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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, September 12, 1901, Image 14

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SUMMER RESORTS.
ATLANTIC CITY. BL J.
HoieS SrcquoSs,
ATLANTIC CITY.
I* offering very low special rates for September.
W Ite fir particulars. W. F. SHAW.
sell 4t.6
-i'lIK SALT BREATH i >y THE SEA BRINGS
HEALTH."
QALEN MALL,
Atlantic City, N. J.
Sanatorium anil hotel. New huildlnfr, handsome
ami elegant In every feature. Physicians ami
nurses. Rooms with private baths and sea water.
A place for rest and heultli seeker*. For booklet
and terms write to F. L. YOL'NG, Gen. Mgr.
uu24-Ut>t.l2
Seaside House,
Atlantic City. N. J
This well-known Beach-front Hotel will remain
open thr? ti^h the year. Evejy modern lmprove
ment. Including hot salt batjn In bouse. Accom
modates .",00 quests. All tilh.F privileges.
se^2?t-8 CHAS. EVANS & SOX.
TI1K RREXTON - KENTUCKY AVE. NEAR
J>each; spec'ai rates fur September; open all the
year. J. A. MYERS.
au30-2Gt Formerly of Brexton. Cape May.
THE FRONTENAC- A NEW HOTEL. KENTUCKY
avc and Reach; offer* large, pleasant rooms; es
cellcnt cuisine, eb-vator, etc.; for $8 to $10 week
ly; <2 dally. Booklet. Sirs. H. Y. MOYER.
au2H-26t.4
Orand Atlantic Hotel,
Virginia Are. and Beach, Atlantic City, N. J.
Sfio beautiful rooms. Special Inst Auk.. Sept. and
Oct. rates. $10, $12, $15 by week. $2 to $3 by day.
Hot and cold sea water baths in hotel.
au21 2tSt-H CHARLES E. COPK.
The Albemarfie,
Virginia ave. near Beach and Piers. This elegant,
modem hotel, new throughout, capacity 400, otters
large cool rooms, with high-class table and ser
vice. at gieatly reduced rates for Septeml>er and
Octolier. of $S, $10 and $12 weekly. Special terms
Friday until Tuesday. Contains elevator, private
baths and every convenience. 4.000 ft. of porchca.
Booklet. J. P. OOPE.
aul3 30t 10
LITTLE BRIGHTON HOTEL, "
Ocean end S. C. ave.; Am. and European plans;
restaurant and buffet attached; full ocean view;
?team heat; open all year. S. A. 8CHWEISFORT.
mhl6-150t.4
HOTEL BERKELEY,
ON THE BEACH. KENTUCKY AVE
Vain corridor leads to txuird wslk and ocean
front sun parlors. Capacity. 400. All modern con
veniences. Daily orchestral concerts. Long-dis
tance 'phot.e all. SiKH-lal September rates. Write
for illnstrited Ixs.klct.
myl0-130t-lrt JAMES AND GEORGE BEW.
M l LI.EH COTTAGE AND A SN KXl
$< North Georgia ave. Capacity, 230. $1 ? day;
$fi h week after Sept. 1.
J. ir>-T?tt-4 Mrs. I. H. MILLER.
The Jackson.
Bench Front. Virginia Are. ?
New fireproof hotel of brick and stone. Private
baths. Elevator from street. K. J. SENSOR & CO.
J. 21 T.St fl
HOTEL ALDINE- Homelike.
PrcIAc ave. near Ohio. Ocean view. Reputation
for good table will lie maintained. Terms. $1.50 to
I
12 SO per dav. Sjwcinl weekly rates. Send for
booklet. H. f>. EASTMAN. I'rop. Jel5-78t-5
OCEAN CITY, MU.
NEPTCNE VILLA.
S??a front; electric lights; modern Improvements;
redded rates for large parties in Sept. Address
au.".l-2it.4 MANAGER. Bq? 48.
COLONIAL REACH, VA.
CoHonia! Beach Hotel, Va.
IIOLTZMAN, RANDALL & CO.
OPEN JULY I, 1901. FOR SEASON.
Rnndall Line steamers dally. Special rates to
families. Board. $2 per day; $7 to $12 per week.
Excellent fare. Good ashing and crabblngr Ac.
C. B. SMITH. Manager.
Jyl9-2m 1321 F n.w.. or Colonial Beach. Va.
IN THE MOUNTAINS.
Hotel Shenandoah.
In nit*. Beautiful scenery, fine shade trees, mag
nificent i>!azx;i*. dancing pavilion; music; cool
nights; mineral water. Good table. Mod. rates.
Carriage meets all trains. Write for booklet.
F. W. I.. ROACH, Prop.. Harper's Ferry, W. Va.
au22-2fit,8
CLERMt (NT.
CHARM I AN P. O.. PA.
Rooms for September anil October.
se.21-26t NIp. CHARLES COWMAN.
HILL TOP HOUSE,
In the Mountains. Noted for Its table. AH mod
ern improvements Telegraph direct to bouse.
T S. LQVETT. Harper's Ferry, W. Va.
myl"-104t.R
VERY ACCESSIBLE. 60 M. FROM WASH., VIA
Eluemont; int., valley and water scenery, bicy
cling. drives, shaded grounds; spring beat; no
children taken; fishing, lasting, swimming; 21
daily malir; first-class fare; fresh meats, fowls,
milk, fruits; $5 per week. Open till Nov. Pro
cure circular. MAC RICE CASTLEMAN. Castle
n an's Ferry, tlarke Co., Va. Jyl6-52t
BUFFALO EXPOSITION.
11.". W. EAGLK ST. HoFSE NICF-LY Fl'RXISH
e.l; 2Tm-. up to $1 per day; convenient to all cars;
near city hall. Don't mind agents on trains.
Call. #ell-2t
R k?MS IN A STRICTLY PRIVATE FAMILY FOR
PAN-AMERICAN VISITORS; ten minutes to ex
position. Terms moderate. References exchanged.
R. F. MORGAN.
au27-tu.th4s8t-!V 439Vs Masten St., Buffalo, N-Y.
^Totel fornes,
Corner Court and Pearl St?.
Modern, fireproof, central; surrounded by all princi
pal hotels and theaters.
Ef'lJOPFAN RATES, $1.50 CP.
Write for Exposition Map and Guide. anlO-78t-7
COUNTRY BOARD.
|,l\'GAN'oRE HILLS INN. NEAR FREDERICK,
ii[M-n throughout the fall; steam heat and modern
Iniprov-m.-nts: refs. ex>-h. For booklet address
Mi-- F. M. BROWN, Frederick, Md. sel2-10t
FOR EXCHANGE.
F<>R EXCHANGE -STORE AND DWEIUNG ON
4'., st. k.w. ; small trust at 5 per cent; well rent
ed"; for alley house or unimproved ground.
W. I*. LOCKWoOD, cor 10th and G n.w. ?.'ll-3t*
ATTORNEYS.
PERCY METZGER. LAWYER. PRACTICES IN
nil courts of the District of Columbia. Equity,
Jaw and 1'robate Court business. Notary Public.
OUBce. 472 La. ave. n.w. Res., CIS F st. n.w.
?.,V2nt?
