-'d will be reisrid at pub r'licu-n.
In front of the pretmise, on THUiiSAY. Arll.'.T
FIp'I'l. 1107, AT FIVE WtCIAM'K l'.M.. upon t.."
same terms and conditions ias at tln' pre-i.. r sale.
GE.. II. It. Wi'iTE.
HENItY M. ItAIE1,
jy24-d&da Trutrees.
THOMAS DOWLING & CO., Al-E'r INEEIitS,
612 E st. n.w.
TRUSTEES' SALE OF A VA.'lABLE TRAIT OF
AItO'T TEN ACRES AW4Ii\iNl itRtIlRT
WOO)D DiIVING PARIK AND Tt.%V:1tS'3
TilE WHOLE LENGTH BY SLXTi-:-\THI
STREET EXTENDEII.
By virtue of a d.ed of truset to ti. recordi
among the lanrl re'rulr of tlhe Iistrict of Cltum
bia, in Litrer No. I., folio 391. and at the re
quest of the Isrty the-reby s'curi. we will sel1.
at nuetim. ia front of the preruises, ron Ti':S
DAY, AI St 1' TillitrD. l97. AT FIVE r'CLIM'K
PAL. the following descrilsd trst of ltud, in the
District of 'olumia. t'inrg part of a tra't of in ri
..;lled "Peter's 11111 Scat." descbll as follows:
Breginning at the nrthr-st turner of ri rt of sxid
trt. neyedl to Sutuel iU. Finrkel iby led
dadr. 'May 141, 1t'i4. tnd rerord-r arncg the landt
recoris of the Itistrict of 4'olumia, in L.itter J. A.
S. 77. folio 241. heing oen the south side of rout
"A" and running thene'. along said road "A"t north
(10 degrees west 2S.xa r.erches to tIe tcrtheenst
corner of part c-meyad to Ke. by ''ed rc-rdl
among said lana ,ewrds in LIber 1076. folio i.e:
thence with the east line of sai Ke- se's land
surtth 32i degrree west 5 S.4 ,reinrc,. to norttm
line of rad "It." Ihene with aid rrad "I' Saut I
60 degrees east 29.c8 p"rches to the routheast
orner of whole tract crsavercd- to 'ineke-. hin rg
rlso the southwest corner of land con.verel t.
ito-illy by deed rcvrled amorng said land r.eords in
Liber J. A. S. 73. folio 30; thence with west lit:
of said Railly's lot cted to road "A" north
32.2 degrees east WA41 S perches to the iegiming,
with iniprovennts ther-.n, consist taig of fraine
building anl tarn; subjact to a prior drerl of
trust reorded among said land records in Liter
No 1747, folio 57. upoan which there is siw du
the sum of $1,400. with interest from Otctober 24,
W)41,.
Terms of sale: One-third of purchase money in
et sh, of which a deposit of $215 must he mad' at
time of sale, and the ial:'nce In eqrual installmenots
at one and two years. for which will te taken
notes of the purchaser, bearing iten-st at 6i per
tent per antnm. layahle e'mi-amnally. from iay
of sle, and serurrd by ded <rf trust on the prop
erty mold. or all In cash, at ijmrerhnser's option. If
terms of sale Sr.- not comtpll.d with in fifteena
days we res-rve the right to resell the said prop
erty at risk arid cost of the d-fal ti purehaser.
('ouveyancing and recording at Irchaser's c.st.
LrIS' P. SI ir :MAK Ei,
J. D. COtIiILAN.
jy23-d&ds Trustees.
DUNCANSON l5l2t0., AUC'Tili'-EiS.
TIUSTEES' SALE OI' VALAIll.E itEAl. ESTATE
IN .ANGaiMN, It. .
By virtue of a . rtan .Ile-d of trust to as. d:It. i
Orloier S. IorN. rtl dily r. --i in I.1i1er No.
1:146, foli, 137 et .te.i., of the ortsl re--a or th
District of t'olumila, and at tI.- r.que-st of the
pearty secured thereby, we. the under.igmtd trus
tees, will sell, at public aiution. in front of the
prmi esIo. 0n NEISNESIAY. lithe -'S'ITit PAY or
AUG11ST. A.D. INT17. at FIVE rt'Lr' CK *.?.. tie
following destribed land :ttl premise. situate in
the county of Waih itgton, In the District i c -
lurma. ra d detgtrttr-l as ard Ibing lots 4 an .
in block 8 of Cyrua A. Itaker's subtlivisin of part
of a tract of land -alled Iaidstwk's bills. and now
known as I.angdon Park. as saiu suisdiviin is re
ctrded in County Itook 6. p~age 112. of ttr- rerords
of the oace :f the surveyor of said Iistrict. to
gether with the hirprovemrents and apIpurteeatees
thereunto l.elonging.