CHARLES S. BUNDY,
Commissioner of Deed* for New York and all other
states ai.d territories. Fendail building, cor. 4^
at., opp.?lte City Hall. "Phone 1S19. au23-4.tf
CAMPBELL CAR KINGTON. ATTORNEY-AT LAW,
Webster Uw building. fs>5 D st. n.w., Washing
ton. D. I. Residence, No. 3 Mount Vernon Flats,
New York ave. and i?th st. n.w. sel3
DOGS, CATS, ETC.
FOR RALE PARROTS, DOGS, CATS. RABBITS,
pigeons, white rats ami mice. Incubators, mock
ing birds, food, etc. SCHM1D S BIRD STORE,
712 12th st. n.w. my25-tf,4
ACCOUNTANTS.
J. E. BATES,
Public Accountant and Auditor,
Room 110. Washington Loan and Trust building,
dfl-tf uth nd v ats n w Telephone No 072
LADIES* GOODS.
FI RS- COMPLETE STOCK TO SELECT FROM.
All kinds of fur garmeuts remodeled in latest
stjle. Also ladies' tailor-made suits to order.
Special prices llORGAN. Ijtdies' Tailor and
Furrier. .33 13th st. n.w., south of N. Y. ave.
a'.2t?-tf 5
Sewing Machines Re 11.
Ail work warranted. Orders by mall promptly
attended to At OPPENHEIMER'S. 514 ?th st.
"fc.w. la23-5tf
UNDERTAKERS.
W. R. Speare,
Undertaker & Embalmer,
?4o F STREET NORTHWEST.
Everything strictly flrat-clasa and on ttaa most
reasonable terms Telephone call M0. )a1-10tf
Injured In an Accident.
Bjx- ial Corres|>otidence of The Evening Star.
LAl'REL, Md.. September 12. 1901.
Miss Katie Browning Is confined to her
home here as the ivsuK of injuries re
ceived in a runaway accident early In the
week. Miss Browning, who is the first
assistant In the post office here, was being
taken to her home by Mr. Charles F.
Bhaffer, Jr.. the postmaster, who, with L>r.
T. \V. Byerly and the driver, was in the
carriage at the time. While driving down
Washington avenue the horses became
frightened and started tq run. Efforts
to control them were unavailing, nntl
Mr. Shaffer and Miss Browning Jumped
from the vehicle. Miss Browning was ren
dered unconscious from the fail. Mr. Shaf
fer and L?r. Byerly, who also Jumjied. were
lucky enough to escape with but a few
bruises. The horses were found about five
miles from the scene of the accident, un
hurt. but the carriage was a complete
wreck ^
It pays to read the want columns of The
Star. Hundreds of situation* are filled
through them.
TRADITION OF THE DELUGE
RECORD OF NOAH'S ARK FOI KD ON
CHALDEVS TABLKTS.
Dimension* and Contents of the Ship
That YVKliMtood the Forty
Day Flood.
Fmm the London Times.
Many readers of the Times would, I be
lieve, be Interested in a fresh witness to
the Chaldean tradition of the dtluge. The
best-known account of this tradition is con
tained In the late George Smithls "Chal
dean Genesis." There was given the first
connected account of the Assyrian version
of the old Babylonian myths concerning
the flood. This version has been drawn up
for the library of Ashurbanipal, the last
great king of Assyria, and had been
brought by Sir Henry I?ayard from the
ruins of Nineveh. A more complete edi
tion, consisting of all the fragments of
the story, preserved In the British Mu
seum, has been published by Prof. Haupt.
Unfortunately the lines which once re
corded the dimensions of the ark are defec
tive, and, though Prof. Haupt considers it
probable that the length was 000' cubits,
while the breadth and height were both 12U
cubits, we have no certainty about the
length. By assuming that the measure
named in the text really denotes a :ialf
cubit, as was once held by Prof. Qppert,
the conjectured length would agr.-e with
the .'too cubits of the Biblical narrative.
Now, one of the tablets, probably also
once In King Ashurbanipal's library at
Nineveh, appears to give a different esti
mate of the dimensions of Noah's ark. It
is catalogued as a "list of animals of cer
tain measurements," etc., and was recently
copied for me for my "Assyrian De?-ds and
Documents," where the cuneiform text will
appear as No. 777. A closer examination
of the contents has made me think tl.ey
deserve to be more widely known.
There is no distinct statement on the tab
let that the measurements refer to the ark,
but I fail to see with what else the figures
given could be concerned. The first three
lines read simply, ".'HiO cubits long, 150 cu
bits broad, 6G0 cubits high." The whole
tablet Is written in the ideographic style,
and some of the ideograms used are not to
be found in published "lists of signs and
Ideograms." But these Ifnes employ only
such signs as are well known from their
use in the historical Inscriptions, and I as
sign to them the meanings which they al
ways have in such texts as concern the di
mensions of buildings.
Temple of Merodarb.
But this would be a very large building.
Indeed. The great temple of Merodach at
Babylon, by many identified with the tower
of Babel, was only 180 cubits high. If we
consider these dimensions as those of a
tower It must have been nearly 1,000 feet
high. Such a height could only be that of
a mountain. Then it would be difficult to
account for the presence of the animals
recorded below. There were no animals
kept In the tower of BaJael, so far as we
are told. The animals whose namos can be
recognized are not such as we have any
reason to suppose were kept by the kings
of Nineveh in a menagerie or zoological
gardens.
The mythical character of the building
seems eyident. The next two lines give
other dimensions, in precisely similar terms
to those used in describing the terraces or
platforms on which the kings erected their
palaces. Interpreting the signs In the same
way as is always done in such cases, the
substructure of this stTange building was
4lo cubits across and 788 cubits along its
side. There is no suggestion of a height.
Now. the Ninevite version of the Chal
dean tradition, above referred to, con
templates the ark as a "house" on a
"boat" or raft. It may be questioned
whether in these texts "height" necessar
ily means "vertical height." If not. we
may suppose a boat 788 cubits in length
over all and 410 cubits in breadth amid
ships, carrying a box-shaped house 000
cubits long:. 3JM) cubits broad and 150 cubits
high above the deck. It is possible that
the roof sloped from a central ridge. Also
the dimensions given may be those of 'a
rectangular raft. In either case there
would be a free space, 10 cubits wide,
along the sides and 64 cubits wide at the
ends, to serve as a "deck promenade." If
we prefer to take 660 cubits as the height,
part of this may have been submerged;
but in any case we should have a curious
shape for an ark, though one quite admis
sible for an Imaginary temple tower.
The Animals Named. a
The animals named, so far as I am able
to recognize their ideographic descriptions,
are dromedaries, camels, horses, mules,
asses, both male and female of each spe
cies. forming one group; then oxen and
cows of various sorts, sheep, goats, ante
lopes or gazelles, hares, with their young
ones, and of both sexes, forming a second
group. The first group seem to be the ani
mals, man's helpers and servants; the sec
ond group are possibly those clean animals
used for food. It may be noted that the
antelope or gazelle is frequently depicted
as associated with Ishtar, or Venus, who
plays such a prominent part in the tradi
tion of the flood. No numbers are given,
in marked contrast to the biblical narra
tive. but there were evidently pairs In the
first group, and it would not be difficult
to make out seven for the bovine race and
sheep. In the many herd lists of Ninevite
kings the numbers of each sort are, of
course, always given. Hence we can
scarcely think of the animals in a farm
yard.
Then follows a list of birds, most of which
are not yet to be identified with any cer
tainty. though nearly all the ideograms oc
cur also in the lists of offerings made to
the gods. Such birds were in all probability
used for food. The list ends "with the
dove, the swallow, the raven." Now. in the
Ninevite version of the story, Noah sent
forth, when the waters began to abate,
first the dove, then the swallow, then the
raven. The order is the same. The raven
would hardly be kept In any domestic es
tablishment; few of the other creatures,
except perhaps antelopes, would be kept in
a menagerie.
The extraordinary dimensions of the
building, the singular selection of animals, |
as remarkable for its omissions as for its
contents, seem suited to no other explana
tion than that we have here a summary
estimate of the size and contents of Noah's
Ark.
I may add that the shape of th% tablet is
unusual, one side being flat, the other con
vex. The contour is a long oval, like that
of a pressed fig. The writing reads the
same way on both sides, contrary to the
usual custom of the scribes, who "turned
over" from top to bottom, not from left to
right, as we do. and as in the case of this
tablet. The text is a sort of palimpsest, in
that several lines are written upon partly
erased characters. The Ideographic style
seems to indicate that this was an extract
or abstract from a larger and probably
older work.
? J
Mining; Pumice Stone In Italy.
From the Mnnufnoturer.
The German Nachrlchten fur Handel und
Industrie contains some interesting details
as to the production of pumice stone in
Italy. This is found principally on the Isl
and of Liparl, in the northwest of which
there Is a large deposit from one to four
meters thick, and covering about l.SflO hec
tares (3,655 acres), which consists of pumice
mixed with lightly cemented volcanic ash.
The pumice deposits are- worked in a very
primitive fashion by means of small quar
ries. The number of these is from to
2'JO, but most' of them are worked only from
May to October, two thirds being abandon
ed during the winter months. At the time
of greatest activity about 800 persons. In
cluding MH) women, are employed in the ex
cavations. In 18D0 the production amount
ed to 15,000 tons, and has Increased since
that date. The sale price ojf pumice stone
varies between 37s. 6d. and ?11 5s. per ton,
but very fine qualties are also -produced;
which fetch ?75 and even nearly ?1200 per
ton; the average price, however, is from
57s. to ?6 per ton. The pumice stone pro
duced is sold to merchants, who sort it ac
cording to color, weight and size, and send
It to the town of Liparl to be cleaned and
polished. The refuse and broken pieces are
ground In hand mills to> powder. There are
sixteen recognized qualities ffnd varieties
of pumice stone in the mrfrketV sofne Sf the
finest qualities being used in cleaning and
polishing works of art. other" qualities'for'
lithographing purposes, preparing .leather,,
etc. About 290 work people, 120 being fe
males. are employed In the factories 9nr,,
M5lu?a, "* <*
THE MORALITY OF JAPAN
A CRITICISM OF INCONSISTENCIES OK
WESTERN NATIONS.
Subject* of the Mikado Do Not Lynch
Even the Vlle?t of
Offender*.
From the Literary IMpost.
European journals, which were so full of
praise for Japan after her war with China,
have recently given expression to a good
deal of rather bitter criticism of Japanese
public and private morality, most of the ad
verse criticism being directed against the
alleged bad faith of Japanese merchants
and the assumed low state of social rela
tione In the mikado's empire. This has evi
dently nettled the Japanese, for a long and
vitriolic reply Is made to these charges in a
recent number of a new Japanese re\lew,
the Toyo, which was founded a year or so
ago in Tokyo by Prince Konoye, president
of the house of peers. The article Is en
titled "Pride and Prejudice," and Is un
signed. The writer declares that there are
three classes of critics of Japan the statis
tical the "worshipful" and the damnatory.
His replv Is to the third class, because
"their flippant and cynical observations,
though in themselves unworthy of notice,
have, nevertheless, deluded many western
readers, and caused them to look down
upon Japan as an Immoral, lotos-eating
empire, progressive in a good many ways,
yet with the cancer of oriental laxity o.
virtue at its core; quite out of the question
as a compeer witn the enlightened, clv'l~
ized, moral Occident." At this point the
writer begins his denunciation of the west
! as follows:
Moral* In the Occident.
"Think of the moral Occident, that won
derfully strait-laced Occident that connives
at Armenian and Macedonian masacres;
spends millions in crushing and stamping
out two sturdy little republics, fighting for
bare independence; stabs, shoots and assas
sinates its monarchs; gives over the streets
of its greatest cities, after nightfall, to the
unquestioned rule of the 'demimonde; Is
forever trying to bully weaker nations Into
ceding portions of their territory, and, in
broad terms, goes about with a Bible in
ons hand and a gauntlet on the other; of
which the ranting, all-knowing, hard-drink
ing, preaching, racing, L?ouls XIV 'redi
vivus.' Kaiser Wilhelm II, is the truest
type. ? ? ?
"We do not stab our monarchs In the fe
male line, nor do we act so as to compel
our great emperor to live In a steel-lined
study or travel in a bomb-proof train. \\ e
acknowledge the truth of the imputation
| that we are not Caucasians. Yet there is
I no quarter of our largest cities that is not
as safe at night as it is in the daytime.
Our restaurants are not flooded with bawds
after dark, nor are even our cheapest thea
ters houses of assignation. We do not go
into boasting ecstacies after a victory over
a weaker foe. nor do we make idols of our
admirals and generals one day to revile
them the next. We do not encourage and
foster the bearing of illegitimate children,
nor is the state ever willing to pay a pre
mium on the rearing of fatherless boys.
We do not lynch even the vilest offenders,
nor have we?we confess It to our shame
ever once burned a murderer at the stake.
We admit that we are, on the whole, a
Buddhistic nation. Yet we have never un
dertaken a propaganda of this creed with
cannon in the background to enforce re
ligious arguments; we cannot boast of a
Jesuitical society yearning to confound
church with state; nor have we, to our hu
miliation be it said, ever had an inquisi
tion wherein to teach the gospel of peace
and love by means of thumbscrews, the
rack and the wheel. We hasten to plead
guilty to the accusation of being Japanese,
Asia'tlcs of the Asiatics. Yet we do not
seek to enrich ourselves at the expense of
weaker people. We do not talk justice and
act unjustly. Nor do we permit our sol
diers to rape defenseless women, kill he!])
less infants, or loot the habitations of pow
erless non-combatants."
The Power of Japan.
The writer declares that Japan, single
handed, was more than able to rescue the
besieged Pekin legations; but that the Jeal
ous distrust of the western powers would
not permit her to do so. He characterizes
the indemnity demands of Germany,
France and Russia as barbarous and ab
surd. These powers, he says, know very well
that "China never can. never will pay-"
But they must have their pound of ut-sh.
Russia wants Manchuria and as much of
Chi Li as the other rations will let her
have. Germany wants the whole of Shan
tung. France wants as much of southern
and southwestern China "as the nerves of
the British ratepayers will Permit. And
Japan! She wants simple Justice. She wants
to see poor China "hfelped, not crushed;
raised once more to her feet, not humbled
In the dust; the lives of Chinese citizens
made safe, not given to the mercy of every
vodka-swilling, absinthe-drinking, kummel
sipping soldier." Japan warns the tri
partite harpies" not to exhaust her patience.