Terms of sale: One-third of the pnrehaa moner
to be raid In cash. and the balance in two eqpual
irrstallumer.ts. payable in one and two years, n i:h
iraterest at six. i6) per centum per annumn. alayabl
soir-annually, from day of sale, securtd by deed
of trust upon the property Fold, or all ansh. at
the option of the purchaser. A depsit of $1100 will
ie required of the purchaser at the time of sale.
All conveyancing, recording and notarial fees at
the est of the purchaser. Terms of sale to ie
complied with within ten days from day of sale.
oti:mrwlrie the trustees reserve the right to resell
the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting
M AHIAN ASHFORD,
CONSTANTINE H. WILLIAMSON.
Trustees.
Address, 470 Iseriantia aye.
NATH'L WILSON, Attorney for Part; Secur'd,
No. 6221-621 F at. n.w. jy2-c&ds
DUNCANSON BROS., AUCTIONEERS.
TRUSTEES' SALE OF TWO-STORY AND CELLAR
Pitt0tSED-lltiCK AND BS1it WN ST NE
FlONT DWELLING. NO. 521 TWENTY-Fl'itST
STIIEET NOltTH-WEST.
By virtue of a certain deed of trust to ti, dated
Marci 14. 11142. and duly recordel Merch 16. 11 2.
in Liber No. 1666. at folio 347 et seqol., of th- landi
records of the District of t'olumbia. and at the
request of the party recured thereiby, we, the
uadersigned, trustees, will sell, at spublic auctisou.
in frrt of the premisas, on Tilt ItSDAY. TilE
FIFH DAY OF AUGU'ST. A.1D. 1117. AT FIVE
O'CLOCK P.M., the following dasribed land anl
ptemeirses, situate in the c-ity oaf WrliainigtonI ithe
Iristric't of Gralba, and designatedl as anad being
all of lot nmber'ed one hurndred 41610s, itt Josephri
IR. Johnson's suildivrision of lot sla 46.. In amguar
numbered one hundred and four 11144. as per pint
in Liber 19. at forlio 45. of tire rtecords of the an
raeyor's office of the Disttritt aforesaid, taoget her
w ith thre improvemets,. consiti~tng of a two-story
and cellar dwelling house, with prrsed- rrick and
brown-stone frtrnt, No. 521 21st strewt northwet.
Terms of sale: One-third of the prura,: mnrrey
to ihe panid in rash. rnd the bralanee In t,- erinal
installmuents. pasyabrle I. one and two years. warith
interest at six I6) per centumn per annumr prayalee
setmi-anmarally, fromn day of sale, secored bry deedi
of trust upon the prop~erty sold. or all a-ash, at the
roption of the purchaser. A deposit of $1541 will
be reqihred of the purchaser at the time of sale.
All eonv-eyancing, recor-ding and noasrial fees rat
tire ',ost of the purtchaser. Terms of saie tr be
yomplied with within ten day~s from day of raae.
otherwise the trustees resetre the right to resell
the operty at the risk and cost of the detfaulting
MAHILON ASHFYORD.
ALDIS B. BR1O WNE,
jy24-d~rds ______________Trursteesa.
RATCLIFFE, .5ULTTON & CO., AUCTIONEERS.
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF FOUtR-ItOOM FRAME
HOUSE. NOt. 430 N STItENT Nr)ITIIWEStT.
By virtue of a dec'reer of the Suapaeme Court of the
Di-trIct of Cradumbia. passed in erquity cause No.
16579, the undersigned trustee wil offer for ale,
bry publitc auctior. in front of the pr-emisres, on,.
WEDNPSDAY. FOUlITH AUG;UST. A. 1ra97. AT
FIVE P.M., the following diesc.ribedi rrarl estate, to
wIt: l'trt of lot 2l, in sqarer 513. fnt-oaIng I5
feet 1t4 Inches by~ a depth of 100 feet 14 Icrhesr to
an alley. tugethaer with all the imiswovemr-nts,
righrtsec.