"Let them have their pound of flesh; but
if they shed one other drop of Asiatic blood
in the taking "of It. they will have another
indignant, righteously indignant, empire
to deal with; a nation that will fight to its
last gasp in the defense of oriental peace
and integrity." He closes with an appeal
to England and the United States for aid
In these words:
"England!. Is your Insular prejudice,
your pride of race, so great that you will
refuse to stand by us, shoulder to shoulder?
Will you let Russia work out her nefarious
schemes on oriental soil and to en
force her 'orthodoxy' on the Chinese at
the bayonet's point? Brutus, awake! Thou
?deepest Orientals though we be, we have
not shown ourselves unworthy of your
trust and friendship.
The Land of Liberty.
"America! Nation of liberty and the
rights of men, will you let three great Eu
ropean nations work ruin on oriental soil?
Are you ready to proffer us the right hand
of fellowship? Join our standard, on which
we have inscribed. In hues never to fade.
?Justice.' As you are great, be you strong
to redress the wrongs of millions of Asiat
ics Newest and greatest of great nations,
stand by us, the 'Anglo-Saxons of the
orient," in our struggle for the right."
A number of the thrusts come so nearly
home to Europe and the United States and
show such an intimate knowledge of west
ern hlstorv and conditions that the Kobe
Herald (published under British auspices)
doubts its real Japanese authorship. It Is
not Japanese thought or sentiment, declares
this Journal. It is probably to be described
?3 "a dumping ground of some temporarily
Jaundiced foreigner s imagination of things
from the Japanese 'point d'appui.' " It is
merely "a gush of bile," observes the Japan
Weekiy Gazette (British. Yokohama), which
declares that while quite in sympathy with
the aspirations of the Toyo writer with re
gard to China, It wishes that his style were
calmer, less bitter and less disfigured by
that rather vulgar jingoism which is not
ordinarily a Japanese fault.
?
The Roy and the Tin Can.
To the Editor of The Evening Star:
I have read a number of complaints at
different times in regard to disturbing
noises, such as crying babies, barking dogs
and crowing chickens, but have read none
concerning the "small boy" with a tin can.
All of the above mentioned noises are a de
cided nuisance I will admit, but a person
could become used to what might be term
ed natural sounds, but for a soul-harrow
Ing, nerve-destroying sound commend me
to the boy with a tin can. It is such an
impertinent combination, too. If you re
monstrate with the boy he will answer
with a grin and an extra hard kick at the
can, and if you speak to the boy's mother
she will say that "boys will be boys," and
then will say to her next door neighbor
that you are a hateful old thing and that
you'd better make your own children be
have.
I am willing to believe that it is more
thoughtlessness than an actual spite
against one's neighbors that parents will
allow their children such noisy playthings,
but to my mind it will overbalance the
combined noise of the baby that is proba
bly sick and the dog that more than like
ly "sees things" and the rooster that is
simply following his calling, and I am sure
that if one or more of the "worried and In
dignant cltlsens" were at home in the
afternoon some time and had to listen to
the noise I refer to while trying to gain
a little rest after a long worrisome morn
ing or had "Just gotten the baby to sleep"
.they would feel as much lUie fighting a*
the writer of this complalnt/fend I am not
a man either.' !>?
MINT STARTED IT
How the Great Southern Tracking
Industry Originated.
HAS CROW I TO GREAT PROPORTIONS
Good Things to Eat Sent in Im
mense Quantities Up North.
favored localities
Few persons are aware of the fact, which
has been brought out in its latest bulle
tin by the Agricultural Department, that
from the carrying by a southern man to
New York of a small quantity of mint
some years ago arose the great southern
garden truck business of today, which
gives employment to thousands of men and
Involves the expenditure of millions of dol
lars annually.
A prominent official of the Pennsylvania
Railway Company is authority for the
statement that in the winter of 1847 No. 34
Are engine of New fork had its headquar
ters on Church street, between Fulton and
\esey. Fire engines in those days were
manned by citisen firemen. Next door to
the engine house the boys rented a loafing
parlor, and it goes without mention that
toddles and the stiff mixtures were always
In season. A clerk on one of the Charles
ton boats, which then landed at Pier 4,
North river, front of Morris street, was a
guest, and while taking something re
marked the drink was nothing compared
with the mint julep of the south, "such
a one as I had a few days ago." The boys
received the reference as a yarn, for where
could mint be gotten in the middle of win
ter, they having no personaf experience
of any other climate than that of New
York. The clerk promised to prove his
statement upon his next trip north. He
left the boys, 'accompanied by a commission
merchant, and in later conversation added
that he would bring not only mint, but
lettuce, radishes and strawberries as well.
At this the merchant was doubly doubt
ful, and challenged the statement with
a treat. Upon the return of the steamer
the clerk proved the truth "bf his asser
tion. In a second-hand champagne bas
ket he brought lettuce, radishes, mint,
and. within an inner basket, were two
quarts of strawberries. The strawberries,
the first ever seen in New York in winter
time, were placed In a store window as a
curiosity, where they were visited and ex
amined by hundreds.
MnrvelouH Development.
The greatest concentration of truck
farms occurs in the neighborhood of Bos
ton, Mass.; New York, N. Y., and Phila
delphia, Pa., and in the peninsular district
of Delaware and the eastern shores of
Maryland and Virginia, while probably the
finest trucking country In the world Is lo
cated on the Atlantic coast from Norfolk
to southern Florida. The development of
this district in recent years, particularly
along the Florida coast, has been almost
marvelous. It is possible in Florida to pro
duce fruit and vegetables In open air at a
season of the year when it is practically
impossible to raise them in any other part
of the country, except under glass, and in
consequence there has been a great demand
for Florida products at very high prices.
The success of this business has been so
gratifying and the profits so large that It
has bectfme one of the chief industries of
the state.
As the trucking business depends almost
entirely on proper transportation facilities,
it is absolutely essential that the proper
centers for the reshipping of garden truck
should be along the lines of railways or
located at some seaport, where ready com
munication can be had with the various
large cities, which are nearly always the
distributing points for this class of pro
duce. In this respect the south Atlantic
states have been particularly fortunate,
and have been greatly aided In their devel
opment by superior steamboat accommoda
tions. From Norfolk, Va., there are lines
of ocean steamers to Philadelphia, Pa.;
New York, N. Y.. and Boston, Mass., which
during the height of the season dispatch
several steamers every day, loaded almost
entirely with garden truck. In addition to
these there are dally lines to Washington,
D. C.; Baltimore. Md.. and Richmond. Va.,
which carry large quantities of truck
among their mis?ellaaeous cargoes. Charles
ton. S. C.; Savannah, Ga? and Jacksonville.
Fla.. also have a large fleet of steamers
which land enormous quantities of truck
in New York, N. Y., and Boston, Mass. In
the territories tributary to Norfolk and
Baltimore there are numerous bays, rivers
and creeks, upon which small steamers,
sailboats and flatboats are used to trans
port truck from, the farm to the central
point where it la to be reshipped direct by
9teamer or railway.
Value and IU? of Trnek Faring.
The increasing demand for land %n cer
tain regions of the southern states, owing
to the establishment of great numbers of
truck farms, has resulted in a remarkable
advance In the value of property, and
many farms on the Atlantic seaboard
which were almost worthless or valued at
from $2 to $5 per acre before truck farm
ing was introduced have Increased in value
to from $40 to $500 per acre, according to
location with regard to the markets.
An average truck farm will contain from
ten to fifteen 1 acres, while some of the
larger farms contain from 75 to 100 acres.
A ten-acre patch, well cultivated and skill
fully worked, will often produce $2,<KX>
worth of garden truck in a season.
In the years 189fi, 1897 and 1898 New
York received 2,4.'J5.715, 2.*i.'!2,77<> and 3,82(1,
0.'? packages of vegetables, respectlvelv,
from southern territory, and in the single
month of June, 188)9, over a million pack
ages were received from the same sources.
During the height of the season it Is no
unusual sight to see piled on a single rail
road wharf along the river front in New
York city 100,000 southern watermelons
awaiting delivery, while as many as 200
carloads of southern peaches have arrived
in a single day.
Norfolk the Grratfut Center.
Norfolk, Va., is the greatest garden
truck center in the south, its location giv
ing it many advantages.. The soil of the
surrounding country could hardly be im
proved upon, and the climate is well
adapted for the business, being insured
against sudden changes In temperature by
the close proximity of the great gulf
stream. Moreover, this district is almost
entirely surrounded by water and is in
dented by numerous sounds and channels
from the ocean, from Chesapeake bay,
from Hampton Roads and from the Eliza
beth and James rivers.
Next to Norfolk,- Va., Charleston Is prob
ably the center of the greatest trucking
area in the south. A strip of land known
as "The Neck," located between Cooper
and Ashley rivers and comprising about
12,000 acres, is the main source of supply
for the produce shipped from Charleston,
although many hundred acres of truck
farms will be found at ^lount Pleasant,
S. C., and on lands about the harbor and
coast. Truck begins to move from Charles
ton about the first week in April and con
tinues for four or five weeks. The highly
perishable fruits and vegetables are for
warded by an all-rail fast-freight service,
while those of a less perishable nature are
sent by steamer.
The great staple product along the east
ern coast of Georgia is the watermelon,
which begins to move northward in July,
and is shipped to nearly all large markets
east of the Mississippi river. Nearly fifty
per cent of all the watermelons grown in
the United States come from this district.
The strawberry yields of South Carolina
and Georgia are large, and begin to move
northward about April 1, while the Justly
renowned Georgia peaches are readv for
market in July. y
The entire dl*rict is well adapted for
truck gardening of all kinds; but potatoes
asparagus, meloas, peaches and berries are
cultivated to the greatest extent
In the vlncllty bf Mobile. Ala., large quan
tities of potatoes and cabbages are grown
These vegetahtes are shipped principally
to western citie* and a special fast-freight
service is employed. ,
The Duke_ ?f Newcastle has joined the
Atlantic Union ?f London. In doing go he
expressed the o?inio? that "anything' that
leads -to promcftt cosdhrllty and "good feel-1
tag between thli country and the United'
ItatN hM jlvi)ri of warm symp&t&f,"
DISCIPLINE IN PRISONS
PIKISHMBKT IN THE PEXAL INSTITU
TIONS OF ENGLAND.
Severe Treatment of Convict*?Im
provements in Jail Life in
the United State*.
Prom the Sing Sing Prl!?on Paper, "Star of Hope."
The amelioration of prison discipline in
the last twenty years has been so marked
that even those persons who rarely observe
anything have noted the change. The aboli
tion of the contract system, although not
general In the United States, is practically
so in all the northern states, and no longer
exists in any European country. Its abuses
were so varied and incurable that lr? was
necessary to root it out entirely, and this
has been done, except in a few states in the
south, where the social conditions are such
83 to prevent any radical changes unless
pushed with persistent effort. That was
the most important step made in prison re
form, and its good effects upon the prison
ers are so obvious that they cannot be ques
tioned. There is, however, little harmony
of method in the prisons of different states,
or even in the prisons of the same state,
the management of each institution being
the author, for the most part, of its body
of rules and regulations, although in New
York a long step in the centralization of
authority has been made, and in the similar
methods of administration.
In British Prisons.
It Is possible that, with the frequent Im
provements made in the condition of con
victs in recent years, those who profit by
them may be interested in the methods em
ployed in Great Britain, where the disci
pline is stern and unyielding, and every day
of a sentence has twenty-four hours of
time in it. It has fallen to my lot to do a
long "lagging" in a public works prison in
England, and the experience has no allevi
ating memory. It was simply unalloyed
haoee. On conviction and sentence the
prisoner is taken to a county prison to do
nl.ie months of separate confinement. This
is spent in a large cell, well warmed, light
ed and ventilated, without a bed for the
ti'-t t three months, with a^bed two nights in
the week fur another three months, and
then with increasing frequency, until the
last month a bed, with sheets, rug and pil
low, is given every night.
The work is sowing bags and weaving,
and the task is as much as a green hand
can do with industry. The food is ample,
but unvaried?23 ounces of bread daily,
made from unbolted flour. A pint of gruel
for breakfast and supper, based upon four
ounces of oatmeal; and a pint of soup for
dinner four days in the week, and three
ounces of meat on the other three days,
with eight ounces of potatoes daily. The
food Is clean, served in the cell hot, and is
ample for a man not working In the open
air.
No one except a keeper comes into the
cell. The governor of the prison passes
the opeh door daily, and the doctor comes,
if summoned. No books except a Bible,
hymn book and prayer book are given,and
there Is ho variation in this awful period,
in which many men break down physically
or mentally. The keeper is not allowed to
speak to a prisoner except in the briefest
terms, and then only to issue an order.
I spent six months In this separate con
finement without hearing a human voice
except at church service, and the whole
nine months of "separates" without speak
ing a word to a fellow-prisoner. The inten
tion of this imprisonment is to give the pris
oner a realizing sense of his position, and
It fetches him every time by its cold,
calm, silent, unchanging oppression.
The "separates" being finished, the pris
oner is transferred to the public works
^prison, of which there are now four in
England?Dartmoor, Portland, Parkhurst
and Borstal?with a female prison at Ay
lesbury, in Oxfordshire. Men who were
engaged in the same offense, or brothers,
are not sent to the same prison.
Punishment of Men.
The transfer Is made In a prison car,
which Is simply an exclusive carriage, and
the traveler Is not made the wretched vic
tim of public curiosity. Arriving on the
public works the prisoner Is assigned to
outside labor and kept at It. There is an
average of one warder or assistant warder
to every ten men, besides a battalion of the
Royal Infantry for guards at each station.
These warders are long-service men with
first-class discharges from the army, navy
or marine corps, In which school they
have learned that an order from a su
perior authority is sacred. They tuc for
bidden to construe any offense they may
observe in any other way than as a sub
ject of report, and report means punish
ment in 999 cases out of a l.OW.
Punishment consists of confln _rr.ei;t in
separate cells, light and warm, with one
pound of bread and one pint of water
dally, loss of class, privileges of writing
or receiving letters or visits. For assaults
on officers the penalty Is flogging with
either the cat or birch, not more than
thirty-nine strokes of either; but no man
falls to be taken to the hospital who has
received twenty cuts of the cat. The work
Is redeeming marsh land, building fort
resses, quarrying stone or cutting It for
building purposes. But the day's work,
even In summer, is rarely moro than seven
hours. Meals are taken in the cells, and
the food Is not sufficient. There are no
fat men in penal servitude. It is prescribed
to the fraction of an ounce, and if the pris
oner feels that he has not his allowance
he can, at all times, have it weighed or
measured In his own presence.