Terms, as prescribsed by the decree, are: One
Ihirdl in rcash,. and tire residue in tawo eqiual in
slallments, In two and three years from ther day
of arne, with interest at 6i tper cent per annum.
Istyabale seml-ananally, seenred bry deed of itenst
art the property sold, or all tcash. Ut the roptionh rf
the purchaser. A deposit of $2110 requlmiredi Ulyrm
acceptarnce of bid. If the terms of salte nare not
complried with in fifteen days from the day of rerle
the trustee resetraes the righrt to reserll the prrup
er-ty at thre risk and cost (If the de'faultinrg isr
chraser,. after flee days' adverisemnact of such tv
sale in some newspaper puibllished hr Washiagton,
D.C. All conveyancing and recrdinbg at lthe put
chaser's cost.
ROBERT H. TERRIELL. Trustee,
jy24-eod&ds Rooa 6, 0031t F at. n.w.
C. G. SIWAN & CO., AUCTIONERe,
-1407 0 at. u.w.
TRULSTEIIB' SAL.B OF VAIXABLE IMPROVED
PEIOPELTY ON PRlOIPELT~ AVENUE BE
TWEEN THIRLTY-SE00lNDi AND THIRTY
THIRD SlTEEDS, IN GI!SiltGETOWN.
By virtue of a decree of the lspreme Ourt of
the Diutrict of Canluahia, paswed in equity cause
Nro. 18886, wherein Harry C. GIven et al. are corn
plairants and linry A. Fatlee et al. are defend
ants, thme muersigriei trustees will tfer for sale, at
subli see Ion in fsnt of the premises, en MOIN
DAY* te NNTHDAY of AUGUST,. at FIVE
O'C hC P.M.,THe lwn real estate, altated
In Gieergetown, D.C., and known and distinguishe~d
as and breng lof lots fil and 90, in BaIeatty and
Hawkino' iato Georgetown, beginng 45
feaet east of the west line of lot 90; thence nort
88 feet, east 15 fleet, south to 1'rrspmet street, and
thence weut to the b-ein. lampreed by paem
inee No. 325 '~rc aseen.. rthwest.
Terams of sale: nethird cash and the balsam nce
41ne and two yearn, with interst, or ali each. If
the teetas are et amplied with in ufteem days
the right is semerend 'to sl at the rm and east
of ihe destheli purchaser. Anl aeer in ad
zeoir-ding at the eat ot the purhae. Ad ~ t
e$ 1U0 will he regnisad at the time of sale.
J40? G ut. mwo.,
AUCTEflN SArar OF UNREDEID1ICD
I will dell big pubic auetie. at 43? lith at. mw.,
WUINEUIAY, AbIIUST POUJBT'H,1SS. AT HALF
PAStr M~fl 0% M P.M. *en esse en w'
interst smatea uud aht of Gall, ldet
ad Net'al Watd rein., . Jewelry of a5
kinds Dns..a nOd e .3mu ast eica
Plaa,3 pwrte. te F wARR
AUCTION SALE.
br~ie n SinS.
Ro1ml2.'pE, stm.111N A eq0., .I 1uen INEA.
PEREMPTORY SALE OF VERY
VALUAIRLE REAL ESTATE
TO CLOSE AN ESTATE.
BRICK HOUSE No. tog 711
ST. N. E., 11RICK HOUSE No.
- 303 7TH ST. S. E., 2 BRICK
HOUSES Nos. 64 AND 661
NAVY 'LACE S. E. AND
BRICK H( bUSE No. 13o2 NE\\
JERSEY AVE. S. E.
On Tilt'RSDAY AiTI, 9\41,N Art' IT FiI-g-H
11,1111. Ct tM M E\41\.; A T 1'It ' l 'R ' w.
ill oil ht order of the" heirs. In fnt of 'he re
spt'etite premisea:
Firti Ist ile, in in-ere 54 i17,477.. p8,,lgn.v hr
a w-mimn preen arb,-L d.ellir. N., t:'t St -: n...
SHeesd--atn the same d.se tri'od!t IS after Ith..
ab..,. he.t ".1. ur.inr '473 12'.'. I i-r e..d ty a 6i
room'n brt b.ho. N.. sC: pish ..
'hiir -n thi- sam dnt. at 4 :' ,.'.-l.t p m.
iots 549 and ein. awinr.- "'. Im i.-...'al h. 2 carb-k
tousee. Note. 1i.9 ati 1I1 \n1 p rlph -.- N..-.
F.urth 4Sn the pa-- d.y-. :' . at i..4 - m , at
.f hot 12. in aenar 741. npr.o.'i . nn o.id torbte
1 ontaNe. No. tiut. N. J. a'.e. .'.
Terms: ''ne-Il ird cash. tb.h baIlan. in s1% :1nd
iwilve moot ha. ,r all ensh. A d.t"o.it ..r $1160 .on
eac"h piee reptired i t ith, time ..f W"1. T'.-,1m- 1.0
I' cornlted with in lift. "-n .1a insro 'i.a of ale.
t'ouvey-ancing. et... at tie pur-hlaer's a ,at.
By order of the heir,.
itATt'UJFFE, itT'.IN & (Y .
jy23-d&ds Au.ttoneerw.
IATLIFF. S-TTON & tI.. Auction.ta.
TIl STEFA' SALE O I" t\l'Ri'tl0IE11 P1:.'1'EIRTY
SIT1'ATEi, l' \ 4;l-.IlT.,W\ 1. .'
By vi tue of a de'.l ..f trust :. r. -t l.' am'ng
the land reo.rds of ft..r 101.1t1,t ~f 4'ohuiethi:. In i
t.-r No. 1732. toll, 210. 0e IlI I ll at%-- u1 : n. in
frta of the pre-mnie. ..tt FtltiiAV. iNH11 At -
pain'T. jIt7. AT IIsli.nl'A'.T I1ti- lr,'i Ai
I th u I os lare. a dof grouand len s tr, .t. to , it: ti.-"
said Dtistrict. andl dA,"<i.u'.-d ats and h..m:: !eart. of
ru. intered 0' and 41, in "1 -I a.t El .a.- .r t-,! ..in
in- taai 2and b:amdn as foil'ns - i.iim ing for 1he' atni - a! a
psint eon eat litne of Jeataten str-.-t ..::.ri.- th.e
sane is intrteii bs the 'niuth hoinntorr line .ar
the t''esNapeake an:d 4iMe Canal 00(Ntnmiil~t, aend
running ' n-v J i ithel rly w.ith, said . it litt " f .
t.1rl-n street Lt4 fe.t: IbIin.-. east pnrl. Ie IFi..
lt ree t Ilk. t 1n inch e It tla." en-.-rIn ". i lit, of
the original plan of otte f diit of e4 lcorrt .mn then.- .
t htrly with a id outline to t he w.tb it i.t -.1.1
4'-:;.al tessun lary Htew: tI.,.e by and ..111h slid so'uth
l, tthe point of feginning: ale atll that pariel
of rind lying in sai d su. ae 1. in aid lit.'
town t. ewribal as foIIaos ldeginml. on the eat
line of Jenffran aire.it t h fell 5 in.*hN1 ,iuth fr..Ia
the. southemat inter-so-1hod of Blridge and .Irfferneen
Ntreets. andt riunuaagv the-n'. santh with said1 .-ans7
line" of Jefferseen street .o feet: thence" -".t :and
parnllet with Br er fitret 140r fei.- t t inchs tt
enstern uti:ne. of origi .l pIln of ti .-r.:.,tw t:
thencoe north wit said east Ill, :e 1,s f--I, assel :1Nwn.-o
wen.t 1i feet I iwh,. to the bifginnin. awpg ;h.e
stihl . i0 feet ,of I It1 i l.y dept. onl-t.1.i I.. 1.1
....rigend t l: said t w. ia reeit I ir '. in: .- ....m. --" ..."
Ia r e non6it. among saidl laned r.n.rlitt In .i...r
No. 7.7 4. i I tj..Ail t- for ein l,--.se-rrl.-.i
gpropserty will be. s.1d s:ubje.t to if prior el.-d of
trust, recor.d amon g .a;d1 Fowl r.ld Als in .i- r \o.