Classes of Convicts.
As his sentence wears away the prisoner
passes into different classes, which are
shown by the facings on his jacket, with
Increased privileges; and the last year of
his sentence, if he has been a good-conduct
man throughout, may be spent in the spe
cial class, which gives him a blue dress,
visits every two months and more frequent
letters. The burden of penal servitude
falls in with the perpetual supervision,
which never relaxes. No man can go out
of sight of the officer in charge of his party
nor pass behind him. He must not talk,
laugh, nor even smile. He is not allowed
any other article in his possession than a
handkerchief. He can have no paper nor
pencil, but one piece of soap, one towel,
one wooden spoon, one plate, tin cup and
washbasin. He must be silent, obedient
and, although the rules do not say so, he
must look as miserable as it is Intended to
make him feel. The weekly dietary scale
never changes. There are no holidays ex
cept Good Friday and Christmas, and these
are only marked by chapel service, which
never changes. No outsiders ever come
to speak, nor are there any visitors ever
admitted into the prison. In eight years I
never heard a woman's voice in speech or
song; never tasted fruit, nor any other
vegetable than peas and potatoes; never
spoke to a fellow prisoner except suvep
titiously. During imprisonment the worst
offense possible Is to have tobacco. The
heel of an old pipe that Is blowing about,
snatched up, will cost six months' short
time?if caught. Every man Is searched
five times a day; his cell Is visited aiwi
searched two or three times a week, and
yet the men do get tobacco, and take long
risks to get It.
On discharge the prisoner receives a
tlcket-of-leave, which may be canceled at
any time before the expiry of his whole
sentence; also, three to six pounds sterling
gratuity ($15 to $80 of United ? States'
money). His hard treatment has done him
no good, for 55 per cent of the men in
penal servitude are seoond-tlmers, and ao
per cent are third-timers. After that they
are dead.
A Question of Verb Form.
From London Answers.
The train had just recommenced its
Journey toward Bedale. "What did th?..
porter say was the next station?" asked
one passenger of another. "Excuse me,1'
said passenger No. 2, "you mean what
the next station. It's still a station, you
know." "You're wrong. What is waif,'
wasn't It? Is is was, but was Is not nec
essarily !?." "Now. you're getting ridicu
lous," said the 3econd speaker irritably.
"What was is, and what is is. Is was is,
or is la was." "Don't be' foolish! Was
may be ta, but Is is not was. Is was was,
but If was was is, then is isn't is, or wus
wasn't was. If was Is. was is was. Isn't
It? But If la Is was, then " "Listen. Is
Is, was was, and is was and Was - 1?>J
therefore, is was is. and was was was,
and is Is was." "Shut up, will you! 'I've&
gene by my station already!" And there
w?? silence for * M J
WITH MASONIC CEREMONIES
COMI3G CORNER STOXE LAYING OF
THE RUPPERT HOME.
Deacrtptlon of the Inntltnt ton. Which
Will Care fop the A?e?l and In
digest of All Cliuiei.
With the Grand Lodge, F. A. A. M.. of
ficiating, and DeMolay Commandery,
Knights Templar, serving as escort, the cor
ner ftfone of the building to be known as
the Christian and Eleanora Ruppert Home,
will be laid, with appropriate ceremonies, at
4 o'clock "the "h'fteFnoon of Thursday. Sep
tfmber 2ti. The .site of the home is on
the Good Hope road, a short distance be
yond Anacostla. The object of the institu
tion ia to provide.a .comfortable home for
the aged and Indigent, Irrespective of re
ligion and nationality. It was founded and
endowed by. Christian Ruppert. who died
In 18!?2. Mr. Ruppert amassed wealth
through a business he conducted for many
year's on 7th street near D street.
Under the will of the deceased the fol
lowing are the board of trustees charged
with the duty of erecting the structure:
Simon Wolf, president; Meyer Cohen.
William G. Johnson, Charles Graff, Jacob
J Appich, Fred Gieseking, George H
Plant. Jr., and Louis Faber. George Em
mert, who was executor under the provi
sions of the will, died about three years
ago, "and the bnard of trustees elected in
his place Christian Heurich. The chair
man of the building committee is Jacob A.
Appich; William Henderson is the builder,
and John Smithmeyer the architect of the
home.
Procession and Exerctie*.
At procession, headed for the Good Hope
road site, will start from Masonic Temple,
IHh and F streets, at 3 o'clock the after
noon of the 2<>th of September. In line
will be the Grand Lodge, and DeMolay
Commandery, as well as a number of Ger
man societies. In connection with the cor
ner-stone laying there will be singing and
an address by President Simon Wolf of the
board of trustees. The ceremony proper
will be in accordance with the Masonic cus
tom. The corner block, which will be of
Cleveland stone, will bear the inscription.
Christian and Eleanora Ruppert Home,
l Jul.
Cliarncterintim of the Structure.
It Is explained that the home will be a
commodious structure, arranged to accom
modate thirty inmates, besides a complete
corps of servants. The plans, drawn by
Mr. Smithmeyer, call for a building 100
feet long, with a depth of 103 feet in the
main structure and 51 feet in both wings.
It is to be constructed of bufT brick, trim
med with Cleveland stone, and the front
elevation presents a most artistic combina
tion of brick, stone and iron. The manner
of construction will make the building what
is known as "slow burning," practically
fireproof. The center of the building will
be three stories In height, while each of the
wings will contain two stories and base
ment.
The main entrance will be constructed
of stone. Upon entering the large double
doors the visitor will be ushered into a
commodious hall. On the right of this will
be found a reception room and library,
which will be provided with suitable read
ing matter for the use of the inmates. The
reception room will communicate with the
matron's room by a door opening in the
extreme right-hand col-ner. The elevator
will also open into the reception room, ts
well as the mhin corridor.
On the left of the reception hall w'll be
found the parlor and office of the institu
tion. A clerk's room will open off this In
a manner corresponding to the mutron's
room, on the other side. To the rear of
the vestibule and reception hall will be
found a large assembly hall, directly in
front of the refectory. Back of this will
be an Immense pantry, and In the rear will
be a kitchen. The remaining apartments
on the first floor wUJ be bed rooms.
Two large staircases will lead from the
first to the second floor, at the head of
which will be found the superintendent's
room. To the right of this it is planned
to have a smoking room, and to the left
will be found a sewing-and mending room.
On the right-hand side of the south cor
ridor quarters will be provided for a nurse
and an infirmary. There will be fourteen
sleeping.rooms on the first floor and sixteen
more on the second and third floors The
partitions between the rooms will be con
structed of fireproof material, and double
floors will be provided, between which will
be layers of asbestos.
?- ... i
Chinese Children's Drill.
Krom the St. Louis Globe-Deinocrat.
One of the most laughable sights he be
held in Pekin, says a returned soldier, was
the efforts of the little fellows to imitate
the foreign soldiers. Every day the Amer
ican, British, German and other troops
would come out in martial order to perform
their regular drill upon the streets, or de
tachments would be sent to various parts
of the city for garrison duty. Every na
tionality had its particular form of drill,
and all this gave to the scene a wonderful
variety. Then when the big soldiers were
all out of the way, here would come an
other show, Just as novel and much more
laughable?a whole battalion of Chinese
boys, dressed in . their loose sacks, wide
flowing trousers and queer shoes that the
yellow man wears. The youthful regiment
comes down the street, the chief officer
marching ahead, and every lad that follows
bearing a broomstick over his shoulder.
Now they march with all the pomp and im
portance of a German squad; now they are
imitating the light step of the American or
Japanese, and now the heavy foot of the
czar's men. No onlooker, be he Chinese or
foreigner, could refrain from laughing at
their ludicrous antics. And such splendid
imitators are the Chinese as a race that
.even these small boys show every peculiar
turn made by the foreigners. Day after
day this broomstick regiment turned out to
drill and to enjoy the sport.
?- ? ? ?
AUCTION ( ALES OF REAL, ESTATE, ?Jfce.
Today.
James W. Ratcllffe, Anrt., 820 Pa. ave. n.w.?
Trustee's sale of building site on Woodley road, on
Thursday, September 12, at 6 p.iu. John H.
Dwyer, trustee.
AUCTION SALES.
future days.
C. G. SLOAN & CO., AUCTIONEERS, 1407 G ST.
A gTand opportunity to buy good
Furniture at public auction within
our rooms, 1407 G st., SATUR
DAY, SEPTEMBER FOUR
TEENTH, 1901, at TEN A.M.,
from private residences, storage
houses^ etc.
COMPRISING ELEGANT ROSEWOOD CASE UP
RIGHT KNABE PIANO FROM A NAVAL OF
> FICER, ALSO A CHICKERING UPRIGHT,
BIRD'S-EYE MAPLE MIRROR-FRONT FOLD
ING BKD, WITH CHIFFONIER, TOILET
DRESSER. ESCRITOIRE, BUREAU AND
WASHSTAND TO MATCH, MAHOGANY
Chamber suite with chiffonier to
MATCH, MAHOGANY TOILET STAND, RICH
BRASS BKDSTFxADS. CREAM AND GOLD
SCROLL METAL BEDSTEAD. MAHOGANY
AND OAK WARDROBES. LEATHER SEAT
AND BACK DINING CHAIRS. OAK AND
OTHER -CHAMBER SUITES. ODD BUREAUS
AND WASH STANDS. BRASS AND ENAMEL
BEDSTEADS, FANCY ROCKERS, TABIJCS I
AND CHAIRS. SIX NEW BIGELOW RUGS.
. J2*lt FEET. LEATHER EASY CHAIRS, ROLL!
TOP DESKS. CHINA CLOSETS. LIBRARY OR I
HALL TABLE. FINE NEW JAP. MATTINGS
CARPETS, PICTURES. MIRHOHS. ORNA
MENTS, FINE HAIR MATTRESSES. PIL
LOWS, TOILET SETS. BEDDING, COFFEE
URN, LOUNGES. EDDY REFRIGERATOR. I
EXI7. TABLES. SIDEBOARDS AND DINING
CHAIRS. CROCKERY AND GLASS WARE
? OFFICE PARTITIONS, SHOW CASES. CUpI
BOARDS, SH EL\ ES, COUNTER, STOVFS
.-KITCHEN GOODS, &c. '
AND. AT TWELVE M..
VEHICLES, HARNESS. HORSE, ice.
TfeRMs L ASH. NOW ON VIEW
. SLOAN & CO., Auctioneer*.
ae!2-2t " *-'<??? 1407 G at.
.JAMES W, RAfCUFFE, AUCTIONEER
TRUSTEE'S SAI.E OF "BAUMEI8TER" UPRIGHT
PnSttr AND -STOOL BY AUCTION,
w Si T'rtU^'' *** ot j?*. recorded la
tiI i*. ot tb? tworda
of the District of Columbia, and at the request of
IS? t,h?*by. 1 ? public auc
tion, within the sale* room* of Jam**- W. Rateliffe
N* *20 IM. are. n.w.. 00 SATURDAY. TH"S
TEENTH DAY OF ^SEPTEMBER, lfol ATTEN
BwrneUter" Piano.
No. 2004,' and Stool, mentioned in schedule "B" at*
tached'to said treat. Tern* caah.
HUM WILLIAM A.FARLE&, Trust*.
AUCTION 6ALES.
THIS AKTKRXOOM.
JAMES W. RATCLIFFK. AUCTIONEER.
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF DESIRABLE BUILDING
SITE OX WOODLEY ROAD,
By virtue of a devd of trust duly recorded in
Liber 2305, folio 5 ft soq., one of the land if *nfds
of District of Columbia. and at the of
the bolder of the note secured thereby, the under
Signed trustee will sell. at public auction. In front
of the premises. on TIintSDAY. SEPTEMBER
TWELFTH, 11*01. AT FIVE O'CLOCK P.M.. the
following described psrel of real estate. tU: The
south nfty-two and eighteen hundredths (52.181
feet on 28th street extended of lot numlx-red
?even (7) In Klla C. Mlddletnu's subdivision of
fart of the tract of land railed "Woodley." n. *r
now n aa "Ilartford Place." a* per plat n>c<irded
In Liber County No. 7. folio 75. of the records of
the attics of the aurveyor for the District of Co
lumbia.
Terras of sale: Cash. A deposit of $100 v 111 ha
required at time of sale. If terms of sale are not
compiled with In 15 days, the trustee reserves the
right to resell un 3 daya' notice at risk and ioat
of defaulting purchaser. Conveyancing and record
ing at purchaser's coat.
JOHN H. DWYER. Trustee.
W. WALTON EDWARDS, Attorney.
Equity building- f|ty. anSl dA-ds
KITIHE DAYS.
PE HEM PTORY RALE, AT AUCTION, OF A
VALUABLE LOT, SUITABLE FOR A FLAT
BUILDING. FRONTING 25 FEET ON THE
SOUTH SIDE OF NORTH CAROLINA AVE
NUE. ADJOINING THE IjOT ON SOUTH
EAST CORNER OF SAID AVENUE AND 3D
STREET SOUTHEAST.
I will offer for aale. In front of the premises, od
TUESDAY. THE SEVENTEENTH DAY OK SEP
TEMBER. 111)1, AT FIVE O'CLOCK P.M., the
west 25 feet front by depth of lot 7, In wjiuiv 792.
Terms essy and made known at time of aale.
De[*n?!t $100 required. Terms to In1 compiled with
In ten days, the deposit will be forfeited.
G. W. STICtvNEV, Auctioneer.
sel2-4t* &a> loth at.
DUNCAN80N BROS., AUCTIONEERS
TRUSTEE S 8AIJC OF THREE8T0RY BRICK
DWELLING. NO. 128 D STREET NORTH
EAST.
By virtue of a certain deed of tniat. recorded In
Ul?er_ Nfe 1722L at folio 12 et seq., of the land
.. ? lug __
scribed real estate, situate In the city of Wash
ington. in said District: All of lot ntiinl*>tvd fifty
?eveu ? .">7? In Bertrand S. Asliby's sulslivlston, in
sguan* numbered seven hundred and twenty-three
(<23), aa |?er plat recorded In IJber No. 10. at
folio 102. of the records of the surveyor's office of
said District, together with the Improvements,
constating of three-story brick dwelling, No. 128
D st. n e.