1731 folio 215. T1,m ntlnmt of Ind.tetalelts. secur.-et
the"r-undler will ane nrade ki own aet d et of .ale. Alsoi
all osf lot 27 and sw. nirw-h of lost 2%: :1. 1. ,tint -
eli .ted. within the i- l itand Io'm tia .i' 't.m
Isattr, In Iteall's Audliin Its (:'.o-..-1,. Ah.-. a
strip or lot of sw:l ."",th of said I..t 27. kva..w" 'In
part of -Wapping and huid- d on te. , -.r .v
said lot 27. on th. .lot bys Washilagtn te-..a. .l
if:- loutly- lot 412 of ia's. .' Srl "'si.:se',
Addition to Gergetown. and in t. t, .-t he the
lint- of told Geo.rge-townl: all oft .aid !.ar"!hn"_ In
lulare 21. in lid I .eoretow-i tnin l I.- w7. lt -2a
and pt. "Wappig-'g II ilee w..b si.uby.to p eri.,r
idetr a of trust re'.irted ain .olt l-t. Il r.gnar I
In liter No. 1.61,. folind 2'5P, and 2.e2. Ti,. anint
of indelht.lednes secured tiwrentale-r will be" neaal.
known at day o sale.'i
Terms of sale: f'uei-th ird of the llbas.' mini -
In rsh. a'd the inlranie in ."itial installm.nts rat
oe -tied two yeart. w'ith intrest fromai S If liue
at rate of 6 t cent, :.. al.- w trni-n tot~. o'r
all in tash, at urioeb,"'s op.ti4n. Th- 4.'f.-rr It
SW ymenls to bee sec"urett by gpurchansr's nester and
led of trust n pres.rty sth d. A dn-ait --f $hi2,
will I." ratilred at tie of ate. T.-rin. .f .a1, to
be -ii)illed with within i.-n days frmn i. y o.f .ao.,
ioneitatiI and r.lording at purthaar't Ilt.
J1 \l Ui. '.I' i p111, V
HENtY 1. G4l.Ill r'n
Jy-27-d&ds_ Trust..els.
i^ 4'rLIFFE. SI' sN & e.. AL'CI h i\Ii:l S.
TRItt-TEIN' SALE 4OF A IIFE ilA1iftf it!RICK
lii ndISE. Neo. 4( K 14TRE1. I N1 f'.i 4i 1'.
fly virtue of a dh-ed of trust, dohl. r-ne.rded In
L.11."r No. 170.4. al feolio 15 e"t se*q., .1e esf the-" 1.1nd
t,.1rd for the Ieist ri-l if 41'lumnia. atvl at the
re.!ue"st of tiwl laty securd the"reb1y, the uniter
.hr.da rostf+- will off.r for a! %. pathil auet on.
len froint of the p.retis". rn1 WI-2IY TlIt'AY. TItil
Fo'T ' AY111 At'JI'. I iI" A' SX. A. Ul. 1517. AT
H.4L-l'A.T 1e'Rt O'(i/M'K P.M., the" feeliewing
d".wriised r-al cosate. nituiate in the city of Wnah
tIut.. in t h" list ri-t of Solumrbia. to wit: Parts
of original lots tw-o ,21 arnd three .:t. In .1uarM
nutere ttie ntidred and fiftln i.,. Ite ginnin
at a ptint on t,"n thenrth line of K atret lIistant
forty-air 46 fwat west frmn the inthitleast .rner
of said lot nin 4ealn two 2. and rumning thee,.i
west tweety-<an 1214 feet, Itence north ninety-ale
t..1: feet ileten 1tl iucetl. then,, east I-twnty
one 4211 f.''t, tafi.ene southe ninety-se 1il ifet
loven Indhe to the tlane of beginning. t e.th'.r
with all the imp.eneats. rights, et-. This ,.gp
rerty will be sld subj-ct. however, to a prhr deed
of trust for $3.:3m.1 the full partic-ulars of whichli
will he stated at the time of sale.
Ti'na ens tte r the- trust. A ditttiti) of $2,11
tiliured upno neceptancd oif thi. T o. te
cigtetd with in fifteen dty. (rn the d' y of sale.
n terwi dy.e tniste will n'seRll the nri-rty at the
link and cit of the dfauting purchauer afer live
days' advertisernent <of suinehresnie Ino esome n,"ws
pager gueldished In Wahingtn. D. 4'. All gun
v."yan.-ing etc"., at the Jourchaser-a co:t.
Jy23-d&ds T _IlMA J. _'A__KEt. Trustee.
DUNCAN8sON 'tI011.. AL CI'IONI-bls.