Terms: One-third cash, balance In equal In
stallments. at one and two years, with Interest at
five <B) |>er centum per annum, payable semi-an
nually. from day of sale, secured by deed of trust
upon the property sold, or all cash, at the option
of the purchaser. A deposit of $:?*> will be re
quired at time of sale. All conveyancing anil re
cording at purchaser's cost. Terms to t?e com
plied with within ten days, otherwise the trustee
reserves the right to resell at risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser.
ALOIS B BROWNE.
sel2-dA-ds Surviving Trustee.
NOTICE IS HEREBY UIVEN_Til AT OX THE
FOURTEENTH DAY < >F SEPTEMBER. lool, AT
TEX O'CLOCK A.M., I will sell at public auction,
at the ware rooms of James W. ltatcllffe. No. 920
Penna. ave. n.w? certain furniture and other house
hold articles found by the police, between the 8th
and 12th of December, 1699. In front of and adja
cent to promises No. flo7 fith st. n.w.. and which
have not been called for by the owner, or owners,
as contemplated by law. JAMES A. KEMP, Chief,
also Property Clerk. Metropolitan I'olbe, lM.strlrt
of Columbia. Approved by Commissioners. D. C.
sel l-3t
JAMES~W. RATCLIFFB, AUCTIONEER.
Government sale of un
serviceable Furniture,
Carpets, <&c., from U. S.
Capitol, comprising
leather-covered Sofas,
Couches,Chairs,Book
cases, Revolving and
other Desks, Screens,
Brass Fenders, Car
pets, Rugs,&c.
-On SATURDAY MORNING,
SEPTEMBER FOURTEENTH.
1901, commencing at TEN
O'CLOCK, I will sell at the sales
rooms of James W, Ratcliffe, 920
Pa. ave. n.w., a general assortment
of unserviceable goods.
This sale presents an excellent op
portunity to secure relics from the
U. S. Capitol.
Terms cash.
O M RANSDELL.
?ell-3t Sergeant-st-Arms. U. 8. Senate.
MARCUS NOrES. AUCTIONEER.
TRUSTEES' SALE OF DRUG STORE, N.W. COR
NER 5TH AND G STREETS NORTHWEST.
By virtue of a certain deed of trust, recorded In
Liber 2294, folio 156 et seq.. one of the land rec
ords of the District of Columbia, and at the re
quest of the party secured, we will sell, on MON
DAY, TIIE SIXTEENTH DAY OF SEPTEMBER,
A. D. 1901. AT HALF-PAST FOUR O'CLOCK, the
entire stock of Drugs. Fancy Artlclea. Fixtures.
Furniture, Soda Fountain, Awning and all personal
property, coutalned in the said drug store and cel
lar of said premises. Terms of sale cash. A de
Eoslt of $100 will l>e requited at time of sale, and
nlance of purchase price to be paid within hve
days All conveyanc ng and recording at the pur
chaser's cost. If terms of sale are not complied
with as aliove stated the trustees reserve the right
to resell the property at the risk and coat of the
defaulting purchaser, after three days' advertise
ment n. 11. HOWENSTEIN,
SAMUEL BIEBER.
WOLF & ROSENBERG, Trustee*
Attorneys for Parties Secured. aelo-5t
JAMES W. RATCLIFFE,-KVCTIONEE1L
Trustees' sale of valu
able Real Estate on 4%
Street Northwest between
Pennsylvania Avenue and
C Street, formerly occu=
pied by the District Gov
ern ment.
By virtue of a deed of trust, duly recorded in
Liber 1997, folio 132 et seq., of the laud records
of the District of Columbia. ati<l at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned trustees
will ofTer for sale by public auction. In front of
the premises, on THURSDAY, THE NINETEENTH
DAY OF SEPTEMBER, A.D. l?ol. AT HAl.F
PAST FOUR O'CLOCK P.M.. the following de
scribed real "state, situate In the city of Wash
ington, District of Columbia, to wit: Part of orlg.
lnal lot numbered twenty-three (2Ji), In squaro
numbered four hundred and ninety-one (4911, con
tained within the following metes and hounds,
namely: Beginning on Four-and-a-half street at
the northeast corner of said lot. and running
thence south on said street flfty-six i56? feet to
the southeast corner of said lot; thence west on
the south line of said lot seventy-live (75) feet
ten (10) Inches; thence north twelve (12) feet;
thence west forty-nine (49) feet two (2) Inches to
an alley In the rear; thence north on said alley
forty-four (44) f*et to the northwest corner of said
lot; thence east one hundred and twenty Ave (125)
feet to the place of beginning, embracing the north
half of said lot and all of lot uuml'ercd twenty
seven (27) of Morrison's subdivision, as In Lll>er
No. 12, folio Ji44 of the records of the office of
the surveyor of the District of Columbia, together
with all the Improvement*, rights, Ac.
Terms: One-third cash, the balance In one and
two years, with Interest from the day of sale at
the rate of six (6%) per cent per anuum, secured
by deed of trust on the property sold, or all cash,
at the option of the purchaser $5uo deposit re
quired st the time of sale. If the terms of sale
are uot complied with In fifteen dsys from the day
of sale the trustees reserve the right to resell the
property at the arlsk and cost of the defaulting
purchaser, sfter five days' advertisement of sucii
resale In some newspsper published in Wsshing
ton, D. C. All conveysn<;tug, recording, stamps,
&c., at purchaser's cost.
SAMUEL CROSS, Trustee.
se9-d&ds 18ADORE SAKS. Trustee.
JAMES W. RaTCIJFFE, AUCTIONEER.
TRUSTEES' SALE OF A FRAME HOUSE. NO.
238 THIRTEENTH-AND-A-HALF STREET
SOUTHWEST.
By virtue of a decree of the 8upreme Court of
the District of Columbia, passed In Equity Cuuse
No. 22092. the undersigned, trustees, Will offer fur
sale, by public auction. In front of the premises,
on TUESDAY, THE SEVENTEENTH DAY OF
SEPTEMBER. A.D. 1901. AT HALF-FAST FOUR
O'CLOCK P.M., the fellowlng described real es
tste, situate in the city of Washington, District of
Columbls. to wit: Psrt of lot numbered six (b),
in square numbered two hundred snd sixty-four
(264), contained within the following metes jiid
bounds: Beginning for the same st tne southwest
corner of said lot and running thence north four
teen (14) feet eleven (11) Inches; thence esst sixty
six (86) feet eight (8) Inches; thence south four
teen (14) feet eleven (11) inches, and thence west
sixty-six (00) feet eight (8) laches to the place of
beginning.
Terms of sale: One-third cash, the bslance In
one and two years, with .Interest from the day of
sale at six per cent per annum, secured by deed ot
trust on the property sold, or all cash, st the op
tion of the purchaser. A deposit of $100 required
at time of aale. If the terms of sals are pot com
plied with within fifteen days from the day of sal*
the trustees rrserve the right to resell the prop
erty at the risk and cost of tbs defaulting pur
chaser. after five days' advertisement of soch re
sale In some newspaper published in Washington,
D. C. All conveyancing, recording, stamps. Ac.,
at cost of pore baser.
ALEXANDER H. BELL. Trustee.
32B 4Vfc at. m.w.
SIMON LYON, Trustse>
Ui% V ?*. n-Wb

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