TRI'STF' SALE OF VAIAtLA" S'Bt'itilAN
l'A0dPhFtTY IN '1 II C.NTitle'T III'ln i''it-M'itA.
l'y virtue o. a fd.l of trust. dnted Jnmrt t.
15l', and rel' ndtl in Lihrr 11094. folio 473. of the
ld rnd orf of the iisrict of I.fumlia. :ind at the
reluent of the larti.-< urad, weo will offer the
fill-'wheg lts, ai at of the itet onamed in front
of the pfrmiste, o4 W FeeFilA. TItE Fut-tl 1,T'
D.AY OF A Sti). I111. AT NIX fe'I 'K I.M.,
tihe following lot in the IWatrict of 'latathia,
namely, lot an hundred na thirty-one (.1,. Is
14iteh-ra 4. Huarlieurl's subdilvtiine of lot ,ono,
huti-d ad eleirn 1111 .of ilalenin & lIigoten,
trues', autdhviedr of the alin efstait. .nt
P1l.-anant andi Ple'asant liains, As said subellvisio"n
is raIred in 'un i llntLk 5 lag.- . ' .'( the ree
ords of the suneyrit r ae d of the iistrict of Cl
luunida.
mntmediatel e after the abov e offer. we will offer
lot <n; hundrd and thirty-two (182i of th waem
subdivish.
Tendms of sale an each let: oe-third c-ath, hal
i nm' In one and two years, with, six gleer ,'ent into,:
esgt pt 'e. aniinualy cstufb dau'h of tr-s
choaaer. on fveyincing ader.erdin at nuesta
ptjuchatit. Trmso aems e emetdwt
$19103on eacI. lot when ."e14d
jy23d~dsTruate-es.
DUNCANSONUID Attoy.4 a.aTin~w.
TitTI' AE A~lTI A0'T.. AtO YA'i'll
NR'ltEIs OF SA~ 1F0THM 11'REIF', W.,
WASiG18AIN., IN I'.. AD Il'R 21 E'NEWT
t1e, virtder Of deed of tust dlte '-d M iay In. 1Ii.
ul orinLber 2o 11. o 2o414e eoelof Il2. lan ec.f
thelando thenristrofth ('lniik- ofd dniat . the
m-datrofgte wil elat aptsed atheion all' nf lot
aumlard onutee aIt offe f2o. thlie by.th :.ne oiritip
in ite fth subdiviionof semar NEuanDeant thr.-h h
dr-d. undort I340, ATade- by the be i. -Lf Joh
.aM.on ase folaind udsion real relnte. inthe
inte cit t surveyimro. the sti si o Cgni.
in 10:ak N. K..' page fteiand 4141. the isatu.. ntiltg
dainnrefag of wlet fet, n thar veottn-idef
an stevnth (by) degt thho 2 afeet. 4di..gc
T~nermes: rsw-thir. a. o ieh$'. ms
deposited withia the ees atnae if time. and
tyear, with Intest fro t dt.-e4 of ate at 6r
It entpe ae umt paeabedb deme-anualyust se
aidcrd.nteprpr or all, ah t opin-hfet'e
opfon sae 1f~ ter~msO ase not nmd ithl with
tn dal y ftromh day of sale th truai't'-ra t'.
-ev tihe u to re sell a ri and enstof deautting' pur
cid asr an the das' advertipm neter anveyesg
advrtaam-tin ie. ROICER 4T' F ulLiE,
H.BATO I UWNEND.
STrustees
M. SH~t.~ Attrne. 47 l.av.n.
T'n8pTElf ALE O' FRW3 Ot-in. WITHlP
Bt(E STARI, N RARN3 29NE
AtmatRK AVUE NO T. AIUM VW3
ber N. A9T6 fli-43M etUR(Ceg ~ ., on fteitdre
ords for the Ditit ofI 8'oumi and. at Ithe ra
ignd trstee misa ofer o aeb gamb.ic aiedo
to frant of ge the prms nMm NDA . NI'Tlet'
GUST. A.D. WLI.Sm. AT HALF-PAeT ata .-1t'
P.M.. the . fott i Sethed rea te siuat
intir catyd at Washigen e ituric of Coa.
hambia,* to it Lot S fy-it 5qa in ueellsub
bdisio Whof st tev in M uaeV. uoe
ti m .sde alu l em.a h pino h

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